Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014

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Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014

Butler University Technology Master Plan

2010 - 2014


Table of Contents

Technology Master Plan Charge & Committee Members .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4

Dare to Make a Difference Priorities .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

Technology Master Plan Goal Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

Butler University’s Strategy within Higher Ed, per Gartner Models ................................................................................................................................................................................... 7

The World in Which We Operate ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 8

Technology Master Plan Goals ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 12

Executive Summary Recap ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 21

Appendix ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Attached

A. Technology Master Plan Scope Document (Dare to Make a Difference Priority 7D)

B. Technology Master Plan SWOT Recap

C. Technology Master Plan Campus Survey Quantitative Data

D. Technology Master Plan Campus Survey Question 5 Comments

E. Educause Center for Applied Research Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2009, Butler Report

F. Minds on Fire - Seely and Adler

G. 2018: Digital Natives Grow Up and Rule the World - Gartner

H. Four 'Business Model' Scenarios for Higher Education: An Introduction to Strategic Planning Through Storytelling - Gartner

I. Gartner Strategy Map for Butler

J. Higher Education 'Business Model' Scenarios: 'Me Not U': Edge in Market - Gartner

K. Top Ten IT Issues 2009 - Educause

L. What is CRM – A Definition

M. CRM A Vision for Higher Education - Katz and Associates

N. Business Process Redesign

O. Top Business Process Improvement Candidates

P. Emerging Technologies Recommended for Adoption by ETG

Q. Collaboration Technology Definitions

R. Butler Computer Labs & Possible Laptop Programs - Forthcoming

S. Full list of initiatives

2 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Technology Master Plan Charge & Committee Members

Charge for Workgroup 7D

“In addition to anticipating the needs of digital learners, we must also keep pace with advances in administrative technology. Given the human and

financial resources required to implement technological improvements, the Information Resources department should initiate a collaborative planning

process designed to set institutional priorities and timelines that span academic and administrative needs.” (Appendix A)

Committee Members

Member College/Department Related IT Committees Strategic Plan Workgroups

Catherine Hagerman Pangan COE Faculty Emerging Technology Group ---

Caitlin Smith Student, LAS --- ---

Jennifer Griggs Academic Affairs Administrative Systems Committee Priority Workgroup #5

Jerry Carlson Operations Administrative Systems Committee Priority Workgroup #7

Joe Ader IT Technology Support Group ---

Joe Indiano IT Information Management Council (IMC) ---

Jon Sorenson LAS Faculty --- ---

Jonathan Small Human Resources Administrative Systems Committee Priority Workgroup #6

Josh Rattray Athletics --- ---

Joshua Lingenfelter Clowes Memorial Hall Emerging Technology Group ---

Julianne Miranda Instructional Technology Emerging Technology Group Priority Workgroups #6 & #1

Karla Cunningham Residence Life --- Priority Workgroup #7

Kathleen Wilkey IT Administrative Systems Committee ---

Kent VanTyle COPHS Faculty IMC & Emerging Technology Group Priority Workgroup #4

Laura Behling Associate Provost Administrative Systems Committee Multiple Workgroups

Lisa Phillips Finance Administrative Systems Committee, interim ---

Marcia Dowell University Relations/Advancement Administrative Systems Committee Priority Workgroups #6 & #9

Melissa Smurdon Enrollment Management Administrative Systems Committee Priority Workgroup #5

Priscilla Arling COB Faculty Information Management Council ---

Rob Koharchik JCFA Faculty Emerging Technology Committee ---

Scott Kincaid IT -- Convener IMC & Administrative Systems Committee Priority #7 & Implementation

Scott Nemeth Student, LAS Student Government Association CPA ---

Sondrea Ozolins Registration & Records Administrative Systems Committee ---

Stephanie Elpers Admission Information Management Council Priority Workgroup #2

Teresa Williams Library --- ---

Tyler Johnston IT -- Project Analyst Technology Support Group Priority Workgroup #6

* Lisa Symons administrative support

3 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Executive Summary

The technology master plan analysis was conducted considering:

1. Butler University’s mission

2. Dare to Make a Difference Strategic Plan and Priorities

3. Technology strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (Appendix B)

4. Belief that the most effective use of technology comes not from the technology alone, but from an optimal

mixture of people, processes and technology

4 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

Priority One: Encourage academic excellence and innovation.

Shaping Learning

Priority Two: Develop, strengthen, and expand creative co-curricular programs and campus collaborations to promote student

learning, development, retention, and success.

Priority Three: Pursue creative collaborations to engage students in learning experiences with local impact and national reach.

Priority Four: Build on Butler’s reputation in international education by forging additional opportunities and partnerships.

Sustaining the University

Priority Five: With our mission and commitments firmly in mind, calibrate Butler’s optimal student body size and shape, given

coming demographic shifts and the dynamic external financial environment.

Priority Six: Make Butler an employer of choice for a highly qualified, diverse mix of faculty and staff.

Priority Seven: Construct and maintain facilities and infrastructure commensurate to the mission and reflective of the

commitments and aspirations of the University.

Priority Eight: Grow and steward resources that enable us to execute our plans and sustain the University for future generations of

students.

Priority Nine: Increase Butler’s national profile.

5 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Technology Master Plan Goal Executive Summary

Goals:

Technology enables and extends the relationships that make Butler unique by helping build

community.

Technology at Butler supports the development of life-long community by creating a "high touch"

environment that fosters collaboration through connecting constituents and giving them easy access to

information. This helps ensure that Butler stays competitive among its peer institutions in both academic

and administrative endeavors. (Appendix H, I & J)

1. As technology drives societal change, Butler continually evolves to meet the demands of our students, faculty, staff and

other constituents.

2. Faculty and staff demonstrate digital fluency and information literacy and are aware of how technologies and information

can be used to enrich learning and to enhance their professional activities.

3. Technology is applied intentionally to facilitate effective and innovative teaching and learning.

4. Students, faculty and staff have the tools and information they need to be successful at Butler.

5. Butler students become responsible and well-prepared digital citizens.

6. It is easy to get things done on and off campus via interconnected, efficient and accessible systems and processes.

7. Effective planning, emphasizing open dialogue, fosters an environment with appropriately integrated technology.

8. We are responsible stewards of the resources necessary to meet institutional goals.

9. Technology systems are reliable, secure and sustainable.

6 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Butler University’s Strategy within Higher Ed, per Gartner Models

7 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


The World in Which We Operate

INDUSTRY CHANGES in LAST TWO DECADES
















Bookstores; to online buying

Music stores (CDs); to digital downloads

Auctions, physical; to eBay

Movie theatres; to rentals; to on-demand and downloads

Newspapers, in decline

Corner drug stores; to big chains and mail order

Phone company & landlines; to wireless phones, data, text plans

Traditional stock brokers; to eTrade-like providers

TV networks; from few channels to so many can’t count

Film-based cameras; digital photos (volume is up)

Customer service 8-5 Monday to Friday; to weekend & evening expected

AAA maps to MapQuest; paper maps to GPS

K-12 & chalkboards; to mediated classrooms, grades online, reference material online, instant notification systems

Higher Education traditional models; explosive growth of distance education and online degrees

World; more globalization & less boundaries

TODAY



Most students carry mobile device

Facebook reports half-billion Facebook users


Amazon reports they are selling more Kindle eBooks than hardback

books.


On-demand TV


GPS embedded in many devices with integration to applications

8 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


PACE OF CHANGE INCREASING

Period of Time for 50 Million Users to Adopt New Technology (source IDC)

Radio – 38 years (to 50 million users)

PC -- 16 years

TV – 13 years

PlayStation – 5 years




World Wide Web – 4 years

Facebook – 3 years

iPhone – 3 years

STUDENTS OF TODAY/TOMORROW

When considering the major technology events that occurred in 1992 (the year many in the class of 2014 were born), one cannot help but realize that their

outlook on the world is much different than those born before this time. In the year 1992, the World Wide Web debuted, compact discs surpassed

cassette tapes as the preferred medium for recorded music, Windows 3.1 was released, and the first SMS (text) message was sent.

Today’s students essentially grew up with:






Mobile devices, texting

iPods, iTunes, digital music sharing

Video games

TiVo – on demand TV, Hulu, Netflix

GPS





Internet access at home

Google, Wikipedia, MapQuest, MySpace

Self-publishing: YouTube, Flicker, blogs

Social network: Facebook, MySpace, Twitter

To many people who were born earlier, the items above are incredible. To today’s student they are as ubiquitous as cars and electricity. This does not

mean they are necessarily skilled using technology, but they come with a fundamentally different set of experiences than past students.

9 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Educause Center for Applied Research Study of Undergraduate Students and

Information Technology, 2009 Data

Butler Student Ownership of Handheld Device

Capable of Accessing the Internet

100%

90%

Don’t know

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Senior Freshman Other

Yes

No, but I plan to

purchase one in

the next 12

months

No, and I don't

plan to purchase

one in the next 12

months

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

Butler Student Course Technology Preference

Senior Freshman Other

Student Opinion on How Many of Their

Instructors use IT Effectively in Courses

Butler University

Other 4 Year Institutions

0%

I prefer taking

courses that use

no information

technology

I prefer taking

courses that use

limited

information

technology

I prefer taking

courses that use

a moderate level

of information

technology

I prefer taking

courses that use

information

technology

extensively

I prefer taking

courses that use

information

technology

exclusively

40%

35%

30%

25%

Data from The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students

20%

15%

10%

and Information Technology, 2009, Butler Report.

(n=230) Appendix Item E

5%

0%

Almost none Some About half Most Almost all Don’t know

10 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Technology Master Plan Campus Survey

Which of the Following Best Describes You?

60%

Student Faculty Staff

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

I am skeptical

of new

technologies

and use them

only when I

have to

I am usually one

of the last

people I know

to use new

technologies

I usually use

new

technologies

when most

people I know

do

I like new

technologies

and use them

before most

people I know

I love new

technologies

and am among

the first to

experiment with

and use them

Are You Satisfied With the Rate at

Which Butler Adopts Technology?

Data from the Technology Master Plan Campus Survey

(n=719) Appendix Item C

11 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Yes No, go faster No, go slower

Student Faculty Staff


Technology Master Plan Goals

Goal #1

As technology drives societal change,

Butler continually evolves to meet the demands of

our students, faculty, staff and other constituents.

We live in a time where technological advances are driving

sociological changes that are comparable in magnitude to what

our ancestors experienced with the invention of the printing

press, the automobile and the TV. These shifts in our society

are causing transformations in traditional organizations as

society’s expectations change. While we cannot foresee what

society and technology will be like in the future, we can say

there will be changes in the traditional approaches to the

education and services we provide. Our students, faculty, staff

and the community expect us to keep abreast of these changes.

Therefore, we constantly evaluate our systems and processes to

ensure that we invest in the right tools and methods at the right

time. This includes ongoing examination of the changing nature

of K-12 education and other institutions, continual evaluation of

what we need to do to remain relevant, and a regular assessment

of the needs and expectations of the digital learners we serve.

(Appendix F, G & K)

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 & 9






Major Initiatives

Increase Information Technology (IT) support for a range of

mobile devices. Create and execute on a clear strategy for

adapting to the trend of consumerization of technology.

Move more computing services to cloud computing (cloud).

Develop an overall cloud strategy, including approach to data

ownership, integration, contracts and federation standards.

Evaluate the mixture of IT staff skill sets and evolve those

skills to meet the changing needs of our customers. Provide

more analyst, consultant, project manager and engineer skill

sets to develop better, more education and business processcentric

solutions to meet changing university needs; review

roles of departmental functional analysts as well.

Develop practices, demonstrations and expectations to stay

abreast and collaborate on the evolving impact of technology,

and how it may apply to the learning, living and administrative

areas of the university and expectations of our constituents.

Include campus leadership in the process as well as the

community at-large.

Institute metrics to assess our progress on adopting

technology against our competitor peer institutions, K-12

schools, and other industries related to higher education. Make

periodic reports to the community.

12 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #2

Faculty and staff demonstrate digital fluency and

information literacy and are aware of how

technologies and information can be used to enrich

learning and to enhance their professional activities.

Technology allows access to resources, both digital and human,

that can shape and deepen the activities of the institution. Faculty

and staff utilize professional development opportunities afforded

to them, have technological skills and awareness, and are able to

appropriately apply these skills in their professional activities.

Butler's faculty and staff model appropriate use of technology for

our students.

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

3, 4 & 6






Major Initiatives

Create a well-organized, centralized collection of information

technology education, tips, FAQs, case studies, procedures

and knowledge base. (In progress)

Use the technological knowledge of our faculty and staff to

benefit the entire community through technology mentoring

programs that foster a more conducive environment for

knowledge sharing.

Strongly encourage or require faculty to use Blackboard for

posting syllabi and at least one other function as they choose,

such as posting assignments, accepting assignments

electronically or posting grades; assist with student

engagement by providing timely feedback and provide some

consistency in Blackboard use for students.

Define technology literacy expectations and create a plan to

help faculty, staff and students achieve that proficiency; assess

our progress. Additionally, discuss appropriate ways to

balance the use of and disengagement from technology.

Support the evolution of a digitally-focused library. Market

digital holdings as highly visible and effective resources for

faculty, student and staff; add a mobile computing interface to

digital library holdings. Support the digitization of unique

university intellectual assets by the library; link Blackboard

references to library journal articles.

13 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #3

Technology is applied intentionally to facilitate

effective and innovative teaching and learning.

Major Initiatives

The intentional application of technology empowers innovation

in teaching, scholarship and service, all of which are at the core of

faculty life. Technology can facilitate deep connections between

classroom learning and experiences in the real world. Teaching

methods are enhanced by making more content available outside

the classroom, by utilizing mobile technologies to engage

students and applying hybrid/blended course techniques.

Students, faculty and staff have the support and resources they

need in these endeavors.




Integrate instructional technology into academic units

through strategic partnerships with the Office of the

Provost, colleges and the library.

Have an instructional technology staff member physically

located in each college to assist faculty. Provide one-onone

and learning community focused initiatives in addition

to workshops.

Enhance traditional teaching methods by making more

content available outside the classroom, utilizing mobile

technologies, investigating hybrid courses, and considering

the use of distance education techniques where beneficial.

(Appendix P)

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

1, 3, 4, 6 & 9

14 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #4

Students, faculty and staff have the tools and

information they need to be successful at Butler.

We have and sustain the resources and tools needed to support

the technology-rich environments in which we teach, learn, work

and live. This includes the hardware, software, training and

practices that enable collaboration and access to information,

improve productivity, assist with research and contribute to

building community. The university libraries support a wide

range of digital content and all teaching spaces have technology

appropriate to their discipline. IT works to make the sometimes

confusing and complex world of technology simple to

understand and navigate. The campus benefits from the

knowledge of our faculty, staff and students by fostering a

consultative environment which encourages collaborative

working relationships and technology mentoring programs.

"

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

All Priorities










Major Initiatives

Become a more mobile-friendly campus by creating a

comprehensive wireless network; allow easy and secure

connections across a myriad of devices.

Provide more access to Butler resources via a range of mobile

devices and applications.

Mediate 95% of Butler classrooms with appropriate

technologies; ensure that the classes and faculty placed in these

classrooms can use the technology for the maximum benefit of

the students; assess utilization of facilities and proper level of

mediation.

Develop an easy web conferencing toolkit to support

collaboration through shared applications, desktops, IM, voice

and video across the Internet, e.g., WebEx-like system.

(Appendix Q)

Design a shared document toolkit that is more flexible and

allows multiple contributors, sharing outside the institution and

user-specified sharing controls, e.g., Google doc-like system.

(Appendix Q)

Develop a comprehensive telecommuting solution that includes

access to applications, voice, fax, lab software, policies and

procedures, and other computing resources -- work/learn

anywhere.

Leverage the laptops that most students bring to campus and/or

create a formal laptop program/requirement campus-wide.

And/or support other mobile devices they bring for Butler

educational goals. (Appendix R)

Ensure that faculty and staff have the devices and support they

need to do their jobs, including laptops, smartphones, thin client

applications, virtual desktops, and/or dual monitors as

applicable; includes central funding of key devices for faculty.

Change the name of Information Resources to Information

Technology to make it easier to understand and more consistent

with higher education. Also, change the name of the current

Instructional Technology area. (In progress)

15 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #5

Butler students become responsible and wellprepared

digital citizens.

Major Initiatives

Butler cultivates critical thinking and reflection in our students

through our liberal arts and professional programs. Students

know how to evaluate information and then apply this knowledge

in new environments, including through use of technology. Just

as we educate students to be good and moral contributors, we

also prepare them to be good digital citizens who value and

promote ethical behavior in a digital world, and our curriculum

reflects such.




Work with the faculty curriculum committee to identify

technology educational needs of students. Ensure that our

curricula provide opportunities to educate and grow future

digital citizens.

Grow, expand and evolve the Information Commons

program into a more robust student-assistance center to

help students acquire information and technology literacy

skills; re-design its space to support its equipment and

training needs; provide more equipment and programmatic

resources to support its mission.

Ensure students attain digital fluency and information

literacy, with emphasis on effective and ethical use of

technology and information. Achieve this by combining

the expertise of library faculty with that of discipline faculty

and instructional technology staff.

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

1, 2, 3, & 4

16 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #6

It is easy to get things done on and off campus via

interconnected, efficient and accessible systems

and processes.

Our processes and systems work well for the Butler community

both on and off campus. To better relate to our constituents, we

fashion systems with a cradle-to-grave view of their interactions

with campus. Accurate information is readily available to all

appropriate parties. Through continual analysis, collaboration

across departments and improvement, campus processes are costefficient,

focused on constituents, and utilize University-wide

standard applications.

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 & 9










Major Initiatives (Appendix O)

Improve Human Resources and Payroll communications and

processes, including absence management, time and labor

accounting; improve employee and manager self-service

functions on routine HR information. (In progress).

Provide technology and processes to support strong

relationships with alumni (In progress).

Improve the University's requisition, purchasing, and accounts

payable processes.

Develop business process reengineering (BPR) skill set on

campus; provide IT staff resources to identify campus process

improvement opportunities and assist in their reengineering

and/or automation. (Appendix N)

Improve on-boarding process for new faculty, staff and

student workers.

Widely implement document imaging technologies we already

own to gain workflow efficiencies and reduce paper

consumption. Priority areas include Admission, Financial Aid,

LRC and HR.

Better engage students in their college experience by

supporting future class selection (i.e., full year) options well in

advance of final registration.

Provide easy access to accurate enterprise-wide data by using

common data definitions and providing secure,

straightforward tools to analyze that data.

Help the University develop best relationships possible with

our constituents through systematic application of technology

via Constituent Relationship Management (CRM) set of

practices and/or system. (Appendix L & M)

17 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #7

Effective planning, emphasizing open dialogue,

fosters an environment with appropriately

integrated technology.

All University constituents, including the Board of Trustees,

consider the impact of changing technology in Butler’s long-range

planning. Technology planning is purposefully integrated into the

university to assist in the analysis and design of solutions that help

departments meet their goals and objectives. IT is seen as a

valuable and essential partner integrated in the day-to-day

functions of the university and in the university’s planning

initiatives.

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

2, 4, 6 & 8







Major Initiatives

Better IT ongoing communication/awareness on what technology

and capabilities are available at Butler; communicate best practices,

tips and tricks, availability of in-house expertise, and evolving trends

through wide-range of tailored communications. Expect faculty,

staff and students to more consciously seek such information.

Create a program to help senior management understand and

embrace technology; ensure we stay ahead of the curve as

technology impacts future of higher education.

Ensure that university executives consider technology as part of

strategic planning; periodic reports to the Board of Trustees by the

CIO and more CIO involvement in campus planning.

Affirm university-wide and constituent needs come before

department-specific goals. Update governance on campus processes

and data; for example, the President/VP steering committee/CIO

oversee cross-campus work flows and assign data stewards;

departments oversee their content/data and local business

processes; IT manages and oversees technology selection and

computer systems.

Develop a more formal project portfolio and service catalog to

better share services available and status of initiatives.

Assess and report on the progress of the technology master plan

goals and initiatives at regular intervals.

18 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #8

We are responsible stewards of the resources

necessary to meet institutional goals.

We are purposeful and disciplined in how we allocate our

abundant but finite resources. As we adopt new technologies, we

sometimes drop others. As we approach projects, we are

cognizant of the long-term costs, benefits and potential

environmental implications. IT as a department recognizes that

not everything needs to be done in-house; IT consciously

partners with others and utilizes the services of the cloud. IT

crafts high quality, repeatable processes through constant,

iterative improvement; however, IT is nimble and encourages

innovation by leveraging the unique talents of individual staff and

faculty.

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

8







Major Initiatives

Develop strategies to keep IT focused on the highest value

opportunities and shed support and maintenance of low value

items. Conduct assessment of activities for streamlining or

reduction of some functions.

Revisit replacement cycle strategy and funding to ensure we

have a plan for replacing classroom equipment, printers and

future technologies. Continue to review devices and plans;

examine ways to reduce expenses and ensure no duplication of

efforts.

Improve management of printing by implementing student

print allotments. Evaluate best use of Sharp/centralized vs.

HP/departmental printers, more use of scan to file, help

format materials so people can read online, fax to email and

more use of online forms.

Improve energy efficiency of technology: desktop computers,

servers, classroom AV gear and/or new technology for

campus activities.

Work with senior leadership and participate in fundraising as

identified in the Dare to Make a Difference budget goals.

Reduce overall costs by series of initiatives: a) over time move

to one Ethernet port per room (vs. one per pillow) given

wireless coverage, b) replace CISCO voicemail with Microsoft

product; c) keep & extend life of current phone system.

19 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Goal #9

Technology systems are reliable, secure and

sustainable.

Major Initiatives

loc

Butler commits capital and human resources in IT to ensure our

technology is reliable and performs consistently. This

fundamental commitment allows us to provide and maintain the

systems upon which Butler depends. We diligently secure the

information that has been entrusted to us by our constituents; we

maintain disaster recovery and business continuity plans. We

maintain up-to-date documentation, cross-train our staff, and

keep our systems current so that we can benefit from stable,

secure and vendor-supportable systems.





Improve identity and system access management; streamline

user account creation, permissions and removal to improve

security, efficiency and make it practical to expand access to a

wider range of constituents.

Assess and evolve policies, procedures and technologies to

strive to be current with security best practices as technology

threats change.

Develop metrics to ensure computer environment is up-todate

with published standards (age, patch levels); create

escalation path if any are off course.

Continue daily and annual maintenance activities to ensure

reliable and secure systems. Keep current on our installed

software base to maximize vendor support; evolve processes

as needed.

Connects With Dare to Make a Difference Priorities

1, 2, 6, 7 & 8

20 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014


Executive Summary Recap

21 | Butler University Technology Master Plan 2010 - 2014

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