Student Teaching Handbook - Butler University

butler.edu

Student Teaching Handbook - Butler University

B U T L E R U N I V E R S I T Y

C O L L E G E O F E D U C A T I O N

2011-2012

Student Teaching

Handbook


Student Teaching Handbook

Butler University

College of Education

Contact Information:

4600 Sunset Avenue

Indianapolis, Indiana 46208

Website: http://www.butler.edu/coe/

Telephone: (317) 940-9331

Fax: (317) 940-6481

All undergraduate and graduate programs in the College of Education at Butler University are accredited by the

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the State of Indiana Office of Educator

Licensing and Development (OELD).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................................4

Acknowledgements...........................................................................................................................................................5

Mission and Vision of the College of Education...............................................................................................................6

Glossary ...........................................................................................................................................................................7

Goal of Student Teaching..................................................................................................................................................9

Policies and Procedures...................................................................................................................................................10

Qualifications for Student Teaching.........................................................................................................................10

Placement of Student Teachers.................................................................................................................................10

Prerequisite Assignment: Placement Introduction ...................................................................................................11

School Orientation & Observation .........................................................................................................................12

Length of Assignment..............................................................................................................................................12

Length of Day.........................................................................................................................................................13

Absences .................................................................................................................................................................13

Athletic Involvement During Student Teaching.......................................................................................................13

Employment ...........................................................................................................................................................13

Enrollment in Additional Courses During Student Teaching...................................................................................13

Mediation Procedures Related to Student Teaching Placement ...............................................................................13

Required Seminars...................................................................................................................................................13

Disruption of Instructional Process .........................................................................................................................14

Conferencing with Students.....................................................................................................................................14

Substitute Teaching..................................................................................................................................................14

Process for Placing a Student on Academic Contract...............................................................................................14

Termination of Placements .....................................................................................................................................15

Grading...................................................................................................................................................................15

Appeal and Reinstatement.......................................................................................................................................15

Qualification for Recommendation for Initial Licensure..........................................................................................16

Criminal Background Check...................................................................................................................................16

Zachary’s Law .........................................................................................................................................................16

The Art of Being a Cooperating Teacher.........................................................................................................................17

Role & Responsibilities of the Cooperating Teacher........................................................................................................18

Role & Responsibilities of the Student Teacher...............................................................................................................19

Role & Responsibilities of the University Supervisor.......................................................................................................20

Role & Responsibilities of the Cooperating Principal......................................................................................................21

Invitation to Training......................................................................................................................................................22

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Early Childhood & Middle Childhood Program ............................................................................................................23

Program Description ..............................................................................................................................................24

Timeline

Smart Starts: Weeks 1-3...........................................................................................................................................26

Test Flights: Weeks 3-6 ...........................................................................................................................................28

How Am I Doing? What Are My Next Steps?: Weeks 6-8........................................................................................30

In the Thick of it All: Weeks 8-12............................................................................................................................31

Stepping Back & Stepping Forward: Weeks 12-15...................................................................................................32

Teacher Work Sample..............................................................................................................................................33

Middle/Secondary Program............................................................................................................................................35

Program Description ..............................................................................................................................................35

Timeline

Smart Starts: Week 1................................................................................................................................................36

Test Flights: Week 2.................................................................................................................................................38

How am I doing? What are my next steps? Week 3..................................................................................................40

In the thick of it all: Weeks 4-7................................................................................................................................41

Stepping Back & Steppeing Forward: Week 8..........................................................................................................42

ED434 Professional Portfolio and Rubric................................................................................................................43

Student Teaching Rubric.................................................................................................................................................46

Butler University – College of Education – .

Student Teaching Observation Sheet........................................................................................................................47

Butler University – College of Education – .

Student Teaching Midterm......................................................................................................................................49

Butler University – College of Education – .

Student Teaching Final............................................................................................................................................55

Educational Placement....................................................................................................................................................61

Self-Managed Credential Files .................................................................................................................................61

Praxis Testing...........................................................................................................................................................61

Licensure.................................................................................................................................................................61

Job Search ...............................................................................................................................................................61

Tips for Writing Letters of Recommendation ..........................................................................................................62

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INTRODUCTION

The Butler University College of Education is committed to providing our students with a positive, supportive, practical

and rewarding student teaching experience. Most educators will agree that the student teaching experience is of prime

importance in developing teachers who will enter the profession as enthusiastic, effective and reflective teachers.

At Butler, the student teaching experience affords the student an opportunity to continue to develop and reflect on

the skills, knowledge and dispositions critical to student learning. While students have been given many opportunities

throughout the teacher preparation program to develop their teaching skills through an early and wide variety of clinical

experiences, clearly the student teaching experience is the capstone.

Throughout our teacher preparation program, it is obvious that it is both a teaching and a learning experience. The importance

of this phase of the process is exemplified by the fact that the student teacher becomes an important member of

the school community under the direction of an expert or master teacher/mentor and also under the supportive direction

of a university supervisor who has expertise in content and developmentally appropriate instructional approach.

Student teaching at Butler University is a collaborative process from the partnership of placement to the supervision

and reflection on growth that takes place along the way. We believe that a crucial key to the realization of a successful

student teaching program lies in the ability of the teacher candidate, the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor

to make the experience a supportive one for the optimum development of a reflective, knowledgeable professional. It

is hoped that this capstone experience will prepare the student teachers for their education career and will benefit all of

those involved.

The Butler University student teaching program offers the candidate a variety of experiences which will assist in their

individual development of the necessary competencies of a professional educator. Each candidate has the opportunity .

for student teaching experiences in two different settings. Early Childhood and Middle Childhood student teachers .

(Elementary) will have two student teaching settings of one semester each. Middle/Secondary and K-12 Music and

Physical Education student teachers will also have two different settings of 8 weeks each. The variety of settings .

addressing both content and developmental levels assures a well rounded, competent teacher education graduate.

It is important to note that the College of Education recognizes the world as our community and intentionally develops

an appreciation for and knowledge of our global neighbors. We create an inviting learning environment for people of all

cultures. The college provides curricular and co-curricular opportunities for cultivating awareness of diversity, expanding

into first hand experiences as global citizens. We seek the support of our partner schools both locally and globally, cooperating

teachers and university supervisors in achieving this goal throughout our students’ professional preparation.

The purpose of this “Student Teaching Handbook” is meant to be a resource guide with practical information for those

who are a part of our capstone experience. It is by no means meant to be comprehensive. We constantly revise and update

information especially as we receive your feedback and suggestions.

We extend our gratitude to the public, private and international schools that accommodate our Butler students and .

provide the learning community for this most important phase of our program. We also extend our thanks to the .

professional teachers and university supervisors who provide support and mentoring throughout the student teaching

experience.

Sue Stahl

Director of Student Personnel Services

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

FACULTY & STAFF OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Dr. Ena Shelley

Dean, College of Education

Daniel Abbott

CORE/Foundations

Susan Adams

Instructor, ESL

Dr. Meredith McAllister

Middle/Secondary

Dr. Stephen Bloom

Early/Middle Childhood

Dr. Roger Boop

Middle/Secondary

Dr. Katie Brooks

Middle/Secondary

Jannine Campbell

Middle/Secondary

Dr. Deborah Corpus

Reading/Early/Middle Childhood

Dr. Kelli Esteves

CORE/Foundations

Dr. Lisa Farley

CORE/Foundations/Physical Education

Karen Farrell

Accreditation Coordinator

Dr. Ryan Flessner

Early/Middle Childhood

Dr. Shelley Furuness

Middle/Secondary

Dr. Ronald Goodman

School Counseling

Dr. Sam Guerriero

Middle/Secondary

Cathy Hargrove

Early/Middle Childhood

Dr. Arthur Hochman

Early/Middle Childhood

Dr. Brooke Kandel-Cisco

Director METL/ESL

Dr. Thomas Keller

School Counseling

Dr. Suneeta Kercood

Special Education

Vikki Kramer

Administrative Clerk

Dr. Debra Lecklider

Associate Dean

Angela Lupton

Assistant Dean

Dr. Matt Maurer

Instructional Technology

Dr. Brandie Oliver

School Counseling

Maggie Power

Administrative Specialist

Theresa Meyer

CORE/Foundations

Dr. Catherine Pangan

Early/Middle Childhood

Chris Price

Office Administrator

Brian Reagan

Physical Education/Health

Cindy Smith

Administrative Specialist

Sue Stahl

Director Student Personnel Services

Dr. Marilyn Strawbridge

Physical Education/Health

Dr. Marilyn Sudsberry

EPPSP

Darlene Waddell

Administrative Assistant

Dr. Mindy Welch

Physical Education/Health

Lindsay Williams

Instructor, METL

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MISSION STATEMENT

The Mission of the College of Education is to prepare individuals to be highly qualified professionals who challenge the

status quo and exemplify our core values by:

• Engaging in interactive and intentional experiences that foster honoring differences and seeing similarities.

• Creating a learning community that supports opportunities to model teaching, learning and mentoring by faculty,

students and professional partners.

• Valuing the development of theoretical knowledge and its integration into practice in order to support the transformation

of schools and society.

• Developing a standard for professional dispositions that is based on an ethic of care rooted in both integrity and

responsibility.

VISION STATEMENT

We need a valid vision. We need the will.

With vision and will, everything is possible.

– Asa G. Hilliard III

The College of Education believes we must prepare our students for schools as they should be, not simply perpetuating

schools as they currently exist. We must be willing to explore with our students the difficult issues of inequities that exist

in our schools and society and to help them to become agents of change. This of course means that as faculty we must

examine our own beliefs, be willing to keep our hearts and minds open to the ideas of others, live our lives with integrity,

and model how great teachers take risks, challenge the status quo, and advocate for the rights of all students.

Ours is a college that continually changes because learning is a transformational experience. Members of the college

embrace what Parker Palmer described as a “capacity for connectedness.” Palmer stated:

Good teachers possess a capacity for connectedness. They are able to weave a

complex web of connections among themselves, their subjects, and their students so

that students can learn to weave a world for themselves. (Courage to Teach, p. 11)

The College of Education’s learning community presents transformational experiences that allow students to create their

own tapestries. As an intention of their preparation, students invest in school-communities that differ from theirs. They

are challenged to examine their assumptions about other people, how children from diverse experiences learn, and reflect

about the responsibilities of innovative educators. Exemplary teachers mentor education students by modeling best practice,

supporting leadership, and demanding courage.

Participants in the learning community engage in scholarship that supports teaching as inquiry. As investigators, they

become constructors of knowledge that seek to connect theory with practice. As a function of scholarship, students use

technology applications to discern strategies for learning, creating, modeling, and assessing. Faculty and students take

advantage of opportunities to study abroad and have new experiences that help them become better global citizens.

As faculty and students weave their unique tapestries, they gather regularly to discuss instructional strategies and the

implications of new research. We celebrate the successes of the learning community’s participants and encourage them to

reach new heights.

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GLOSSARY

Candidates: Individuals admitted to, or enrolled in, programs for the initial or advanced preparation of teachers, teachers

continuing their professional development, or other school professionals. Candidates are distinguished from students

in P-12 settings. (In this document, student teachers/candidates are one in the same.)

Conceptual Framework: An underlying structure in a professional education unit that gives conceptual meanings

through an articulated rationale to the unit’s operation, and provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate

performance, faculty scholarship and service, and unit accountability.

Cooperating Teacher: The classroom teacher who directly supervises and mentors a student teacher in the classroom

setting. He/she assists in providing professional experiences and guiding student development.

Cooperating Principal: The principal of the school for the student teaching placement.

Core Values: The four core values of the College of Education are: Appreciation of Diversity and Similarity; The Excitement

of Teaching, Learning, and Mentoring; The Challenge of Integrated Practice and Collaboration; The Strength of

Integrity and Responsibility.

Developmental and Content Standards: The recognized sets of developmental and content standards that will be used

to assess new teachers. All program frameworks are under continual review. Each Initial program area in the college also

has a knowledge base and program goals based upon our four core values and course objectives are matched to the values

as well as state and content specific standards.

Dispositions: Professional attitudes, values, and beliefs demonstrated through both verbal and non-verbal behaviors

as educators interact with students, families, colleagues, and communities. These positive behaviors support student

learning and development. Professional dispositions are assessed based on observable behaviors in educational settings.

Dual Licensure: Butler COE provides opportunity for dual licensure in Early Childhood and Middle Childhood education

or Middle Childhood and Early Adolescent education by add the Mild Intervention (MI) in special education This

licensure includes the categories of learning disabilities, mild/moderate intellectual disabilities, emotional disabilities,

autism spectrum disorder/Asperger syndrome, traumatic brain injury, and other health impairments. Dual licensure is

also possible for Early Childhood and Middle Childhood education or Middle Childhood and Early Adolescent education

majors by adding the reading teacher license.

Early and Middle Childhood Program: This program prepares students for teaching and instructional leadership in

elementary schools. Based in a comprehensive liberal arts background the early and middle childhood education majors

are prepared to meet state licensing course requirements for licensure in early childhood (beginning with kindergarten)

and middle childhood settings.

Full-time Teaching: The period in which a pre-service teacher takes on the full responsibility of a classroom for the

entire day. This is done with collaboration and support from the cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

INTASC: Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium

The set of ten core principles developed to model performance-based standards and assessments for the licensure of

teachers.

Licensure: The official professional recognition by a state governmental agency that an individual has met certain qualifications

specified by the state and is, therefore, approved to practice in an occupation as a professional.

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Middle Childhood and Early Adolescent Education Program: Our MC/EA license supports students who are interested

in working with students in the intermediate grades (4th and 5th) and the middle school grades (6-8 and 9th if the

middle school has a 9th grade). Students choose a specific content area for their middle school focus, and have the option

of adding on a special education (mild intervention) license.

Middle and Secondary Education Program: The middle/secondary education program enables students to combine

the strength of in-depth preparation in an academic content area with the professional teacher education skills necessary

for success in the classroom. A middle /secondary program (grades5-12) 12) may have the following content area major

(36-54 hours depending on individual major requirements): English, Foreign language (French, German or Spanish),

Mathematics, Sciences (primary areas in biology, chemistry, physics) Social studies, Theatre. Or, a secondary program

may be for all grade (K-12) licensure in: Music education (choral and/or instrumental or area) or Physical education and

Health. Students may also pursue the non licensure program of Physical Education with a concentration in exercise .

science.

Performance Assessment: A comprehensive assessment through which candidates demonstrate their proficiencies in subject,

professional, and pedagogical knowledge, skills, and professional disposition, including their abilities to have positive

effects on student learning.

Portfolio: A cohesive accumulation of evidence about individual proficiencies, especially in relation to explicit standards

and rubrics, used in evaluation of competency as a teacher or other school professional. Contents might include

end-of-course evaluations and tasks used for instructional or clinical experience purposes such as projects, journals, and

observations by faculty, videos, comments by cooperating teachers or internship supervisors, and samples of student

work. These artifacts and samples, explanations and reflections are meant to portray an accurate picture of the teacher’s

competencies and style.

Student Teacher/Candidate: Butler University students who have met all of the standards of the Teacher Education

Program, including, CORE I, II & III and appropriate Praxis tests and who have applied to and been recommended for

the student teaching program. They share with the cooperating teachers, the classroom and school/community responsibilities.

Student Teaching: Preservice clinical practice in P-12 schools for candidates preparing to teach.

University Supervisor: Employee of Butler University who shares responsibility with the cooperating teacher/mentor

teacher for the professional growth of the teacher candidate. University supervisors regularly visit and confer with the

candidate.

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GOAL OF STUDENT TEACHING

The goal of the student teaching experience is to prepare teachers who are competent and confident in their knowledge,

both subject and pedagogical and in their skills to teach all children. Through a planned, carefully supervised and mentored

student teaching experience students are supported in their professional development process. They are expected to

exhibit dispositions of a competent, independent, and effective practitioner.

The student teaching experience provides the teacher education candidate with the optimum opportunity for growth

and development as a beginning teacher and a time to develop his/her own style through collaboration and collegiality

between the teacher candidate, university personnel and school personnel. Although the schedule for increasing teaching

responsibilities during student teaching is individualized for each teacher candidate, it is expected that each teacher

candidate plans, teaches and assesses student learning during a substantial portion of the experience in collaboration and

partnership with the cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

The preparation programs and student teaching experiences are performance based and are aligned to State, SPA and

NCATE standards. These developmental and content standards form the basis for the performance expectations for successful

program completion.

A part of facilitating the growth of student teachers is the assessment/evaluation process. Each candidate is observed

throughout their experience. Observation forms are included in this handbook. The observations are to be shared between

the candidate, cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

The midterm evaluation is done at approximately half way through the professional phase. Timing for this varies by program.

It is done to reflect on the candidate’s progress up to that point. Feedback and support from both the cooperating

teacher and the university supervisor are important to the process as well as the self-reflection of the teacher candidate.

The midterm is shared and is to be used as a tool to assist and guide further development of the candidate with the goal

of continual professional growth.

The final evaluation, also included in this handbook, should be the basis of a formal conference at the conclusion of the

student teaching experience. The university supervisor assumes final responsibility for submitting the teaching evaluation

to the candidate’s program area.

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Qualifications for Student Teaching

All candidates are advised that they are subject to the Zachary check and the Criminal Background Check. (See information

on Criminal Background Check and Zachary’s Law at the end of this section.) It is the responsibility of each

candidate to follow expected procedures for each district in which they are student teaching.

Acceptance into student teaching, the final phase of the teacher education program, requires the demonstration of readiness

and the completion of the following:

• ED CORE I, II and III and full admission to Teacher Education – See College of Education Undergraduate Transition

Points in the student resources section of our website.

• Recommendation by the program for admittance to ED CORE IV: Student Teaching. (No grade below C will be

accepted for licensure in the major, minor or professional education.)

• Senior or graduate standing.

• A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better, and a GPA of 2.75 in the teaching content major and a GPA of

2.5 in all education courses.

• At least 15 semester hours at Butler University to qualify for admission to Teacher Education and Student Teaching.

• Attendance at one of the 4-6 posted Student Teaching Information Sessions prior to submission of the application in

January. (January of the year prior to student teaching)

• Submission of the Student Teaching Application to the advisor for his/her approval and signature in December.

• Four copies of the complete Student Teaching Application with official transcripts attached submitted (by the .

student) to the Director of Student Personnel Services at the start of the spring semester in January of the year .

prior to student teaching.

• The completed Student Teaching Questionnaire submitted in January along with the application.

Placement of Student Teachers

Teacher education candidates should apply for student teaching by the posted date in January of the academic year prior

to student teaching. Applications for student teaching are available on the College of Education website in the student

resources section under student teaching.

Student teaching placements are made in terms of providing the best experience possible. Students will have two placements

that offer diverse experiences. Final decision for placement is based on a variety of factors. Student teaching assignments

will likely not be made where conflicts of interest exist, such as:

• in schools attended by the student teacher or from which the student teacher graduated within the previous 15 years,

• in school buildings where the student teacher has substitute taught for more than 20 days during the previous year

prior to placement,

• in school buildings where the student teacher has been employed within 5 years prior to placement,

• with cooperating teachers who were former teachers of the student teacher or are close relatives,

• in school buildings where relatives work and/or school corporations where relatives hold a position of authority (i.e.,

administrator, board of directors, etc.),

• in school buildings where close relatives (i.e., children, siblings, nieces/nephews, grandchildren, etc.) are currently

attending, or

• in school buildings/corporations where there is another conflict of interest that could potentially reduce the quality

of the student teaching experience.

Exceptions to this policy should be discussed with the Director of Student Personnel Services. The Director of Student

Personnel Services in cooperation with program faculty will make all final determinations.

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Student Teaching assignments are made in terms of providing the best experience possible. Preferences are considered,

BUT factors such as the availability of high quality classrooms which reflect best practices within a school and super-.

visory loads must also be considered. It is the goal that during student teaching our candidates are placed with high

quality mentors, teach in high needs areas, teach diverse pupils and show impact on P-12 learning. Candidates must

be willing to accept the assignment as determined by the College to be both in the student’s best interest and within the

resources that are available to provide proper supervision and a quality student teaching experience.

The College of Education at Butler University with the cooperation of area schools places candidates for student teaching

in public, private or parochial school classrooms in the greater Indianapolis metropolitan area. This area could include

Marion and the contiguous counties. The program also provides opportunities for student teaching abroad.

When a corporation accepts a student teacher, a signed contract is returned to the College of Education. It is possible

that a request for student teaching placement may have to be submitted to several school districts before a placement is

confirmed. Some reasons that an applicant may not be accepted by a corporation are the following:

1. poor quality of application (spelling, grammar)

2. marginal grades in professional education and/or content area

3. school corporations requiring a 3.0 or better

4. Late applications (many school corporations have completed their student teaching assignments by February

and contact our office with the message that they will not take any more student teachers for the coming year).

5. Some corporations only permit their teachers to take one student teacher per year.

6. Some corporations take only a limited number of student teachers.

7. School corporations have several levels of review and the application may be stopped at any level; i.e. superintendent,

personnel director, principal, department head and the classroom teachers.

Candidates will receive confirmed placement information at the end of semester orientation seminar prior to the academic

year of student teaching. Candidates will be sent an additional confirming email in July/August prior to the start

of fall student teaching or December prior to the start of spring student teaching.

Pending a confirmed placement student teachers MUST attend a pre-professional meeting. Administrative and performance

requirements will be reviewed. This meeting will take place near the end of the semester immediately prior to the

student teaching semester. Candidates will be notified via Butler email of date and location of this required meeting.

Prerequisite Assignment: Placement Introduction

Prior to the start of student teaching the candidate should make contact with the cooperating teacher and principal.

The Prerequisite Assignment: Placement Introduction Checklist

1. Contact the teacher and arrange a convenient time to meet. Call or email the teacher at school.

2. At the meeting with the teacher:

• Exchange phone numbers, emails, and addresses.

• Confirm with the cooperating teacher the first day to report to school.

• Determine whether to meet again with the cooperating teacher before student teaching begins.

• Pick up any supporting materials to be used, i.e., teacher editions of textbooks, workbooks, planning

overviews, CDs, websites, etc.

• If possible, determine what parts of the curriculum, courses, subjects, or units you will be responsible for

teaching.

• Request classroom rules, guidelines and the student handbook.

• Also obtain a copy of the faculty handbook and/or department policies.

3. Contact the principal and clarify who should receive the Criminal History Check report and what type of

Criminal History Check is required by their district. If you have two placements, at different schools, contact

the principal or central office administration at each school regarding this important matter.

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Important Contact Information

School Corporation Web site:

Person Name E-mail Phone

University Supervisor

Cooperating Teacher

Principal

School Orientation and Observation

Orientation to the school community is critical to the student teacher’s comfort and confidence, and ultimate success

in student teaching. The student teacher/candidate and supervising teacher share responsibility in the acclimation and

induction process. Ongoing communication through orientation and observation will set the foundation for success in

the student teaching experience.

The Orientation should include:

A review of teaching responsibilities

• Parent nights, open houses, faulty meetings, department meetings, committee meetings

• Duties (bus, hallway supervision, lunch supervision)

• Computer accounts, lunch accounts, parking pass information

• Tour of the building

A review of School Policies and Procedures

Student handbook (discipline and attendance policies, writing passes)

• Teacher handbook (classroom policies regarding discipline, attendance, grading, passes, emergency procedures i.e.

fire drills, school nurse procedures, universal precautions)

A review of Classroom Policies and Procedures

• Classroom rules and management plan (discipline referral procedures)

• Recording absent and tardy students

• Writing hall passes

An introduction to Instructional Resources

• Media center, computer labs, and technology coordinators

• Computer use expectations

• District and school websites

• State standards for the course or grade level

• Appropriate instructional materials

• Lesson plan and student assessment expectations

• Community resources to enhance instruction

A discussion about Community and Student Needs

• General socioeconomic and cultural background of the student population

• After school student activities and opportunities for student teacher involvement

• Parent involvement in the school, expectations to communicate and work with parents

• Allergies or specific health/participation restrictions of any students

Length of Assignment

Early Childhood and Middle Childhood (Elementary) student teachers will complete two semesters of student teaching

and they follow the calendar of the school corporation to which they are assigned. Because of the length and intensity of

a two semester student teaching program Early Childhood and Middle Childhood student teachers will also be given the

Butler Thanksgiving break during the fall semester and the Butler spring break during the spring semester.

12


Middle/Secondary and K-12 student teachers complete a full semester of student teaching with two placements of 8

weeks each and they follow the calendar of the school corporation to which they are assigned.

The Director of Student Personnel Services in conjunction with program faculty must approve exceptions to the length

of any student’s assignment.

Length of Day

Student Teachers are expected to keep the same daily schedule as a regular full-time teacher, excluding extra-curricular

responsibilities. Student teachers should be excused to leave school early if necessary to arrive at the student teaching

seminars on time.

Absences

Daily attendance is required. There are no excused absences from student teaching other than the 2 university sanctioned

Teacher Candidate Interview Days in the spring semester. All absences may be required to be made up in consultation

with the university supervisor and cooperating teacher. The student teacher is responsible for notifying the cooperating

teacher, university supervisor and, if necessary, the building principal, if he/she will be absent. Excessive absences for any

reason will result in termination or an extension of the student teaching period.

Athletic Involvement during Student Teaching

If a student is involved in a Butler University athletic program during student teaching, the student must make arrangements

to bring together the cooperating teacher, university supervisor, coach and Director of Student Personnel Services

at the beginning of the student teaching semester. At this meeting all aspects of the schedule for the semester should be

discussed.

Employment during Student Teaching

Student teaching is the student’s primary responsibility and should be viewed as a full-time job. Candidates are strongly

urged to arrange their schedules so that they are not employed during student teaching.

Enrollment in Additional Courses during Student Teaching

Student teaching is the candidate’s primary responsibility and should be viewed as the full semester load. Other college

activities should not interfere with teaching responsibilities. Most student teachers find that it is difficult to take additional

classes during this experience. Therefore, student teachers are strongly advised not to attempt additional coursework

during this period. Under exceptional circumstances candidates will be permitted to register for additional credit

hours upon approval of their advisor. If it appears that the additional course load beyond student teaching is jeopardizing

the success of the student teaching experience, the candidate will be given the option of dropping either the additional

course(s) or student teaching.

Mediation Procedures Related to Student Teaching Placement

The student teacher is expected to fulfill his/her teaching responsibilities to the best of his/her abilities. Any student

teacher who experiences conflict or discomfort with the placement will be expected to discuss the issue(s) directly with

the cooperating teacher. If after such an interaction the conflict has not been resolved the university supervisor should be

contacted and informed of the problem. At that time, the cooperating teacher, university supervisor, and student teacher

will arrange a meeting to further address the issue(s) of concern. The program coordinator and other area faculty may

also be included. Student teachers are expected to follow the same protocol of a professional educator; it is the candidate’s

responsibility to handle sensitive situations in a confidential, ethical, and appropriate

Required Seminars

After the initial orientation meeting, student teachers will have various required seminars during the semester. These

will be in addition to the courses that are part of the student teaching program. Attendance and active participation are

required of all student teachers.

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Disruption of Instructional Processes

During disruptions of instruction (i.e., student unrest, bomb threats, etc.), student teachers should comply with the policies

and procedures of the school corporation and the directives of law enforcement officials. A student teacher should

report any disruptions to his or her university supervisor for direction as soon as is practical. Should such circumstances

cause a disruption to the point that the student teaching assignment must be terminated, the procedures under “Termination

of Placements” will be followed.

In the event of a teacher strike, the student teacher is not to report to the school, but instead, should contact the university

supervisor or Director of Student Personnel Services for direction. Candidates may not participate in any job action.

(strikes, picketing)

Conferencing with Students

Student teachers/candidates should always conference with students in an open, visible, and easily accessible place.

Substitute Teaching

Student teachers are students of Butler University and are not employees of the school corporation for any purpose.

Whenever the cooperating teacher is absent, the school must provide a substitute teacher, another fully licensed teacher,

or administrator in the building to oversee the student teacher in carrying out his/her planned responsibilities.

Process for Placing a Student on Academic Contract for Completion

of Student Teaching

The cooperating teacher and/or the university supervisor should notify the program faculty and the Director of Student

Personnel Services as early as possible when a student teacher is experiencing difficulties in meeting satisfactory ratings in

one or more areas during the student teaching placement. Each case/situation will be handled individually.

The student teacher who is determined to not be making sufficient progress as determined by the cooperating teacher

and university supervisor may be put on a specific student teaching contract. This contract may include:

• specific areas of needed improvements,

• strategies for implementation,

• specific outcomes expected,

• assessment tools that will be used to monitor performance,

• specified persons responsible for assessing outcomes,

• a timeline with specific deadlines,

• consequences for not completing the plan adequately, and

• date and signature of the student teacher, university supervisor, cooperating teacher and the Director of Student

Personnel Services. The student teacher, university supervisor, cooperating teacher and Director of Student Personnel

Services will each receive copies of the plan.

Strategies for implementation of the contract may include but are not limited to:

• added contact between the university supervisor and the student teacher through increased journaling and/or other

appropriate assignments and additional observations/conferences,

• added contact between the university supervisor and the cooperating teacher to monitor progress and provide for

additional interventions,

• observation and/or evaluation by qualified individuals such as the cooperating principal or university faculty,

• referral to appropriate areas for testing and/or counseling,

• requirement of additional coursework or tutoring,

• modifications and/or accommodations that are deemed appropriate.

• The university supervisor, cooperating teacher and Director of Student Personnel Services will document ALL interactions

in the process. This documentation must include a description of major points of discussion, conclusions

reached, and dates.

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Possible outcomes from the steps outlined above include:

• The student teacher satisfactorily meets the requirements of the contract and is allowed to complete the student

teaching experience.

• The student teacher makes significant progress but does not make adequate progress in some or all identified areas

for improvement. The Director of Student Personnel Services in consultation with cooperating teacher, university

supervisor, and faculty/university/program representation may choose to extend this student teaching experience

with the agreement of the cooperating teacher, cooperating principal, and university supervisor or may assign the

student to an additional student teaching experience in the same or subsequent semester. In the latter case, a grade of

“I” (incomplete) will be assigned until the completion of the additional student teaching experience.

• The student teacher makes little or no progress in remediating the identified area(s) of concern. Under these circumstances,

the student teaching assignment will be terminated and the Director of Student Personnel Services and

other appropriate university personnel will discuss consequences (regarding grades, future enrollment options, degree

options, etc.) and other options (i.e., personal counseling, career counseling, degree, etc.) with the student teacher.

• The student teacher may decide to withdraw from student teaching. Under these circumstances, the Director of Student

Personnel Services and other appropriate university personnel (i.e., university supervisor, cooperating teacher,

program faculty and/or others) will discuss consequences and options (i.e., personal counseling, career counseling,

the Bachelor of Education degree without licensure, etc.) with the student teacher.

Termination of Placements

The Director of Student Personnel Services may terminate a student teaching assignment under the following situations:

• Cooperating teacher or cooperating principal requests termination.

University supervisor recommends termination.

• The student teacher requests withdrawal.

• A major disruption at the school hinders completion of the assignment.

• It is determined that the presence of the student teacher is an impediment to the education of the pupils in the assigned

teaching classroom.

• The student teacher has made little or no progress in remediating identified area(s) of concern.

• Other good cause is determined.

The Director of Student Personnel Services will place a notice of termination in the student teacher’s file and send a written

statement concerning the termination to:

• the student teacher/candidate,

• the cooperating teacher,

• the cooperating principal,

• the university supervisor, and

• the Dean of the College.

A candidate is dismissed from the program by the consensus of the program faculty.

A candidate is not permitted to enroll more than twice for student teaching in order to pass with validation.

Grading

Student teaching is graded on a P/F basis. In order to be recommended for licensure a candidate must receive a PV—pass

with validation. A grade of P indicates that the candidate passed the experience, but will not be recommended for licensure.

In this case, credit is earned toward graduation. An F indicates that the candidate does not pass and does not receive

credit.

Appeal and Reinstatement

The Administrative Team, with the Associate Dean acting as chair, is the appeals body of the College of Education. A

candidate who wishes to appeal a decision of the College of Education, such as dismissal from student teaching, should

write a letter of appeal to the Associate Dean in which the student clearly specifies a rationale for the appeal. The Associate

Dean then convenes and chairs the Administrative Team that considers the appeal.

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A final appeal may then be addressed to the Dean of the College if the student so chooses. It is the candidate’s responsibility

to initiate the appeal and meet all deadlines.

Qualifications for Recommendation for Initial Licensure

In order for student teachers to successfully complete Butler University’s program with a recommendation for initial

licensure in the state of Indiana, candidates will:

• Meet all university requirements for graduation or completion of a non-degree graduate licensure program.

• Receive favorable final evaluations from the cooperating teacher and university supervisor with a grade of Pass with

Validation (PV) assigned by the appropriate faculty member.

• Document basic skills competency at the time of admission to the teacher preparation program, and attain passing

scores on the appropriate Praxis II exams and any other standardized tests that are required.

• Complete and submit all license application materials including the required CPR/Heimlich/AED certification on

line at https//license.doe.in.gov.

Criminal Background Check

1. Candidates are advised that they will be required to obtain and submit to the School Corporation the results of

a criminal history check prior to beginning their placement. In addition some districts may require that you

submit a full Criminal History Check or Local Criminal History Check. No student will be permitted to start

student teaching until they have complied with the district policy on criminal background checks.

2. Candidates are advised that persons who have been convicted of a felony that does not result in the inclusion on

the Indiana Sex and Violent Offenders Registry may not, in the long term, be eligible for a license to teach in

the State of Indiana or, in the immediate term, be accepted for placement in an Indiana School Corporation.

3. “Students are advised that if during the course of the placement the student is convicted in Indiana or any other

jurisdiction of any of the following offenses: Murder; causing suicide; assisting suicide; voluntary manslaughter;

reckless homicide; battery; aggravated battery; kidnapping; criminal confinement; a sex offense under I.C. 35-

42-4; carjacking; arson; incest; neglect of a dependent; child selling; contributing to the delinquency of a minor;

an offense involving a weapon under I.C. 35-47 or I.C. 35-47.5; an offense relating to controlled substances

under I.C. 35-48-4; an offense relating to material or a performance that is harmful to minors or obscene under

I.C. 35-49-3; an offense relating to operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated under I.C. 9-30-5; an offense

that is substantially equivalent to any of the offenses listed in this subsection in which the judgment of conviction

was entered under the law of any jurisdiction or an attempt to commit anyone of the foregoing offenses,

the student must immediately notify the University and the School Corporation of such fact.”

Zachary’s Law

1. Candidates are advised that persons who have been convicted of a felony that results in their inclusion on the

Indiana Sex and Violent Offenders Registry shall not, in the long term, be eligible for a license to teach or to

hold a teaching position in the State of Indiana and, in the immediate term, be accepted for placement in an

Indiana school corporation.

2. University shall immediately notify the School Corporation and shall terminate its activities with regard to

placing a prospective Student Teacher or Participant or shall offer its assistance in removing a currently placed

Student Teacher or Participant from the placement if the Director of Student Teachers learns that a Student

Teacher or Participant is on the Indiana Sex and Violent Offenders Registry.

16


The Art of Being a Cooperating Teacher

A Guide for Selecting Preservice Teacher Mentors

Developed by: The Butler University College of Education, Early and Middle Childhood Program

Our Goal – Remarks by Dr. Ena Shelley, Dean

The College of Education takes pride in preparing teachers to create schools as they should be, not to perpetuate the

status quo. Therefore we believe our students must be able to think critically, understand the connection between

theory, development and practice and be passionate about learning.

In Dr. John Goodlad’s definitive research study, the Study of the Education of Educators (SEE), the student teaching

experience was found to have the most influence on the preservice educator. Mentoring a student teacher is therefore

a privilege and an enormous responsibility.

For the student teacher, student teaching is a time for practice, synthesizing learning and beliefs, reflecting on

their teaching and the role of the teacher and learner. It is analogous to preparation in other professional fields such

as medicine. Future surgeons are mentored by master surgeons and learn through practice standing shoulder-to

shoulder and side-by-side. They do not enter their internships or residencies at the mastery level, nor do student

teachers. Our student teachers are to be mentored, shoulder-to-shoulder with master teachers so that they are ready

to enter the field of teaching.

Qualities of an Outstanding Preservice Teacher Mentor

Perhaps one of the greatest challenges in selecting cooperating teachers is the recognition that outstanding teachers

do not always make outstanding mentors. Just as all teachers recognize their strengths in teaching particular developmental

levels, the ability to teach and learn from a preservice teacher is something that not everyone excels at nor

enjoys. As you consider faculty that would be ideal in this role, please think about the following:

Cooperating Teachers are able to...

❖❖

Reflect on their own practice in order to better inform the preservice teacher about why they do things and

not just what they are doing.

❖❖

Model positive professional relationships with other teachers and administrators.

❖❖

Guide development in a constructive manner – provide consistent positive feedback and identify opportunities

for growth.

❖❖

Utilize child centered approaches in their teaching and are willing to let preservice teachers test their new

ideas in a safe setting.

❖❖

Learn — from themselves, from their students and from the preservice teacher.

❖❖

Embrace diversity and positively support all learners in the classroom.

❖❖

See teaching as a wonderful profession and want to share that enthusiasm with a future teacher.

17


ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

OF THE COOPERATING TEACHER

Cooperating teachers are selected in collaboration with the Director of Student Personnel Services, the program faculty

and the appropriate representatives of the school corporation. Cooperating teachers are chosen based on their experience,

a minimum of three years, and their willingness to accept the responsibility of guiding and nurturing the professional

growth of a candidate. They are looked to as a model for professionalism in its many aspects and as the school personnel

who can provide diverse opportunities and information to assist the candidate to enrich his/her learning. The cooperating

teacher is the foundation for the candidate’s preparation program.

Expectations for the cooperating teacher include the following:

• Have a minimum of 3 years of teaching experience

• Develop a positive, collegial, collaborative relationship with the candidate

• Early in the experience discuss with the candidate school and classroom expectations, guidelines and philosophy

• Orient the candidate to policies and procedures including schedules, curriculum materials, and health and safety

precautions

• Collaborate with the both the university supervisor and candidate to develop and implement a plan for daily progress

• Guide, teach, and assess the candidate through the experience

• Provide both oral and written feedback as appropriate

• Complete the “Cooperating Teacher Data Form” and the “W-9” and return to the university for purposes of accreditation

and payment of honoraria

• Complete the formal midterm and final evaluation and share this with the candidate and the university supervisor

• Write a letter of recommendation for the candidate’s self managed credential file if the candidate requests

• Additional or varying Early/Middle Childhood and Middle/Secondary program specific roles are included here in

this handbook for the cooperating teachers. Please refer to the appropriate section for program details.

Required Qualifications

• Holds a valid Indiana teaching license

• At least three years successful teaching experience

• Demonstrates the knowledge, dispositions, and performances for successful performance based assessment

Preferred Qualifications

• Experience with preservice education students in a supervisory capacity (e.g., previously mentoring a student teacher

or a field experience student) and/or is enrolled or has completed the mentor teacher training process

• Demonstrates on-going commitment to their own professional development

• Willingness to allow preservice students the flexibility to integrate a variety of instructional techniques, create innovative

ways to implement standards based curriculum, and establish an environment that is developmentally

appropriate.

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ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

OF THE STUDENT TEACHER

The student teaching experience is one where the candidate occupies both the position of a candidate as well as the position

of a teacher charged with professional responsibility. This is a challenging experience and candidates are to plan to

devote maximum energies to the experience. The experience will take place in two phases and in two different settings.

Length of the placement varies depending upon Early/Middle Childhood program or Middle/Secondary program.

Expectations for the scandidate during student teaching include the following:

• Attend all orientations, seminars and interview days scheduled by the University

• Be familiar with and be prepared to implement all parts of the Student Teaching Handbook

• Be familiar with the host school policy both as it is related to faculty and to students

• Meet with the school principal/administrators to introduce him/herself and to find out about expectations and

procedures

• Adhere to policies and expectations of the assigned school corporation including such things as appropriate professional

dress, behaviors, language and attitude

• Demonstrate professional discretion. It is inappropriate to discuss outside of your professional setting any information

that is learned about pupils or teachers

• Call if you must be absent from school or late for any reason. The first call goes to your cooperating teacher, the

second to your university supervisor

• Be open minded and recognize that while you are developing your own unique teaching style you must respect the

policies and procedures of the school and the cooperating teacher.

• Establish clear communication lines with the cooperating teacher and university supervisor

• Establish a schedule for conferences for both planning and feedback with the cooperating teacher and university

supervisor

• Complete all required assessments and assignments including such items as the professional portfolio

• Complete self-managed credentials, employment applications and submit license application to the Indiana State

Department of Education — LVIS

• Follow all individual program requirements (Early/Middle Childhood and Middle/Secondary).

Assignments and requirements may differ by program area due to the variations between the professional semester(s) for

Early/Middle Childhood and Middle/Secondary. Activities and a timeline as well as appropriate forms are provided for

the individual programs in materials that follow.

19


ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITITES

OF THE UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR

The university supervisor is an employee of the College of Education at Butler University who shares the responsibility

for the professional growth and development of the candidate. The university supervisor is both an instructor and a liaison

between the university and the school. He/she is accountable for working cooperatively with university faculty and

the school personnel to design and implement appropriate and effective experiences for each candidate as an individual.

The university supervisor serves as a source of information and support for both the candidate and the cooperating

teacher.

Expectations for the university supervisor include the following:

• At the initial visit, establish procedures for easy communication between him/herself, the candidate, and the cooperating

teacher

• Confer on a regular basis by phone, e-mail and in person with the candidate and cooperating teacher

• Participate in conferences with the candidate and cooperating teacher as needed

• Observe the candidate in the classroom and assess his/her performance based on standards

• Maintain appropriate records for each student, clearly documenting each conference or/or observation

• At the middle of the term, evaluate your student teacher using the Midterm Evaluation form. Discuss the evaluation

with the student teacher/candidate and cooperating teacher as you set goals for the remainder of the experience

• Document and discuss any absence from student teaching

• Provide copies of the written observations to the student teacher/candidate and cooperating teacher

• Notify the program faculty and the Director of Student Personnel Services of any concerns as early as possible

• Write a letter of recommendation for the candidate’s self-managed credential file

• Submit mileage record sheets with the completed expense report to the Office Administrator in JH171.

• Required Qualifications

• Three years of successful teaching experience in the content area of supervision

• Demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and performances of a professional educator

• Knowledge of Indiana Academic standards

• Ability to facilitate growth in diverse learners and provide positive and/or proactive support in the areas of instructional

techniques, curriculum development, and developmentally appropriate practices

• Demonstrate on-going commitment to their own professional development

• Ability to observe and/or meet with their candidate(s) as needed (which may exceed the minimum of 6 observations

that are part of the formal evaluation process.

Preferred Qualifications

• Experience with preservice education students in a supervisory capacity (e.g., mentoring a student teacher or a field

experience student)

• Knowledge and/or experience related to special education.

University reporting forms for the university supervisor and cooperating teacher are included here by program area i.e.,

Early/Middle Childhood or Middle/Secondary.

20


ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

OF THE COOPERATING PRINCIPAL

The cooperating principal is a key to the success of the student teaching program. It is with his/her guidance that appropriate,

quality student teaching placements are made at the school site. The program depends on the professional judgment

of the principal to place candidates with cooperating teachers who will model commitment to the development and

support of young people entering the field of teaching.

Expectations for the cooperating principal include the following:

• Assist in the placement of student teachers

• Welcome candidates into the school and involve them as participating members of the faculty

• Assist the cooperating teacher in providing information to the candidate regarding school policy and procedure

• Communicate with the university representative as appropriate and as needed.

21


STUDENT TEACHERS * COOPERATING TEACHERS *

UNIVERSITY SUPERVISORS

YOUR PRESENCE IS REQUESTED FOR OUR 2011 FALL TRAINING

(or SPRING 2012)

Faculty from the College of Education at Butler University will conduct the fall training for student teachers,

cooperating teachers and university supervisors on Wednesday, August 24, 2011 from 4:30-

6:30 p.m. in the Reilly Room of Atherton Union on the campus of Butler University. (Spring semester

date is Tuesday, January 17, 2012 from 4:30-6:30PM) Here are some things to help you prepare for

our afternoon:

General Information

• The afternoon will include important information and materials to help make the fall semester a

success. It is important that the student, cooperating teacher and university supervisor attend this

training together in order to facilitate communication and understanding. We have found a significant

connection between those who go through the training together and the success of the student

teaching experience.

• Because it is the beginning of the semester, parking is fairly unrestricted with the exception of the

metered spaces. If you choose to park at a metered space you will need to follow the posted guidelines.

There are also numerous visitor spaces near Robertson Hall.

• If you need directions, go to http://www.butler.edu/about/?pg=4417&navID=12467 for both directions

to campus and a campus map.

• We realize that this training follows a long work day, so we will do our best to make it interactive,

fun, informative and concise.

• Please contact Angela Lupton at alupton@butler.edu (for elementary) or Shelly Furuness sfuruness@

butler.edu (for middle/secondary) if you have any questions.

To Our Cooperating Teachers

• Attendance is expected even if you have been a cooperating teacher for us in the past. This session

is crafted with both “veteran” and new cooperating teachers in mind.

• You will also receive your student teaching handbook and complete a cooperating teacher data sheet

during the training.

To Our Student Teachers

• You will need to bring a piece of evidence about your teaching/learning from your courses/field

experiences with you to the training. Be sure to think through how/why you would like to share this

evidence with your cooperating teacher and supervisor.

• You will need to purchase your two copies of the student teaching handbook prior to the start of the

training at the bookstore. One of the copies will be for your cooperating teacher, so it is important

that you bring both copies with you.

• Remember to bring both the evidence and your handbooks – this will be part of the

“first impression” that you are making on your new cooperating teacher and a way to

the semester off to a very positive start!

• Please be sure to talk to your cooperating teacher about attending the training when you contact

them (prior to August 24). (For spring 2012 please contact prior to January 17.)

22


Program Description

EARLY CHILDHOOD &

MIDDLE CHILDHOOD

23


The Early Childhood Middle Childhood (ECMC) program at Butler University is a comprehensive teacher preparation

program for undergraduates seeking licensure in early and middle childhood (ages 5-12). ECMC faculty along with a

group of program stakeholders has identified characteristics of our program that are central to our mission, integral to the

experiences we offer and close to our hearts. The flowing synthesis is an attempt to describe these characteristics with the

purpose of communicating clearly and succinctly ‘who we are and what we’re about’ in the ECMC program in the College

of Education at Butler University.

Primacy of the Child

The ECMC program is built around the belief that the child is central in designing, implementing and assessing educational

experiences. Therefore we seek to prepare teachers to understand the significant role that child development plays

across the early and middle childhood period. We take a social constructivist view of development, which recognizes and

values the profound influences of relationships, family, culture, language and physiology on the complex continuum of

abilities and orientations that children experience in their growth over time.

Centrality of an Integrated Inquiry Curriculum

The ECMC program embraces an inquiry oriented, integrated approach to curriculum. We have adopted inquiry approach

to curriculum because it is consistent with our belief that people construct knowledge through personal and social

interaction. Thus we hope to prepare out preservice teachers to develop implement and evaluate curriculum that supports

children in learning by pursuing questions, investigating issues and seeking information that is personally and socially

relevant.

In one semester for example, Butler preservice teachers will study, construct implement and evaluate early childhood curricula

which integrates language and literacy, social studies, science, math and technology through an inquiry approach.

In a separate semester Butler preservice teachers will similarly study, design, implement and evaluate curricular for middle

childhood students.

We also believe that an inquiry oriented, integrated approach to content at the college level is appropriate and important

in developing a meaningful and useful knowledge base in educational theory, curriculum and teaching strategies. It is

through such an approach that we hope to prepare teachers who understand the inherent connection between theory and

practice and who can, and do, pursue questions and investigations into topic areas of their interest. We also believe that

an inquiry approach helps to prepare preservice to teach in schools as they are, to serve as agents for positive educational

change. We believe that an inquiry approach to curriculum also encourages lifelong learning in our preservice teachers.

Our view of inquiry is based upon the following curricular model.

Inquiry Cycle

Provocation

Intense Personal

and Social .

Engagement

with Ideas

Examination/Reflection

on the Learning Process

Reflection

Revision

Revisiting

Sharing Understanding

Assessment and .

Documentation

24


The Need for Site Based and Collaborative Experiences

A pivotal belief of our program is that our courses be meaningfully linked to high quality educational settings. In these

settings we develop collaborative relationships with teachers, administrators and other site personnel, in order to provide

learning opportunities for preservice teachers, as well as to share professional development opportunities with our colleagues

in the field. We value each site’s uniqueness as an educational institution and use the vitality of each setting as a

resource for curriculum in our program coursework. It is our goal to develop, and maintain committed positive relationships

in a small number of sites so that each site becomes a strong community of learners.

Moreover, we seek diverse educational settings that provide our preservice teachers with experiences that invite them to

think deeply about how differences in gender, race ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and language variations influence

teaching and learning.

The Significance of a Knowledge Base

The ECMC program recognizes the tension between identifying and valuing a specific knowledge base in the area of

teaching and learning, and the notion that such a knowledge base is ever-changing. We are dedicated to helping our

preservice teachers have a solid grounding in educational theory and practice while helping them to develop a stance of

inquiry towards that knowledge base and their own teaching. For example, while we do identify and help students know,

understand and be able to implement best practices, we also are committed to helping them critique and analyze those

practices and continue to seek more effective and equitable approaches to teaching and learning for themselves and their

students.

An Ethic of Care

We in the ECMC program believe that the relational aspects of teaching and learning are significant and profoundly

important. We strive to ground ourselves and the program we offer in an ethic of care, in which the positive and committed

relationships we form with our students guides our practice. We endeavor to personalize the learning process for

the preservice teachers as they develop their sense of themselves as teachers and understand the importance of appropriate

nurturing as they take on new professional responsibilities.

Moreover we believe that this ethic of care is fundamental to the relationships we have with professional in our partnership

sites, as well as with the children we are privileged to interact with at those sites. We value and promote the sense joy

that a life of teaching and learning can bring and hope to be models of this to the preservice teachers our programs.

MILD INTERVENTION LICENSE

Students in the Early Childhood and Middle Childhood program are encouraged to include Mild Intervention in their

teacher preparation program Students choosing this option fulfill practicum requirements in each of their two semesters.

For additional information including course requirements and PRAXIS II requirements, see the Early Childhood and

Middle Childhood curriculum sheet.

READING TEACHER LICENSE

Students in the Early Childhood and Middle Childhood program may also include Reading Teacher in their teacher

preparation program. Students choosing this option fulfill a sequence of classes outlined on our curriculum sheets. For

additional information see the curriculum sheet for the Reading Teacher License and plan with your academic advisor.

ELL LICENSE

Students may also include a minor in English as a New Language. Students choosing this option fulfill a sequence of

classes outlined on our curriculum sheets and complete a student teaching experience in an ENL (ELL) classroom at the

developmental level of licensure.

25


Smart Starts: Weeks 1–3

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. Observe the classroom environment. Pay attention to the kind of management techniques the cooperating teacher

uses to affect appropriate student work habits and behavior.

2. Walk around the room as you observe. Physical proximity to each student is important. If you see a problem and

know what to do about it, nip it in the bud. Praise desired behavior when you notice it. Try to notice it often!

3. Become familiar with the total school atmosphere. Where are the office, the cafeteria, the restrooms, the gym, the

music and art rooms, the nurse’s area, the copy machines, etc.? How does the professional faculty dress? Is there

a student dress code? What is the school’s discipline policy?

4. Realize you are in an established environment. Even if this is your first-semester experience, the cooperating

teacher and building principal will have had many years of practice in education and will have ideas about what

needs to be done in schools. As you begin to develop your own teaching style in the student teaching experience,

you will need to follow, unless otherwise directed, the school and classroom patterns/routines already in

use.

5. Really look at the children in your classroom. Who are the leaders? Who are the ones who seem shy? Who are the

aggressors? Who are the special needs children? How do all of these roles affect the entire group? Each child

matters! Do the classroom management and instructional patterns seem to nurture the best learning and development

for each student?

6. Ask if there are individual educational plans (IEPs) for special needs children. If so, request that you see them.

Ask about resource help (when, where, and how long it occurs). Find out what your responsibilities will be for

special needs students’ instruction.

7. Appreciate and acknowledge the many responsibilities, beyond actual instructional tasks, the cooperating teacher has.

Ask if there’s anything you can do to assist with these duties as you begin student teaching and remember to

inquire about any professional development opportunities.

8. Introduce yourself to your student’s parents. Send home a newsletter. Be positive! Encourage parent questions.

Home and school are partners in education. If parents know you’re working in their child’s best interest, they’ll

be more open and cooperative if problems arise. Don’t wait for a negative problem as a reason for parent .

contact.

9. Realize you will soon be the teacher in the classroom. Be friendly with all students, but remember, you are not

there to be a buddy. You will need to be assertive. Pals have trouble taking charge.

10. Set up a regular discussion time with the cooperating teacher. Let him/her take the lead in choosing a scheduled

time. Communication between the two of you is critically important.

a. At your earliest convenience, share the Butler University Midterm Evaluation form so both of you

become familiar with the performance proficiency checklist. A copy of the form is available in the

student teaching handbook.

b. Discuss evidence you will be collecting throughout your student teaching experience. Such evidence

will show you are a caring, committed, and competent beginning teacher.

c. Talk about coming field trips, open house, parent-teacher conferences and your role in each.

d. Ask about ISTEP and other testing done at your grade level and how you can assist in the testing

process.

26


e. Invite you cooperating teacher to use an observation form as s/he observes you in a teaching role. Your

University Supervisor can provide an extra copy of the form they use.

f. Review with your cooperating teacher the existing student assessment procedures for your particular

grade level before you assess student work.

g. Find out what curricular units of study are coming up and how you will assist or plan fully for their

implementation.

h. Tell your cooperating teacher, in case of your absence, you will let him/her AND the Butler University

Supervisor know when you can’t be at school to carry out student teaching responsibilities. Explain you

will have lesson plans available for your cooperating teacher to follow for all subjects that you are currently

teaching if such absence occurs.

i. Inform the cooperating teacher that you will follow the vacation schedule of the school to which you

are assigned with the exception of Butler University’s Thanksgiving Break and Spring Break. Due to

housing conflicts you will follow the University’s vacation schedule for those two breaks.

Performance Evidence Gathering

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

11. As you start to work with the whole class, use drama to make a point with the students. Model the behavior you

desire. Be sure to model constantly. Keep a listing of your experiences as caring evidence.

12. Discuss with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor ways you can begin working with students: oneto-one,

student pairs, and small groups.

13. Keep your students busy. Always have options available for children who finish their work. Be consistent in routine!

Keep a written record of student work choices as commitment evidence.

14. Let students know what you expect. Deadlines, contracts, rules, etc. should be written out. Unless otherwise directed,

promote the idea that the class belongs to all of you, that the rules are class rules, not just your rules, etc.

Ownership begets responsibility! Keep copies of contracts and rules as competency evidence.

15. Write out your lesson plans. Check with your cooperating teacher about appropriate formats. Make sure your

plans include state proficiencies for children, as well as school district instructional objectives. Show your plans

to your cooperating teacher before you teach a designated lesson. Keep a copy of each lesson plan as evidence of

your caring, commitment, and competency.

16. Check out websites that are useful to beginning teachers. Document, as evidence, each useful site you find and

how it helped you.

17. Ask for help if you need it! Your university supervisor is available as a sounding board, a confidant, an encourager,

and someone whose teaching experience you can count on.

27


Test Flights: Weeks 3–6

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. This is a critical time of your student teaching. After having observed and soaked in the routine of things during

your first three weeks you may or may not be ready to take on more responsibility. Recognizing your own

comfort level and taking initiative is important. Look for ways that you can help out both the students and the

teacher and contribute to the class in a positive way.

2. Start thinking about what possible goals you may want to set as part of your midterm. Discuss possible ideas

with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

3. Take time to reflect on your teaching. No matter how many or few subjects or things you are doing in the class

take time to think about how the students responded and debrief with the cooperating teacher about what

worked well and what could be improved for the next time.

4. Watch the cooperating teacher teach. Take mental notes of strategies that he or she uses that works well. Notice

the way the students interact and respond to each other and the teacher. Look for ways that the teacher differ

- entiates his/her lessons and makes modifications/adaptations for special needs students. Compare/contrast

your teaching style to that of your cooperating teachers. This will help you better understand your own teacher

identity.

5. Get to know the students. Take time during recess, lunch, morning arrival, and dismissal to talk to them about

something other than school. It might be asking them what they did over the weekend, or some other conver -

sation that shows that your interest goes beyond just what he or she does in school. Remember this is to show

an interest and not to be their best friend. This will also help you when you start taking over subjects to gear lessons/activities

to the interests of your students. Use the personalities of the children in the class to enhance your

teaching. If you know that a child is a leader give them some responsibility, or if a child is typically shy find an

area that they know a lot about and encourage them to share it with the class.

6. Develop a plan with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor about parent communication. Ask the

cooperating teacher if you can write a portion of the newsletter or make some positive phone calls home or

write some positive notes. It is always best if a positive relationship is already formed, that way if a negative situation

does occurs the parents will be more responsive to listening to what you have to say.

7. Realize that you will soon be the teacher in the classroom! This is important for several reasons. Don’t rely on

the cooperating teacher to handle all of the discipline problems. It is ok to consult with him or her, but soon

you will be making the decisions. Also, start looking ahead to units/standards that you will be covering. Don’t

wait until the last minute to start collecting resources for that topic.

8. Communicate on a regular basis with your cooperating teacher. You should have a regular discussion time .

established.

• Share the midterm and observation form. Talk about possible evidence that could be gathered for each area

of the core values and goals that could be set in that area.

• Confirm possible field trips, open house, parent-teacher conferences, PTA meetings and other events that

you should be attending. Get these dates down so you can make sure that you attend these events.

• Discuss testing ISTEP, NWEA, CTBS, and other standardize tests that the students might possibly be taking.

Find out what you can do to assist in this process and when and how you might be able to use the data

to plan instruction.

• Plan a way to get feedback after your lessons. For example will a journal be used, will the cooperating

teacher fill out an observation form on you, or just verbal discussion at the end of each day.

28


• Decide the format of your lesson plans and what they will look like for your cooperating teacher.

• Show the cooperating teacher your lesson plans and have her/him ok them and make suggestions to them.

• Discuss which subjects or units you will be picking up and teaching. This will help give you an idea of

what you need to start preparing for. Ask about the resources that are available to you.

• Talk to the cooperating teacher about differentiation, multiple intelligences, and learning styles. Ask them

for suggestions about classroom management.

• Assessment: talk about developmentally appropriate ways to assess the students. Discuss midterms, weekly

reports, and report cards and what your role will be in each of these.

9. Document communication with every parent/family. This includes phone calls and visits to the school, discipline

situations, and as well as positive interactions that can be used to make positive phone calls.

10. Create a resource file. Collect a variety of materials for use in your own classroom. These may include activities,

handouts, tests, innovative teaching strategies, or any other items or ideas that might be useful for that first year

of teaching. Ask the principal if it is ok to pin a note above the copy machine requesting teachers to place in

your envelope any great worksheets, seat work, etc...that you may take with you when you leave this semester.

11. Ask for help if you need it! You may feel like you need more responsibility or you may feel like you have too

much too soon. Communicate your ideas and thoughts with your university supervisor and cooperating

teacher.

29


How am I doing?

What are my next steps: Weeks 6–8

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following.

1. The student teacher should have established a relationship with the children and should be implementing

classroom management techniques such as positive reinforcement and proximity to effectively manage the class.

The student teacher should plan proactive strategies that will prevent/minimize inappropriate behaviors during

instruction.

2. The student teacher should be familiar with the procedures and routines of the school and be able to guide the

students effectively using these procedures.

3. Personally be able to identify each child in your class. Be able to list their areas of strengths and weakness. Be

able to identify their learning style. Know the students who work well together and who do not work well

together.

4. Be able to lead both small group and whole group instruction within the class. Be able to facilitate learning

within the classroom.

5. Differentiate your lessons to meet the diverse needs of your students. Lessons should include remediation and

enrichment. Evidence of multiple intelligences, learning styles, and Blooms levels of thinking should be evident

with some of the student teachers lessons. Modifications should also be implemented according to students who

have IEP’s.

6. Actively participate in activities beyond the regular school day. Examples of these activities might include conferences,

special events, GEI or Staffings, staff meetings, team or grade level meetings.

7. Strengthen parent and community involvement. The student teacher should assume responsibility for parental

contacts through phone calls, letters, newsletters and emails with the cooperating teacher’s support.

8. Communicate with the cooperating teacher. Regardless of the amount of subjects you are teaching a common

planning time should be established and continued. A method of sharing and gathering ideas and feedback

from your cooperating teacher should be established.

9. Midterms should be completed by the cooperating teacher, student teacher, and university supervisor. Three

goals should be set by the student teacher with the assistance of the cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

An action plan should include benchmarks on how to reach the goal. Evidence of the goal should also be

included on this form. Debriefing regarding the midterm should take place between the cooperating teacher,

university supervisor, and the student teacher.

30


In the Thick of it All: Weeks 8–12

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. The student teacher should continue to maintain a safe and caring environment for all children in the class.

2. Effective classroom management should be implemented so that the student teacher is handling discipline problems

that occur throughout the day. The cooperating teacher should offer support and guidance.

3. Continue to differentiate your lessons to meet the diverse needs of your students. Lessons should include

remediation and enrichment. Evidence of multiple intelligences, learning styles, and Blooms levels of thinking

should be evident with many of the student teacher’s lessons. Modifications and adaptations should continue to

be made according to students who have IEP’s.

4. Participation at school functions beyond the school day is still important. Continue to participate in after

school meetings with colleagues and family evening events.

5. Document parent involvement such as notes home, phone calls made, and visits to the classroom. Continue to

build relationships with parents and families to establish an open line of communication. Remember to keep

the parents aware of their child’s progress. There should not be any surprises at the end of the nine weeks. A

newsletter telling the parents what is being taught and what you are working on in the class is a great way to

keep the parents notified of all of the wonderful things that you are doing.

6. Communication with the cooperating teacher is so important! Continue to have a designated meeting time to

go over lesson plans and ideas.

7. Midterms goals should already have been established. The student teacher should be taking action to work

towards reaching these goals. Documentation should be gathered by the student teacher to show evidence of

progress made towards the goals.

8. The student teacher should take time to reflect on their teaching. Remember that assessment should guide your

teaching and is not just an end result.

• Continue to offer various forms of assessment (formal and informal) to the students.

• Discuss with the cooperating teacher other forms of assessment that are developmentally appropriate for

your grade level.

9. Community Involvement: The student teacher should become a valuable part of the entire school community

by participating in special events, arranging for guest speakers or organizing field trips (when appropriate).

10. While you are In the Thick of it All arrange for the principal or assistant principal to come in and observe you

teaching. This will be especially useful if you are planning on asking the principal for a recommendation at the

end of the semester.

11. Collaborate with your peers and other colleagues within the building. It is good to get a range of ideas and see

what works for other teachers.

• Investigate the resources available to you...ask your cooperating teacher what resources she/he uses.

• Check out books from the library on your topic/unit of study.

• There may also be a section in the school library and/or public library where teacher books are kept.

• The Indianapolis Children’s Museum and other community organizations have a wide range of teacher

resources.

• Share ideas with your university supervisor, lab instructor, and peers.

12. Ask for help if you need it. As you become In the Thick of it All you may start to be a little overwhelmed. Just

remember that you have a cooperating teacher, university supervisor, and lab instructor that would be happy to

act as a sounding board. We are in this together, and we want this to be a positive experience for you!

31


Stepping Back and Stepping Forward: Weeks 12-15

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. This is typically known as the phase out teaching period. Of course this varies with each person. It depends

on how long you have been full time student teaching as to how many subjects you would be teaching at this

point. However, if possible, it is a good idea to transition the bulk of the load back to the cooperating teacher

before the student teaching period is over. It is ideal to be able to gradually hand back each of the subjects one

or two at a time in the reverse order that you picked them up within the weeks of 12-15; however, this needs

to be flexible based upon unforeseen absences, snow days, etc. In these cases, you may need to full time teach

almost until the last day.

2. During this time the student teacher should assist the classroom teacher in the areas that used to be taught by

the student teacher. This helps to make the transition easier on the students.

3. Although the student teacher should still be visible in the classroom when he or she is not teaching, it is a good

idea for the student teacher to plan observations of other teachers. Try to observe a range of teachers at a variety

of grade levels. It may be helpful to ask your cooperating teacher if she/he has any suggestions of teachers that

they might recommend for you to observe. Let your cooperating teacher know that Butler encourages these

observations. However, make sure these observations occur at a mutually convenient time for you the student

teacher, the cooperating teacher, and the person you are observing.

4. Ask the principal of the school or your cooperating teacher if they would be willing to give you a mock interview.

This would include sample questions that they frequently ask prospective teachers. This would also be a

good time to ask them about what they like to see in a portfolio if you haven’t already put one together...get

their ideas about what they look for when they hire teachers.

5. Take pictures or sketch ideas of possible bulletin boards and hallway displays that you find neat. Remember

you never know what grade you might end up teaching and having a file of pictures with unique bulletin board

ideas at your finger tips could sure come in handy.

6. Continue to be involved at the school. Just because you’re phasing out of the full time student teaching does not

mean you should phase out of attending family/community events.

7. Tell the cooperating teacher that the university supervisor will be asking them to write a recommendation letter

at the end of the semester. The university supervisor will also write a letter of recommendation. If there are any

other letters of recommendation that you want, then you will need to ask that person. Examples may include

the principal (if they have seen you teach), a teacher that you have been team teaching with throughout the

semester, etc...

8. The student teacher, cooperating teacher, and university supervisor should all fill out a final observation form

that shows the growth of the student teacher over the semester. The goals should also be revisited at this time.

The student teacher should be able to produce evidence or be able to verbally state what they did to make progress

towards reaching their goal.

32


Student Teaching Lab for ECMC and MCEA

Teacher Work Sample Model Project

GOAL: To gather evidence of thoughtful creation, implementation and analysis of teaching practice and the impact on

K-6 learners utilizing both the Teacher Work Sample Model and self-created assessment.

PROCESS:

• Reflect on your work during your student teaching. Think about a project, unit, subject, individual plan, etc.

that utilized differentiation in order to meet the needs of your learner(s) in your classroom.

• Review the rubric associated with the Teacher Work Sample Model. Think about, “What did I already know

about my students that let me to differentiate?” “How did I know this?” “How did my differentiation respond

to the need of my learners?” “How effect was the differentiation – how did I analyze the effectiveness?” “What

did I learn about MY teaching AND my students learning with this process?”

• Gather your evidence. This should include 3-5 visual pieces that are “interview ready” that may include lesson

plans, student work, photographs, web pages, documentation panels, etc. These should visually “tell the story”

of the Teacher Work Sample Model.

• Construct a written set of talking points (bullet point) that support each of the indicators on the TWS rubric

(Contextual Factors, Objectives, etc.).

• Print a hard copy of the Teacher Work Sample Model rubric. Self assess your evidence and talking points – do

you address each section? Will this make sense to an interviewer who has no knowledge of you or your teaching

context? You will need to turn in this self-assessment, along with a supporting narrative, to the course

instructors as part of your overall project.

• Utilize the student created interview rubric to present your evidence to an outside evaluator. Remember:

Outside evaluator must be someone not familiar with your teaching, but is directly related to the field in a capacity

that supports your professional goals (building principal, etc.). Be sure to follow all requirements on the rubric that

was established by you and your peers.

• Be prepared to present you work to your peers in Lab Class. On the night you present, you will be asked to

present in the same way that you would for an interview and submit the following:

° ° 3-5 pieces of interview ready evidence (color copies that can be left with instructors so that your originals

are ready in case you need them for an interview, etc.) that visually tell your Teacher Work Sample story

° ° Clearly stated written talking points to support each indicator

° ° Self assessment with narrative support

° ° Interview rubric that was completed by your outside evaluator

GRADING

Course instructors will use all aspects of the project (written work, oral presentation and score from outside evaluator)

to determine the final grade.

33


Program Description

Middle-Secondary

The Middle-Secondary Program at Butler University is committed to preparing teachers to work toward achieving our

college’s core values and shared vision for education. We believe all our programs must prepare our candidates for schools

as they should be, not simply perpetuating schools as they currently exist. The Middle-Secondary Program at Butler

University is a comprehensive teacher education program that combines in-depth preparation in the academic content

areas of English, Mathematics, Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics), Social Studies or Foreign Language (French, German,

Spanish) with the professional teacher education skills necessary for success in the classroom for undergraduates

seeking licensure in grades 5-12 in the areas: Students interested in the content areas of music, theatre, and physical

education may also pursue K-12 licensure. Specific curriculum requirements for each content area are available on line at

www.butler.edu/coe under Student Resources.

The Middle-Secondary program is grounded in a set of beliefs which serve as a compass to guide the work we do with

students within our program and are the principles that we hope will guide the work our candidates will do with their

future students. We believe in the:

Primacy of the learner: Core Value: Diversity and Similarity

• Meeting the needs of the learner through the development of caring relationships is the most important part of

our work.

Student needs are social, cultural, linguistic, developmental, physical, emotional, and cognitive in nature.

• Meeting the foregoing needs provides safe opportunities for students to take risks that lead to individual

growth.

Students come first.

Ethic of Care: Core Value: Integrity and Responsibility

• Our work with students, schools, teachers, the community, and each other will be grounded in an ethic of care,

compassion, honesty, respect and transparency.

• Developing caring relationships creates space for transformative experiences to happen.

Significance of Knowledge Base: Core Value: Collaboration of Theory and Practice

• Content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge are inextricably intertwined.

• Theory and practice are linked, but ever-changing. This means we must intentionally model life-long learning.

• Having a deep understanding of this knowledge base strengthens teachers’ ability to make informed curriculum

decisions in the classroom.

Integrated Inquiry Curriculum: Core Value: Collaboration of Theory and Practice

• Content areas are integrated through meaningful connections and shared assessments.

• Inquiry mindset is modeled by learning alongside our students and being open to living with uncertainty and

yet to be answered questions.

Site-based Collaborative Experiences: Core Value: Teaching, Learning, and Mentoring

• Placements are purposeful and community stakeholders are considered a part of the larger learning community.

• Relationships are nurtured with classroom teachers, university supervisors, and faculty

• Collaboration is seen as an intentional part of a teacher’s work.

35


Smart Starts: Week 1

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. Observe the classroom environment. Pay attention to the kind of management techniques the cooperating teacher

uses to affect appropriate student work habits and behavior.

2. Walk around the room as you observe. Physical proximity to each student is important. If you see a problem and

know what to do about it, nip it in the bud. Praise desired behavior when you notice it. Try to notice it often!

3. Become familiar with the total school atmosphere. Where are the office, the cafeteria, the restrooms, the gym, the

music and art rooms, the nurse’s area, the copy machines, etc.? How does the professional faculty dress? Is there

a student dress code? What is the school’s discipline policy?

4. Realize you are in an established environment. Even if this is your first-phase experience, the cooperating teacher

and building principal will have had many years of practice in education and will have ideas about what needs

to be done in schools. As you begin to develop your own teaching style in the student teaching experience, you

will need to follow, unless otherwise directed, the school and classroom patterns/routines already in use.

5. Really look at the students in your classroom. Who are the leaders? Who are the ones who seem shy? Who are the

aggressors? Who are the learners with exceptional needs? How do all of these roles affect the entire group? Each

learner matters! Do the classroom management and instructional patterns seem to nurture the best learning and

development for each student?

6. Ask if there are individual educational plans (IEPs) for special needs learners. If so, request that you see them. Ask

about resource help (when, where, and how long it occurs). Find out what your responsibilities will be for special

needs students’ instruction.

7. Appreciate and acknowledge the many responsibilities, beyond actual instructional tasks, the cooperating teacher has.

Ask if there’s anything you can do to assist with these duties as you begin student teaching and remember to

inquire about any professional development opportunities.

8. Introduce yourself to your student’s parents. Send home a letter. Be positive! Encourage parent questions. Home

and school are partners in education. If parents know you’re working in their child’s best interest, they’ll be

more open and cooperative if problems arise. Don’t wait for a negative problem as a reason for parent contact.

9. Realize you will soon be the teacher in the classroom. Be friendly with all students, but remember, you are not

there to be a buddy. You will need to be assertive. Pals have trouble taking charge.

10. Set up a regular discussion time with the cooperating teacher. Let him/her take the lead in choosing a scheduled

time. Communication between the two of you is critically important.

a. At your earliest convenience, share the Butler University Midterm Evaluation form so both of you become

familiar with the performance proficiency checklist. A copy of the form is available in the student teaching

handbook.

b. Discuss evidence you will be collecting throughout your student teaching experience. Such evidence will

show you are a caring, committed, and competent beginning teacher.

c. Talk about coming field trips, open house, parent-teacher conferences and your role in each.

d. Ask about ISTEP and other testing done at your grade level and how you can assist in the testing process.

e. Invite you cooperating teacher to use an observation form as s/he observes you in a teaching role. Your

University Supervisor can provide an extra copy of the form they use.

f. Review with your cooperating teacher the existing student assessment procedures for your particular grade

level before you assess student work.

g. Find out what curricular units of study are coming up and how you will assist or plan fully for their implementation.

h. Tell your cooperating teacher, in case of your absence, you will let him/her AND the Butler University

Supervisor know when you can’t be at school to carry out student teaching responsibilities. Explain you will

have lesson plans available for your cooperating teacher to follow for all subjects that you are currently teaching if

such absence occurs.

i. Inform the cooperating teacher that you will follow the vacation schedule of the school to which you are

assigned.

36


Performance Evidence Gathering

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

11. As you start to work with the whole class, use drama to make a point with the students. Model the behavior you

desire. Be sure to model constantly. Keep a listing of your experiences as evidence of classroom management.

12. Discuss with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor ways you can begin working with students: oneto-one,

student pairs, and small groups.

13. Keep your students busy. Always have options available for students who finish their work. Be consistent in routine!

Keep a written record of student work choices as evidence of student engagement.

14. Let students know what you expect. Deadlines, contracts, rules, etc. should be written out. Unless otherwise directed,

promote the idea that the class belongs to all of you, that the rules are class rules, not just your rules, etc.

Ownership begets responsibility! Keep copies of contracts and rules.

15. Write out your lesson plans. Check with your university supervisor or seminar instructor about appropriate

formats. Make sure your plans include state proficiencies for grade level, as well as school district instructional

objectives. Show your plans to your cooperating teacher before you teach a designated lesson. Keep a copy of

each lesson plan as evidence of planning and assessment.

16. Check out websites that are useful to beginning teachers.

17. Ask for help if you need it! Your university supervisor is available as a sounding board, a confidant, an encourager,

and someone whose teaching experience you can count on.

37


Test Flights: Week 2

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. This is a critical time of your student teaching. After having observed and soaked in the routine of things during

your first week you may or may not be ready to take on more responsibility. Recognizing your own comfort

level and taking initiative is important. Look for ways that you can help out both the students and the teacher

and contribute to the class in a positive way.

2. Start thinking about what possible goals you may want to set as part of your midterm. Discuss possible ideas

with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

3. Take time to reflect on your teaching. No matter how many or few subjects or things you are doing in the class

take time to think about how the students responded and debrief with the cooperating teacher about what

worked well and what could be improved for the next time.

4. Watch the cooperating teacher teach. Take mental notes of strategies that he or she uses that works well. Notice

the way the students interact and respond to each other and the teacher. Look for ways that the teacher differentiates

his/her lessons and makes modifications/adaptations for special needs students. Compare/contrast

your teaching style to that of your cooperating teachers. This will help you better understand your own teacher

identity.

5. Get to know the students. Take time during passing period, lunch, morning arrival, and dismissal to talk to

them about something other than school. It might be asking them what they did over the weekend, or some

other conversation that shows that your interest goes beyond just what he or she does in school. Remember this

is to show an interest and not to be their best friend. This will also help you when you start taking over subjects

to gear lessons/activities to the interests of your students. Use the personalities of the learners in the class to

enhance your teaching. If you know that a student is a leader give him/her some responsibility, or if a student is

typically shy find an area that he/she knows a lot about and encourage him/her to share it with the class.

6. Develop a plan with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor about parent communication. Ask the

cooperating teacher if you can write a weekly newsletter or make some positive phone calls home or write some

positive notes. It is always best if a positive relationship is already formed, that way if a negative situation does

occurs the parents will be more responsive to listening to what you have to say.

7. Realize that you will soon be the teacher in the classroom! This is important for several reasons. Don’t rely on

the cooperating teacher to handle all of the discipline problems. It is ok to consult with him or her, but soon

you will be making the decisions. Also, start looking ahead to units/standards that you will be covering. Don’t

wait until the last minute to start collecting resources for that topic.

8. Communicate on a regular basis with your cooperating teacher. You should have a regular discussion time established.

• Share the midterm and observation form. Talk about possible evidence that could be gathered for each area

of the core values and goals that could be set in that area.

• Confirm possible field trips, open house, parent-teacher conferences, PTA meetings and other events that

you should be attending. Get these dates down so you can make sure that you attend these events.

• Discuss testing ISTEP, NWEA, CTBS, and other standardize tests that the students might possibly be taking.

Find out what you can do to assist in this process and when and how you might be able to use the data

to plan instruction.

• Plan a way to get feedback after your lessons. For example will a journal be used, will the cooperating

38


• teacher fill out an observation form on you, or just verbal discussion at the end of each day.

• Use the appropriate format of your lesson plans.

• Show the cooperating teacher your lesson plans and have her/him ok them and make suggestions to them.

• Discuss which subjects or units you will be picking up and teaching. This will help give you an idea of

what you need to start preparing for. Ask about the resources that are available to you.

• Talk to the cooperating teacher about differentiation, multiple intelligences, and learning styles. Ask them

for suggestions about classroom management.

• Assessment: talk about developmentally appropriate ways to assess the students. Discuss midterms, weekly

reports, and report cards and what your role will be in each of these.

9. Document communication with every parent/family. This includes phone calls and visits to the school, discipline

situations, and as well as positive interactions that can be used to make positive phone calls.

10. Create a resource file. Collect a variety of materials for use in your own classroom. These may include activities,

handouts, tests, innovative teaching strategies, or any other items or ideas that might be useful for that first year

of teaching. Ask the principal if it is ok to pin a note above the copy machine requesting teachers to place in

your envelope any great worksheets, seat work, etc...that you may take with you when you leave this semester.

11. Ask for help if you need it! You may feel like you need more responsibility or you may feel like you have too

much too soon. Communicate your ideas and thoughts with your university supervisor and cooperating

teacher.

39


How am I doing?

What are my next steps: Week 3

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following.

1. The student teacher should have established a relationship with the students and should be implementing

classroom management techniques such as positive reinforcement and proximity to effectively manage the class.

The student teacher should plan proactive strategies that will prevent/minimize inappropriate behaviors during

instruction.

2. The student teacher should be familiar with the procedures and routines of the school and be able to guide the

students effectively using these procedures.

3. Personally be able to identify each child in your class. Be able to list their areas of strengths and weakness. Be

able to identify their learning style. Know the students who work well together and who do not work well

together.

4. Be able to lead both small group and whole group instruction within the class. Be able to facilitate learning

within the classroom.

5. Differentiate your lessons to meet the diverse needs of your students. Lessons should include remediation and

enrichment. Evidence of multiple intelligences, learning styles, and Blooms levels of thinking should be evident

with some of the student teachers lessons. Modifications should also be implemented according to students who

have IEP’s.

6. Actively participate in activities beyond the regular school day. Examples of these activities might include conferences,

special events, staff meetings, team or grade level meetings.

7. Strengthen parent and community involvement. The student teacher should assume responsibility for parental

contacts through phone calls, letters, newsletters and emails with the cooperating teacher’s support.

8. Communicate with the cooperating teacher. Regardless of the amount of subjects you are teaching a common

planning time should be established and continued. A method of sharing and gathering ideas and feedback

from your cooperating teacher should be established.

9. Midterms should be completed by the cooperating teacher, student teacher, and university supervisor. Three

goals should be set by the student teacher with the assistance of the cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

An action plan should include benchmarks on how to reach the goal. Evidence of the goal should also be

included on this form. Debriefing regarding the midterm should take place between the cooperating teacher,

university supervisor, and the student teacher.

40


In the Thick of it All: Weeks 4-7

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following:

1. The student teacher should continue to maintain a safe and caring environment for all learners in the classroom.

2. Effective classroom management should be implemented so that the student teacher is handling discipline problems

that occur throughout the day. The cooperating teacher should offer support and guidance.

3. Continue to differentiate your lessons to meet the diverse needs of your students. Lessons should include

remediation and enrichment. Evidence of multiple intelligences, learning styles, and Blooms levels of thinking

should be evident with many of the student teacher’s lessons. Modifications and adaptations should continue to

be made according to students who have IEP’s.

4. Participation at school functions beyond the school day is still important. Continue to participate in after

school meetings with colleagues and family evening events.

5. Document parent involvement such as notes home, phone calls made, and visits to the classroom. Continue to

build relationships with parents and families to establish an open line of communication. Remember to keep

the parents aware of their child’s progress. There should not be any surprises at the end of the grading period.

A newsletter telling the parents what is being taught and what you are working on in the class is a great way to

keep the parents notified of all of the wonderful things that you are doing.

6. Communication with the cooperating teacher is so important! Continue to have a designated meeting time to

go over lesson plans and ideas.

7. Midterms goals should already have been established. The student teacher should be taking action to work

towards reaching these goals. Documentation should be gathered by the student teacher to show evidence of

progress made towards the goals.

8. The student teacher should take time to reflect on their teaching. Remember that assessment should guide your

teaching and is not just an end result.

• Continue to offer various forms of assessment (formal and informal) to the students.

• Discuss with the cooperating teacher other forms of assessment that are developmentally appropriate for

your grade level.

9. Community Involvement: The student teacher should become a valuable part of the entire school community

by participating in special events, arranging for guest speakers or organizing field trips (when appropriate).

10. While you are In the Thick of it All arrange for the principal or assistant principal to come in and observe you

teaching. This will be especially useful if you are planning on asking the principal for a recommendation at the

end of the semester.

11. Collaborate with your peers and other colleagues within the building. It is good to get a range of ideas and see

what works for other teachers.

• Investigate the resources available to you...ask your cooperating teacher what resources she/he uses.

• Check out books from the library on your topic/unit of study.

• There may also be a section in the school library and/or public library where teacher books are kept.

• The Indianapolis Children’s Museum and other community organizations have a wide range of teacher

resources.

• Share ideas with your university supervisor, seminar instructor, and peers.

12. Ask for help if you need it. As you become In the Thick of it All you may start to be a little overwhelmed. Just

remember that you have a cooperating teacher, university supervisor, and seminar instructor that would be

happy to act as a sounding board. We are in this together, and we want this to be a positive experience for you!

41


Stepping Back and Stepping Forward: Week 8

Communication Ideas and Activities

The cooperating teacher needs to read the following and the student teacher needs to do the following.

1. This is typically known as the phase out teaching period. Of course this varies with each person. It depends

on how long you have been full time student teaching as to how many subjects you would be teaching at this

point. However, if possible, it is a good idea to transition the bulk of the load back to the cooperating teacher

before the student teaching period is over. It is ideal to be able to gradually hand back each of the classes one or

two at a time in the reverse order that you picked them up within the weeks of 4-7; however, this needs to be

flexible based upon unforeseen absences, snow days, etc. In these cases, you may need to full time teach almost

until the last day.

2. During this time the student teacher should assist the classroom teacher in the areas that used to be taught by

the student teacher. This helps to make the transition easier on the students.

3. Although the student teacher should still be visible in the classroom when he or she is not teaching, it is a good

idea for the student teacher to plan observations of other teachers. Try to observe a range of teachers at a variety

of grade levels. It may be helpful to ask your cooperating teacher if she/he has any suggestions of teachers that

they might recommend for you to observe. Let your cooperating teacher know that Butler encourages these

observations. However, make sure these observations occur at a mutually convenient time for you the student

teacher, the cooperating teacher, and the person you are observing.

4. Ask the principal of the school or your cooperating teacher if they would be willing to give you a mock interview.

This would include sample questions that they frequently ask prospective teachers. This would also be a

good time to ask them about what they like to see in a portfolio if you haven’t already put one together...get

their ideas about what they look for when they hire teachers.

5. Take pictures or sketch ideas of possible classroom layouts find neat. Remember you never know what grade

you might end up teaching and having a file of pictures with ideas at your finger tips could sure come in handy.

6. Continue to be involved at the school. Just because you’re phasing out of the full time student teaching does not

mean you should phase out of attending family/community events.

7. Tell the cooperating teacher that the university supervisor will be asking them to write a recommendation letter

at the end of the semester. The university supervisor will also write a letter of recommendation. If there are any

other letters of recommendation that you want, then you will need to ask that person. Examples may include

the principal (if they have seen you teach), a teacher that you have been team teaching with throughout the

semester, etc...

8. The student teacher, cooperating teacher, and university supervisor should all fill out a final observation form

that shows the growth of the student teacher over the semester. The goals should also be revisited at this time.

The student teacher should be able to produce evidence or be able to verbally state what they did to make progress

towards reaching their goal.

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Goal:

ED434 Professional Portfolio and Rubric

• Demonstrate professional training background

• Provide in-depth analysis of current abilities in planning, implementing, and assessing learning

• Provide an introduction into the second year teacher portfolio required by the state of Indiana.

Portfolio Evaluation:

Acceptable or exemplary rating must be achieved before a final class grade will be recorded. Overall evaluation categories

include:

• Proficient — consistently exceptional demonstration of skills and abilities

• Competent — all areas demonstrate competence and/or mastery

• Basic — a basic level, but needs to continue to improve

• Emerging — portfolio section must be resubmitted before assignment will be accepted (e.g., incomplete, unorganized,

and/or unsatisfactorily addressing goals)

Section I — Professional Training and Preparation

Summation of Evidence:

• Resume (max. 2 pages)

• Transcript (unofficial copy — will not include final semester grades)

• Philosophy of Education Statement Paper (max. 2 pages)

• Letters of recommendation (min of three and max of five letters)

• Classroom Management Plan (max 6 pages) – includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: philosophy

of management, homework policy, start of school, grading, classroom rules/guidelines/procedures, room

organization and parental communication (which includes concrete support of your experience with working

collaboratively with students’ families and the community to promote student development).

Section II — Planning, Implementation, and Student Learning

Summation of Evidence:

• Context of teaching (max. 3 page commentary)

• Unit/series of lessons:

• Overview of unit (1 page)

• Lesson plans (max. 1 page for each lesson)

Student achievement/learning (relating to two lessons in unit)—organize material one lesson at a time

• Commentary on student learning for each lesson (2-3 pages for each)

• Include any ancillary materials, rubrics, keys used to assess learning and copies of two students work for

each lesson

• Analysis of unit (max. 4 pages)

Context of teaching (max. 3 page commentary) should address all the following:

1. identify school and community issues (demographics issues) [No school names]

2. detail school organizational structure (e.g, team/solitary approach, district/school/class curriculum)

3. briefly identify central focus of unit and indicate how this unit relates to prior and subsequent unit

4. identify prior knowledge and/or skills necessary for success

5. ways to provide interesting, accessible, and relevant learning for ALL students (most important component

of commentary)

Unit/series of Lessons show include:

1. Overview of unit (one page) — be sure to include: essential question(s) for the unit, main concepts learned,

overview of key learning activities (investigations), and overview of how learning was assessed and evaluated.

2. Lesson plans (8-14 lessons — max 1 page for each) — each lesson must contain all the essential components

for an effective lesson. And, a lesson plan should be provided that meets each of your content-area professional

organization standards (NCTM, NSTA, etc). For instance, in Science, a lesson plan should be included

43


that represents each of these areas: Science, Technology, and Society; Unifying Concepts; Inquiry; Nature of

Science; Issues in Society; Science in the Community.

Student achievement/learning — taking the lessons one at a time complete the following for the unit taught:

1. Provide a 2-3 page commentary that addresses student learning for the unit.

b. The introduction should make clear which lessons are being featured (e.g., Day 4, Lesson #4, etc.), what

the primary objective(s) was, how the lessons fit into the context of the unit, how student learning was

assessed, and a brief description of a single class or group of students whose work is being featured.

c. The body of the commentary should specifically discuss student learning and achievement as it relates to

this specific unit plan. Further, primary examples should analyze the learning and achievement of the class

of students featured. For instance, apply appropriate descriptive statistics to the data. It is very important

that you include in your discussion the strengths and weaknesses of 1) the assessment instrument/

process, 2) the learning demonstrated, and 3) the feedback provided.

4. Include all necessary ancillary materials for the lessons/assessment with rubrics/keys

5. Include two diverse samples of student work (include originals but eliminate student names — replace with

student #1 and #2). Comments and evaluations made by you that were provided to the student should be part

of the submitted samples

Analysis of unit (max. 4 pages) — key issues to address:

1. Coherence of unit

2. Challenges including classroom management issues and how they were addressed

3. Evidence for how goals/objectives of unit were met

4. Level of success, accessibility, and learning for ALL students

5. Adjustments — what changes were made during the unit and what changes would need to be made in the

future?

Section III — Reflective Practice

Summation of Evidence:

• Final Commentary Over Professional Preparation (3-4 pages)—specifically addressing your current abilities as a

future teacher.

Final Commentary On Preparation (max. 5 pages) — The 10 INTASC standards may be helpful in guiding your

thoughts, but this section must go well beyond just listing things that teachers should know and be able to do. Make sure

that the following issues are specially addressed:

1. Ability to design and implement effective, coherent, meaningful curriculum

2. Ability to assess student growth over time

3. Ability to effectively manage and lead students (classroom management issues)

4. Ability to positively impact ALL students

5. Ability to collaborate with parents and school community

The Final Commentary provides a good place to unite/synthesize your beliefs, abilities, and training, but it should

also be a place to elaborate on things that are not well encapsulated in the other components. For instance, how are

you prepared to contribute to coaching, extra curricular activities, clubs, etc.? The commentary should provide concise,

clear examples to support any claims.

Final note: the components and order of the portfolio are clearly defined; make sure that your portfolio is complete

and well organized. To maximize your success, develop a clear, concise portfolio that includes everything as

stated above.

Many of the ideas for this portfolio were adapted from: the Indiana Professional Standards Board “Beginning Teacher Assessment

Program(BTAP)” and the Connecticut State Department of Education handbook entitled, “Best Program.”

Last Revised: 7/5/11

44


Professional Portfolio Rubric

Student Name:__________________________________________________________________________________

Evaluator:_____________________________________________________________________________________

Assessment of the portfolio will be broken into three sections. Section two will receive twice the weighting of the other

sections. Any scores of Emerging must be corrected and approved by your course instructor before a final grade will be

issued for the portfolio and course. Evaluators should return evaluations directly to the course instructor who will later

return them to the student.

The following items

should be graded

with a checklist of

completion — please

add comments/suggestions

as you deem

appropriate:

Transcript(s) are

present and neatly .

organized/displayed

At least 3 Letters of

recommendation which

address teaching/.

coaching/mentoring

abilities — letters must

be from those who

can provide first hand

knowledge of your

abilities

Philosophy of

Education includes

roles and beliefs regarding

teachers, students,

parents (community),

and curriculum.

Résumé (2 pages max.)

is concise, accurate, .

mechanically strong,

and developed in order

of importance.

Classroom Management

Plan (5 pages

max.) discusses overall

philosophy of .

management, homework

policy/grading,

start of school, classroom

rules/guidelines/

procedures, room

organization, and contains

samples of parental

communication (with

concrete support).

Section 1: Professional Training and Preparation

Proficient – 4 Competent – 3 Basic – 2 Emerging -1

Complete and included

Complete and .

includes 3 letters

Complete. Includes

roles and beliefs regarding

teachers, students,

and curriculum.

Complete and .

concise, accurate, mech.

strong, and developed

Complete and includes

overall philosophy of .

management, homework

policy/grading,

start of school, classroom

rules/guidelines/

proce dures, room

organization, and contains

samples of parental

communication (with

concrete support).

Not included

Two letters included One letter included No letters included

Philosophy of .

education is complete

but does not .

sufficiently include the

roles and beliefs

Completed but not

concise, accurate, mech.

strong, and developed

Complete but has one

missing section or min

or mechanical problems

Philosophy of .

education is incomplete

or un-acceptable due to

quality of writing

Data missing or

improperly ordered,

unacceptable quality of

writing

Incomplete with two or

more missing sections or

serious mech. problems

Philosophy of .

education is not included

Resume is not included

Not included

45


Student Teaching Rubric

Rationale for the Instrument and Its Use for Data Collection

Faculty in all program areas collaboratively designed the student teaching rubric that is used in the College of Education.

The rubric was initially crafted to evaluate candidates’ ability to address the INTASC standards as well as the Core Values

of our college. In order to also align the rubric with specific standards within each licensure program, addendums were

created for specific program areas.

This allows the use of the overall document to collect data on our candidates as a whole (all programs), but also allows

the analysis of data that is specific to programs in order to provide a context and rationale for program changes.

The general rubric is utilized as both a formative and summative instrument. The programs ask that a midterm conference

be held during the halfway point of placement. . The midterm looks at general progress of the candidate as it

relates to the college-wide student teaching rubric. The rubric is completed independently by the candidate, cooperating

teacher and university supervisor and is then followed by a conference that provides a forum for goal setting based on the

results. At the end of the semester, the instrument is used as a summative evaluation of the candidate’s progress during

that placement. In addition, the addendum that addresses the specific curricular areas is utilized. Because of the phase in/

phase out nature of the student teaching experience, the addendum is only applicable after the placement has been fully

completed. Again, each reviewer completes the instrument individually and then a final conference is held.

The data collected on the final rubric each semester is reviewed at the end of each academic year by the program for

consideration and possible program revisions.

46


Butler University – College of Education - Student Teacher Observation Sheet:

Student __________________________________________________ Date _____________ Observation #: _______

School ________________________________ Grade Level/Subject _______ Cooperating Teacher _____________

This form should be used to document the student teacher’s progress throughout the semester. Further definition of each indicator below can be

found on the midterm/final form. Evaluators should add any additional observed elements that may not be clearly defined on the form.

For each area please use the following ratings: 4-Proficient, 3-Competent, 2- Basic, 1-Emergent, NO – Not observed during this observation.

Lesson Observed: ________________________________________________________________________________

Pedagogical Areas: Focus on the Core Value of Teaching, Learning and Mentoring

Content

• Explains skills and concepts clearly; restates in different ways

• Connections to other parts of curriculum

• Connections to students’ lives and prior knowledge

• Has knowledge of content and concepts are taught in multiple ways

• Moves from concrete to more abstract ideas

Developmentally Appropriate Teaching:

• Language level is developmentally appropriate

• Content is appropriate to the developmental level

• Activities and instruction are planned in response to developmental level

• Exceptions to learning patterns are understood

• Genuine caring & respect for individual students is demonstrated

Students exhibit respect for teacher

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Learning Styles: Focus on the Core Value of Diversity and Similarity

Differentiation and Learning Styles

Student Interests &Cultural Heritage:

• Candidate uses manipulatives, visuals and knowledge of students’ • Displays a knowledge of student’s interests or cultural heritage

varied approaches to learning in planning for individual needs

• Planning and instruction give evidence of thought to

adaptations/modifications, including IEP goals

• Seeks collegial support if needed (ex/ special education teacher)

• Appropriate praise & encouragement is used

• Integrates students’ interests and/or heritage into lessons

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Instructional Strategies: Focus on the Core Value of Theory, Practice and Collaboration

Instructional Techniques:

• Utilizes a variety of instructional techniques

• Techniques and learning activities are appropriate

for the instructional goal and effective student

learning

• Activities engage students in meaningful learning

• Recognition if/when a lesson needs to be adjusted

and can make a major adjustment in response to

student needs

Appropriate Use of Technology:

• Available technology is used to enhance

learning

• Available technology is used to enhance

instruction

Questions

• Uniformly high quality

• Adequate time for students to respond

thoughtfully is given

Students formulate many of their own questions

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Communication: Focus on the Core Value of Teaching, Learning and Mentoring

Oral & Written Communication:

Positive Student Interactions:

• Models clear oral & written communication to parents & students • Groups are engaged and work independently

• Responds to questions & concerns in a timely, appropriate manner • Students assume responsibility for productivity

• Group members are respectful of peers

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

47


Positive Learning Environment: Focus on the Core Values of Integrity and Responsibility; Teaching Learning

and Mentoring; Theory, Practice and Collaboration

Classroom climate:

• Models an enthusiasm for

teaching/learning

• Encourages students

Classroom Standards of Conduct:

• Standards of conduct are clear to all students

• Standards of conduct are consistently enforced

Students are treated in a fair and respectful

manner

Response to Behaviors

• Highly effective response to inappropriate

behavior

• Sensitivity to student’s individual needs

• Correction with minimal interruption to learning

• Proactive prevention of inappropriate behavior

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Planning: Focus on the Core Values of Teaching, Learning and Mentoring; Theory, Practice and Collaboration

Instructional Time:

Lesson Structure:

• Directions and procedures are clear

• Structure is clear

• Anticipates misunderstandings

• Includes an introduction and closure

• Transitions are kept to a minimum

• Flexibility for different pathways if needed

• Materials are organized, including an efficient plan for distribution • Enhances the on-going educational objectives and curricular plan

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Assessment: Focus on the Core Values of Teaching, Learning and Mentoring; Theory, Practice and Collaboration

Assessment Criteria:

Variety of Assessments:

• Assessment criteria and standards are clear and have been clearly • Uses multiple forms of assessment that are developmentally appropriate

communicated to students

• Results are used to differentiate instruction

Students contribute to criteria & standards, when developmentally • Students are aware of how/why they are being assessed

appropriate

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Professional Development & Reflection: Focus on the Core Value of Integrity and Responsibility

Self-Reflection:

Applying Feedback:

• Thoughtful, accurate assessment of professional practice and the • Seeks and utilizes feedback from a variety of sources, including students and

extent to which teacher goals and learning objectives were achieved, colleagues

citing specific examples

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

Collegiality: Focus on the Core Values of Diversity and Similarity; Integrity and Responsibility

Collaboration:

• Good rapport with cooperating teacher, team,

and staff

• Takes leadership role in collaboration

• Helps to ensure that decisions are based on

the highest professional standard

Family Contacts

• Timely and substantive information to students

and families is provided, as appropriate

School Policies

• Fulfills required hours of teacher contract

• Volunteers to participate in school

events/meetings, and makes a substantial

contribution to the overall school community

4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO 4 3 2 1 NO

48


EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT

Self-Managed Credential Files

The College of Education has moved to entirely self-managed credentials. Self-managed files are appropriately responsive

practice in the era of portfolios and electronic applications and communications. Current job listings for Indiana are

on “Blue” on the Butler Website, on individual school district website or listed on the State Department of Education

website.

Students will be attend seminars and work independently on the development and management of their placement files.

Additional information is available on the COE webpage under Student Resources

Letters of Recommendation

Candidates look to their cooperating teachers to write letters of recommendation to be included in their self managed

credential files. On the following page you will find helpful tips for writing those letters of recommendation.

Praxis testing

• Successful completion of Praxis II exams are required for Indiana licensure. Praxis information and Indiana

required tests are included here one the COE website under student resources and testing.

• In addition, students may go to Indiana’s Virtual Library, INSPIRE Indiana, at http://www.in.gov/library/

inspire/info.html and search databases for Testing and Education. At this site students may prepare for praxis

through study and test taking as well as going through an actual diagnosis of strengths and weaknesses.

Licensure

• In order to be licensed in the state of Indiana students must successfully complete an approved program and

required Praxis tests, submit proof of current CPR/Heimlich/AED certification via the online process with the

Indiana State Department of Education.

• There will be a $36.72 charge at the end of the process.

Job Search

Students will be guided and assisted in their job search through the office of Student Personnel Services. There

will be required seminars and two required interview days.

• Teacher Candidate Interview Day will be held at the Hendricks County Fairgrounds on Wednesday, April 18

and Butler’s Campus Interview Day will be held on our campus on Friday, April 27, 2012.

61


Writing a Letter of Recommendation for Student Teachers

Tips for Cooperating Teachers

Whether it is your first or twentieth letter of recommendation for a student teacher, it can sometimes help to review what makes

a great letter and how your letter can impact a student’s future career path.

See what the student teacher needs: This does not mean asking the student to write his/her own letter, but rather ask

them where “holes” exist in the current body of recommendations that they have. For example, if a student is wonderful

at classroom management everyone may have noted that in their letters. However, the student might need someone to

remark about his/her ability to differentiate. A simple way to do this is to ask the student to email you 3 topics he/

she would potentially like addressed in the letter.

Build the letter around strengths: One colleague noted that, “I try to remember that this is permanent. Thus, though

there are things that we all need to work on, if this student is one who will be a great teacher then I try to focus the letter

positively.” A simple way to do this is to go back through the final evaluation rubric and build from the areas that

were rated most highly.

Think beyond just curriculum: Letters can certainly address lesson plans, etc., but often times it is the relational qualities

of teaching that can set apart one applicant from another. A simple way to do this is to consider including at least

one of the following: how they work with children, colleagues, parents and/or administrators in the building.

Be specific/concrete: After reading many letters of recommendation they can all certainly start to feel the same! One way

to make a candidate’s letter more personal is to be very specific/concrete with your content. A simple way to do this is

to include at lease one direct quote from a child, principal, parent and/or colleague about the student teacher.

Include Professional Development: We all know that teaching is more than just the hours in the classroom, so don’t

forget to address the professional growth/opportunities that the student teacher had while in your classroom. A simple

way to do this is to list the major topics of staff development, PBA Days, workshops attended, etc.

Remember the basics: This is a professional document, so it should reflect that in appearance as well as content. Some

simple, yet essential parameters include:

• One page (if at all possible), on school letterhead

• A brief description of you and your involvement with the candidate, including grade level and school demographics

• A way to contact you (even when school is out of session) for additional follow-up

Recognizing when things aren’t perfect: We are all unfinished products in our learning and development. It may be

that there is still a significant issue that you feel needs to be addressed in the letter. A simple way to handle this is to

remember that there is a big difference in defining something as a “weakness” and “an opportunity for continued

growth”.

Above and Beyond: If your student teacher has been a shining star in your classroom; you may be seeking a way to

explain that to a prospective employer. A simple way to handle this is too simply state that you would want to teach

with this teacher, or if applicable, that you would want this candidate to teach your child. There really is no

higher compliment than that.

62


Copies for Now and Later: A job search is a process. Some students will find their perfect job on the first try, and others

will be engaging in a second job search more quickly. Keep in mind that their ability to use letters of recommendation for

an extended period of time is essential. A simple way to facilitate this is to provide multiple hard copies and a write

protected electronic copy as well. Instructions for write protecting a document in Microsoft Word are as follows:

• Open a new document as you normally would. If your school corporation has scanned letterhead as a template,

you may use that as well.

• Type your letter of reference for the student as you normally do in MS Word. If you have a scanned signature,

you may include that in your letter as an object file in the appropriate place in your letter. If not, your typed

name will suffice.

• Please include the following statement a few lines under your signature “This document has been protected by

the author to assure that no modifications may be made to the original.”

• After you have completed the letter and included the line above, click on the Tools>Protect Document.

• Choose the Forms radio button and type in a password that you will remember should you wish to modify the

letter.

• You will be asked to re-enter your password and click OK.

• Now you are ready to save your document. Click on File>Save As and save your document to your destination

of choice. You may email the document as an attachment or download it on a disk. The document is protected

and may not be altered, copied or modified in anyway.

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