Student Handbook - Butler University

butler.edu

Student Handbook - Butler University

B U T L E R U N I V E R S I T Y

2009-2010

Student

Handbook


From the Vice President for Student Affairs

Butler University strives to prepare graduates not simply to make a living, but to

make a life. . . this is The Butler Way. Whether you are new to Butler University or

are a familiar face on campus, I want you to know the quality of campus life is crucial

to the success of a University. At Butler, the Division of Student Affairs strives to

integrate our students’ educational experiences into a campus setting with

opportunities, challenges and services that promote development as a total person.

Learning happens in and out of the classroom. I encourage you to actively participate in Butler’s community

of learning. With this goal in mind, the departments within the Division of Student Affairs focus on meeting

the needs of students from the time you join this community through commencement – and beyond. Our

staff seeks to maximize each student’s potential. As you build an academic foundation, we are here to help

you apply that knowledge by discovering personal passions, strengths and opportunities for further

development. I challenge you to connect with faculty, staff and fellow students, and most importantly, make

good choices that reflect a balanced life. Embrace diversity and foster collaboration within the community as

you prepare to take leadership roles after graduation. Use the student handbook as a resource guide to

campus. Take time to become familiar with what the University has to offer you and what is expected from

you as a vital member of this community.

The ultimate goal of student affairs is to send unique individuals into the world who are poised to make a

positive contribution. Use your time as a Butler student to prepare for the day when you can transfer your

learning into action. Remember at its heart, The Butler Way requires that we aspire every day to improve

ourselves and those around us.

Enjoy this year!

Sincerely,

Dr. Levester Johnson

Vice president for student affairs


TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION...................................................................... 1

HISTORY OF BUTLER UNIVERSITY ..................................... 3

CAMPUS RESOURCES ............................................................ 6

ACADEMICS........................................................................... 12

CAMPUS LIFE........................................................................ 33

RESIDENCE LIFE................................................................... 62

GREEK LIFE........................................................................... 80

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES......................................... 89


INTRODUCTION

The student handbook is meant to serve as a map of the Butler University community — one comprehensive

guide covering a wide variety of topics. All Butler students are responsible for the University rules

and regulations that appear here. This document also contains important information about the University’s

student conduct system. Students, faculty and staff alike are involved in the actual administration of this

conduct system. Therefore, it is to your benefit to familiarize yourself with its content. While this student

handbook is intended to be a fair summary of certain matters of interest to students, its readers should be

aware that it is not a complete statement of all procedures, policies, rules and regulations of Butler University;

as stated above, the University has the right to change without notice any procedures, policies or programs

that appear in the student handbook; and the various colleges and departments of the University may

have their own procedures and policies that apply to students. In addition, except where expressly noted

herein, this student handbook is not, nor is it intended, to create a contract between any student and the

University. The terms set forth in this student handbook do not create contractual or legal rights for students.

Please note: For ease of reading, references to a single gender may appear in the student handbook when

the reference may include men and women.

Although we believe this document to be accurate at the date of publication, changes may occur. Various

committees and officers of the University are responsible for the areas covered in the student handbook. The

University, these committees and officers have the right to make changes in University regulations, policies,

procedures and other matters as deemed appropriate, with or without notice to students.

The student handbook should serve as a general reference guide for most questions concerning Butler

University’s policies, procedures, regulations and services. The handbook has been divided into the following

general sections (Information and Resources, Academics, Campus Life, Residence Life, Greek Life and

Rights and Responsibilities).

Butler students wishing further information concerning the topics dealt with in the student handbook

are encouraged to contact the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs in Atherton Union, Room 200,

ext. 9570. Comments or concerns regarding the student handbook are welcome. If you have ideas for making

this publication better in the years to come, do not hesitate to contact a student affairs staff member.

The publication of the student handbook is made possible through the combined efforts of many people,

particularly the staff members of the Division of Student Affairs. Special thanks are also provided to all

of the editors that made the production of this book possible.

Welcome to our community!

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EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

Butler University is committed to the principle of equal opportunity. It does not knowingly discriminate

against any applicant, student or employee on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, race, color, age, religion or

national, ethnic or geographical origin. It attempts to make its programs equally accessible to all qualified

applicants regardless of physical or mental disability. This school is authorized under federal law to enroll

non-immigrant alien students.

DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY

Butler University disclaims liability for any injuries to or property damages suffered by a student regardless

of cause. This liability disclaimer is a matter of contract between the University and each student and

it applies to, but is not limited to, the following:

• Any injury or damage sustained on property owned by or under the control of the University, its

subsidiaries or affiliated institutions (such as classrooms, residential units, structures, buildings,

public areas and grounds, vehicles, etc.)

• Any injury or damage incurred while attending a classroom or related activity, whether for credit or

non-credit and regardless of cause

• Any injury or damage suffered in an intercollegiate or intramural contest or event (athletic or otherwise)

as a participant, spectator or other; this includes transportation to and from a contest or event

• Any injury or damage resulting from fire, theft, the elements or other cause

• Any injury or damage as a result of any act or omission by any University personnel (faculty, staff,

employee, officer, trustee), student or contractor

Students accept the foregoing disclaimer and agree, as a matter of contract, to be bound thereby upon

admission, re-admission or continued enrollment at Butler University.

The relationship between Butler and its students is non-custodial in nature and nothing in the student

handbook shall be construed to place Butler in the position of being custodian, guardian or surrogate parent

of any student or to otherwise establish any special relationship between the University and any student.

Upon being admitted, a student is bound to follow all of the University’s rules and regulations. Butler

students who fail to read the student handbook will not be excused from compliance with the policies and

requirements herein. Butler University may disseminate additional information and policies directly to students

via their Butler email account. It is imperative for students to read their e-mail.

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HISTORY OF BUTLER UNIVERSITY

Six years before the Civil War, two professors, a couple of assistant teachers and 20 students walked

through the doors of Butler University to begin 150 years of academic excellence and visionary innovations.

In the absence of high schools or adequate private academies, the university had to operate its own preparatory

department until 1907. At its inception, this preparatory department enrolled about 60, with another

54 in the pre-prep classes. Originally named North Western Christian University located at 13th St. and

College Ave., the school began establishing precedents virtually unheard of in the world of academia:

• Women were admitted on an equal basis with men - only the second institution in the nation to do

so and the first in the state of Indiana.

• All minorities have been admitted throughout Butler’s history.

• The first university or college in the state to allow its students, with parental consent, to choose subjects

suited to their needs under an elective system.

• Catharine Merrill was appointed as Demia Butler Professor and was the first female professor of

English literature in Indiana in 1870. This astonishing appointment positioned Butler as the first

in the nation to establish an endowed chair specifically for a female professor and only the second

university to appoint a woman to the faculty. Merrill also was the first to use the lecture method for a

subject other than science.

• Phi Delta Theta fraternity was the first Greek-letter organization on campus in 1859, followed by

Sigma Chi in 1865 and Delta Tau Delta in 1878. Kappa Alpha Theta sorority founded a chapter in

1874 before the campus was moved to Irvington; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Butler’s oldest continuously

active sorority, established itself in 1878.

In 1875, the board of directors decided to sell the downtown campus and accept a gift of 25 acres in

Irvington, which was then a suburb east of Indianapolis. Four years later the school became known as Butler

University in honor of Ovid Butler, a prominent Indianapolis attorney and abolitionist who wrote the University’s

charter in 1850. The handwritten document is currently preserved in Irwin Library.

As the city grew, Butler moved a final time in 1928 to its current location that was known as Fairview

Park. The new site was nestled in a wooded tract north of the city on the White River and the Inland Waterway

Canal. Classes met in the Arthur Jordan Memorial Hall. Jordan was a local businessman and philanthropist

who consolidated the city’s four music conservatories into the Arthur Jordan Conservatory of Music,

forerunner to the present Jordan College of Fine Arts.

As the campus grew, so did the University’s academic offerings. In keeping with the mission of the charter,

the University added to its original College of Liberal Arts and Sciences a cluster of professional schools:

College of Education (1930); College of Business Administration (1937), now known as the College of

Business; College of Pharmacy (1945), now known as the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and

Jordan College of Music (1951), currently named the Jordan College of Fine Arts.

To serve the needs of the growing community, Butler began offering evening courses in 1899, established

a summer session in 1905, and created a graduate division in 1932. When a wooden structure used

as a campus club and cafeteria burned in 1946, faculty, students and alumni joined to raise money for a new

student center, named for John W. Atherton, the successful long-time financial secretary.

The early 60s saw the addition of Lilly Hall, made possible by the Lilly Endowment and the Jordan

Foundation, to house the Jordan College of Music and the G.H.A. Clowes family and other donors erected

Clowes Memorial Hall, a center for the performing arts and culture which opened in 1963 on Butler’s campus.

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In 1985, the University completed an extensive self-study involving the efforts of more than 200 volunteers

to plan Butler’s future. This commission was chaired by Thomas E. Reilly Jr. (then president of Reilly

Industries Inc. and member of Butler’s board of trustees), who charted the University’s course for the next

five years.

Dr. Geoffrey Bannister became the 18th president of Butler in 1989 after the retirement of John “Jack”

G. Johnson, who served as president from 1978–88. It was during Bannister’s tenure that Butler became

more of a residential University, emphasized international education and renovated a number of campus facilities.

Dr. Gwen Fountain became the interim president of Butler University in June 2000. Fountain, a faculty

member in the College of Business Administration and the former dean of academic affairs, was the first

woman president of Butler. Dr. Bobby Fong became the 20th president of Butler University in June of

2001.

Today, the city of Indianapolis has once again surrounded Butler, but the 295-acre campus retains a

serene and park-like atmosphere with 21 buildings, recreation areas, a formal botanical garden and a nature

preserve surrounded by well-established residential communities.

A solid foundation for creative changes and progress was laid 150 years ago, and though traditional

methods continue, the path for visionary ideas and innovations in higher education will keep Butler achieving

academic excellence for future generations.

Traditional Events

Block Party: Get the scoop on Butler, Indianapolis and student organizations as you cruise the mall, pick

up valuable information and take in food, fun and entertainment. Aug. 25, 2009

Bulldogs into the Streets (BITS): Students go into the streets for a day of service. Last year, more than 300

students worked at various community service agencies around Indianapolis.

Aug. 25, 2009

Homecoming: Homecoming week features student competitions which lead to the football game and the

crowning of king and queen. Sept. 28–Oct. 4, 2009

Family Weekend: The weekend features open houses with student/parent and activities for the entire family.

Oct. 31–Nov. 1, 2009

Geneva Stunts: YMCA campus-wide competition of musical skits, originated in 1922 to raise money to

send students to Lake Geneva. The profits now are directed toward helping Butler students and the local

community. Oct. 31, 2009

Dance Marathon: Students participate in a 12-hour event dancing all day to raise funds for Riley Children’s

Hospital. Jan. 23, 2010

Honors Weekend: A spring weekend with student/parent activities, including the outstanding student dinner

at which students are honored for achievement. April 9–11, 2010

Spring Sing: An all-campus competition of famous medleys sponsored by the Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and

Sigma Alpha Iota.

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Spring Sports Spectacular: Students from the various housing units, Greek chapters and commuters come

together for this all-night, all-campus event. Participants compete in some serious and not-so-serious games.

Proceeds go to Special Olympics Indiana.

Exam Jam: Student Government Association sponsors numerous outdoor events to welcome spring and

celebrate the end of the semester. April 26, 2010

University Songs

Gallery of Memories - Alma Mater

In the gallery of memories

There are pictures bright and fair,

And I find that dear old Butler

Is the brightest one that’s there.

Alma Mater, how we love there.

With a love that ne’er shall fade.

And we feel we owe

A debt to thee

That never can be paid.

-Fred W. Wolfe, Class of 1916

Butler War Song

We’ll sing the Butler war song,

We’ll give a fighting cry;

We’ll fight the Butler battle-

Bulldogs ever do or die.

And in the glow of the victory firelight,

Hist’ry cannot deny

To add a page or two

For Butler’s fighting crew

Beneath the Hoosier sky.

-John Heiney, Class of 1923

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CAMPUS RESOURCES

University Administration

President

Executive assistant to the president

Provost

Dean, College of Business

Dean, College of Education

Interim Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Dean, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Dean, Jordan College of Fine Arts

Dean, Libraries

Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Interdisciplinary Programs

Associate Provost of Student Academic Affairs

Director, Learning Resource Center

Program coordinator

Director, student disability services

Director, postgraduate studies

Director, Center for Faith and Vocation

Program coordinator

Registrar

Director, internship and career services

Associate director

Manager, employer development

Career adviser

Program Coordinator

Coordinator, on-campus employment

Program assistant

Director, institutional research

Vice president, student affairs

Dean of student services

Dean of student life

Associate director, student affairs

Multimedia specialist

Director, diversity programs

Assistant director

Assistant director

Director, dining service

Director, counseling and consultation services

Director of training/Associate director

Staff psychologist

Director, health services

Associate director

Bobby Fong

Ellen Clark

Jamie Comstock

Chuck Williams

Ena Shelley

Judith Morrel

Mary Andritz

Peter Alexander

Lewis Miller

Laura Behling

Carol Hagans

Jennifer Griggs

Cara Cima

Michele Atterson

Johnny Pryor

Judith Cebula

Marguerite Stanciu

Sondrea Ozolins

Gary Beaulieu

Jennifer O’Shea

Julie Schrader

Jennifer McConnell

Mona Guirguis

Jane Clarke

Kent Grumbles

Levester Johnson

Sally Click

Irene Stevens

Beth Alexander

Brandon Van Hook

Valerie Davidson

Melissa Trahyn

Bobbie Gibson

Stacey Puck

Keith Magnus

Claire Dean

Vicky Rosa

Patricia Riedy

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Coordinator, health education & outreach programs

Director, recreation

Assistant director, aquatics

Assistant director, challenge education and outdoor recreation

Assistant director, fitness

Assistant director, HRC operations

Assistant director, intramurals and club sports

Director, programs for leadership and service education

Associate director

Assistant director

Assistant director

Office manager

Director, residence life

Assistant director

Operations assistant

Coordinator, Residential College

Coordinator, Ross Hall

Coordinator, Schwitzer Hall

Coordinator, University Terrace and assessment

Director, Greek life and orientation programs

Director, athletic bands

Spirit coordinator, cheerleaders and mascot

Vice president, finance

Controller

Executive director, financial planning and budgeting

Vice president, operations

Director of Public Safety/Chief BUPD

Director, Maintenance Services

Director, Building Services

Vice president, enrollment management

Executive director, financial aid

Director of admission

Manager, bookstore

Vice president, university advancement

Executive director, university relations

Executive director, alumni and development programs

Director, public relations

Director, print marketing and communications

Director, web marketing communications

Director, conferences and special events

Executive director, development

Executive director, campaign programs

Director, donor relations and development communications

Director, constituent management

Director, alumni & parent programs

Sarah Barnes

Scott Peden

Terese Schurger

Erinn McCluney

Adrian Shepherd

Josh Downing

Eric Kammeyer

Caroline Huck-Watson

Julie Pakenham

Meg Haggerty

Frank Council

Mary Ann Huser

Karla Cunningham

Doug Howell

Chris O’Donnell

Diedra Tate

Jeff Tyner

Julia Joshel

Jeremy Votaw

Becky Druetzler

David McCullough

Jamie Troyer

Bruce Arick

Jill McGregor

Robert Marcus

Michael Gardner

Benjamin Hunter

Gerald Carlson

Dick Hamm

Tom Weede

Richard M. Bellows

Scott Hamm

Allison Bonez

D. Mark Helmus

Marcia Dowell

Rachel Stephens Burt

Courtney Tuell

Sally Cutler

Sheila Shidnia

Ed Groves

Wendy Harlow

Margie Nebesio

Christine Carlson

Michele Miller

Nikki Mazelin

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Senior director, corporation & foundation relations

Director, development & alumni services

Director, development –annual giving

Executive director, human resources management

and development, chief diversity officer

Chief information officer, information resources

Director, administrative computing

Director, instructional technology

Director, networks and systems

Executive director, Clowes Memorial Hall

Operations manager

Box office manager

Business manager

Event manager

Director, athletics

Associate athletic director, internal operations

Assistant athletic director, facilities and events

Associate athletic director, external operations

Associate athletic director, sports information

Assistant athletic director, eligibility and compliance

Lori Norris

John Page

Erica Altuve

Jonathan Small

Scott Kincaid

Kathleen Wilkey

Julianne Miranda

Joe Indiano

Elise Kushigian

Karen Steele

Shelia Sharp

Lisa Whitaker

Lee Davis

Barry Collier

Tom Crowley

Carl Heck

James S. McGrath

Beth Goetz

8


Campus Phone Directory (Prefix: 940 unless otherwise listed)

Admission — graduate and international 8120

Admission — undergraduate 8100

Atherton Union board 8436

Athletic office 9375

Black Student Union 9300

Bookstore — main floor 9228

Bookstore — textbooks 9362

Butler University Police Department (BUPD) –business # 9396

College of Business 9221

College of Education — dean 9517

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences — dean 9224

College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences — dean 9322

Butler Ballet 9346

Programs for Leadership and Service Education 9262

C-Club 9706

Center for Career Planning and Development 9383

Center for Faith and Vocation 923-7253

Clowes Hall 9696

Collegian (student newspaper) 8813

Commuter association 6566

Computer help desk 4357

Conference and event services 9352

Convenience store, apartment village

Counseling and consultation center 9385

Dance department 9346

DawgNet (online student publication)

www.butler.edu/dawgnet

Efroymson Diversity Center 6570

Exploratory studies program 9308

Facilities management 9393

Financial aid 8200

Food service 9701

Greek Life and orientation programs 6590

Health and Recreation Complex

4472 (4HRC)

Health education/peer educators (PAWS) 8311

Health services 9385

Information Resources 9420

Institute for Study Abroad 9336

International student services 9888

International programs/overseas study 8473

Intramurals/recreation 7434

Jordan College of Fine Arts — dean 9231

Learning resource center 9308

Library — Irwin 9227

Library — science 9401

Media Arts 5962

Media center 9928

Multicultural affairs 9381

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Mortar Board 6533

Music department 9246

Police department, Butler University 9396

President’s office 9900

Print shop/Campus Impressions 6495

Public affairs 9351

Recreation department

4732 (4REC)

Registration and records 9203

Residence life 9458

Student accounts 9353

Student affairs 9570

Student disability services 9308

Student Government Association 9361

Switchboard 0

Telecommunications (telephone services) 4357

Theatre department 9659

University police 9396

Victim Advocate (Sexual assault 24 hr. assistance 910-5572

Volunteer center 6006

Welcome center 6528

YMCA 9542

Yearbook — The Drift 9330

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Campus Addresses

Butler University 4600 Sunset Ave. 940-8000

Indianapolis, IN 46208-3485

Residence Halls and Apartment Complexes

Apartment Village 5026F Boulevard Place 940-6025

Residential College (ResCo) 630 W. Hampton Drive 940-9851

Ross Hall 629 W. Hampton Drive 940-9335

Schwitzer Hall 750 W. Hampton Drive 940-9315

University Terrace 599 W. Westfield Blvd. 940-6800

Sororities

Alpha Chi Omega

Alpha Kappa Alpha

Alpha Phi

Delta Delta Delta

Delta Gamma

Kappa Alpha Theta

Kappa Kappa Gamma

Pi Beta Phi

Sigma Gamma Rho

Fraternities

Delta Tau Delta

Lambda Chi Alpha

Phi Delta Theta

Phi Kappa Psi

Sigma Chi

Sigma Nu

Tau Kappa Epsilon

725 W. Hampton Drive

c/o Greek Life

824 W. Hampton Drive

809 W. Hampton Drive

737 W. Hampton Drive

825 W. Hampton Drive

821 W. Hampton Drive

831 W. Hampton Drive

c/o Greek Life

4340 Haughey Ave.

4721 Sunset Ave.

705 W. Hampton Drive

810 W. Hampton Drive

655 W. Hampton Drive

4400 Haughey Ave.

715 W. Hampton Drive

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ACADEMICS

Academic Adviser

Butler University views academic advising as a significant aspect of the partnership in the education of

students. The Butler student is responsible for seeking adequate academic advice, knowing and meeting degree

requirements, enrolling in appropriate courses to ensure timely progress toward a degree and using resources

the University provides in the advising process.

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor with special knowledge of the area of the major. The advisor

explains and enforces regulations established by the University faculty and administration, especially with

regard to curricular issues. In working with a student to create his/her academic schedule, the advisor guides

the student in choosing those courses that best fit the student’s individual inclinations and needs. Each student

should work closely with his or her advisor to ensure that program requirements are met.

Students are encouraged to consult their advisors not only during registration periods, but also throughout

the year. A student who is having academic difficulty or is uncertain about procedures and regulations

will find the academic advisor ready to help. If at any time a student is unable to get in touch with the advisor

on a matter that requires immediate action, the student should contact the dean’s office of the their college

and ask for assistance. Students who wish to change advisers should consult the dean of their college.

Academic Ineligibility

Any student whose academic record does not demonstrate satisfactory progress toward a degree may be

declared academically ineligible. A declaration of ineligibility is not an attempt to deny any rights or privileges

or to punish a student for unsatisfactory performance. It is, rather, an attempt to prevent a student from

spending additional time and money without strong prospects for earning a degree.

A student runs the risk of being declared ineligible if the student:

1. Has gone as many as 24 points on probation in two or more semesters.

2. Has remained on probation for more than two semesters without making any significant reduction

in the amount of probation.

3. Has completed 90 semester hours without achieving the required 2.0 grade point average.

4. Has failed to earn a specified average during any given session after having been informed that

such an average would be required.

5. Has begun a session on probation and has finished with a lower cumulative average than that carried

at the beginning of the session.

6. Has been granted renewed eligibility and has failed to satisfy the stipulation under which

readmission was authorized.

7. Has been admitted on probation or as a transfer student and has failed to earn a 2.00 average

during the first two semesters at Butler.

A student declared academically ineligible will not be readmitted to Butler until at least one full semester

has elapsed. If, after an absence, the student feels that the problems that led to the academic difficulty have

been solved, the student may petition for renewed eligibility by writing a letter to the dean of the college in

which he was enrolled. This letter should be submitted at least 30 days before the start of the session for

which the student wishes to enroll.

The petition will be presented to the administrative committee of the college, which will consider both

the student’s record and the evidence presented in the letter to determine whether or not another opportunity

to enroll seems warranted. A student who has taken any academic work elsewhere during the absence from

Butler also must present a satisfactory transcript for all such work in order to be readmitted. If the administrative

committee concludes that the student has a reasonable chance to redeem the earlier record and earn a

degree, it may grant renewed eligibility — ordinarily with the stipulation that the student must earn a 2.50

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average during the first two semesters of further work and must then continue to reduce the probation

through subsequent semesters, in order to remain eligible.

Academic Integrity

Butler University is an academic community. It exists for the sake of the advancement of knowledge; the

pursuit of truth; the intellectual, ethical and social development of students and the general well being of

society. All members of our community have an obligation to themselves, to their peers and to the institution

to uphold the integrity of Butler University. In the area of academic integrity, this means that one’s

work should be one’s own and that the instructor’s evaluation should be based on the student’s own efforts

and understanding. When the standards of academic integrity are breached, mutual trust is undermined, the

ideals of personal responsibility and autonomy are violated, teaching and learning are severely compromised

and other goals of the academic community cannot be realized.

Students are responsible for being fully aware of what constitutes academic dishonesty; claims of ignorance

cannot be used to justify or rationalize dishonest acts. Academic dishonesty can take a number of

forms, including but not limited to cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, facilitation and interference:

Cheating includes receiving or giving help on papers, experiments, reports, compositions, projects or

examinations without the instructor’s permission. It also includes submitting part of or all of the completed

assignment of another student as one’s own work. Of special note and concern is the use of purchased research

papers. It is a violation of the regulations of Butler University for a student to purchase a term paper.

Cheating is also using unauthorized materials and aids, such as books, one’s own notes or those of another

and calculators during an examination.

Plagiarism is the fraudulent misrepresentation of any part of another person’s work as one’s own. Submitting

any writing, including take-home exams, that does not properly acknowledge the quoting or paraphrasing

of another person’s words, or that fails to give proper credit for another person’s ideas, opinion, or

theory is plagiarism. Any unacknowledged use of sources to which one is indebted including but not limited

to, music, video, audio, theatre projects, compositions, Website and computer software constitutes plagiarism.

Fabrication is the falsification or invention of information or data in reports, lab results, bibliographies

or any other academic undertaking.

Facilitating Academic dishonesty involves assisting someone in an act of dishonesty.

Interference includes the theft, alteration, destruction or obstruction of another student’s work. Interference

may take the form of the theft, defacements or destruction of resources, e.g., library periodicals and

books, so as to deprive other students of information.

The requirements of academic integrity also extend to academic activities involving computers and networks

and unethical/unprofessional conduct specific to academic programs. For more information, refer to

the “Rights and Responsibilities” section of the student handbook, section VI.

A person who violates the standards of academic integrity undermines the values integral to the educational

mission of Butler University. Academic dishonesty is a serious offense, harming both the community

and the perpetrator, and Butler University has, accordingly, adopted procedures for dealing with possible

instances of academic dishonesty (Procedures found in the Rights and Responsibility section).

Academic Load

For most degree programs, a student can complete requirements on schedule by carrying an average of

15 to 17 hours a semester. This, however, is an average, and students are usually encouraged to adjust their

academic loads according to their individual aptitudes, academic situations and extra-curricular commitments.

The maximum academic load is 18 credit hours in a regular semester and six hours in each of the

summer sessions. These limits can be exceeded only with the special written permission of the student’s academic

dean. Hours in excess of 20 in a regular semester will be approved only under the most unusual cir-

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cumstances; they also will carry an additional tuition charge at the credit-hour rate published by the business

office. (See “Non-credit” and “Enrichment, Audit for.”)

Graduate students must carry at least nine hours to be considered full-time.

Academic Probation

The minimum grade point average required for any degree at Butler is 2.00. Therefore, any student

whose cumulative GPA is below 2.00 is considered “on probation.” The amount of a student’s probation is

indicated in grade points, as the difference between the total grade points the student has accumulated and

the number the student would have if the GPA were 2.00 or C. That is, a student should have at least twice

as many grade points as credit hours; with fewer than that number, the student is on probation the number

of points “short.” Thus, every hour of D puts a student one point on probation and every F, two points;

every hour of B removes one probation point and every hour of A, two points. (See “Grade point average.”)

Excessive probation or continued probation without improvement can lead to a student’s being declared

academically ineligible. Therefore, a student on probation should take all available measures to improve his

or her standing. One usually helpful step is to reduce the academic load; by concentrating on fewer courses,

a student increases the amount of study time available to devote to each and thus improves the chances of

earning the desired grades.

Practices on restricting loads for students on probation vary somewhat from college to college. At the

time of seeking approval of a schedule, the adviser or dean of any restriction will inform the student. The

restrictions are designed not to hamper the student but rather to protect the student’s academic eligibility.

Advanced Placement

Students may earn advanced placement with credit under any of the following three programs:

1. College Board advanced placement program (“AP Program”)

Students whose high schools participate in this program may receive advanced placement with credit

upon receipt of satisfactory scores on certain advanced placement tests from the College Board. Scores

of four generally merit credit; in a few subjects, a test with a score of three is reviewed by the appropriate

department head. More specific information regarding tests and required scores can be obtained

in the Office of Registration and Records.

2. College Board “college level examination program”

Students enrolled as degree-seeking students who have had their scores reported to Butler may receive

credit for as many as 14 hours for satisfactory achievement on the five CLEP general examinations

and also may receive appropriate credit through the individual subject examinations. More

specific information regarding tests and required scores can be obtained in the Learning Resource

Center office.

3. Departmental advanced placement

A Butler student who has been unable to take advantage of either the College Board advanced placement

program (AP) or the college level examination program (CLEP) may be placed in advanced courses in

any subject if the department head or senior faculty member in the subject area is satisfied that the student

can perform the work of the advanced course adequately. If the student is granted advanced placement and

seeks credit for the course or courses bypassed, the student should consult the appropriate dean. Credit may

be awarded on the recommendation of the dean and the department head, provided the student has earned a

grade of at least C- in the advanced course. No advanced placement credit is awarded for courses that a normal

high school preparation should enable the student to bypass, such as first-year language or college algebra

and trigonometry.

Students with a strong background in foreign language study at the secondary level (normally three or

four years of a single foreign language) may be eligible for as much as nine hours of advanced placement

credit upon completion of two foreign language courses (six hours) at Butler. The courses must be numbered

at the 300 level or above, and the student must earn a grade of C or better in both of them to be eligi-

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le for advanced placement credit. Placement in 300-level courses is by examination administered by the

Modern Foreign Languages department during the orientation period at the beginning of each semester. For

more information about departmental advanced placement in foreign languages, contact the head of the modern

foreign languages department.

Students who speak and write a foreign language with the proficiency of a native may apply for a proficiency

examination in French, Russian or Spanish. If the application is approved by the dean of the college

in which the student is enrolled and by the head of the Department of Modern Foreign Languages, and if

the results of the examination are deemed satisfactory, the student may receive a maximum of 11 hours of

credit in the language (the nine hours of advanced placement credit described above and two hours of upperdivision

credit for knowledge of the literature of the language).

Students who do not qualify for advanced placement with credit may receive placement in the advanced

courses in any department without receiving credit for the prerequisite courses if the department head is satisfied

that the student can perform adequately the work of the advanced course.

Advancement in the Colleges

Each professional college (business administration, education, pharmacy and health sciences and fine

arts) may set its own requirements for advancement in that college above the minimum standards established

by the University. Such requirements will be set forth in the University Bulletin, and students will be

bound by the requirements published at the time they enter the University.

Audit for Enrichment

This program is for adults with at least a high school diploma interested in not-for-credit learning experiences

for personal or professional enrichment Audit for Enrichment (AFE) students do not receive a grade

or transcript record of course work, they are not considered to be admitted or enrolled as regular students at

the University, nor do they have access to electronic course resources. To apply for AFE status with the University,

students should submit a completed Audit for Enrichment application along with proof of the highest

educational degree received (i.e., final official high school academic transcript indicating date of graduation

or university diploma or verification) to the Office of Registration and Records. The application must be

submitted no later than one month before the semester begins, though individuals cannot actually register

for AFE courses until the first day of instruction when it will be determined whether there are available seats

in the class. There is a non-refundable fee of $100 per credit hour due at registration. Questions should be

directed to the Office of Registration and Records at (317) 940-9205.

Blackboard at Butler

Blackboard is a web-based course management system that instructors may use to provide online resources

for their courses. All courses taught at Butler may be made available on Blackboard should instructors

choose. Tools available include: email, discussion boards, chat, class calendars, grade books and more.

The Butler Blackboard may be accessed at http://blackboard.butler.edu/.

Computer Lab and Classroom Facilities

Butler University supports over 15 student computing facilities, several of which are open 24 hours

during the fall and spring semesters. Standard applications include Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite

and web browsers. All computer labs have access to Butler’s online library resources, high volume laser

printers and network file storage. Most labs are available for use outside of scheduled class time. Visit

www.butler.edu/labs for hours and locations.

Available facilities include:

15


• Atherton Union – Microsoft Windows and Mac computer lab located on the lower level of Atherton

Union. Open 24-7. Butler ID required for entry.

• Jordan Hall 041, 043, 220 – Microsoft Windows computer labs/classrooms used primarily for

teaching. Open for general use when not scheduled for class. Butler ID required for entry.

• Residence Halls and Apartment Village – All have dedicated Microsoft Windows labs for their residents.

• Fairbanks 148 – Microsoft Windows computer classroom primarily used by Computer Science and

Software Engineering.

• Fairbanks 152 – Microsoft Windows computer classroom reserved for Computer Science and Software

Engineering.

• Fairbanks 248 – Microsoft Windows digital media classroom used primarily by the School of Journalism.

Open for general use when not scheduled for class.

• Gallahue 037 – Microsoft Windows lab for the Biology department.

• Gallahue 313 – Microsoft Windows lab/classroom for the Chemistry department.

• Lilly Hall 149 – Macintosh computer classroom for the Jordan College of Fine Arts. Open for general

use when not scheduled for class.

• Irwin Library – Microsoft Windows and Mac computer lab open for general use during library

hours. Located on the first floor of Irwin in the reference area.

• Ruth Lilly Science Library (Holcomb Building 202) – Microsoft Windows computer lab open for

general use during library hours.

Computer Purchases

Students wishing to purchase computers should access the Information Resources website at

www.butler.edu/ir/. This site houses information that will guide you through the purchasing process for

both Apple and Windows computers. Specifications and recommendations are provided. You will also find

information on purchasing discounted Microsoft software through eAcademy. If you have any questions concerning

systems or technical specifications, please contact the Help Desk at (317) 940-HELP (4357).

Correspondence Study

A maximum of six semester hours of credit may be allowed for correspondence study work taken in an

accredited institution. Both the adviser and the academic dean should be consulted before a student enrolls

for a correspondence course. (See also “Transfer credit.”)

Dean’s List

Any degree-seeking undergraduate student with at least 12 academic hours of grade-credit may be placed

on the dean’s list of their college of enrollment if they are in the top 20 percent as determined by the semester

grade point average of all eligible students in that college. Courses taken under the pass/fail option do not

count toward the 12.

Degree, application for

Application for degree must be filed in the registration and records office before the deadline announced

by that office—usually early in September for December graduation, early in January for May graduation

and the first week in June for graduation at the end of second-summer session.

16


A student completing the degree at a time other than May but wishing to participate in the commencement

ceremony following the conferral of the degree should inform the registration and records office at the

time of degree application.

Degree, requirements

Although the specific requirements vary considerably according to academic major, every student wishing

to earn a baccalaureate degree from Butler must fulfill the following general requirements:

University Core Curriculum

The core curriculum of Butler University offers a broad general education. In the first year, courses in

English and speech are required. In the sophomore year, an interdisciplinary course on change and tradition

is required. Students also must complete five distribution requirements, a computer literacy requirement, a

writing intensive requirement in an upper division course and two semesters of physical education. A brochure

describing the core curriculum in detail is available in the Learning Resource Center.

Hours and Residence

At least 120 semester hours are required for a baccalaureate degree in liberal arts and sciences and education;

for business administration the minimum is 120 hours; for fine arts the minimum is 136 hours, 147

hours for the physician assistant program, or 170 hours for the area music education degree; and for pharmacy,

212 hours. Of these hours, a minimum of 40 must be upper division (i.e., numbered 300 or

above). The last 30 hours toward a degree must be carried in residence at Butler, and at least 20 of these

must be in the college granting the degree. Exceptions to this requirement may be approved by the dean of

the college involved for reasons deemed valid, provided the student has completed at least 64 hours at Butler

with a cumulative average of at least 2.00.

No more than one associate or baccalaureate degree may be conferred upon a student at one commencement.

Any candidate for a bachelor’s degree who already holds a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent from an

accredited institution must complete a minimum of 45 additional hours at Butler University for the second

degree and must meet all the specific requirements for that degree. If the first degree is earned at Butler University,

a minimum of 30 hours is required for the second Bachelor’s degree.

Two-year Associate Degree

Curricula and total hours vary; all programs require a cumulative grade point average of 2.00, at least 63

hours and completion of the core curriculum.

Grade Point Average

Any candidate for a degree must have a cumulative overall Butler grade point average of at least 2.00 and

must fulfill any additional published grade point requirements for the college in which the degree is to be

conferred. All computed grade point averages are truncated to three decimal places.

Education Records maintained at Butler University

The University maintains several education records that have been initiated by the student (e.g., scholarship

applications, petitions) and others of which the student receives a copy (e.g., senior evaluations,

drop/add forms, responses to petitions). Because the student already knows of such documents, they are

omitted from the list. Documents are open to the student’s examination, and information regarding access to

them is available in the registration and records office. The additional records listed on the following page are

maintained by the University. In cases where copies of a record are maintained in two or more offices, only

the originator or primary custodian of the record is listed. See the “Rights and Responsibilities” section of

the student handbook for more information regarding student privacy rights.

All academic records are available to the president of the University and the provost to examine as necessary

for the overall supervision of the academic program.

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Educational Records List

Custodian of records Records maintained Other personnel approved for access

Registration and

records office

Business office

Office of Financial

Aid

Vice president for

student affairs

Learning Resource

Center

College of Fine Arts

Senior College

Director of teacher

placement

Director of university

police dept.

Cumulative academic record,

earlier transcripts, petition actions

Financial records (listing

charges, payments,

financial records)

All loan, work, grant and

scholarship applications;

financial aid forms; notifications

of awards; records

are kept for seven years

Records of personal

achievements, student conduct

cases, housing financial

records

Test scores (SAT, ACT, AP

CLEP), placement credit,

Honors, certifications

Admission recommendations

audition records

Graduate recommendations,

test scores

Letters and statements of

recommendation, evaluation

University police department

Case reports on reportable

Incidents (e.g., fire, accident

injury, theft, disturbance)

Academic dean, academic adviser, full-time

faculty, student affairs staff, financial aid officefor

checking eligibility progress toward degree,

academic requirements, making of awards

Business office staff, and when necessary collection

agency or, attorney for accounting and securing

payments; financial aid office staff

Director of admission and financial aid office

staff

Student affairs office staff, official members of

student conduct bodies for verification and review

of actions, business office staff, financial

aid office staff

Appropriate senior college dean, registrar academic

adviser, admission officer, for monitoring

credit and progress

Department heads, academic advisers, appropriate

instructors, for guidance

Academic Advisers, for guidance

Dean of education, director and supervisors of

student teaching, employing official of school

corporations, for advising & placement

Vice president for student affairs/deans of student

life/services, student conduct bodies for

appropriate action; business office and insurance

company (if claim involved); Health Services

(if treatment or transportation supplied or

required)

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Enrollment

Any student officially admitted to Butler as a degree-seeking first year student will be enrolled in one of

the five colleges offering the student’s academic program of study. Students who are undeclared in their intended

program of study will be enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Persons transferring to Butler as degree-seeking undergraduates or converting from non-degree seeking

status will be enrolled in the college offering the student’s major: liberal arts and sciences, education, business

administration, pharmacy and health sciences, or fine arts. Students who do not wish to pursue a degree

(non-degree status) at Butler are under the supervision of the Learning Resource Center.

The transcripts of all undergraduate transfer students will be reviewed by the dean of liberal arts and sciences

for certification of core requirements completed. The administrative committee will address all petitions

for a variance or an equivalency in the core curriculum to the dean of liberal arts and sciences for action.

Subsequent to enrollment and matriculation, any student wishing to change from one Butler college to

another should consult the deans of both the college in which the student is currently enrolled and the college

to which transfer is being requested. The student can consult with their academic adviser on the process

to declare a major, change a major or add a minor to the course of study. Changes of major within a college

should be initiated by consulting the office of the dean of the student’s current college or the Learning Resource

Center. A degree-seeking undergraduate may not convert to non-degree status.

Exploratory Studies Program

Exploratory Studies is a structured program aimed at helping students identify interests, explore academic

options, gain exposure to the career development process, and gather information about careers that

interest them. Students who are undecided or who have multiple interests are encouraged to exercise their

intellectual curiosity through a number of programs and classes designed to help students determine their

own best course of study. In addition, students receive specialized attention from trained academic advisors

who assist the students in their decision-making process. Program services include:

• Developmental academic advising

• Exploratory studies class (LC 103)

• Workshops and guest speakers

• Self assessments

• Assistance in setting up job shadowing and informational interviewing opportunities

• Transitional counseling for students who are in the process of changing majors

LC 103 - Exploratory Studies

This course is specifically designed for first year Exploratory Studies majors. Decision making, selfassessment,

academic exploration and career planning are the foundational components. The class encourages

students to reflect upon assessments, personal values, skills, interests and decision-making styles while being

exposed to various academic fields of study. Students apply this knowledge to investigate suitable career options.

(U)(2) For more information go to www.butler.edu/exploratory/.

Final Examinations

Under University regulations a final examination is required of all students enrolled for academic credit

in every course, including students carrying the course pass/fail. The only authorized exceptions are courses

such as independent study, undergraduate tutorial and research, internships and theses.

The dates and times of all final examinations are published in the Schedule of Classes for each session,

so that a student can know at the time of enrollment what the final examination schedule will be. No official

provision exists for arranging a special examination to accommodate a student with a heavy concentration of

examinations on a single day. Wherever possible, therefore, a student wishing to avoid such concentration

should consult the Schedule of Classes before registering and plan accordingly.

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Applied music examinations are scheduled for students by the chairperson of the department of music

and in the Jordan College of Fine Arts. The schedule is posted on the main bulletin board in the lobby of

Lilly Hall approximately two weeks before examinations begin.

If a student is unable to take a final examination for reasons beyond the student’s control, the instructor

should be informed immediately so that appropriate arrangements can be made. If convinced that circumstances

warrant it, an instructor may administer a make-up examination to a student who is unable to take

the final examination on the scheduled date. No instructor, however, is authorized to administer a final examination

before the scheduled date. The instructor, the appropriate department head, the student’s academic

dean and the dean of the college in which the course is taught must approve any petition for an exception

to this rule.

Grades

Butler is on the standard 4.00 grading system. Upon completing a course, a student is assigned one of

the following grades, with the corresponding grade points:

A 4.00 grade points per hour of credit

A- 3.67 grade points per hour of credit

B+ 3.33 grade points per hour of credit

B 3.00 grade points per hour of credit

B- 2.67 grade points per hour of credit

C+ 2.33 grade points per hour of credit

C 2.00 grade points per hour of credit

C- 1.67 grade points per hour of credit

D+ 1.33 grade points per hour of credit

D 1.00 grade points per hour of credit

D- 0.67 grade points per hour of credit

F 0.00 grade points per hour of credit

W Official withdrawal.

Withdrawal is permitted until the 10th week of a regular 14-week semester (with some exceptions) or

the fourth week of a regular six-week summer session. Students should contact the office of registration and

records regarding withdrawal dates for short session courses. The instructor’s signature is required.

P - Passed (for courses taken under pass/fail option). Semester hours are counted as hours passed but

not for computing grade point average.

NC - Enrollment in a course on a non-credit basis. The student may change from credit to non-credit

until the 10th week of the regular semester, the fifth week of a regular summer session or the second week of

the May session. The instructor’s signature is required.

I - Incomplete. This grade may be assigned by an instructor when exceptional circumstances, such as illness,

prevent a student from finishing all work required in a course. The incomplete must be removed

within the next regular session of the student’s enrollment or within two years if the student is not enrolled

during that time. If the I is not removed within the stated time, the I will be changed to X.

X - Unredeemed incomplete, indicating no credit earned, no hours attempted and no grade points.

A cumulative GPA below 2.00 places a student on academic probation.

Grade Point Average

A significant aspect of any student’s record is the cumulative grade point average. It is a low GPA that results

in probation or ineligibility and a high GPA that leads to the dean’s list or other scholastic awards.

The GPA is computed by totaling all the grade points received for courses graded A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+,

C, C-, D+, D, D- or F and dividing that sum by the total number of academic hours carried by those

20


courses. For example, if a student has earned six hours of A, three hours of B-, 15 hours of C, three hours

of D and three hours of F, the student’s average would be 2.094.

6(hours) x 4 points

(A)=24 points

3(hours) x 2.67 points

(B)=8.01 points

15(hours) x 2 points

(C)=30 points

5(hours) x 1 point

(D)=5 points

29 hours total 67.01 points total

67.01/29 = 2.310 GPA

Grade Policies

The final grade in any course represents the instructor’s best judgment of the degree to which the student

has achieved the objectives of the course. Each instructor establishes standards appropriate to the individual

course and is expected to explain those standards early in the semester. Any student unsure of the

grading standards has the right and obligation to ask the instructor to explain them.

Absences

Students are expected to attend every meeting of all classes in which they are enrolled. The definition of

excessive absence, as well as the penalty for such absence, may vary with the nature of the course. A student

who is absent and unable to contact professors may request assistance from the Office of Student Affairs but

the office will not excuse a student from class. It is the student’s responsibility to learn and observe the rules

governing each class.

Early term grades

All freshman and sophomore students are sent an early term grade report. These reports are mailed in

the fifth week of the fall and spring semester to the student’s local address.

Grade reports

At the end of each semester, the registration and records posts grades to https://my.butler.edu. The report

shows the grades and GPA for the semester, the cumulative GPA and total hours completed. A student

who sees what appears to be an error in the grade report should immediately call it to the attention of the

instructor or the appropriate dean. Grades are not sent to students who have a hold on their records.

Pass/Fail option

Students in good academic standing are permitted to elect up to a total of four courses from their total

undergraduate hours for pass/fail credit. Courses carried pass/fail may not be counted toward the core curriculum,

the academic major or minor, or any other course requirements specified by the University or the

college in which the degree is to be conferred. The only exceptions are required courses offered only for

pass/fail, such as PE101 or PE102. Courses taken for pass/fail do not count in the grade point average if

passed; if failed, they are counted as F. Upper-division courses passed under the pass/fail option shall count

for upper-division credit if passed. A change from pass/fail to grade credit or from grade credit to pass/fail is

not permitted after the last day designated in the schedule of classes.

If a student passes a course under the pass/fail option and subsequently changes the intended major to

one for which pass/fail credit in the course would not normally be accepted, the course may be counted toward

the new major with the approval of the administrative committee of the college in which the degree is to

be conferred.

The pass/fail option is not available to graduate students.

Repeat grade policy

A student, with the approval of his or her adviser, may repeat a course that is not otherwise repeatable for

credit only once. Upon completion of subsequent attempts, only the second attempt will count in his or her

grade point average. When repeating a course, a student may not withdraw from the course or change the

course credit designation to non-credit unless the student withdraws from the University. This policy shall

apply only to those courses taken at Butler University. The same policy shall apply to graduate students.

21


Right of appealing a grade

Once a final grade has been reported, it can be changed only upon written request of the instructor and

with the written approval of the head of the department and the dean of the college. Ordinarily only a demonstrable

clerical or computational error will be accepted as grounds for changing a grade.

If a student has good reason to believe that a grade has been improperly assigned for reasons other than a

penalty for academic dishonesty, the student shall first discuss the matter with the instructor. If not satisfied,

the student may appeal to the department head and then to the dean of the college.

If a student has any other complaint about an instructor or a course, he may follow the same appeals

procedure described above. The decisions in all appeals on these academic matters will be advisory rather

than directive.

Withholding of grades

Any student who has not met any University-related obligations or has not returned academic materials

to the proper library or instructor will not receive end of semester grades or transcripts from the University.

Only the registration and records office is authorized to report grades.

Grievance Procedure

The University recognizes that situations may arise in which a student believes they have been treated

unjustly. All members of the University community should attempt to resolve grievances as soon as possible

as, typically, the opportunity to gather information and for mutually satisfactory resolution is greatest at the

earliest point in time. Students may choose to consult with a member of the student affairs staff to determine

how best to address their concern. Students who are concerned about an academic/faculty issue may discuss

the concerns directly with the instructor, the department chair or the dean of their College. Students who are

concerned about a matter not related to academics/faculty should address them with the director or dean responsible

for the area of concern. If these steps do not achieve a resolution, the student may contact the president,

provost, or vice president for student affairs for assistance. Please refer to specific sections of this student

handbook for more information on grievances involving student discipline, academic integrity and harassment.

Honors Program

The Butler University honors program is open to outstanding entering freshmen and to other students

who have demonstrated their academic ability through outstanding achievement at Butler. The honors program

is University-wide, and students who complete it may earn University honors (cum laude, magna cum

laude, summa cum laude). The top two honors are reserved for students who complete the program.

Students may also earn departmental honors (“honors in ______,” “high honors in ______,” “highest

honors in ______”). These honors are primarily for students whose aptitudes or interests are concentrated

in the academic major. Completion of the honors program is not necessary to earn departmental honors.

For specific information regarding requirements for admission to the program, the nature of the honors

work and the requirements for the various levels of honors, refer to the Butler Bulletin, or visit the honors

program office, Jordan Hall, Room 212C or visit www.butler.edu/honors/.

Information Resources Computing Assistance

The Department of Information Resources, including the help desk, is located on the third floor of the

Holcomb Building. The help desk provides phone, email, web and walk-in support for technology-related

problems. The help desk also provides anti-virus and spyware software free of charge to students. Contact

the help desk by calling (31) 940-HELP (4357) or by sending an email to helpdesk@butler.edu.

22


Information Technology and Access

Computer labs are available throughout campus and in all University housing. Both Windows and

Macintosh computers are available with a wide variety of software. General computer labs are available for use

by all students at any time not scheduled for classes. See the “Computer Lab and Classroom Facilities” section

for further information.

Internship and Career Services

The Internship and Career Services office sponsors a full complement of services to assist students and

alumni through career exploration and preparation. Students are encouraged to visit the office early in their

college experience to meet the staff and take advantage of the many services available.

Student Employment. The staff assists students in finding part-time campus and off-campus employment.

Approximately 900 students work on campus each year. This office also assists federal work-study

eligible students in locating on-campus or community service employment. Open positions and information

can be found at www.butler.edu/career/.

Career and self-assessment. The office offers options for students interested in assessing their values,

interests, personality style and skills so that they will make informed decisions about academic major and

career choices. The Strong Interest Inventory and the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) are administered

and interpreted to assist you in your self-discovery process.

Career Counseling. Specially trained counselors are available to help students through the career decision-making

process. They are a source of valuable information on how students can prepare for academic

and professional development while at Butler. Career counselors can help you with specific job search strategies

along with resume writing, mock interviews and cover letter critiques. Students should make an appointment

through the ICS office.

Internship and Career Prep Program. Throughout the fall and spring semesters, workshops are offered

helping students learn how to develop a winning resume, write a cover letter that gets noticed by employers,

conduct a job or internship search and how to interview like a pro. The workshops are delivered or facilitated

by employers or Butler alumni who will share their expertise. If special programming is required, a call to

the office is all that is needed to initiate such programs.

B.L.U.E. is an electronic job search system to assist students and alumni in finding full-time, part-time

and internship opportunities. In addition, this program offers an alumni module which links students to

alumni from a variety of fields.

Additional Services. Graduating seniors and alumni are eligible to participate in on-campus interviewing

(OCI), the College Talent Recruitment Day (CTRD), Accounting Interview Day (AID) and Teacher

Candidate Interview Day (TCID).

Additional programming will be implemented throughout the academic year to better serve the everchanging

professional development needs of our student population.

The Internship and Career Services office is located in Atherton Union, Room 315. The office is open

Monday–Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit the website at www.butler.edu/career for information or call us

at (317) 940-9383.

Jordan College of Fine Arts’ Multisensory Learning Facility (MLF) - LH149

"Technologies for Teaching & Learning the Arts"

Mission

The mission of this multimedia-rich facility is to design, test and support teaching and learning of the

arts through Jordan College of Fine Arts curricula in dance, theatre, media arts, music, visual arts and arts

administration.

23


Resources

Curricular support for students and faculty include web authoring, podcasting and blogging (iWeb,

HTML and Dreamworks), advanced word processing and publishing (MS Office Suite, iWorks, OpenOffice

and Quark), graphic media scanning and editing (AdobeCreative Suite), digital and analogue audio

multi-track recording and editing (ProTools, Logic and Garageband), digital video input, multimedia

authoring (Final Cut Pro and iMovie), MIDI notation (Sibelius and Finale), MIDI sequencing (Band In A

Box. Live Lite), theatre lighting and computer assisted design (VectorWorks), ballet studies (Life Forms),

play writing (Final Draft), marching band and drill editing, and selected computer assisted instruction

(CAI) and internet communications technologies (ICT) applications.

JCFA’s Multisensory Learning Facility supplies 100baseT Ethernet to each station, 802.11g wireless access

throughout Lilly Hall for student and faculty laptops, and SmartMusic for advanced applied studies.

The MLF is equipped with video capture via digital card readers and MiniDV cameras, digital scanning,

large-screen projection, audio amplification, video conferencing via Skype, iChat/AIM and workstation management

via Apple Remote Desktop.

To better assist with the above tasks, we also provide resources and advice regarding storing and retrieving

large digital files using external hard drives, iPods, CD burning and DVD burning.

Staff

This facility is designed and directed by Dr. Tim Brimmer, with support from graduate assistants, lab

managers and trained assistants who staff this facility 60+ hours per week throughout the academic year. Additional

curriculum support is available for faculty by appointment. Suggestions for improving the use of

this teaching and learning facility are welcomed and encouraged. For more information, go to

http://www.butler.edu/music/?pg=6738&navID=16445/.

Employment

Students who have successfully completed ME345/545: EXPLORING THE DIGIAL ARTS or its

equivalent may be eligible for employment as MLF staff. Those who are interested should first apply at the

Center for Career Planning and Development and then contact Dr. Brimmer tbrimmer@butler.edu.

Hours of Operation

When not serving as a classroom, the MLF is open for students and faculty for creative, artistic and academic

purposes. MLF open hours may be viewed at

http://ical.mac.com/tbrimmer/MLF%20Open%20Hours/. Subscription to the Multisensory Learning Facilities’

schedule of classes and weekly open hours is available at

http://webcal://ical.mac.com/tbrimmer/MLF%20Open%20Hours.ics.

Note: Use of this facility for academic or artistic purposes other than described above, however worthwhile, is a

lower priority, and will be allowed only as time, space and staffing permit. Use of this facility and its resources for

non-academic and non-artistic purposes is strictly prohibited.

Learning Resource Center

The Learning Resource Center (LRC) is a coordination site for services, programs and resources that

promote academic success for all students of Butler University. The LRC is committed to supporting and

guiding students as they strive to reach the highest standards of academic excellence. Students are encouraged

to take advantage of these resources and services early in their academic careers to increase their prospects for

academic success.

All services are available free of charge to Butler students and include the following:

Academic Success Workshops

The LRC staff is available to assist all Butler students in further developing and enhancing skills that

promote academic success. The LRC staff works with students on skill development both individually and in

a group workshop format. Workshop topics may vary from semester to semester but generally include the

following:

24


• Transition to Success!

• Enhance Your Memory!

• Prepare for Exams!

• Study Habits that Work!

• Read Effectively!

• Review Notes Effectively!

• Take Charge of Your Time

The workshops provide students with a comprehensive battery of strategies and techniques can assist in

meeting the unique demands of college-level academics. Workshops may be offered in University housing

units, Greek houses and to any student group upon request. For a current schedule of workshops please visit

the LRC website at www.butler.edu/learning/.

LC 100 – Becoming a Master Student

LC100 is a pass/fail, no-credit course that is open to all Butler students. This course is designed to offer

students tools and techniques that will enhance their academic success at the college level. Topics will vary

according to section but may include organization and time management, developing a study plan, effective

reading, memory enhancement, effective note taking and exam preparation.

Academic Success Coaching

Academic success coaching sessions are available to any Butler student interested in enhancing and refining

academic skills. Students will gain insight into areas of academic strength and will identify strategies to

address areas of academic concern. Students will work collaboratively with their academic success coach to develop

a plan of action to improve academic performance. Students will learn strategies and techniques to aid

in approaching their coursework in an active, engaged and intentional manner.

Tutoring Resources

Butler students have access to multiple resources that can assist with course work. Through departmental

study tables and individualized peer tutoring, students have the opportunity to interact with peers who have

previously mastered the material and understand the difficulties that each subject presents.

Study tables are group walk-in tutoring sessions that meet at a specified time and place on a regular basis.

Study table sessions are to be coordinated by each respective department and students are typically notified

of the schedule within the first two weeks of each semester. This service is staffed by student moderators

who have been chosen by the faculty based on their performance in the subject area. Students may come and

go freely from study tables and while they are there they have access to the student moderator for questions

and assistance. The study table program is available in a variety of academic disciplines. Study table schedules

are available to students via their professors and the LRC website (www.butler.edu/learning/), as well as

in the LRC office (Jordan Hall 136).

Individualized peer tutoring is coordinated through the LRC and requires the recommendation of the

course instructor. Individual tutoring allows the student to meet one-on-one with a qualified and recommended

peer tutor. This service is provided on an as-needed basis and is offered to the student for a limited

time. Before requesting an individual tutor through the LRC the following conditions should be met:

• A recommendation from the instructor of the course is required.

Student must be attending all classes and labs.

Student must be completing all assignments to the best of his/her ability.

Student must be attending departmental study tables if available for the

subject.

Student must be working with course instructor during office hours.

If the student has met the above conditions, the LRC will pay for the service. In most cases, individualized

tutoring is limited to one to two hours per week for a limited number of weeks, depending on individual

circumstances.

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Butler Libraries

By promoting students’ mastery of research techniques, information resources and critical thinking, the

Butler libraries work in partnership with the faculty to realize the University’s educational mission. There are

two campus libraries: Irwin Library includes business, liberal arts, music and fine arts resources as well as

the special collections, rare books and University archives room and the education commons (which houses

education books and journals as well as children’s and young adult literature collections). The Ruth Lilly

Science Library, which is located in the Holcomb Building, supports studies in pharmacy, physical and biological

sciences, psychology, mathematics and computer sciences. Individual study tables, group study

spaces and lounge-type reading areas are available at both locations.

The libraries provide access to information through online and print formats. Online resources include:

the Butler libraries’ catalog; approximately 25,000 online journals and magazine titles; and over 150 citation

and full-text databases for locating journal articles, books, and statistical and government information. These

resources are accessible on campus and off campus. Both libraries support wireless access, PC computer labs

(Irwin also provides Macs), printing and laptops for in-house check out. For students working on multimedia

projects, Irwin’s rich media room provides space and equipment where students can record and edit

audio and video presentations.

Students are especially encouraged to take advantage of the following services available through Butler libraries:

• Individual research assistance from librarians is available through walk-up assistance at Irwin’s information

commons desk and the science library servicedDesk. Students also can work with librarians

through instant messaging: www.butler.edu/library/ask/, email: reflib@butler.edu, phone: 940-

9235 and by appointment. Students are encouraged to work with the librarian assigned to their major

area of study; a listing of librarians and the colleges and departments that they work with is located

at www.butler.edu/library.

• Irwin’s information commons desk is a student-staffed service point where students can get help

with basic information inquiries, research questions and technology needs. Student staff can provide

support with: online catalog and database searching; locating both online and print materials; software

applications such as Blackboard, e-portfolio, and MS Office; audio and video recording and

editing; and scanning and printing needs.

• Interlibrary loan and document delivery services provide access to books, articles and media materials

not available at the Butler libraries. Interested students should inquire at any of the libraries’

service desks or http://www.butler.edu/library/research/interlibrary-loan-(ill)/.

• Electronic reserve readings are available via password through the library website and provide supplemental

course materials that professors have designated for use by specific classes. In addition, reserve

collections of print materials are provided at the circulation desks of each library.

• A listening/viewing facility with individual and group study areas is available in the Irwin Library.

Both libraries contain a collection of CD, DVD and video recordings that support their respective

disciplines. Irwin also houses a number of audio recordings and supports audio streaming. Most of

these items represent classical music, opera or dance, but materials covering musical theatre, jazz,

drama and classic films also are available and may be used by any Butler student.

• The student disability services room (Irwin 206) is available to Butler students registered with Student

Disability Services (SDS). Please contact the front desk to check out the key. Assistive technologies

within the room include a Kurzweil 3000, Dragon Dictate, Inspiration 8, FlameReader

and ZoomText 8, as well as a Magnisight page magnifier. For further information concerning these

technologies or any other assistive technology on campus, please contact Rob Hartman, assistive

technologist for SDS, at rhartman@butler.edu.

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• Subject resource guides, named LibGuides, categorize and list resources in specific subject areas and

are developed by the librarians. LibGuides serve as the gateway to resources surrounding the various

disciplines and are the place for students to start their research process: libguides.butler.edu/.

For additional information about Butler Libraries’ hours, services and policies, visit

www.butler.edu/library/.

Non-credit

During the fall and spring semesters full-time degree-seeking students may register, with the approval of

the department head or dean whose subject matter is involved, for a maximum of two courses per semester

on a non-credit basis without additional tuition. Students should register for the special non-credit courses at

the end of the registration period. Courses carried as non-credit are not counted in the total academic load as

discussed earlier.

Post-Graduate Studies

The Office of Post-Graduate Studies is designed to assist students in making informed decisions about

pursuing a graduate or professional school education. Students who are interested in careers in law, medicine,

dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy and other post-graduate programs are strongly encouraged

to make regular use of the office of post-graduate studies, located in Jordan Hall, Room 212. Students

receive one-on-one advising concerning the admission application process, professional school entrance examination

preparation, personal statements and choosing appropriate graduate or professional schools. The

office maintains a resource library containing entrance examination preparation and application materials,

placement information, career-oriented publications, graduate and professional school program guides and

advising information. The office also assists in preparing faculty committee letters for admission to medical

school and other health professional programs.

Pre-Law Society. This organization, depending on students’ interests, sponsors a variety of activities

and programs, such as informal panel discussions with practicing attorneys, trips to observe trials and administrative

hearings and participation in the Chicago Forum, a two-day workshop attended by a large

number of representatives of American Bar Association approved law schools from across the United States.

Butler University Mock Trial Team. Students prepare a court case, either civil or criminal, and compete

in invitational, regional and national tournaments sanctioned by the American Mock Trial Association. Students

learn the skills necessary for a trial attorney including how to conduct direct and cross-examination of

witnesses, how to present an opening statement and closing argument and the rules of evidence. Students on

the team may compete as an attorney or witness. Mock trial is an ideal activity for students interested in acting,

debate or the trial process. Academic credit may be sought for participation on the team.

Pre-Health Society. This organization provides assistance to pre-professional students interested in careers

in the health sciences by increasing communication among pre-health profession students, offering opportunities

for students to talk and work with health care practitioners and opportunities to volunteer in the

local community. The Pre-Health Society sponsors student attendance at conferences, organizes shadowing

experiences and conducts a weekly speaker series showcasing area health care professionals.

Pre-Dental Club. This organization helps students interested in careers in dentistry with dental school

admission, providing tours of dental schools and hosting individuals from the Indiana University School of

Dentistry (IUSD), along with other IUSD alumni and students, for informational panels. In addition, the

Pre-Dental Club provides its members with volunteer opportunities at the Theodora House for women.

Shadowing experiences and research opportunities. Shadowing and networking opportunities with area

legal and health professionals are available. Students may receive grants to work with faculty mentors in the

Butler Summer Institute or may undertake individual research projects with faculty mentors.

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Programs for Overseas Study

Butler University encourages students to study in international settings as part of their academic experience.

Students may choose to study for a semester, year or summer vacation period. All students who wish to

study abroad must apply through the Center for Global Education. Interested students may study abroad

during their sophomore and junior year and possibly their senior year if their academic dean approves their

petition to intrude upon their final 30 hours at Butler.

The Center for Global Education provides study abroad advising, organizes pre-departure and reentry

sessions and maintains Butler’s list of approved programs for overseas study. This list of overseas study opportunities

offers a wide variety of options to Butler students interested in studying abroad during the academic

year. All programs on the list meet Butler’s high standards for academic excellence. Students are expected

to select their overseas study program from the approved list. The programs fall into two broad categories:

reciprocal exchanges and study abroad, in addition to some of Butler’s own programs. For more

detailed information about study abroad, please contact the Center for Global Education in Jordan Hall,

Room 212, 940-8473 or visit our website at www.butler.edu/global-education.

Reciprocal Exchange Programs

Reciprocal exchanges provide an opportunity for Butler students to attend carefully selected partner universities

abroad while students from those universities attend Butler, on a one-for-one basis. Some of these

exchange opportunities have been developed by Butler; others are available through the International Student

Exchange Program (ISEP). The University’s faculty and study abroad advisor will work closely with individual

students to select the program that best fits each student’s academic and personal development needs.

Butler has established reciprocal student exchange relationships with several premier universities in

other countries including Australia, New Zealand, Canada, The Netherlands, Germany, France, Chile,

Hong Kong and Peru. A wide range of courses are available at the partner universities in areas such as business,

education, languages and cultural studies and many other disciplines in the arts and sciences. Students

also have access to the comprehensive services available to all students attending the University as well as the

continued support provided by the Center for Global Education.

Butler is a member of the ISEP headquartered in Washington, D.C. ISEP is a worldwide network for

international education, consisting of over 250 institutions from more than 35 different countries, through

which students may exchange on a one-for-one reciprocal basis. Each student Butler sends to an ISEP member

institution receives tuition, room and board and other benefits as defined by the hosting institution.

Since ISEP is a totally integrated program, students studying in countries where the language of instruction

is not English must prove sufficient language proficiency before Butler will accept their application for approval

to study abroad.

Study Abroad Programs

Butler University has been fortunate to have a cooperative agreement with the Institute for Study Abroad

(IFSA-Butler), founded on Butler’s campus in 1988. IFSA-Butler is one of the main study abroad program

providers for Butler students. The organization annually sends 3,500 students from 400 U.S. universities

to more than 90 universities in Argentina, Australia, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, England, Mexico, New Zealand,

Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Scotland and Spain.

IFSA-Butler is a separate service organization and helps students through the application process, assists

with travel plans, arranges overseas housing and advises on a variety of related issues. In addition to the Indianapolis

office, IFSA-Butler maintains fully staffed offices in each country where it has programs. The

overseas offices conduct student orientations, sponsor excursions and provide various student services. All

grades earned through an IFSA-Butler program are posted to an official Butler University transcript.

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In addition to IFSA-Butler, students may also select their overseas study opportunity from programs offered

by over 15 other colleges, universities and well-respected study abroad organizations. All provide a

wide range of student services and give careful attention to safety and security issues. Approved programs

represent a broad range of geographic regions. Educational opportunities may be classroom based or experiential,

including internships or service learning.

Butler Semester in Spain Program

Butler offers a faculty-led program at the University of Alcalá de Henares each fall term. Butler students

are able to take an entire semester’s load of 12 credits that can be applied toward the Spanish major and minor

or can count as electives. All participating students take one course with the Butler faculty director, while

the rest are taught by professors at the University of Alcalá de Henares in courses designed for non-native

speakers of Spanish. Students with superior Spanish language skills can petition to enroll in University

courses for native Spanish speakers. The program includes guided excursions to other regions of the Spain.

All students live with carefully selected Spanish families, thus enriching their opportunities for cultural immersion.

Students must have completed two 300-level Spanish courses in order to be eligible for the program.

GALA – Global Adventures in the Liberal Arts

Butler’s Center for Global Education, in partnership with Butler faculty, organizes a traveling study

abroad program that provides up to 20 students the opportunity to spend an entire semester traveling while

taking four Butler core classes. The location for GALA differs by semester. The classes, taught by Butler professors,

will be a blend of classroom and on-site lectures, discussions, site visitations, written assignments

and exams. The spring 2010 program will take place in Florence, Paris, London, Scotland and the English

lake district. The fall 2010 program will take place in Latin America, traveling from Panama, through Costa

Rica and Nicaragua to Mexico. The group will spend from two to six weeks in each location, which will allow

students time to explore the sights and sounds of their various settings.

Tuition and Financial Aid Applicability for Study Abroad

In most cases, federal and state aid will apply to study abroad costs if the student is currently receiving

aid. Students who study abroad will pay Butler University tuition during their semester(s) abroad. Those

who participate in approved study abroad programs may apply 50 percent of their Butler institutional financial

aid toward their tuition for their study abroad semester(s). Those who participate in reciprocal exchange

programs — through Butler’s bilateral exchanges or ISEP — may apply 100 percent of their Butler institutional

financial aid to their tuition for their semester(s) abroad.

Registering for Classes

Continuing students

Early in November and March, your registration appointment time will be posted on

http://my.butler.edu/. Please check this day and time.

You will have access to look at your current transcript and advising audit through http://my.butler.edu/.

At your advising appointment discuss your schedule for the next semester. You will be able to register for

classes using my.butler.edu when your registration appointment opens. Registration priorities are established

based on completed coursework – those students closest to completion of their degree have the highest

priority. Appointments will begin after advising for the semester is complete. Appointment times for all students

will be scheduled Monday through Friday for two weeks. Hours of the help desk will be posted on

my.butler.edu.

All registrations in applied music must have the approval of the dean of the Jordan College of Fine Arts.

If your schedule includes an arranged course you must secure a permission number from the department

head or dean. You will use this permission number to register for applied music courses.

New student procedures for early registration

Freshmen will be assigned an advising/registration appointment by the Learning Resource Center.

Transfer students will be assigned an advising/registration time by their college of enrollment. Graduate stu-

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dents may register during any published registration period; they will receive a final schedule with their billing

statement. Non-degree students may register following the last group of freshmen.

Registration and course changes will be held according to the schedule published prior to the first day of

class.

All students should note carefully the advising and registration dates, published in the Schedule of

Classes, especially the deadline for registration and course changes. Beyond that published date, no student

is permitted to enroll, to add a course (except for independent study and non-credit courses) or to change

registration in a course from grade to pass/fail or vice versa. Registration or changes of registration in applied

music require approval by the dean of the Jordan College of Fine Arts.

Registration and Withdrawals, changes of

Any change of schedule after open registration concludes — such as adding a course, dropping a course

or switching from grade to pass/fail or from credit to non-credit — is initiated by the student in consultation

with the academic adviser. Upon obtaining the adviser’s approval, the appropriate form must be turned in to

the registration and records office. The effective date of the withdrawal is the date it is received and processed

by the registration and records office.

Except for withdrawal from a course, change to non-credit or change to or from pass/fail, no changes of

registration are permitted past the deadline published in the Schedule of Classes (ordinarily the end of the

first week of the semester). For each term, the registrar publishes a deadline for withdrawing from a course

with a grade of W. Prior to that date a student may switch to non-credit or withdraw from a course without

any academic penalty. After that date (usually about three weeks from the end of the semester), no changes

are permitted in a student’s schedule. It is the student’s responsibility to learn and observe the published

deadlines.

Changes of registration in applied music require approval by the dean of the College of Fine Arts.

Student Athletes

Athletic competition requires a considerable commitment of time and energy. Academic responsibilities

are considered the highest priority for student athletes attending Butler University. Student athletes should

refer to the latest edition of the student athlete handbook for more information or see the assistant athletic

director for compliance (940-9630) for additional assistance.

Student Disability Services

Butler University is committed to treating all members of the University community, including students

with disabilities, in an equitable manner. To this end, the University provides accommodations and

support services for qualified students with documented disabilities. Physical and/or academic support may

be arranged if the need to provide services is substantiated by written documentation from an appropriate

licensed professional.

Documentation must be submitted to the director of student disability services before requests for accommodations

can be considered. To obtain further information regarding policies and procedures or to

discuss questions and concerns, please contact student disability services in Jordan Hall 136 or at 940-

9308. You may also wish to access information online at www.butler.edu/disability/.

Studying

One problem that students may face is what to do between classes with not enough time to go home but

too much time to waste. In addition to Irwin and Lilly libraries, here are some places to study on campus:

• The C-Club (Atherton Union).

• Starbucks

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• The Jordan Hall lounge (Jordan Hall, Room 339). Recently remodeled, the lounge has comfortable

seating, vending machines and a microwave oven.

• The foreign language lab (Jordan Hall, Room 391). The lab is a quiet, comfortable study area with

access to several computers. Foreign language films, magazines, satellite T.V. stations and instruction

tapes are available for students who want to study a language.

• A study lounge in the lower level of Atherton Union next to the Efroymson Diversity Center

Transcripts

The official student academic record is kept in the registration and records office. The student must make

any request for a transcript of the record in writing to the registration and records office. Students may view

their transcript at my.butler.edu. To protect the student from an unauthorized person obtaining a transcript,

telephone requests will not be honored. Currently enrolled students may have up to five unofficial transcripts

without charge; in the semester a student applies to graduate, and for one year after that application,

the student may have official transcripts free of charge up to a limit of 25. There is a fee for all other transcript

requests. No transcript will be issued if there is a “hold” on the record because the student has not

fulfilled financial obligations or has failed to return University property.

Transfer Credit

Occasionally a student pursuing a degree at Butler may find it necessary or desirable to take academic

work elsewhere—usually during a summer session at a school near the student’s home. Any student planning

to take work elsewhere for credit to be applied toward a Butler degree should note carefully the following

procedures and regulations:

1. Approve in advance: Course selections and schools must be approved in advance if the student

wishes to ensure that the credits will be accepted. The student should obtain from the school he

plans to attend a “guest” or “transient” student application and catalog with adequate descriptions of

the courses selected and should bring these to their academic dean. If the student is in good standing

and the requested courses are acceptable, the dean will so certify on the transient student application

and will note on the student’s record the fact that the courses have been approved for transfer

credit. The student, of course, will ordinarily wish to consult the adviser when selecting courses.

2. Transcript to Butler: The student must request of the registrar at the school of guest enrollment that

a transcript be sent to the registration and records office at Butler. Early in the next semester, the

student should stop at the registration and records office to verify receipt of the transcript. The registrar

will post the credit on the student’s record.

3. Minimum grade: Butler will grant transfer credit only for courses passed with grades of C- or better.

Grades earned elsewhere are not computed in the Butler cumulative GPA, which is the average

of grades earned at Butler. One should, however, earn the highest grades possible, even as a transient

student. Later, when applying for graduate or professional school or for a position, the student

will be asked to submit transcripts from all institutions previously attended; grades earned at other

institutions could affect the disposition of the application.

4. Transfer credit will not be granted for any course that duplicated one passed at Butler. A grade at

Butler cannot be replaced with a grade earned elsewhere.

5. Credits earned at an institution that is on the quarter system will be converted to semester hours at

Butler. Three quarter hours equal two semester hours at Butler.

Withdrawals

If it becomes necessary to withdraw completely from Butler for reasons other than medical, a student

should confer at once with the dean of the appropriate college who will initiate the complete withdrawal. The

form must be taken to the office of registration and records before the withdrawal is official. If a student seeks

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a withdrawal for medical reasons, he/she should contact the office of vice president for student affairs. As the

University health officer, the vice president for student affairs will review the applicable documentation and

offer a recommendation to the dean of the appropriate college who will initiate the complete withdrawal.

Stipulations may be imposed for future re-enrollment.

Instructors should be informed personally of the student’s withdrawal. In the case of suspension, expulsion

or other officially directed involuntary withdrawal past the deadline for withdrawals, instructors will

report W or F, reflecting the student’s standing on the date of the directed withdrawal. Upon a complete

withdrawal within the first five weeks of a regular semester, a partial refund of tuition will be made in accordance

with a sliding scale published in the Schedule of Classes. (See “Refunds.”)

Students who choose to withdraw from Butler are asked to complete an exit interview with someone in

the student affairs office (200 Atherton). Students can call 940-9570 to arrange for a short exit interview.

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CAMPUS LIFE

Atherton Union (AU)

Atherton Union is the focal point of many activities on campus and oversight of the building is the responsibility

of the Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) office (Atherton Union, 101).

The union houses the volunteer center, bookstore, the Marketplace dining room, the C-Club, Starbucks

Café, the Reilly Room, quiet study lounge, 24-hour computer lab, a student lounge area and several meeting

rooms. The offices of the vice president for student affairs, PuLSE, Efroymson Diversity Center, residence

life, Greek life and orientation programs, University bands and spirit programs and the office for internships

and career services are located in the union. Several student organizations such as Student Government Association

(SGA), off-campus student organization, panhellenic association and interfraternity council, the Drift

yearbook, YMCA, black student union, DEMIA, Butler Alliance, Latino Unidos, ASIA, Voices of Deliverance,

International Club, Dawg Pound and ECO also make their home in the union.

Bulletin boards are located throughout the building to keep students informed about campus events.

Check these boards for up-to-date information on campus activities and functions. The PuLSE office staff

must stamp all notices to be posted, with the exception of employment opportunity notices, which must be

approved by the office for Internship and Career Services (AU 315). Please see the sign posting policy on

page 58.

If there are facility issues or problems with the union, please report them to the PuLSE office at 940-

9262. In the case of an emergency please contact BUPD at 940-9396.

ATM

A Chase bank machine is located in the south end of the C-Club, near the convenience store. An Indiana

Members Credit Union bank machine is located in Jordan Hall near the post office.

Band and Spirit Programs

University Bands

In cooperation with the campus spirit program, the University bands department provides bands for

University-wide events, off-campus University relations’ events and athletic events. The Butler University

Marching Band (BUMB) and the Butler University Basketball Band (BUBB) are part of 'the spirit center of

the Butler campus" and interested students are encouraged to participate. For information contact the University

athletic band office in Atherton Union, 316, call the band office (940-9876) or visit the band website

at www.butler.edu/spirit/.

Spirit Programs

In cooperation with the University band department, the campus spirit program encourages all students

to get involved in "the spirit center of the Butler campus" by supporting Butler University and Butler athletics.

The spirit programs advise and coordinate the Butler University cheerleaders and the BU mascots. Information

is available from the spirit programs office in the Atherton fitness center, by calling 940-9623 or

by writing spirit coordinator Jamie Westfall at jwestfal@butler.edu.

Bicycles

Bicycle Racks

Butler University has placed bike racks at several campus locations. Faculty, staff and students who ride

bikes on campus are encouraged to use and lock theirs bikes to one of the existing bike racks. Bikes should

not be chained or locked to trees, handrails, benches, light poles, etc. Bikes that are locked to anything other

than a bike rack will be removed and held in a secure location for the owner to claim. Damage to a lock or

33


chain resulting from the removal of a bike from an unauthorized location will be the responsibility of the

bike owner.

Bicycle Registration

Registering bicycles with BUPD reduces the chance of theft and increases the chances of recovery if lost

or stolen. Registration can be done Monday–Friday 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. at BUPD, 525 W. Hampton

Drive.

Bookstore

The Butler bookstore, located on the second level of Atherton Union, stocks Butler mementos, general

books, reference materials, clothing, stationary supplies, gifts, greeting cards and candy and academic supplies.

The textbook department on the lower level of Atherton Union carries all textbooks, music and pharmacy

reference.

Regular Hours for the Bookstore:

Monday–Friday

8:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

Saturday

10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Sunday

noon–5 p.m.

Textbook Department Hours:

Monday-Friday

8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday closed

Special Summer/Break Hours:

Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday closed

Building Hours

A policy on access to buildings has been established to ensure that University facilities remain open in a

safe and secure manner. Buildings are open until 11 p.m. during the fall and spring semesters. These hours

may vary during scheduled University holidays.

Butler University Police Department (BUPD)

The purpose of BUPD is to maintain a safe and secure environment for the University community.

BUPD is responsible for ID card issue, parking services, risk management, emergency response planning,

crime prevention, investigation of criminal activity, incident response and patrol activities. It also assumes

responsibility for providing assistance in emergency situations, including fire, ambulance and police services.

The phone number for BUPD is 940-9396 or, in case of emergency, 911 from a campus phone.

BUPD is located at 525 W. Hampton Drive, across the street from Ross Hall, to the east.

Clowes Memorial Hall

Clowes Memorial Hall is recognized as Indianapolis’ finest performing arts facility and has been since its

historic opening in 1963. Each year, Clowes presents an eclectic season of events (known as Clowes Presents)

ranging from modern dance, jazz, popular music and international performances. Clowes is also home to

performances from the Indianapolis Opera, Butler music ensembles, Butler Ballet, the Diversity Lecture

Series, Broadway Across America Indianapolis and countless comedy tours, concerts and theatrical productions.

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Commencement

Formal commencement ceremonies are held for the May graduation. Candidates are required to attend

the commencement exercises in academic attire, which can be purchased in the bookstore for the occasion.

Convenience Store

Butler University’s convenience store is located at the Apartment Village. The store features a variety

of groceries, health and beauty aids, bottled beverages and snacks. For your convenience, use

your flex dollars, declining balance dollars (“Dawg Bucks”), MasterCard or Visa.

Copies

Copiers are located in all libraries, the lower concourse of Jordan Hall (west end basement), lower level

of Atherton and in all residence halls. Copies are 10 cents each. You also have the option of using a copy

debit card. You may purchase a card from the encoding machines located on the first floor of Irwin Library

by the reference desk. The cost is $1 each (charges are reviewed periodically). You then reinsert the card into

the encoding machine and deposit the amount of money you want to have encoded on the card ($1, $5,

$10, $20). The copiers will automatically debit your card each time you use it. The cost per copy is seven

cents. The copiers will accept coins as well as cards. See the copy center manager for further details.

Copies also can be obtained in the copy center, Campus Impressions, located in the Holcomb basement,

Room 23. Campus Impressions provides a variety of printing and copy related services. Please call 940-

6495 for more information. All electronic files can be sent to cirequests@butler.edu. CD’s and jump drives

must be left for output.

Counseling and Consultation Services (CCS)

Counseling and Consultation Services (CCS), located in the Health and Recreation Complex, Room

120, provides individual and group therapy to currently enrolled students. Students use our service for a

wide range of concerns, including relationship problems, test anxiety, stress management, grief, anxiety, depression,

substance abuse and eating and body image difficulties. Students may also call or come in to simply

consult with us on a mental health related topic. All services are strictly confidential to students who are

over the age of 18 (with some exceptions) and may be utilized by students under 18 with parental consent.

CCS works on a short-term therapy model which means most student concerns can be addressed in eight

to10 sessions. Students requiring longer-term therapy are encouraged to secure services off campus. CCS

does not have a psychiatrist on staff.

CCS is staffed by licensed psychologists and also by closely supervised pre-doctoral and master’s-level

interns. Most students generally attend counseling for an average of eight sessions annually. Students are seen

on the hour by appointments and can be scheduled more immediately for emergency or crisis appointments.

To schedule an appointment for counseling or a consultation meeting for information gathering, please call

940-9385 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Emergencies

In case of an emergency, call the center, tell the receptionist it is an emergency and ask to talk with a

therapist. If you have an emergency when our service is closed, please call BUPD at 940-9396 and ask to

speak with the on-call therapist. You may also contact the Crisis and Suicide Intervention Service at (317)

251-7575 if you prefer off campus assistance. Students in crisis may also go to a local emergency room for

assistance.

Alcohol and Other Drugs Service

Our services are designed to respond appropriately and effectively to persons seeking help for problems

associated with alcohol and other drug abuse. This includes persons who may have a family member or

friend who is abusing alcohol or other drugs. CCS can assist with services for court-mandated treatment or

35


legal recommendations. Additionally, the CCS staff will help students connect with treatment options provided

by off campus providers. Students are responsible for costs for all referral services received off campus.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings are held at CCS on Fridays at noon and Al Anon meetings are held at

CCS on Mondays at noon. Students seeking Al Anon or AA meetings can also attend meetings 365 days a

year at the Carvel Club, 4627 N. Carvel Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46205, (317) 255-0037.

Confidentiality

All interactions are handled on a confidential basis since the center deals with problems of a private and

sensitive nature. No information about a person’s use of our service may be shared with anyone outside of

our service unless it is dictated by Indiana State law, for example handling unreported incidents of child

abuse, or the person has provided permission to do so. When providing consultations to students, faculty

or staff, the CCS staff may ask for permission to share any information resulting from a consultation discussion

if it is to be used on behalf of another student or other parties.

Dining Services

The University dining services office is located on the main level of Atherton Union, Room

110. Butler University students, faculty and staff may purchase Dawg Bucks and use them to purchase

meals and snacks in the dining rooms, C-Club food court, Starbucks, Zia Juice bar and the

convenience store. An additional five percent is added to your account with each deposit of $50 or

more. Visa and MasterCard are accepted. Orders can also be made online at

www.butler.edu/dining/.

Residential Dining Rooms

The residential dining rooms are located on the second level of Atherton Union and the main

floor in the Residential College. In these “all you care to eat” settings is a wide variety of options

from which to choose, including hot entrees, salad bar, soups, deli, grill, vegetarian selections and

desserts. You have the option to purchase an unlimited, 290-block, 240-block and 180-block meal

plan. For more information, contact the residence life office at (317) 940-9458. Meals for guests

may be purchased at the entrance to the dining rooms.

C-Club Food Court

Located in the lower level of Atherton Union, you may enjoy the following: Papa John’s Pizza,

Grill Works and Montague’s Deli. Sushi, salads, sandwiches, snacks and beverages also are available

for quick grab n’ go. For your convenience, use your flex dollars, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Starbucks

Starbucks is located on the north end of the Atherton Union just past the bookstore. The Butler

University location was the first Starbucks to open in the Indianapolis area. It has a cozy, contemporary

atmosphere that offers a quiet setting in which to enjoy friends, food and service. For your convenience,

use your flex dollars, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Zia Juice

The juice bar is located in the Health and Recreation Complex. The juice bar features an array of

freshly squeezed juices and smoothies. Coffee and selected grab n’ go products are also available. For

your convenience, use your flex dollars, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Convenience Store

Butler University’s convenience store is located in the Dawghouse at the Apartment Village. The

store features a variety of groceries, health and beauty aids, bottled beverages and snacks. For your

convenience, use your flex dollars, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Discounts

Theatre department productions - For ticket or audition information, contact the theatre department

box office in Lilly Hall, Room 130 or call 940-9247.

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VIP movie passes - AMC, Regal/United Artists and Kerasotes Theaters movie tickets may be purchased

for $7 in the PuLSE located in Atherton Union, Room 101.

Clowes Memorial Hall - Butler students may subscribe to the Clowes Presents season or purchase single

tickets to individual events at a discount. For more information on discounts available to Butler students,

on campus or off campus call (317) 940-6444 or log on to www.cloweshall.org/butler/. To receive additional

offers and breaking news subscribe to the Clowes eNews by signing up at www.ClowesHall.org or

find us at Facebook, Twitter or MySpace.

Diversity Programs

The Office of Diversity Programs, located in the Efroymson Diversity Center, Atherton Union 004,

emphasizes the University’s commitment to diverse student concerns and assesses the academic, social, cultural

and economic needs of the multicultural and international student population. The office coordinates

academic, career, cultural and leadership development programs and social activities that promote a better

understanding of racial and ethnic diversity and enhance the total development of the student population.

Some of the programs organized by this office are:

At-Risk Advance Warning System

A component of the Butler University multicultural student recruitment and retention model, the at-risk

advance warning system, was implemented for all first year students to provide a cooperative academic monitoring

system and early identification of students with potential academic difficulties.

Big Brother/Big Sister Program

The Big Brother/Big Sister program, sponsored by the Black Student Union, provides a peer-mentoring

component to assist in the academic and social orientation and retention of multicultural freshmen and transfer

students. Peer mentors also facilitate the new students’ adjustment to the collegiate environment.

Celebration of Diversity

Butler University’s Celebration of Diversity was implemented in 1987 under the auspices of the Office

of Diversity Programs to create awareness and campus recognition of the contributions of African-Americans

to American history and society.

What began as a University observance of African-American history month has evolved into a Butler

community collaborative effort that encompasses African-American history month, women’s history month,

the King holiday observance and the Hispanic heritage celebration, as well as special events and multicultural

programs throughout the academic year. Celebration of Diversity has been expanded to include multicultural

programs that focus on Asian and Native American culture and GLBT issues.

Celebration of Diversity provides a comprehensive analysis of the importance of diversity within our

global history and culture. Promoting ethnic diversity is an integral goal stated in the Butler University mission

statement. The celebration of diversity, through multicultural interaction and awareness, facilitates a

greater appreciation of the inherent complexities and commonalities of our global community.

Serving Butler and the greater Indianapolis community, Celebration of Diversity has become one of the

largest multicultural collegiate observances in the Midwest, hosting over 20,000 people in the last decade.

The population served includes Butler students, faculty, staff and alumni, area high school and college students,

Indianapolis community leaders and residents and student and faculty groups from other Indiana

colleges and universities. Program highlights include:

• Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series

• African-American music heritage festival, featuring the annual GospelFest

• Women’s history month programs

• Hispanic heritage celebration

• Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday celebration

• Fall study tour

Butler ethnic festival

• Reflections film series and dialogue

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• Annual student sponsored service projects, educational programs and events

Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series

The Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series, implemented in 1987, and the visiting African-American

Scholars Program, implemented in 1989, were developed to provide Butler and the greater

Indianapolis community increased interaction with outstanding dignitaries and scholars through short-term

campus visits. In 2002, the Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series became a collaborative

diversity initiative between Butler University and the Office of the Mayor, City of Indianapolis, with generous

support from the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Vectren Corporation, Allison Transmission and

Anthem. The mission and purpose of this partnership is to:

• Support the Mayor’s commitment to race relations within the Indianapolis community

• Combine efforts to develop a sense of awareness and understanding of differences and similarities

among people of different races through increased dialogue and cultural interaction.

In addition to planning these programs and many more, the director of diversity programs advises the

Black Student Union, Latinos Unidos, the Voices of Deliverance Gospel Choir and directs the Morton-

Finney Leadership Program.

International Students

Butler University seeks to increase intercultural appreciation, foster international experiences and promote

global literacy for students, faculty and administration. The keystone for international students at Butler

is the Office of International Student Services. The office serves as a campus and community resource for

international services and concerns. All matters pertaining to arrival and orientation, immigration advising

and the general well being of international students on campus are channeled through this office. Approximately

150 international students from over 50 different countries are enrolled at Butler. One of the most

important functions of this office is to provide personal advising, employment authorization, ensure compliance

with government immigration regulations and to assist students in maintaining proper immigration

status.

The Butler University international community, which includes study abroad and exchange students, citizens

of other countries, interested faculty and staff and globally minded students and local residents, comes

together to share mutual experiences and interests at regular campus events. These include activities coordinated

through the International Club, the formal annual international dinner, International Education Week

in November and the unique International Living Learning Center in the Residential College. Welcoming

and bringing people of diverse backgrounds together through campus life and personal advising are major

focuses of the Office of International Student Services.

Efroymson Diversity Center

The Efroymson Diversity Center of Butler University exists to enhance the personal development and

academic success of students by preparing them to be active and responsible citizens demonstrating respect

and appreciation for the diverse cultures represented on campus as well as the diversity inherent within our

global society.

Dedicated in December 2006, the Efroymson Diversity Center, located in Atherton Union, Room 004,

was made possible by a generous gift from Lori Efroymson-Aguilera, the Efroymson Family Foundation and

the Central Indiana Community Foundation. The Office of Diversity Programs and the Office of International

Student Services are housed in the center. The center also provides office space for several diversity

student organizations that include:

• Asian Students Intercultural Alliance (ASIA)

• Black Student Union (BSU)

Butler Alliance

• Demia

• International Club

• Latinos Unidos

• Voices of Deliverance gospel choir

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Efroymson Diversity Center facilities include a multi-purpose lounge area equipped with study tables,

reception area and a flat-screen television and entertainment center with a comfortable viewing area; multicultural

resource library and gallery, kitchen, prep room and storage space. The center has wireless access and

cable television and is equipped with computer terminals for student usage.

Programs and services coordinated through the Efroymson Diversity Center or “The D.C.” include

• Information and referral

• Individual student advising

• Multicultural and international student organization advisement

• Diversity education programs/Celebration of Diversity

• Academic, career and personal development programs and activities

• Leadership development and volunteerism programs and activities

• Social and cultural interaction and development activities

• The Efroymson Diversity Center hours of operation during the academic year are Monday-

Thursday, 9 a.m.–10 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. The center is closed on weekends except for special

events. Summer hours of operation are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

DVD Rental Kiosk

New release movies are available for rent or purchase in the DVD kiosk located in the C-Club. The kiosk is

available 24/7; it accepts credit cards only. Questions about the kiosk can be directed to the Office of the Vice

President for Student Affairs in Atherton 200.

Emergency Telephone System

There are 25 emergency phones located throughout the campus as well as in all campus building elevators.

Activating a phone by pushing the red button connects the caller directly to the University police dispatch

office.

Escort Program

BUPD offers escorts from dusk to dawn, 365 days a year, to individuals who need to go from one campus

location to another. To arrange for an escort, call 940-9396. Specify to the dispatcher where you are,

where you will be waiting and your destination. If calling from inside a building, wait inside, but check periodically

for the car or officer. Escorts may be provided by foot or vehicle.

Financial Aid

Investing in a Butler Education

Butler University is committed to providing students and parents with a variety of options to assist with

their educational expenses. An offer of financial aid may include need-based grants or merit scholarships,

student loans and student employment opportunities from federal, state and University programs for which

the student qualifies:.

Financial aid counselors are available for appointments and phone counseling, Monday through Friday

from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Appointments are advised but not necessary. Walk-ins are seen on a first-come, firstserved

basis after appointments. Often many questions and concerns can be handled over the phone. The

phone number to make an appointment or to talk to a financial aid counselor is (317) 940-8200 or toll free

(877) 940-8200. For additional information or copies of required forms, please check out our website at

www.butler.edu/financial-aid.

Full time undergraduate students pursuing their first bachelor’s degree may apply for federal, state and

institutional aid by completing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). To receive priority consideration

and meet the Indiana state grant deadline, the FAFSA must be completed in full and submitted

by March 1 each year, the financial aid file must be complete by May 1 and returning students must be en-

39


olled full-time for the fall semester by May 15. We will accept your FAFSA after the stated dates, but there

is no guarantee of gift assistance from Butler University. Graduate students and students who already have a

bachelor’s degree are eligible for student loans only.

Financial Aid Programs

Financial aid at Butler University includes merit and talent awards and need-based aid. These awards

may be in the form of scholarships and grants — gift aid that does not have to be paid back; or self help,

such as the federal student loans or student employment — aid that must be repaid or earned. In addition

to the traditional sources of financial aid, financing options are available to help all families pay the bill by

maximizing their resources.

• Merit and talent awards consist of scholarships or awards based on academic achievement or performance

ability. These tuition specific awards are normally awarded to incoming freshmen only and

available for four years of full-time undergraduate enrollment and often carry specific requirements

such as GPA, academic performance, etc.

• Need-based aid, such as federal, state and Butler grants, is based on the family’s financial aid eligibility.

The information reported on the FAFSA determines a family’s ability to contribute (financial

strength). The formula for determining financial aid eligibility is: cost of attendance (tuition, room

and board, books, transportation and personal allowance) minus the family’s ability to contribute

(EFC) as determined by the information provided on the FAFSA.

Financial aid guidelines

• The combination of all financial aid may not exceed the total cost of attendance for any given year.

Tuition-specific awards cannot exceed the tuition charges and certain combinations of aid programs

cannot exceed the student's financial aid eligibility.

• Your eligibility for financial aid and the programs for which you qualify may vary each year as your

family’s financial circumstances fluctuate, college costs increase, funding levels change and your academic

standing changes. Therefore all families are encouraged to file each year.

• Verification is a federal requirement which requires Butler University to obtain documentation that

supports the information provided on the FAFSA. Financial aid will be offered after the Office of

Financial Aid receives all requested documents.

• Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) requires financial aid recipients maintain a 2.0 GPA. In addition

to the GPA, progress is measured by credits earned in relation to those attempted and the

length of the academic program.

Financial aid notification and disbursement

• Financial Aid Notification – Once the financial aid you qualify for has been determined you will be

notified through your Butler email account. You may review your financial aid anytime at

http://my.butler.edu - self service - student center – finances – review/accept/decline financial aid.

• The last day you may submit a complete application for an education loan (federal and private) is

one week prior to the end of the semester. Applications received after this date can not be processed.

• You will be notified if revisions to your aid are made due to new information such as outside scholarships

not previously reported.

• When you review the Financial Aid Notification, you must accept or decline each award offered, select

a lender, sign the master promissory note (MPN) if you are accepting a student loan and report

any outside scholarships you may be receiving for the academic year.

• If an outside scholarship is not on your notification, assume that the Office of Financial Aid has no

knowledge of this award or the amount. Contact the Office of Financial Aid with all available information

(e.g., award letters from the donors for all awards).

• Receiving a Financial Aid Notification does not mean your bill is paid in full. It is your responsibility

to compare your financial aid with your bill from the Office of Student Accounts to determine

the amount you owe and make payment arrangements with the Office of Student Accounts.

40


• The Office of Student Accounts will not credit outside scholarships to your billing statement until

the funds have actually been received. It is your responsibility to ensure that outside scholarship

funds are received and the bill is paid in full by the due date.

• Federal, state and institutional funds are automatically credited to your student account; however,

funds cannot be authorized for disbursement until you have accepted the awards offered.

• Financial aid will appear as “Anticipated Aid” on your billing statement until the funds actually disburse

to your student account on the fifth day of classes each semester.

• Estimated awards will appear on the student’s account as anticipated for a limited amount of time.

These awards are pending until the federal or state government receives confirmation or until all

documents have been submitted to finalize the aid.

• The Federal Perkins and Stafford loans will appear as “Anticipated Aid” on your account until the

promissory notes have been completed online and submitted to the university or the lender. Some

loan checks require a signature each semester.

• Indiana state grants (the Higher Education Award and Freedom of Choice Grant) will be credited

when the Office of Financial Aid receives confirmation of your eligibility from the State Student Assistance

Commission of Indiana (SSACI).

• You must finalize your Federal Work-Study arrangements with the Center for Career Planning and

Development by Oct. 1 or Federal Work Study awards may be canceled for the entire academic year.

• You may be required to repay financial aid funds received if you drop below full-time between the

fifth and the tenth day of classes.

• The State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana (SSACI) requires that a student be full-time (12 or

more hours per semester) at census and remain full-time for four weeks after the start of the semester to qualify

for the full amount of the Higher Education Award, Freedom of Choice Grant and 21 st Century Scholarships.

Changes in enrollment status during that period of time may result in full cancellation of the state

grants. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid prior to making any changes to your enrollment status.

Changes in packaging procedures

Receiving other financial aid or changing your enrollment status can cause your financial aid to change.

It is your responsibility to report these changes to the Office of Financial Aid:

• scholarships received from outside donors

• changes in enrollment status

• change of major

Paying the bill

• All students must notify the Office of Student Accounts of their payment arrangements. Do not assume

the Office of Student Accounts is aware of financial aid or outstanding loans for which you

have applied.

• Full payment of your bill or an arrangement for payment must be made with the Office of Student

Accounts prior to the first day of classes each semester.

• If you anticipate a credit balance after your financial aid is disbursed to your student account, we

recommend that you not budget living expenses for the first two months around your refund

money. Refunds are available after the balance is paid in full and after the fifth day of class each semester.

Financial aid and special circumstances

If your family’s financial situation should change and affect your parents’ ability to contribute to your

educational expenses, the Office of Financial Aid may be able to help. Contact a member of the counseling

staff in the Office of Financial Aid as soon as possible regarding any difficulties created by your circumstances.

You may be asked to provide written documentation to the Office of Financial Aid regarding these

changes. Your situation will be reviewed by the financial aid committee and you will be notified of any

changes. Additional aid for special circumstances will generally consist of increased loan eligibility. However,

41


in very rare instances, gift assistance may be increased to an existing financial aid package (i.e., federal or state

grants).

Financial Aid Student Rights and Responsibilities

You have the right to ask a school:

• What financial assistance is available, including federal, state and institutional financial aid programs.

• What the deadlines are for submitting financial aid applications.

• What the cost of attendance is and what the policy is on refunds if you withdraw.

• What criteria are used to select financial aid recipients and how it determines your financial aid eligibility;

this process includes how costs for tuition, fees, room and board, books and supplies and

personal and miscellaneous expenses are considered in your budget.

• What resources (such as parental contribution, other financial aid and your assets, etc.) are considered

in calculating your aid eligibility.

• How much of your financial aid eligibility has been met.

• To explain the various programs in your financial aid package.

• What financial aid must be repaid and what is gift aid; if the aid is a loan, you have the right to

know what the interest rate is, the total amount that must be repaid, payback procedures and the

length of time you have to repay the loan and when repayment begins.

• The policy on satisfactory academic progress.

You have the responsibility to:

• Review and consider all information about a school’s program before you enroll.

• Pay special attention to your application for student financial aid, complete it accurately and submit

it on time to the right place. (Intentional misreporting of information on application forms for federal

financial aid is a violation of law and is considered a criminal offense subject to penalties under

the U.S. Criminal Code.)

• Read all documents you are sent regarding your application for assistance and contact the Office of

Financial Aid in writing if corrections are needed.

• Accept or decline the financial aid offered within three weeks of the date the email notification was

sent.

• Return all requested documentation in a reasonable amount of time (within two weeks).

• Read and understand all forms you are asked to sign and keep copies of them.

• Accept responsibility for all agreements you sign.

• Notify your lender of changes in your name, address or school status.

• Perform in a satisfactory manner the work that is agreed upon in accepting a Federal Work-Study

Award.

• Know and comply with your school’s refund procedures.

Tuition and Financial Aid Applicability for Study Abroad

Students who are currently receiving federal and state aid and apply to study abroad must complete the

entire study abroad application process and meet with a financial aid counselor to find out if their financial

aid will apply to the study abroad costs. Eligibility is based on the program in which the student is applying.

Students who study abroad will pay Butler University tuition during their semester(s) abroad. Those

who participate in reciprocal exchange programs — through Butler’s bilateral exchanges or ISEP — may

apply 100 percent of their Butler institutional financial aid to their tuition for their semester abroad. Those

who participate in approved study abroad or IFSA programs may apply 50 percent of their Butler institutional

financial aid toward their tuition for their first semester abroad. If the student chooses to enroll for a

second semester 25 percent of their Butler institutional financial aid will be applied.

Financial questions you should consider for study abroad:

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• What does the program fee cover? What additional costs will you incur?

• Is your program choice is compatible with financial aid eligibility?

• If you are counting on financial aid, do you know how much you will receive?

• Are there scholarships or grants available to you?

• Have you already applied for aid or scholarships?

Students planning to study abroad are required to complete a Declaration of Intent to Study Abroad

form, generated by the Office of International Programs. Students must meet with a member of the counseling

staff in the Office of Financial Aid to review financial obligations, assistance and to have their declaration

form signed by a financial aid counselor.

Financial Matters

Tuition, fees and other charges paid by students cover approximately 60 percent of the educational costs

at Butler. The University provides the remaining funds through income from its endowment and gifts from

foundations, business, industry, alumni and friends. Tuition and fee levels are set by the Butler University

Board of Trustees and are subject to change by action of the board.

For financial matters, the college year consists of two semesters and a summer school composed of two

sessions. The academic year comprises the fall and spring semesters. The unit of instruction is the semester

hour, which signifies one recitation a week throughout a semester or an equivalent. Students are billed a flat

rate of tuition when registered between 12 and 20 credit hours. Students are billed a per credit hour rate

when registered in 11 or fewer credit hours. Students enrolled in more than 20 hours are charged an additional

per credit hour rate.

Accept Financial Responsibility

Butler University policy requires each student wishing to enroll in courses to complete the Accept Financial

Responsibility process now included in the finance section of the student center. The Acceptance of Financial

Responsibility statement outlines that each student is assuming responsibility for paying all University-related

expenses. The statement also outlines the penalties that may be incurred by the student if the

University-related expenses are not paid or paid in a timely manner

Student Accounts

Tuition, fees and room and board are due prior to the start of each semester or session, if a student is not

enrolled in the monthly payment plan.

Refund of tuition charges

Students who withdraw from the University during a semester or summer session will receive refunds

for tuition according to the tuition refund schedule available in the Office of Student Accounts. Fall 2009

and spring 2010 refund schedules are available at www.butler.edu/student-accounts/. Click on Refund Policy

and then on Institutional Tuition Refund Schedule for Fall 2009 or Spring 2010. Refunds are computed from

the date on which the requested change is received in the Office of Registration and Records, not from the

date of the last class attended. Fees for orientation week and services used are not refundable. For residence

hall and meal plan refunds, please contact the Office of Residence Life. Students who pay tuition, room

and/or board charges through the monthly payment plan and who withdraw before the account is paid in

full are not relieved from payment of the amount due but will receive credit according to the refund schedule.

Notwithstanding the provisions of the University’s refund policies, if any disciplinary action results in

the suspension or expulsion of a student, the University may refuse to refund, in whole or in part, such student’s

tuition, fees and room and board charges.

Tuition and Fees

Students who register through the early registration process, the total amount due for tuition, fees and

room and board is payable on or before Aug. 4, 2009, for the fall 2009 semester and Jan. 2009, for the

spring 2009 semester, unless the student has enrolled in the Monthly Payment Plan. The student will be

billed approximately one month before the beginning of the semester for these charges. Summer sessions are

43


illed in May, June and July. Students who register after the start of the semester are required to pay by the

due date stated on the billing statement. However they will not have the option of participating in the

monthly payment plan. Students are expected to follow the due dates published on their billing statements

to avoid late fees. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which you are enrolling for the

most accurate information regarding tuition and fees.

Educational Costs 2009-2010

COB, COE, JCFA, LAS

Full time (12–20 hours)

$14,230/semester

1–11 hours $1,200/hr

Each hour above 20 hours

$1,200/hr

College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Full-time (12–20 hrs):

Health Sciences year 1 (pre-Health)

Health Sciences year 2 (pre-Health)

Health Sciences year 3 curriculum

Health Sciences year 4 curriculum

Pharmacy year 1 (pre-Pharmacy)

Pharmacy year 2 (pre-Pharmacy)

Pharmacy year 3 (P1)

Pharmacy year 4 (P2)

Pharmacy year 5 (P3)

PharmD. (6th year only)

-billed 5% Summer I ($1,705),

5% Summer II ($1,705), 45% Fall* ($15,360),

45% Spring* ($15,360)

*Each hour above 20 hours is

1-11hours

Each hour above 20 hours

Graduate tuition

Tuition rate — graduate by college of enrollment:

Liberal Arts and Sciences

MFA Creative Writing

College of Education

Jordan College of Fine Arts

Pharmacy and Health Sciences

PA Masters – Clinical Phase

MBA (continuing )

MBA (new student fall 2009)

MPAcc

Miscellaneous fees

Full-time activity fee

Health and Recreation Complex fee

$14,230/semester

$14,230/semester

$15,390/semester

$15,390/semester

$ 14,230/semester

$ 14,230/semester

$ 15,390/semester

$ 15,390/semester

$ 15,390/semester

$ 34,130/year

$1,270/hour

$1,270/hr

$1,270/hr

$410/hr

$600/hr

$410/hr

$410/hr

$550/hr

$440/hr

$550/hr

$600/hr

$550/hr

$138/semester

$255/semester

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Applied music course fee

First year student Welcome Week fee

Transfer student Welcome Week fee

New student early registration fee

Residence hall program fee

COPHS mobile computing fee

COPHS mobile computing fee (P4 only)

$210/credit hour

$120(one time fee)

$ 80(one time fee)

$100(one time fee)

$35/year

$475/semester

$150/semester

Room and board rates

Ross Hall/Schwitzer Hall

Triple Room

Double Room

Single Room

Residential College (ResCo)

Double Room

Single Room

University Terrace

Shared Room

Single Room

Studio Apartment

Apartment Village

Single Room

$1,890/semester

$2,140/semester

$3,185/semester

$2,385/semester

$3,435/semester

$2,775/semester

$3,280/semester

$3,790/semester

$3,780/semester

Board Rates

Unlimited Meal Plan plus $75

$2,485/semester

290 Block Meal Plan plus $100 $2,485/semester

240 Block Meal Plan plus $150 $2,485/semester

180 Block Meal Plan plus $200 $2,485/semester

Commuter Meal Plans

75 Block Meal Plan plus $300 $760/semester

50 Block Meal Plan plus $400 $760/semester

The above costs do not include books, supplies, long distance telephone, parking decal, library fines, library

replacement fees and other incidental expenses that the student may incur during the course of the academic

year.

Educational Costs 2009-2010

Tuition and fees for the 2009-2010 academic year are published in the fall 2009 and the spring 2010

Schedule of Classes. The fall 2009 schedule is available in the Office of Registration and Records. It is also

located on the Office of Student Accounts website at www.butler.edu/studentaccounts/.

Payment Terms

Students who register through the early registration process for fall receive their first bill in July. Early

registered students must pay in full by Aug. 4, 2009, or enroll in a monthly payment plan. Failure to do so

45


may result in the cancellation of classes. Students who register at the beginning of classes will be required to

pay all charges as billed.

The University offers a payment plan for eligible students. To participate, the student needs to complete

the online registration process between July 9 and Aug. 10, 2009, for the fall semester. The payment plan

allows you to divide your semester’s tuition, fees, room and board costs and miscellaneous charges into manageable

monthly payments. Since the payment plan is not a loan, there is no interest or finance charge. However,

a participation fee is charged. Plan payments will be due as billed. If plan payments are not received on

or before the due date listed on the statement, a late fee will be assessed. People with past due balances or

poor payment histories with the University will be denied participation in the payment plan. All past due

balances must be paid before a student will be allowed to enroll for a new semester. There is no payment

plan for the summer sessions.

Students who have not paid their balance in full by the due date or are not enrolled in the monthly payment

plan will be assessed a monthly finance charge of 18 percent APR. Students who choose to be enroll in

the “all terms” payment plan for fall 2009 will automatically be included in payment plan for all subsequent

spring and fall terms. Students who did not choose the all terms payment plan option for the fall 2009

and/or spring 2010 semester(s) and wish to be included in the fall 2010 payment plan must enroll in the

payment plan online.

The University provides a tuition prepayment plan, which guarantees a fixed tuition rate for all pre-paid

semesters. The prepaid tuition rates are based on the first term in which the student participates in the prepaid

program. This program applies only to students enrolled on a full-time basis in an undergraduate degree

program or PharmD. The pre-payment plan does not apply to graduate programs. Contact the Office of

Student Accounts for contract and cost information.

Tuition refund schedule

Students should contact the Office of Student Accounts if you plan to reduce the number of credit hours

enrolled or withdraw from the University. Refund schedules are available from the Office of Student Accounts

and are also available on our website www.butler.edu/student-accounts. Any student receiving any

financial assistance must contact the Office of Financial Aid PRIOR to changing their enrollment.

Outside billing

The University will bill a third party for tuition, room and board as well as fees provided a voucher

and/or written authorization is received by the Office of Student Accounts prior to the beginning of each semester

and payment will be made on or before the first day of that semester. The University will not bill any

employer or third party who pays upon completion of the course.

Any balance remaining unpaid by the first day of the semester will be assessed a monthly finance charge

of 18% APR. If the third party will not pay the finance charge, the student will be responsible for payment.

Students will continue to receive a billing statement directly from Butler University until the account balance

is paid in full. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the third party payer to determine why a delay

in payment has occurred.

Unpaid items charges

A student who is past due in any debt to Butler University is not permitted to register in any college of

the University and is not entitled to a written official/unofficial transcript or grade report from the Office of

Registration and Records until the indebtedness has been paid. Any check presented to the University that

fails to clear the bank, shall be subject to a $25 handling charge. If the check is for payment of a debt, it also

will be considered non-payment.

Board fees will be refunded only in the case of a student on food contract who withdraws completely

from the University. Refunds for board fees will be made on a monthly basis beginning the first of the

month following the date a student officially vacates the residence hall.

Students who pay tuition through the monthly payment plan and who withdraw before the account is

paid in full are not relieved from payment of the amount due, but will be credited according to the refund

schedule.

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Notwithstanding the provisions of the University’s refund policies, if any disciplinary action results in

the suspension or expulsion of a student from Butler, housing or any activity, the University may refuse to

refund, in whole or in part, the student’s tuition, fees or room and board charges.

When a student is in possession of University property or owes a particular department for charges not

applied to the student account, the department may request a department requested hold be placed on a student's

record. This hold is removed upon confirmation from the requesting department. This hold also prevents

the release of written official/unofficial transcript or grade report from the University.

Delinquent bill accounts

Students who have not met their financial obligations to the University are refused written grades and/or

transcripts and readmission to Butler University. In the event that Butler has to hire a collection company or

attorney to collect delinquent accounts, the student must reimburse Butler for reasonable collection fees, or

attorney fees and court costs.

Business Services

Checks totaling up to $100 per day may be cashed by registered students with a valid Butler ID card at

the Office of Student Accounts during the posted cashiering hours. The University reserves the right to deny

check cashing privileges for those on financial hold or who have a history of returned checks with the university.

A $25 charge will be assessed to anyone having a check returned for any reason. Any returned check

that has not been cleared may result in the holding of grades and the loss of check-cashing privileges. Money

orders are available for purchase up to a maximum of $200 each. Money orders must be purchased with

cash only. A valid Butler ID card must be presented to purchase a money order and a $2 fee must be paid at

the time the money order is purchased.

Withdrawals

Withdrawals for reasons other than medical must be made through the office of the dean of the college in

which the student is enrolled. Non-attendance does not constitute a valid withdrawal. Medical withdrawals

must be made through the office of the vice president for student affairs.

Health Services

Health Services, located in the Health and Recreation Complex, provides health care on an outpatient basis

to all students enrolled at Butler University. It is staffed full time by registered nurses and part time by

physicians. It provides treatment for minor illnesses and emergencies. All treatment is based on protocols

approved by the medical director.

Students need not make an appointment to see a nurse. However, an appointment is needed to see a

physician. To make that appointment, the student must first be triaged by one of the Health Services nurses.

Women’s and men’s health appointments are the exception – a student may call and make an appointment

by speaking with the nurse.

If students need medical attention before a physician is available, they will be referred to one of the area’s

immediate care centers or to an emergency room. If medical attention is needed after Health Services is

closed, the student can call BUPD (9396), and they will help the student get medical attention.

Hours: (subject to change)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Physician hours:

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

8 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

8 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

8 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

9 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

8 a.m.–1:30 a.m.

noon–7:30 p.m.

noon–3:30 p.m.

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Friday 8 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Women’s/Men’s Health Appointments

Appointments can be made throughout the week.

Allergy injections

Allergy injections are given to students at the following times

Monday

10:30 a.m.–3 p.m.

Tuesday

9:30 a.m.–3 p.m.

Wednesday

1– 6:30 p.m.

Thursday

noon–3 p.m.

Allergy injections will be given only under the direction of the student’s allergist. It is mandatory that the

student remains at health services for at least 20 minutes and be checked by a nurse following the injection

in case of an emergency. The health services nurses can order refills for the student as needed.

Billing

Health Services will bill insurance companies. The student must bring their insurance card to every

visit. If your company is an HMO or POS please check our website at www.butler.edu/health-services for

further information. If the student receives health care that is not covered by their insurance company, a receipt

for payment will be given at their request. If the student has a co-pay, it can be billed to their student

account along with any other services not covered by the insurance company.

Class excuses

When a student must be absent from a class, a laboratory or an examination for medical reasons, it is the

student’s responsibility to discuss this directly with their professor. Health Services staff cannot excuse you

from class. Under certain circumstances Health Services will give a student written verification of the date of

their visit to the center. This should not be considered an excuse to miss class. In the case of a student who is

hospitalized or has a prolonged illness, the health services staff will communicate with the appropriate student

affairs dean’s office regarding the illness, but only with the permission of the student.

Student Health Record – MANDATORY

A student health record is required to be on file at Health Services by Aug. 1 or Jan. 1 of each year. If

Health Services does not receive a health record or the health record is incomplete, the student’s ability to

register for the next semester will be placed on hold until the requirements are met. For athletes – the health

record must be submitted to Health Services and your athletic health form to athletics. Please make sure the

forms are sent to the appropriate areas. A patient’s Bill of Rights and Responsibilities as well as the Notice of

Health Information Practices is available at Health Services.

Health Insurance – MANDATORY

A copy (front and back) of the student’s health insurance card needs to be included in the health record.

Butler University offers an insurance plan through Student Resources part of United Healthcare. To look at

that plan, you may visit their website at www.uhcsr.com/, or visit our website at

http://www.butler.edu/health-services/.

Immunizations:

Health Services offers a variety of immunizations. Please visit www.butler.edu/health-services or call

(317) 940-9385 for more details. We offer flu shots to students in the late fall and early winter for free.

Infectious waste

Current legislation requires health-care providers to notify their clients about proper disposal of infectious

waste. This waste includes needles and syringes used by the students administering their own injections.

Butler students must inform the health services nurses if they self-administer injections. The nurse

will issue, free of charge, a safety container in which to place their used equipment. When the container becomes

full, the student must return it to health services for proper disposal. The student will then be issued

another container. The student administering his own injections is responsible for compliance with this law.

A notice must be posted in each housing unit for all students and employees to read. Each housing unit is

encouraged to make this policy known and enforced.

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Medicines

Health Services will provide some over-the-counter medicines to students on an as needed basis. There

are also a limited amount of prescription meds available at Health Services for the physicians to dispense.

The student may pay for these by cash, check or charging to their student account. We do not bill insurance

companies for meds nor are we able to accept prescription cards.

Medical records

Medical records are maintained by Health Services and are strictly confidential. In accordance with professional

standards, provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and the other relevant

privacy laws, the health services staff is unable to discuss with a third party (including a parent) anything

in the student’s medical record unless the student signs a detailed release authorizing the release of

health information.

Payment of medical services

Students are responsible for payment of all medical services outside health services. Payment for those

services will be required at the time of service. It is also important to have medical insurance information

available. The student is responsible for determining which outside health-care provider the student may or

may not see under their insurance plan. There may be a fee attached to some of the tests run at health services

that can be paid for by cash, check, or charged to the student’s account. Health Services will run tests ordered

by our physician or any other medical professional.

Prescription drugs

If a student has a prescription that needs to be filled, there are several pharmacies in close proximity to

the Butler campus. One of those pharmacies will deliver on campus to the Health Services for the student to

pick up (There is a fee to deliver on campus). To receive that benefit, the medicine must be paid for in advance.

Health Services physicians do not prescribe or write prescriptions for antidepressants, ADHD meds, etc.

Those students who will be in need of those types of meds will need to talk with their prescribing MD.

Health Education and Outreach

The Health Education and Outreach office is located in the Health and Recreation Complex. The health

education office addresses critical issues affecting college students by coordinating the peer education programs

(PAWS and GEAR), providing direct programming and consultation to students in areas related to

health and wellness and by coordinating the Victim Advocate Program. Butler University’s Victim Advocate

Program offers support and information for victims of sexual assault, interpersonal violence and harassment

by trained staff members. Support is available 24-hours a day from a Victim Advocate by calling (317)

910-5572. The coordinator for Health Education and Outreach can be contacted at (317) 940-8311. Please

visit www.butler.edu/health-education/ for more information about programs and services coordinated

through this office.

Health Officer

The vice president for student affairs or designee serves as the University health officer. In consultation

with appropriate medical and University personnel, he/she may direct the following at his/her sole discretion:

• He/She may require any student to withdraw from the University at any time if the vice president

determines the student’s condition may constitute a hazard to him/herself, any other students or the

campus community.

• He/She may require any student to submit to a psychological/psychiatric assessment to determine

whether that student’s behavior may constitute a hazard to her/himself, any other student, or the

campus community

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• He/She may require any former student or prospective student to obtain and submit a medical clearance

to the University before being admitted or readmitted to the University where the vice president

determines this is in the best interest of the student, the University or the campus community.

• He/She may require any student to withdraw from the University if the vice president determines

the student likely has a medical condition that interferes with their attendance or progress at the

University. At the vice president’s sole discretion he/she may recommend voluntary withdrawal to

the student as an alternative to requiring the student to withdrawal.

• He/She may enforce compliance with the Infectious Waste Law.

Identification Cards

Every registered Butler student must carry a Butler ID card. Cards are issued Monday through Friday

from 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., at BUPD, 525 W. Hampton Drive. ID cards have a number of purposes: to

check out library books; to access some facilities; to obtain student discounts and to receive food services.

There is a replacement fee of $20 for a lost or damaged card. A stolen card will be replaced at no charge, provided

the student files a police report.

Intercollegiate Athletics

Butler University is a Division I member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Student-athletes

at Butler University are known as “Bulldogs” and proudly wear the official school colors of blue

and white.

The women compete in basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, indoor and

outdoor track and volleyball. The men field intercollegiate teams in baseball, basketball, cross country, football,

golf, soccer, indoor and outdoor track and tennis.

Eighteen of Butler’s 19 teams compete in the Horizon League, along with Cleveland State, Detroit, Illinois-Chicago,

Loyola Chicago, Wisconsin-Green Bay, Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Wright State, Valparaiso and

Youngstown State. The Butler University football team, Division I-AA, is a member of the Pioneer Football

League, which includes Campbell, Davidson, Dayton, Drake, Marist, Morehead State, San Diego, University

of Jacksonville and Valparaiso.

Butler University students are admitted to regular season home athletic events at no cost with a valid student

ID. For more information on intercollegiate athletics visit www.butlersports.com/.

International Students

International students are welcome at Butler University. Considerable efforts are made to provide an enriching

campus experience for citizens of other countries while they pursue their educational goals. International

students heighten the awareness of the interdependent world in which we live, foster mutual understanding

and promote international involvement for the entire Butler family.

Upon arrival at Butler, international students must report to the Office of International Student Services,

which is responsible for all matters pertaining to proper maintenance of status with the U.S. Citizenship and

Immigration Service (USCIS, formerly INS). Every international student must:

• Maintain full-time student status during fall and spring semesters (12 hours for undergraduates

and nine hours for graduate students)

• Contact the international student advisor prior to dropping any classes or changing any aspect of the

previous plan of study, including transfer, graduation or leaving the country

• Discuss any potential employment with the international student advisor. (Severe penalties exist for

violation of employment regulations, including deportation. This applies to on-campus and offcampus

internships and practical training)

• Report any change in residence or telephone to the Office of International Student Services and to the

Office of Registration and Records within 10 days

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• Have valid health insurance coverage and a completed health record on file at Health Services

A multitude of activities is planned each year for Butler students. Every international student is encouraged

to participate in at least one campus activity and to seek out opportunities to become integrated into the

community. Additionally, there are special orientations and programming for new international students

prior to the start of the fall and spring semesters. All support services for new and returning international

students at Butler University are available by contacting the Office of International Student Services at ext.

9888. This campus is “user friendly.”

Late Night Event Policies

A “Late Night Event” is an event sponsored by a student organization(s) that extends past 11 p.m.

These events are on a Friday or Saturday night and are typically alcohol free. Recognized Butler University

student organizations may sponsor campus-wide late night social events on Friday and Saturday nights until

2 a.m.

The location for late night events shall be in Atherton Union, HRC and Hinkle West Gym. Events

must be registered four (4) weeks in advance with Conferences and Special Events and PuLSE. No events

will be scheduled the Friday prior to or during designated University extended breaks.

Butler has two late night event policies – one for events that are only open to the Butler student

community and the other is for events that may be opened to and promoted to individuals not associated

with Butler. The former, a “Butler only” event, requires a Butler faculty/staff advisor and a facility person to

be present. The latter policy requires security and a faculty/staff advisor to be present.

The complete policy and a Late Night Event Checklist can be obtained in the PuLSE office and

online in the policies for student organizations.

Lost and Found

Lost and found items should be taken to BUPD, 525 W. Hampton Drive. If you lose an item on campus,

check to see if it has been returned to BUPD.

Mail

The U.S. Postal Service, FedEx and UPS deliver directly to each residence hall. Stamps can be purchased

and packages can be mailed at the mail center in Jordan Hall, Room 114. Packing materials are available at

the Jordan Hall Mail Center or in the Holcomb Mail Center, Room 021. A public fax machine is also available

in the Holcomb Mail Center. The HB Mail Center hours are Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. The

Jordan Hall Mail Center hours are 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. We accept cash only.

Motorist Assistance Program

The Butler University Police Department provides assistance to motorists on campus for the following

situations: gasoline, disabled vehicle, vehicle unlock assistance and vehicle jumpstart.

Network Infrastructure

The Butler Network is a joint effort between Information Resources and Facilities Management that provides

voice and data services to the entire Butler campus. The Butler network is accessible by high-speed

Ethernet, wireless or dial-up connection and provides connectivity for computers, printers, phones and a

myriad of other IP enabled devices. The Butler network supports all generally accepted computing platforms

(Macintosh, Windows, Unix/Linux) and is available to all students, faculty and staff. Use of the Butler network

is governed by Butler’s computer use policy. For further information visit www.butler.edu/ir/.

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Off-Campus Students

The Off-Campus Students Organization office is located in Atherton Union, Room 12 (across from the

computer lab). A study lounge is located next to the Efroymson Diversity Center in the lower level of Atherton

Union. The lounge has lockers which off-campus students may utilize. Locks may be checked out at the

off-campus student office. The off-campus students’ bulletin board is in the lower level of Atherton Union

just outside the off-campus students’ office. For additional information on programs and services for commuter

students, check out the Off-Campus Students Organization website at www.butler.edu/commuter/,

stop by or call the Off-Campus Students Organization office, (317) 940-6566 or the PuLSE office, Atherton

Union, 101, (317) 940-9262.

Operation Identification

This is a crime prevention program designed to discourage theft by permanently identifying valuables.

Engravers are available to be signed out by individuals or groups from BUPD, 525 W. Hampton Drive.

Parking

Students are permitted to park only in the appropriate designated student parking areas.

Students are not allowed to park on neighborhood streets.

• Parking spaces for the disabled are plainly marked.

• All parking violations may result in a citation. An appeal may be filed in writing to the chief of police

or online via the BUPD website, if the ticket written is in error. Fines may be paid in person at

the student accounts office located in Jordan Hall, Room 104 or by mail.

• Vehicles illegally parked in a disabled space, in violation of the emergency snow zones during winter,

blocking a dumpster or in a fire zone or in posted tow away zones may be towed immediately. In

addition, repeat violators may be immobilized or towed upon the third violation.

• Parking fines will be automatically transferred to the student’s University account. Unpaid fines may

result in a hold being placed on the student’s grades and transcripts.

Peer Education

Peers Advocating Wellness for Students (PAWS) is Butler’s campus-wide peer health education group.

Greeks as Educators Advocates and Resources (GEAR) is Butler’s peer health education group trained to

serve as a resource for students within the Greek community. PAWS and GEAR collaborate with a variety of

campus offices to enhance the health and safety of the student community. A variety of programs and initiatives

are planned throughout the year such as small group discussions, presentations, media campaigns and

awareness weeks. The issues addressed by PAWS and GEAR include alcohol and other drug awareness,

stress management, body image, eating disorders, sexual assault, sexual health and relationships. Training

for peer educators is ongoing through meetings, workshops and conferences. For information about becoming

involved with PAWS or GEAR or to learn how these groups can provide education and support to individuals

and groups on campus please contact the coordinator for Health Education and Outreach Programs

at (317) 940-8311.

Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE)

The Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) office strives to enhance student learning

and development through leadership, service and other hands-on involvement opportunities. In partnership

with students, we believe in creating a challenging and supportive environment that encourages social and

educational development through participation in student organizations, leadership programs, service opportunities

and the activities provided in Atherton Union.

The PuLSE office provides assistance with student involvement, leadership and community service.

Some of these functions include:

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Advising. Members of the PuLSE office advise several student organizations including all branches of the

Student Government Association (SGA), Fall Alternative Break (FAB), Alternative Spring Break (ASB) and

Ambassadors of Change (AOC).

Leadership training. A number of workshops and retreats are offered for the new and/or seasoned student

leader.

Legacy Leadership program. The PuLSE office coordinates the legacy leadership program which focuses

on personal leadership skills, organizational leadership issues and development of community.

Service consultations. Members of the Volunteer Center and the PuLSE office can help individuals and

student organizations connect to a variety of ongoing or one-time service opportunities within the Indianapolis

community and beyond.

Service learning. Members of the PuLSE office work with various entities on campus and within the

community on service-learning initiatives.

Student organization accounts. Student organizations may conduct a variety of financial transactions within

the office. Students can check organizational account balances, make deposits and receive cash advances. Please

note, every recognized student organization must maintain its financial account at Butler University (for full

policy see Organization Funds page 58)

Student organization consultations. Members of the PuLSE office can help individuals and groups

with a variety of organizational needs including event planning, developing goals, resolving conflict, fundraising

and transitioning.

Student organization records. The office maintains student organization records including constitutions,

lists of officers, lists of advisors and various reports completed by the organization. Each December

organizations must complete a fall semester report. Each spring, the office conducts a recognition process in

which all organizations must submit updated information. Anyone who wishes to form an organization must

begin the process through this office.

Volunteer Center. The office supervises the student-run Volunteer Center located in Atherton 100. The

center provides a variety of ways for students to get involved in the Indianapolis community including a

weekly listserv and monthly service projects.

The PuLSE office is also glad to assist any student organization with programming, goal setting, fundraising,

service project planning and any other type of leadership development. A variety of resources are

available in this office:

Leadership library. Students can find books and other resources on a variety of leadership topics and

skills (i.e., icebreakers, team builders, assertiveness, committee recruitment, meeting management) to check

out on-loan as resources.

Master calendar. A list of campus activities and student organization events can be found in this office.

This calendar is subject to change.

Organization mailboxes. Each recognized student organization has a mailbox located in the Atherton

Union study lounge. Organization mail that is received by the PuLSE office as well as University correspondence

is put in these mailboxes.

Reservation “blue” forms. Student organizations use these forms to reserve meeting rooms and activity

space across campus. Students can pick these forms up in the PuLSE office or online at

http://www.butler.edu/about/conferences-special-events/general-information.

Recreation Department

Located in the Health and Recreation Complex, along with Counseling and Consultation Services and

Health Services, the Department of Recreation offers students various activities to promote comprehensive

health. Hours of operation are posted on the HRC website at www.butler.edu/hrc/. Contact the recreation

department at (317) 940-4REC or the Health and Recreation Complex desk at (317) 940-4HRC for more

information. The areas within the recreation department are as follows:

Aquatics

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Provides swim lessons for beginners through skilled swimmers as well as exercise classes and lifeguard

training. Open swim time in the pool (six lanes), hot tub and sauna are also available. Visit

www.butler.edu/recreation/aquatics/.

Challenge Education

Whether you are looking to do something a little out of your comfort zone by flying through the air 38

feet above-ground, by getting a workout climbing our outdoor tower, or you want to try team-building exercises

on the low course, the challenge education program has something for you. Outdoor recreation activities

including canoe trips, nature hikes and more are also being planned!

www.butler.edu/recreation/challenge/

Club Sports

Enjoy an activity that involves sport but don’t know where to turn? Look no more. This programming

area encompasses students who want to participate in a sport as a form of recreation and competition.

If a club sport isn’t currently offered that you would like to join, contact the recreation department and

they will work with you to start your own. Approximately 20 club sports are offered including soccer, volleyball,

lacrosse, crew, hockey and many more. Regardless of gender, skill level or experience – a club sport

is waiting for you! Visit www.butler.edu/recreation/clubs/.

Fitness

Over thirty group exercise classes each week, massage therapy, personal training and educational seminars

are areas within our fitness program. Go online at www.butler.edu/recreation/fitness/ for updates on

class schedules that will include everything from Pilates and yoga to traditional aerobics, cycling, dance and

more. Relaxing and rejuvenating massage are also available. Meet with one of our fitness supervisors and

learn proper use of equipment. Do you want to get started on an exercise program, but don’t know where to

begin? Set up an appointment with one of our certified personal trainers. Join the fun and get active!

Intramural Sports

Intramural sports are competitive, fun, social and exciting. Students, faculty and staff compete against each

other in sports like football, basketball, volleyball, soccer, softball and dodge ball. Look for even more activities

and events to come. Participate as a casual player or compete in our year-round Top Dawg competition

in which organizations and teams can compete throughout the year based on points obtained by participation

and results. Visit www.butler.edu/recreation/intramurals/.

Religious/Spiritual Life at Butler

The spiritual and religious needs of the Butler community are addressed by a number of dedicated individuals

and student-led groups. Clergy are available for conferences and spiritual advising. Information

regarding University recognized groups and community spiritual/religious opportunities and resources is

available through the Butler Center for Faith and Vocation, www.butler.edu/cfv/; (317) 923-7253; or by

visiting the center located in the Blue House, 4615 Sunset Ave., directly across from Clowes Memorial Hall.

The Butler Catholic Community sponsors worship Sundays at 1:30 p.m. in the Johnson Room of

Robertson Hall. Grace Unlimited-Lutheran/Episcopal Campus Ministry and the United Methodist Outreach

offer worship Sundays at 7 p.m. at the Blue House. Campus Crusade for Christ, an evangelical Christian

group, presents a weekly praise service and supports student-led Bible studies across campus. Butler

Hillel, the Jewish student group, hosts weekly gatherings and monthly Shabbat dinners at the Blue House.

Voices of Deliverance is a vibrant gospel choir steeped in the African-American Christian tradition. Young

Life connects college students interested in mentoring middle and high school students. Veritas is a Christian

organization devoted to discussion and reflection about faith and conviction. The Orthodox Christian

Fellowship holds weekly prayer at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Blue House. The Muslim Students Association,

the Butler Interfaith Council and the Shambala and Buddhist Meditation Group are the newest religious

groups serving campus. If you don’t find a faith group on campus that fits your interest, visit the center

staff. They can help you make a connection on campus or in the greater Indianapolis area.

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A wide range of programs dealing with spirituality and pursuing a life of purpose is also offered through

the Center for Faith and Vocation. The center helps students consider how their perspectives on religion and

spirituality affect what they want to do with their lives through one-on-one advising, small group discussions,

internships with faith-based organizations and seminars. Butler honors the diverse religious and

spiritual commitments of students, faculty and staff and encourages distinct faith expression and interfaith

understanding.

Space and Event Reservation

Atherton Union has a limited number of rooms for conferences, meetings and student organization

events. Student organizations requesting meeting space on campus must fill out a reservation form (blue

form). This form must be signed by a member of the PuLSE staff, a member of Greek Life and Orientation

Programs (if applicable) and then turned in at the Office of Conferences and Special Events in Jordan Hall,

Room (JH 18). Rooms will be reserved based on availability. Forms can be found in the PuLSE office or at

http://www.butler.edu/about/conferences-special-events/general-information. Please note some requests may

be denied based on the organization’s standing with the University or the type of activity proposed.

Reservations for the tables located on either side of the Atherton Union Marketplace Cafeteria, and inside

of Starbucks may be made with the PuLSE office. Because space is limited, tables may be reserved for two

days in a row and up to three days in a week. The table located in Residential College (ResCo) is reserved at

the ResCo front desk. Groups must use the reservation form to reserve tables on Starbucks patio.

In most cases, classes and most external groups (with the exception of employers and vendors) may contact

Conferences and Special Events directly. Classes and external groups interested in reserving tables within

Atherton Union and Starbucks must contact the PuLSE office. Verification from faculty members may be

requested for class reservations.

To accommodate any special set-up needs such as requests for tents, barricades or audiovisual equipment,

students should initiate the space reservation process with the PuLSE office at least 30 days prior to the

event. Events that require roadblocks must be submitted at least 60 days prior to the date of the event. If a

scheduled event requiring the attendance of police officers is canceled, Conferences and Special Events and

BUPD must be notified at least seven business days in advance, or payment for the services of the officers

will still be required. Organizations sponsoring any events are responsible for maintaining University rules

and regulations. Those groups who hold events on campus without permission may face disciplinary action.

Only recognized student organizations may schedule events.

If an event will go past 11 p.m., please refer to the “Late Night” policy form which can be obtained from

the PuLSE office, Greek Life office or Conferences and Special Events Office.

Starbucks Café

Starbucks Café is located next to the bookstore in Atherton Union. Starbucks is the perfect meeting place

for studying, socializing and enjoying coffeehouse entertainment.

Student Affairs

Butler University is genuinely concerned about the overall quality of life of its students. The administrative

responsibility for the supervision of the co-curricular life of the University community rests with the

vice president for student affairs and his staff. Furthermore, the vice president for student affairs and members

of the student affairs staff are committed to preserving and protecting the human dignity of all individuals

and groups. They do not discriminate against any individual student or student group on the basis

of age, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, national origin or any other legally protected category.

The Division of Student Affairs is composed of various offices and support areas throughout the campus

as follows: residence life, dining services, health services, counseling and consultation services, health educa-

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tion and outreach programs, diversity programs, Greek life and orientation programs, international student

services, recreation, programs for leadership and service education (PuLSE) and University bands and spirit

programs.

Professional staff members are available in all these areas to assist students with any needs or concerns. A

complete listing of these offices and their phone numbers can be found at the beginning of the student

handbook.

Student Organizations

The University encourages participation in student activities and organizations and acknowledges such

participation as a vital part of a student’s total educational experience. In keeping with this philosophy, the

University offers a wide range of student activities, including honoraria, special-interest groups, athletics,

service organizations, spiritual services, student government and social fraternities and sororities.

A recognized student organization is defined as a group comprised of a minimum of four currently enrolled

Butler undergraduate students that is recognized by the Student Government Association (SGA), Programs

for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) office, Office of Greek Life and Orientation Programs

(if applicable) and University administration. Organizations also must be in good standing with the University.

To remain in good standing, each student organization must fulfill annual requirements as established

by the PuLSE office, maintain a positive student organization financial account and may not be on any disciplinary

probation.

Failure to comply with these requirements could result in the student organization account being frozen,

the loss of the privileges to utilize Butler facilities and other privileges of being a recognized student organization.

List of Organizations

Information regarding student organizations (including an updated list of all student organizations), is

maintained by the PuLSE office and may be found at www.butler.edu/involvement/.

Questions

Please contact us at the PuLSE office, Atherton Union 101, (317) 940-9262,

http://www.butler.edu/involvement or email at involvement@butler.edu.

Student Organizations, policies and procedures

The following policies and procedures have been established to provide oversight from the University

and continuity for student organizations. It is our hope that these policies and procedures will help each student

organization and its members to be successful in their efforts.

Code of Conduct

Student organizations and their members must comply with all rules, regulations and the Rules of Conduct

found in the “Rights and Responsibilities” section of the student handbook, page 89. Organizations

failing to comply will be subject to student conduct proceedings. This includes but is not limited to events,

activities, programs and king/queen contests.

Contracts

All contracts for entertainment, legal agreements, publications etc., must be signed by the director of

Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE), and cannot be signed by students or advisors.

Contracts must be submitted in a timely fashion.

Faculty/Staff Advisors

Every student organization and Greek chapter is required to have a full time Butler University faculty/staff

member serve as an advisor. These volunteers decide to become faculty/staff advisors because they

feel they can contribute to the success of the student organization and its members. While their roles may vary

from group to group, they generally offer continuity, support and guidance.

The faculty/staff advisor and the student organization president will accept their position through the

on-line recognition system and submit it as part of the annual recognition process, by a designated date in the

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spring semester. Failure to submit this or any other required registration information could result in the

student organization account being frozen, the loss of the privilege of using Butler facilities and other privileges

of being a recognized student organization. The PuLSE office provides support and serves as a resource

for advisors.

Fundraisers

Permission to hold any function or event for profit must be obtained from the PuLSE office. Fundraising

proposal forms are available in the PuLSE office and require the signature of the faculty/staff advisor

for the student organization, the director of Greek Life and Orientation Programs for Greek chapters (if applicable)

and a signature of a member of the PuLSE office staff. Forms must be submitted prior to the fundraiser

and in a timely manner.

Any organization sponsoring such an event is responsible for all incurred debts. All funds derived from

the student organization-sponsored event should be deposited at the PuLSE office. Disbursements from these

funds are to be processed by the office as well.

There are certain restrictions to food and other outside vendors due to campus-wide contracts which include

Pepsi. Outside groups brought in for fundraising purposes must be approved by the director of the

PuLSE office. Credit card companies will not be approved. Groups seeking assistance in planning a fundraiser

may contact the PuLSE office.

Late Night Policy

Any event that lasts past 11 p.m. is considered a late night event. Late night events typically involve

more security measures and have a separate application process. Request forms for a late night event must be

submitted at least four weeks in advance with the PuLSE office. The complete Late Night Event Policy is listed

on page 51 and also can be obtained from the PuLSE office, Greek Life office or Conferences and Special

Events office.

Master Calendar Meeting

As a service to student organizations, the master calendar meeting is held each spring to assist with event

coordination. Student organizations are given the opportunity to schedule space on campus before all other

campus offices and departments. Dates and spaces are tentatively held at the master calendar meeting for the

following fall and spring programs. Organizations must submit the reservation “blue” form (signed by all

appropriate offices) to the Conferences and Special Events office. Organizations that fail to submit the forms

run the risk of losing their tentatively held space. Groups who do not attend this meeting may not find an

open date for their all-campus event(s).

As the PuLSE office maintains a list of all campus events, should a group decide to change the date of its

all-campus event, the office asks for updates. Once new event dates are confirmed with the Conferences and

Special Events office, updates can be shared with the PuLSE office by emailing involvement@butler.edu. Requests

for date changes should be made at least one month prior to the event.

Those groups who hold events on campus without permission may face disciplinary action. Only recognized

student organizations may schedule events.

New Organizations

The constitution of any proposed new student organization must be endorsed by Student Government

Association (SGA) executive board, and approved by the director of PuLSE, the director of Greek Life and

Orientation Programs (if applicable) and the dean of student life. An initial meeting with the director of

PuLSE to review the group’s constitution is required.

The constitution must include notification that the organization will not discriminate on the basis of

race, age, disability, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, residence or any other legally-protected category

as well as attempt to be accessible to all regardless of physical or mental disability. All officers must be

currently enrolled Butler students.

Additionally, each student organization must have a minimum of four currently enrolled Butler student

members and a full-time faculty/staff advisor to become a recognized organization. Until approval has been

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given, a new organization may meet only for the purpose of organizing itself. Fraternities, sororities

and related councils must work with the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

Once students wishing to establish a new organization have met with the director of the PuLSE office, the

group must complete an application for a new student organization form, a President/Advisor Statement of

Understanding, a proposed list of officers and provide an electronic version of the proposed constitution to

the SGA vice president of administration. These completed forms are turned into the PuLSE office. A representative

of the proposed organization must contact the SGA vice president of administration to be placed on

the SGA executive board agenda. The organization must present itself to the SGA executive board at a designated

meeting. The board will discuss the potential organization and determine whether it is endorsed by

SGA. Appeals of the SGA executive board’s decision may be taken to SGA assembly. Appeals must be

submitted in writing to the SGA president.

If the group is endorsed by SGA, the group’s application will be given to the director of PuLSE and the

dean of student life for final University approval. Please come to the PuLSE office with any questions and to

receive the necessary paperwork to proceed.

Office Space

Atherton Union has a limited number of rooms for student organization offices. Those organizations

must use the space for more than storage. Organizations having office space must post the hours when the

office will be open which should be at least five hours per week. Keys will be issued to the officers of each

organization by the PuLSE office. If the key is lost, stolen or not returned at the end of the academic year, the

costs associated with re-coring the lock and making new keys will be charged to the student checking out the

key. No refund will be made if the original key is later found. Any other organizational members needing to

use their respective offices should request entry from the PuLSE office or the student organization officers.

Requests for student organization office space should be submitted to the PuLSE office each academic

year and will be reviewed during the spring term for the following year. There is a separate process for office

space allocation in the Efroymson Diversity Center. For more information, contact the director of diversity

programs and the Efroymson Diversity Center. Please contact the PuLSE office for the detailed guidelines and

application form.

Organization Funds

Every student organization must maintain its financial account at Butler University. Outside bank accounts

are strictly prohibited. Student organization accounts are maintained in the PuLSE office. All deposits,

withdrawals and check requests should be made through this office.

An individual can only have one cash advance open at any given time. A cash advance must be reconciled

before another can be opened. It must be reconciled within two weeks. Cash advances are also limited to

one per an event.

Presidents and/or other officers are given financial information at the beginning of each academic year

and then on a monthly basis. Contact the PuLSE office at (317) 940-9262 with any questions. Student organizations

carrying a negative balance are considered inactive and may not hold campus events.

Promotion

Signs, posters, chalkings, table tents or any other promotion material not in accordance with the following

guidelines will be removed immediately. Additionally, individuals and campus organizations have and

assume full responsibility and liability for the signs, posters, chalkings, table tents or any other promotional

material that they post, and should realize that legal action may be possible against persons or members of

groups who participate in defamatory action, intentional infliction of emotional distress or such other causes

recognized and allowed by law.

Sign Posting

For the purposes of this policy, the terms "sign" and "signs" shall include, but are not limited to, billboards,

notices, table tents, flyers, placards, posters, banners, postcards, handbills and hand-held signs.

"Posting" shall refer to any means used to display one or more signs.

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• All signs, handbills and notices, with the exception of departmental notices, must be approved and

stamped by the PuLSE office, located in Atherton Union, 101. All postings are limited to 30 days

and stamped with an expiration date. The PuLSE office may make exceptions at their discretion.

• Postings must clearly state the official name of the sponsoring organization or individual, and may

be posted only on PuLSE office approved bulletin boards. Signs posted on departmental bulletin

boards should be approved by the appropriate academic department.

• Postings in the residence halls must be approved by the PuLSE office as well as the residence life coordinator.

• Signs posted on interior and exterior walls, windows, doors, elevators, floors, sidewalks and on any

wood or painted surfaces are strictly prohibited and will be removed. Student organizations or individuals

posting signs on the above surfaces may be charged a $35 fine. In addition to this $35

charge, organizations or individuals posting signs that cause damage will be assessed and charged accordingly.

• Placing or scattering signs on tables, counters, benches or other like surfaces is prohibited.

• Placing signs on cars or other vehicles on campus or within the surrounding area is strictly prohibited.

• Signs for any campus campaigning efforts are limited to one per approved bulletin board.

• Posted materials may not promote the use of alcohol. Signs promoting on-campus events where alcohol

will be served should contain the following statement, “Beverages Available, Butler University

ID and Driver’s License required.”

• All posted materials must be of good taste and respectful to all members of the Butler community. A

balance of free speech and community standards will be enforced by the PuLSE Office. Restrictions

may apply but are not limited to signs that depict violence, obscenity, defamation of an individual

or group and commercial activity.

• The University may determine the appropriate time, place, and manner in which a sign may be

posted and may prohibit the posting if the guidelines are not followed.

• Individuals having signs approved are responsible for ensuring that the posting policy is understood

by anyone posting on behalf of the organization or individual.

• Facilities must be contacted to help hang all banners, staked signs and other large scale promotion.

• All postings associated with off-campus organizations, programs or individuals must adhere to the

University policies and procedures. Postings must be approved by the PuLSE office and maybe

posted no longer than 30 days.

• A list of the rules listed in this document may be obtained from the PuLSE office Atherton Union

101.

Chalking

• Organizations can chalk most surfaces that can be walked on with the exception of those areas considered

to be artwork.

• Chalking can only be done in areas exposed to rainwater so that eventually the chalkings will be

washed away.

• Chalk is not allowed on buildings, artwork, bridges or under overhangs.

• Organizations are not allowed to use liquid chalk and/or any type of paint.

Table tent approval

• All table tents must be stamped by the PuLSE office, Atherton Union 101.

• Aramark must approve all table tents before being put onto tables. The Aramark office is located in

Atherton Union 110.

• Table tents can remain on the table for no more than four days.

• Only three table tents are permitted on a table at a time.

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Purchasing Policies

Purchases made on behalf of an organization must be approved by the faculty/staff advisor prior to actual

purchase. Purchases made must have legitimate purposes in regards to the organization’s mission and goals

and funds must be available in the student organization account. Purchases must also meet the standards set

by the University business office as well as maintain the standards of the student conduct code. Organizations

must have the funds to cover the cost of purchases.

Scheduling During Finals

All co-curricular activities (including club and student publications) must terminate each semester no

later than the date for the last regular meeting of day classes. No co-curricular activities are permitted on

reading day or during final examinations.

School Closings

Weather-related road conditions sometimes necessitate that the University consider delaying opening,

canceling classes, closing or remaining open. This decision is made by the president based upon input from

the Butler University Police Department. Student organizations may meet when university functions have

been delayed or cancelled but all members must be notified that the meeting will occur. Additionally, meetings

during delays or closures cannot be required nor can critical business such as voting occur.

Events to which off campus guests are invited must be cancelled per University policy. Events for student

organizations may occur but only at the discretion of the office for public safety based on available resources

and campus conditions. This may mean, for example, that the room may not be set or the catering

might not be available. Event planners must contact the Butler University Police Department at (317) 940-

9396 to determine the feasibility of continuing with the event.

Solicitation on campus

Students who are sales representatives as well as off-campus sales representatives must obtain permission

from the director of the PuLSE office before directly contacting students or student organizations. Students

and organizations should report misrepresentation or inappropriate business practices by any such sales representatives

to the director of the PuLSE office. There are certain restrictions to food and other outside vendors

due to campus-wide contracts which include Pepsi. Outside groups brought in must be approved by

the director of the PuLSE office. No credit card companies may solicit credit card applications/accounts on

campus.

Vehicle Registration

All registered students at Butler must have their vehicle registered with the Butler University Police Department

(BUPD). Students are expected to observe traffic and parking regulations on campus. The regulations

are published in the Parking Allocation Map, which is available at BUPD, 525 W. Hampton Drive,

and at http://www.butler.edu/bupd/infoServices.asp.

Victim Advocate

The needs of someone who has been sexually assaulted vary from person to person and may vary over

time. The University offers services and connects to external resources so that a student may choose what she

or he would find most helpful and healing. The Victim Advocate Program at Butler University provides 24-

hour response by a trained victim advocate to students who have experienced sexual assault or interpersonal

violence. To obtain assistance and an explanation of services contact the victim advocate (910-5572) or

BUPD (940-9396). Programs and workshops regarding issues such as sexual violence prevention/response,

dating violence prevention/response and healthy sexual choices are available through the Health Education

and Outreach Programs Office located in 101 HRC (940-8311).

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Volunteer Center

The Volunteer Center located in Atherton Union 100, is a student-run office that coordinates, in conjunction

with the PuLSE office, a wide variety of service opportunities each semester. The staff members serve

as a resource for students and community agencies. The center is open five days a week during for walk-ins

and appointments. Please check the website for a listing of the Volunteer Center hours. Information about

service opportunities is available through a variety of means, including the center website a weekly listserv

and newsletters. Student staff assist in the planning of Bulldogs Into the Streets (BITS), Make a Difference

Day, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, BITS II and monthly service projects. Staff members also

serve as liaisons to campus living units and student organizations. Please contact the center at (317) 940-

6006, volunteer@butler.edu or visit the website at www.butler.edu/volunteer/.

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RESIDENCE LIFE

Residence Life is a department within the student affairs division responsible for promoting and maintaining

an environment on-campus where students are free to develop academically and socially. Developing

a sense of personal and communal responsibility and respecting the rights of others also is an important part

of this program. Residence life staff members oversee the management of Butler’s three residence halls, University

Terrace and the Apartment Village. These staff members are committed to promoting student development

through educational and social programs. Some traditional programs include ResCo Extravaganza,

and participation in homecoming, Spring Sing and Geneva Stunts. Students also have the opportunity to

take on valuable leadership positions through numerous hall government and staff positions. The department

office is located in Atherton Union, Room 303.

We Create a Community!

The term “community” means different things to different people. The Department of Residence Life

defines community as an environment where people:

• know each other,

• have shared goals

• have a say in setting guidelines under which they live

• have ways of holding community members accountable to these guidelines

• respect as well as celebrate individual differences

• feel safe to enhance their personal growth.

We Respect Diversity!

We believe that Butler’s residential community assists its residents in developing skills and attitudes

necessary to become positive and productive members of society. We believe that of these necessary skills and

attitudes, the ability and willingness to appreciate and celebrate individual differences and explore new ideas

are very important. Butler is a community composed of students, faculty and staff of different genders, ethnic

and socioeconomic backgrounds, religious affiliations, races, ages, sexual orientations and levels of ablebodiedness.

We will not tolerate harassment in any form based on these differences and we hold our community

members accountable this standard.

We pride ourselves on our diversity. Each of us must do their part to encourage productive interactions

and relationships among the residents who live in our halls and Greek houses. We believe a great deal is to

be learned, taught and shared by each of us. So stretch yourself; get to know someone different from you.

Learn what another culture is all about. We believe your experience at Butler will be richer for it!

Activities of Residence Halls

Your residence hall is much more than just a place to sleep and study. We encourage you to take an active

role in your hall community. Many opportunities exist for you to meet new friends, influence policy

development and increase your leadership skills. It is easy to become involved in your hall through unit

activities, hall government and residence hall association.

Unit Activities

Each RA works with his or her residents to develop active communities. Unit meetings and social and

educational programs are held regularly to help build a comfortable community in which to live. Program

assistants (PAs) (for University Terrace) and Apartment Village assistants (AVAs) also coordinate programming

opportunities for students.

Hall Government

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Each hall’s governing body is made up of student representatives and is responsible for responding to

resident’s needs, coordinating involvement in all-campus events and intramural sports and organizing hall

activities.

Residence Hall Association (RHA)

RHA is the umbrella organization that serves as the voice of the individual residence hall governments

and the students they represent. This group coordinates grants for hall governments and units and influences

policy development. All residence halls and apartment buildings may send a representative to RHA

meetings.

Housing Options

On-campus living

Living in a residence hall or Greek house will provide you with unique, challenging opportunities to

enhance your collegiate learning experience. You will meet new people, be part of a community of individuals

and be able to take part in the creation of an enjoyable and dynamic living environment. The differences

in backgrounds and interests among residents provide you with unlimited opportunities to learn from each

other.

Living on campus at Butler provides you with many new freedoms. You will choose when to eat, sleep,

study and socialize. You will play a key role in establishing a cooperative living environment. Along with

these freedoms comes a set of responsibilities. You will need to respect the privacy of other residents, help

promote a safe and secure environment, and encourage behavior that creates and supports an academic environment.

The residence life and Greek life and orientation programs staff will work closely with you and other students

to promote the development of residential communities that are marked by respect, courtesy and

consideration for others. We hope you will play an active role in your residence hall and/or Greek community.

Residence halls

Residential College (ResCo)

ResCo is a coeducational residence hall community for predominately sophomore students who are

committed to a living-learning environment. Residential College, completed in 1989, offers a wide range of

experiences to its 480 students, staff and four full-time, live-in faculty members. These faculty-in-residence,

in conjunction with residence life staff, are integral in offering students a full academic experience. While

living in ResCo, a student has the opportunity to interact with faculty outside of the classroom in an informal,

relaxed atmosphere. Faculty-in-residence eat in the dining hall with students, participate in intramural

events with students and host dinners and other varied educational and cultural events for students.

ResCo is dedicated to establishing and maintaining an environment for the best possible learning experience

and the belief that intellectual inquiry extends beyond the classrooms and into the rooms, halls,

lounges and dining hall. ResCo’s primary goal is the academic and co-curricular development of its residents.

This is achieved by sponsoring events and programs throughout the year at which residents can interact

with members of the faculty, other students, administrators and the Indianapolis community. ResCo has

well-furnished study lounges, a computer lab, kitchenettes, a recreation room and vending areas.

Ross Hall

Ross Hall is a co-educational residence hall that accommodates about 540 men and women. Ross has

study lounges, a computer lab, a kitchen, a recreation room, vending area and TV room. The residence life

staff and the hall government offer various social and academic activities for its residents. Those students who

make an early commitment to attend Butler can choose a room in the Freshmen Living Learning Center. As

a student in this unit, residents are connected through class lists so they can form study groups on the living

unit. The faculty-in-residence, who lives in Ross, coordinates study efforts and provides academically related

and co-curricular programming to build strong relationships while helping students to succeed in their

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studies and enhance their feelings of community. In addition to the FIR, there are three faculty allies, who

sponsor cultural, educational, recreational and social programs with students.

Schwitzer Hall

Schwitzer Hall houses 450 female students. Schwitzer has a recreation room, kitchenettes, study lounge,

a computer room and vending area. The women of Schwitzer Hall participate in hall government, social programming

and all-campus events. The hall has been a spirited and fun home for many Butler women.

Schwitzer Hall also offers a Freshmen Living Learning Center with a faculty-in-residence. The FIR coordinates

study efforts and provides academically related and co-curricular programming to build strong relationships

while helping students to succeed in their studies and enhance their feelings of community. In

addition to the FIR, there are three faculty allies, who sponsor cultural, educational, recreational and social

programs with students. Schwitzer Hall also has an exploratory unit.

University Terrace

University Terrace Apartments houses 94 students in apartments ranging from one-person studios to

four-person, three-bedroom apartments. University Terrace is located at the corner of 52nd St. and Westfield

Blvd. This building is staffed by a residence life coordinator, a staff assistant, and four program assistants.

University Terrace Apartments feature central air, phone, cable and internet connections as well as bedroom

furnishings and major kitchen appliances. Students must apply to live in University Terrace as part of

spring housing lottery. Due to the unique layout of this building it is designated as non-freshmen housing.

Apartment Village

The Apartment Village provides a special housing option for junior, senior and graduate students. The

apartment-style complex, located along Boulevard Place, beside the Butler Bowl, houses approximately 500

students. The community is staffed by the assistant director of residence life and four apartment village assistants.

The apartments are designed with four single bedrooms, two bathrooms, a living room and kitchen.

They also feature central air, phone, cable and Internet connections. Each bedroom is furnished. Located in

the center of the village is a community center, the Dawghouse. The Dawghouse offers a laundry room, a

convenience store, a computer lab, a lounge/game room and a front desk.

Special residence units

The freshman living learning center is for early-admitted students who choose to live in a community

with some of their classmates and interact with faculty in residence. (Available in Schwitzer and Ross Halls)

The substance-free unit, where residents and guests may not smoke, use tobacco products or alcohol

while living on this unit. All residents are required to sign an agreement about their commitment to a substance-free

environment. (Available in Schwitzer, ResCo and Ross Halls)

The international living learning center provides international and American students with a unique

alternative living environment. Residents form an international community and participate in field trips,

dinners, dances and lectures. (Available in ResCo)

The exploratory residential unit provides exploratory major students with programming and camaraderie

for their first year. Programming will be determined by students’ needs and interests. (Available in

Schwitzer)

Fraternity and Sorority Housing

Many students also decide to join one of Butler’s 16 national fraternities and sororities, 14 of which offer

housing. Sophomores and upper class level students may live in a Greek house with which they are affiliated.

Off-campus housing

Living off-campus may be an option for senior students. Students are encouraged to become aware of the

laws, codes, and ordinances applicable in the community as they are expected to uphold the law, just as all

citizens. The monthly Greater Indianapolis Apartment Guide lists apartments/houses available for rent.

Before renting off-campus housing, students should ask the landlord to explain all rules. Students

should be certain that they understand and agree to everything in the lease. Some things to consider before

signing a lease:

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• How much is the rent?

• Is a deposit required?

• When does the lease start and when does it end?

• Where do you park?

• Is the space included in the rent?

• Where do guests park?

• Does rent include water, gas, electricity, telephone, internet, cable, air conditioning/heat and trash

pick-up, or do you pay extra for these?

• Can you regulate your own heat/air conditioning?

• What does the landlord keep clean; what is your responsibility?

• Who mows the grass and shovels the snow?

• What furniture, appliances (i.e., washer/dryer), dishes and bedding are included, if any?

• Who may visit you? May you have overnight guests? Children? Pets?

• May you sublet? Under what conditions?

• How much advance notice must you give before moving?

Staff in Residence Life

Director of residence life

The director of residence life is responsible for the planning, development and coordination of Butler’s

programs and services offered within the residence halls and campus apartments. The director works closely

with staff, faculty and students to promote student learning, responsibility and intentional involvement

within the halls and throughout campus. In addition, the director of residence life processes all housing assignments

and billing. Other responsibilities of the director include working with the professional live-in

staff on matters relating to the residence life operation, including programming, building concerns, hall

openings and closings, staff selection and training, advisement of hall governments and programming.

Assistant director of residence life

The assistant director of residence life coordinates all aspects of the Apartment Village housing, and supervises

the four apartment village assistants. In addition, this staff member coordinates the housing selection

processes for returning students and the housing assignment process for the incoming freshmen and

transfer students, and coordinates departmental marketing and website. The assistant director has an office in

the Apartment Village and also in Atherton Union

Residence life coordinators

Four full-time residence life coordinators (RLCs) manage and supervise the three residence halls and

University Terrace. Specific responsibilities include supervising resident and staff assistants, advising hall

governments, assisting students with individual problems or concerns, programming and addressing behavioral

problems. Each residence life coordinator lives in the building where he or she works and has an office

in the building. Your coordinator is an invaluable resource during your stay in the residence halls.

Staff assistants

One staff assistant (SA) assists each residence coordinator with the management of Residential College,

Ross, Schwitzer residence halls and University Terrace. The SA is a Butler student trained in the areas of hall

management, front office operations and emergency response.

Apartment village assistants

Apartment Village assistants (AVAs) assist with the management of the Apartment Village. They work to

create an involved apartment community, provide a variety of program opportunities, complete safety checks,

intervene in roommate conflicts and also manage various operations in the village.

Resident assistants

Resident assistants (RAs) are Butler students in each unit who are available to help you while you are

living in the residence halls. They plan programs and activities, assist in developing a respectful community,

serve as a resource for your concerns and enforce hall policies.

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Faculty-in-residence

Faculty-in-residence are full-time Butler faculty members who live within Residential College, Ross and

Schwitzer residence halls. These individuals are committed to the learning experience that takes place outside

of the classroom and the creation of a more informal relationship between the faculty and students. They

plan social, educational and academically related programming for students living in the residence halls.

Faculty allies

Faculty allies are full-time Butler faculty members who plan programming activities for students in the

residence halls. Faculty allies have similar responsibilities as faculty-in-residence, but do not live in the residence

halls.

Community assistants

Community assistants (CA) are student workers who provide services and respond to emergency needs

in University Terrace, Residential College, Ross Hall, Schwitzer Hall and the Apartment Village hall offices.

Your hall office is an information center within your residence hall and will available be most hours during

the day (limited hours in University Terrace). A CA will help you with services such as equipment checkout

and sorting the mail.

Program assistants

Program assistants (PA) are student workers who reside in University Terrace Apartments and who are

responsible for planning social programs and educational opportunities for their fellow residents.

Residence Hall and Housing Policies

Cancellation

The room and board contract is for one academic year. The University may cancel the room and board

contract without any refund in room fees, with appropriate notice, if a student violates residence hall policies

or regulations. An enrolled student may not cancel the contract after check-in, with the exception of move-out

as a result of fraternity or sorority recruitment, as outlined below:

Pledging at the end of fall semester

An upper class student who chooses to pledge/associate a Greek chapter and wishes to terminate this contract

as of the end of fall semester may do so in order to move into the Greek chapter house, provided an

"Intent to Vacate Notice" is completed in the office of residence life by Dec. 1, and the student is listed

on his or her Greek chapter’s occupancy roster for spring semester. Money paid to the university will

not be transferred to a Greek chapter.

Pledging during formal recruitment

An upper class student who chooses to pledge/associate a Greek chapter during formal Greek recruitment

may cancel this contract to move into her/his Greek chapter house on or before 5 p.m. on the first day of

classes for second semester, providing proper check-out procedures are observed and an "Intent to Vacate

Notice" is completed in the office of residence life. After this time, the student will not be allowed to terminate

this contract to move into a Greek chapter house.

Discontinuing enrollment

If the student does not register for the second semester, he/she must give written notice of intent to leave

the residence halls by completing an "Intent to Vacate Notice" available in the office of residence life.

This notice should be submitted by Dec. 1. If the office of residence life does not receive the notice by

Dec. 1, $100 of the housing deposit will be forfeited.

Contract and Preference Form

Room and board contracts are available in the residence life office. To reserve a room for the academic

year, each new and returning student must complete a room and board contract and housing preference

form. The preference form helps ensure that an assignment is made based upon the student’s choices as

much as possible.

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Disciplinary procedures

All students who attend Butler will be held accountable for violations to the University’s Rules of Conduct

found in the “Rights and Responsibilities” section of the student handbook. Residence hall students

will be held accountable for violations of the terms and conditions of their room and board agreement and

the residence hall policies stated in this publication. Residents of Greek houses also must uphold the standards

set forth by their individual chapter as well as their national policies. If you violate a policy, action will

be taken, which could affect your status as a resident and a student. Should you be found responsible for

violating a policy, sanctions could include, but are not limited to, a warning, probation, administrative room

move, suspension from housing, an educational project, as well as suspension or expulsion from the University.

Refer to the “Rights and responsibilities” section of the student handbook for a complete explanation of

the student conduct system.

Eligibility for housing

All first year students not living at home with a parent are required to live in one of the University residence

halls. All sophomores and juniors not living with a parent also must live in a university residence

hall, University apartment, or in a housing unit provided by a fraternity or sorority of which he or she is a

member. Students must be enrolled full-time at the university to reside in University residence halls.

Hall programming fee

During the first semester of residence each year, the student will be charged a residence hall programming

fee, which is non-refundable after check-in. This fee is allocated to the respective hall government, the

residence hall association and residence life staff for programming.

Housing deposit

During the first semester of residence, the student will be charged a $100 refundable housing deposit.

The $100 housing deposit will be credited to the student account after any charges for damages or missing

property have been made to the student account, and after the student officially leaves university housing.

Damage or missing property noted at checkout will be billed to the student account. If a student damages

common areas or requires a key to be replaced, the charges will be billed directly to the student’s account. In

cases where responsibility for common area damage or missing property cannot be specifically assigned, all

students occupying the living unit will be responsible for damage on a pro-rated basis. The liability assessment

for each student will be charged directly to the student’s account. A student’s liability is not limited to

$100. After all charges have been made to the student account, and if the student does not have an active

housing contract for the following year, the housing deposit will be credited back to the student’s account.

Length of contract

The room and board contract is for one academic year or the remaining portion thereof in all areas except

the Apartment Village where the contract is from August 1 to May 31 if the student does not register for the

second semester, and completes an "Intent to Vacate Notice" in the residence life office on or before Dec. 1,

the contract may be terminated as of the end of the first semester. If the residence life office does not receive

the notice by Dec. 1, $100 of the housing deposit will be forfeited.

Meal plan

All students are required to purchase a meal plan when contracting for housing in the University residence

halls (except University Terrace or the Apartment Village). The board privileges provided are available

only to students who have purchased a meal plan and may not be sold, loaned, assigned or given away.

Meals are provided by Aramark Dining Services. To change a meal plan, contact the director of residence life,

Atherton Union, room 303. Students with special dietary needs should see the director of food service.

A student hired by a women’s sorority to work in exchange for meals may terminate her or his meal plan

upon written request. Written confirmation from the house director verifying employment must be received

by the director of residence life for meal plan termination and refunds to be completed.

New members of Greek chapters (which provide a full meal plan in their chapter houses) may cancel

their meal plans for spring semester only, provided they give written notification of cancellation to the office

of residence life by Dec. 1, (fall pledges/associates), or by the end of the first week of spring semester classes

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(spring formal recruitment pledges/associates). New associates may not use more than 10% of their allotted

“Dawg Bucks” for the spring semester during the first week of the term prior to cancelling their meal plans.

Personal property

Butler University shall accept no responsibility for the theft or loss of monies, valuables or other personal

effects of the student. The University cannot assume responsibility for loss of, or damage to, personal

property. Students are encouraged to make sure that their personal property is covered by their own insurance.

Refunds

If a student withdraws from Butler and the residence hall during the academic year, he/she may be entitled

to a refund of some room and/or board charges. Refunds are based upon the date the student officially

vacates the residence hall, which is the day he/she completes proper checkout procedures and returns all

keys. All refunds are made to the student’s account with the university.

Refunds for room charges will be made according to the schedule listed below:

• Withdrawal within the first week, 100 percent credited

• Withdrawal within the second week, 80 percent credited

• Withdrawal within the third week, 60 percent credited

• Withdrawal within the fourth week, 40 percent credited

• Withdrawal within the fifth week, 20 percent credited

• Withdrawal after the fifth week, No credit

Refunds for board charges will be made on a monthly basis beginning the first of the month following

the date a student officially vacates the residence hall.

Residence and board fees for orientation and welcome week are not refundable. Notwithstanding the

provisions of the University’s refund policies, if any disciplinary action results in the suspension or expulsion

of the student from the university or residence hall, the university may refuse to refund, in whole or in

part, such student’s room and board charges and fees. The student’s housing deposit will be refunded as

explained under "Housing Deposit."

Renting/Subleasing

Renting or subleasing of residence hall or apartment space is prohibited.

Residential requirements

All freshman not living at home with a parent must live in University residence halls. Sophomores and

juniors not living at home with a parent must live in a University residence hall, university apartment or in

a residential unit provided by a fraternity or sorority of which he or she is a member. All requests for approval

to live at home with a parent/legal guardian must include written permission from a parent or legal

guardian and be approved by the director of residence life.

This regulation applies during summer sessions, as well as during the regular academic year; it also applies

regardless of the number of academic hours taken. Students who move off campus during the semester

or a summer term will be required to pay the full charges due to the University.

This policy does not apply to married persons or persons who wish to attend Butler on a part-time basis.

Any changes in home address, permanent address or local address must be reported to the office of registration

and records.

Room and roommate assignments

The University attempts to comply with students´ housing preferences for rooms and roommates. However,

students are not guaranteed their specific assignment requests. Butler reserves the exclusive right to

make assignments and will do so without regard to race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or any

other legally-protected category. The department of residence life has the right to make changes in room

assignments.

Room consolidation

If one occupant of a room moves, leaving one remaining occupant, the remaining occupant, at the discretion

of the University, may retain the room accommodation with a new roommate of his/her choice, be as-

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signed to another room, remain in the room alone at the single room rate or be assigned a roommate by the

department of residence life. Only if an additional charge is assessed will a resident be permitted to occupy a

room alone on a permanent basis. This policy may change based upon available space.

Single rooms

A limited number of single rooms are available for upperclass students in Ross Hall, Schwitzer Hall,

University Terrace and the Residential College. If a student has already checked into the residence hall,

he/she should make the request to the residence life coordinator. If no singles are available at the time of request,

the student can be placed on a waiting list. Students who choose to be assigned to a single room or

who remain in a double or triple room alone (see "Room Consolidation" above) will be charged the single

room rate.

Vacations/Break periods

Housing is not available during break periods, including Thanksgiving break recess, semester break recess,

spring break recess or any other stated recesses of the University except at the Apartment Village. These

periods also are board exceptions.

Some housing exceptions are made for student groups if a request is made from a University official. Individuals

and groups seeking exceptions should plan in advance and contact the director of residence life.

Policies/Procedures/Services of Residence Life

The residential communities at Butler University have a diverse set of objectives that are meant to meet

the needs of the residents and to complement each student’s academic experience. Each resident is a member

of a community that is both residential and academic in nature.

The policies outlined below are designed to protect each individual’s right to sleep, study, and socialize

and to promote a sense of community spirit and responsibility. Butler University has the right to require

residents to immediately remove any items from a residence hall that it deems, at its sole discretion, to present

a life safety hazard. Final determination in these matters will be made by a residence life coordinator

and/or construction maintenance staff. Items that are not removed in a timely manner by the resident will be

removed by the staff and disposed. The resident is responsible for the costs of removal and disposal.

Alcohol guidelines

Residents of legal age and their guests of legal age may possess and consume alcoholic beverages on an individual

basis in the privacy of their own rooms/apartments with their doors closed.

• Alcohol may not be possessed or consumed in the presence of minors.

• Possession of alcohol in any areas other than individual rooms/apartments is prohibited.

• Residents under legal age may not possess alcohol containers in their rooms/apartments including as

decoration.

• Disciplinary action will be taken with residents and their guests if consumption of alcohol in a student

room/apartment results in violation of the safety code, a large number of people coming and

going from the room/apartment, noisy or disruptive behavior or dispensing alcohol to minors.

• Sale of alcohol is prohibited.

• Kegs, defined as any containers requiring taps to operate, are not allowed in the residence halls or

university apartment buildings.

• When transporting alcohol, containers must be sealed and covered with no reference to alcohol visible.

• If a student is found in possession of alcohol in the residence halls/university apartment buildings,

and it is a violation of the stated alcohol guidelines, the student will be instructed to pour the alcohol

into the nearest sink.

These guidelines apply to behavior in the residence halls/university apartment buildings and are in addition

to the alcohol guidelines listed in the "Rights and Responsibilities" section of the student handbook.

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Appliances

Refrigerators used in residence hall rooms cannot exceed 3.0 cubic feet of internal storage, cannot be

larger than the exterior dimensions of 36” H. x 20” W. x 20” D. and cannot draw more than 2.5 amps of

electricity. Items with heating elements such as toasters, popcorn poppers, toaster ovens and coffee makers

may be stored in resident rooms but must be used in kitchenettes or other designated areas. Microwave ovens

and space heaters are not permitted in resident rooms. Other electrical appliances or devices not mentioned

above may be subject to restriction in residence hall rooms/apartments if the type of device, number

of devices or electrical draw exceeds what the University deems acceptable.

Beds

Using non-University mattresses, putting mattresses on the floor or altering structural components of

the beds is not allowed. Students may only use University issued lofts in the residence halls. Platforms and

waterbeds are not permitted. Most rooms are equipped with bunkable beds. Instructions, pins and waivers

are available at each hall office for bunking beds. Beds may not be added to or altered in any way.

Bicycles, mopeds and motorcycles

Bicycles may be parked on the campus grounds in accordance with campus parking regulations. Bike

racks are located at various points around campus. If a resident brings a bike into the residence hall, it

should be stored in the designated bike storage room. Motorcycles and mopeds are not permitted inside a

residence hall. No flammable fluid of any kind is to be in the buildings.

Businesses

Students are not permitted to operate businesses from on-campus residences.

Candles/Incense

Possession of, and/or burning candles, incense or spices such as sage in the residence halls/university

apartment buildings is not permitted. Electric potpourri pots as well as plug in air fresheners are prohibited

Carpet

If carpet is used in student rooms, it must be used without adhesives, nails or tacks. Student are

responsible for removal of carpets/rugs and disposal in the building dumpster. Carpets not properly

disposed or room damage resulting from the use in a resident room, including tape residue will result in a

charge to the resident(s).

Checkout

When checking out of a room/apartment at any time during the year, the student must make an appointment

with an RA or other residence life staff member to complete a proper checkout. The student’s responsibilities

at checkout include the following:

• Make prior arrangements with an RA for a time and day (with 24 hours advance notice) to check

out. Failure to make an appointment and checkout properly with an RA will result in an improper

checkout charge.

• Remove all possessions from room and bathroom (if applicable) and all pictures and posters from

walls.

• Make sure room is clean, desk and dressers are emptied, walls are cleared of all decoration, floor is

swept and trash is removed. At Residential College, the bathroom must be clean and trash removed

upon checkout. At the Apartment Village and University Terrace the bathroom(s) and kitchen must

be clean and trash removed upon checkout.

• Make sure all furniture and fixtures are in room. The student will be charged for any missing, damaged

or altered furniture, fixtures or equipment.

• Contact an RA to check room. Reminder: Make arrangements with an RA 24 hours in advance prior

to your desired checkout time so he/she can be there when you are ready to leave.

• Review the room condition report (RCR) with an RA. Sign the RCR.

• Turn in mailbox key and room key.

• Fill out a change of address/mail forward card and leave at front office.

• Follow guidelines posted and/or distributed before end-of-semester closings.

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By following the above checkout procedures, a student will ensure that he or she is not billed an improper

checkout charge, housekeeping charge or key charges. Final determination of damage charges will be

made by the residence life coordinator and/or construction management staff.

Cooking in rooms

Cooking is not permitted in student rooms. Appliances such as toasters, popcorn poppers, toaster ovens

and coffee pots may be stored in student rooms; however, use of these items is only permitted in designated

kitchen areas within the halls.

Resident owned microwaves ovens are strictly prohibited in student rooms. Microwave ovens are located

in each hall’s kitchenette and/or in some common areas for resident use.

Damages

A resident is liable for all damages/losses in the living unit resulting from negligence, vandalism, theft

and/or abuse. Residents will be charged for all damages/losses that occur during the student’s occupancy of

the room.

Wall damage resulting from the unauthorized use of double sided tape and other unapproved poster

mounting materials is the most common charge. The University provides each resident with a small supply

of approved poster mounting tabs. The student must still properly remove items from the walls.

Charges for room, suite and public area vandalism damages and loss of property, for which individual

responsibility cannot be determined, will be divided among all students in the room, suite, hall or unit. The

charges will be made to the students´ accounts. See "Housing Deposit" and "Check-out" for more information.

Drugs/Controlled substances

The use and/or possession of illegal/controlled drugs in residence halls/university apartment buildings

are prohibited. All cases of use, possession, cultivation or sale of drugs or evidence of use, possession, cultivation

or sale of drugs in living units will result in University disciplinary procedures.

Specifically, manufacture, sale, possession or use of narcotics, marijuana, hypnotics, sedatives, tranquilizers,

hallucinogens and other similar known harmful or habit-forming drugs and/or chemicals, except as prescribed

by a physician, are prohibited by state law and University regulations.

Escort policy

All guests must be escorted at all times within the residence halls/university apartment buildings (See

"Visitation").

Fire/Life Safety Hazards

Collection or storage of materials, supplies or personal property that constitute a fire hazard as determined

by the University is prohibited. Storage or use of combustible materials, explosives, fireworks or firearms

is prohibited. Use of outside TV or radio antennas, sun lamps, halogen lamps, heat lamps, space heaters

or microwave ovens is strictly prohibited.

The following requirements for all resident student rooms have been created in conjunction with the Indianapolis

fire marshal to insure the safety of all residents.

• All extension cords must be of a surge-protected type with an ON/OFF switch, power on indicator

light, and a breaker reset.

• No two prong ground adapters should be used. If a room has outlets that do not accept three prong

plugs, the room should be reported so that the outlets can be changed immediately.

• Wall/Room door decorations limited to 20 percent of surface.

• Personal floor mats, which represent a trip hazard, are not permitted in hallways.

• Do not attach anything to or hang any item on any sprinkler head.

• Do not attach anything near a sprinkler head that may obstruct the spray pattern.

• Do not attach anything to or alter any life safety device such as fire alarm horns, strobe lights, sprinkler

heads, smoke detectors, exit lights, pull stations or any type of emergency signage.

• No items are to be hung from any ceiling.

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• The use of acetate, cellophane, tissue paper or other combustible materials over or in light fixtures is

also prohibited.

• String, rope or other type of decorative lighting is prohibited.

• Exit doors, hallways and stairwells must be clear at all times.

• Candles, incense, and plug-in air fresheners are prohibited.

Fire safety

Tampering with or misuse of fire safety equipment, including fire alarms, fire extinguishers or smoke

detectors, is prohibited by state law and University policy. Smoke detectors and sprinkler heads should not

be covered; students are not permitted to hang anything from this equipment. Exiting alarmed doors in

non-emergency situations is not permitted.

Every student is responsible for immediate evacuation of the building in the event of a fire alarm. Failure

to evacuate can result in disciplinary referral and possible police involvement.

Firearms/Weapons

Residents may not possess or store firearms or other lethal weapons in their rooms or in any other place

in the residence halls/university apartment buildings. Anyone possessing firearms and/or lethal weapons

such as: bow and arrows, swords, billy clubs, brass knuckles, knives, blow guns, dart guns, wrist rockets,

pellet guns, bb guns, catapults, switchblades and martial arts equipment is subject to severe disciplinary action

— which may include suspension or dismissal.

Furnishings

The University does not allow removal of room furnishings or equipment from residence hall

rooms/apartments. Room furnishings should not be placed so that they obstruct vents, ducts, radiators or

doors. At no time may residents disassemble, stack or alter furniture in the rooms or detach furniture from

the walls or doors. Students are not allowed to move public area furniture to their individual rooms.

Guests

Guests visiting the living unit are subject to University rules, regulations and policies and residents will

be held accountable for the actions of their guests. The resident is responsible for informing the guest(s) of

all policies. Failure to monitor guest behavior will result in disciplinary action for the resident. For safety

purposes and to assure the respect of other residents’ ability to study, no more than six persons (including

room occupants) will be allowed in any room at one given time.

Overnight guests are permitted, provided that all roommates are aware of the guest staying and have not

communicated objections. Guests are allowed to stay no more than two successive nights or no more than

three overnight periods in any seven-day period. The University has the right to deny access to any guest, or

ask any guest to leave, if it is reasonably determined that a guest has disturbed or is likely to disturb other

residents.

Halogen lights

Any lighting fixture that utilizes a halogen light bulb is not allowed in the residence halls/university

apartment buildings. The halogen bulb generates extreme heat, which increases the potential fire hazard.

Halogen bulbs can be found in many different lighting fixtures including torchiere, clip on lamps and desk

lights. An easy identifier is that they are typically covered by a glass plate.

Harassment

The department of residence life believes firmly in the rights of individuals and therefore harassment of

any form is prohibited in the residence halls/university apartment buildings. Violations of this policy may

result in referral to the University student conduct system.

Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct that creates a hostile or offensive environment, intended or

not, which is directed, but not limited to the age, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, national

origin, ancestry or any other legally-protected category relating to an individual or group. Harassment

may take, but is not limited to, the form of name calling, signs, notes, slurs or jokes that demean an individual

or group. Harassment also occurs when an individual’s body, possessions or place of residence is vio-

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lated or threatened. Individuals who feel that they are victims of harassment should contact the residence life

coordinator, director of residence life, or the Butler University police department.

Holiday and event decorations.

Holidays and events give rise for the use of decorations in the residence halls. Most decorations and specialty

lighting represent a potential fire hazard.

The following restrictions are in place to reduce that potential:

• Only artificial trees can be used in the residence halls/university apartment buildings.

• The artificial trees are to be set on a stable base, away from any heat source and placed so that they do

not obstruct hallways or exits.

• Electrical lighting (string, rope or other types) is strictly prohibited for use or decoration in the residence

halls/university apartment buildings.

• The use of “spray snow” is prohibited.

• Decoration of any type is prohibited on ceilings, light fixtures, door frames and exit doors.

• Decoration on walls or room doors is limited to 20% of the available space.

Joint responsibility

All individuals who are present in a residence hall room where University policies are being violated are

subject to University student conduct procedures. Residents may be held responsible for violations that occur

in their rooms/apartments, whether they are present or not.

Keys/Locks

Students are expected to carry their room/apartment keys and University ID card when used for building

access with them at all times. At no time should a student loan or give his or her key or ID card to another

person. Duplicating, lending or borrowing room keys is prohibited. If a student is locked out of his or

her room, he or she should wait for a roommate to return or contact the hall front desk in cases of emergencies.

Lost or stolen keys should be reported to the hall staff immediately. For security reasons, a new lock will

be installed on room doors and new keys will be issued. The student’s account will be charged to pay for the

new lock and keys. If keys are later found, no refund would be made.

Addition of locks on room doors or windows is not permitted. Tampering with locks to student rooms,

front or side doors or any other hall rooms is prohibited.

Laundry

Laundry rooms with coin-operated machines are located in the basement of each residence hall and University

Terrace apartments and in the Dawghouse at the Apartment Village. Any refunds for money lost

should be claimed at student accounts while all repairs needed should be reported to the hall office. Butler is

not responsible for items lost or damaged in the laundry areas.

Lottery

The process for students to choose rooms for the following academic year is known as lottery. Lottery

takes place during the second semester. All current students are eligible to participate and lottery number

assignment is based on total credit hours earned.

Lounge use

Students currently living in the residence halls, with approval from the residence life coordinator, can reserve

lounges for special events or meetings. No lounge furnishings may be removed or altered.

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Mail and Packages

The U.S. Postal Service, FedEx and UPS deliver directly to each residence hall. Mail is delivered after 1

p.m. daily and is sorted by the hall’s mail clerk. A student must show his/her University ID to receive large

envelopes, packages, flowers or other deliveries. Mail should be addressed as follows:

Ross Hall Student’s Name 629 W. Hampton Drive Indianapolis, IN 46208

Schwitzer Hall Student’s Name 750 W. Hampton Drive Indianapolis, IN 46208

Residential College Student’s Name 630 W. Hampton Drive Indianapolis, IN 46208

University Terrace Student’s Name 599 W. Westfield Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46208

Apartment Village Student’s Name 5026 Boulevard Place, Apt. # Indianapolis IN 46208

Note: The Apartment Village has separate buildings lettered A-M. All addresses must include the building

letter and apartment number. For example, for building A, apartment 301, the address should read Apt.

A301. Appropriate building letters and room numbers are essential to efficient mail delivery in the Apartment

Village.

Maintenance

Maintenance concerns regarding phone or computer issues in the residence hall/university apartment

buildings should be directed to the HELP desk or telecommunications. All other maintenance concerns and

needed repairs should be reported to the hall front desk, RA, AVA or SA. In each building the SA or AVA

will coordinate the maintenance requests and will forward these to facilities management.

Students should know that it generally takes two weeks for non-emergency repairs. Workers have the

right to enter a student’s room/apartments to perform necessary maintenance. For reasons of safety and security,

facilities management will attempt to honor requests for door re-cores within 24 hours. Building maintenance

emergencies should be reported to the RA or front desk immediately.

Musical instruments

Music practice rooms are available for use at Lilly Hall. Some halls provide pianos that are available for

use during designated hours.

Noncompliance

Residence hall staff members (RAs, SAs, AVAs, CAs, residence life coordinators, and the assistant director

of residence life) are trained to respond to emergency situations and policy violations to maintain a safe

and comfortable living environment for everyone. Students are expected to respond to all reasonable directives

from staff members and are not to interfere with the performance of any staff member’s duties. Any

verbal abuse, harassment, or intimidation toward, or failure to cooperate with, staff members will be considered

an infringement and will be referred to the residence life coordinator or director of residence life.

Noise and disruptive behavior

Residents are expected to respect the rights of others with regard to noise levels for studying and sleeping.

Musical equipment or stereos are not permitted in, or facing out of residence hall windows. Residents

being bothered by noise should notify the noisemakers and request lowering of volumes. If no response is

made, students can contact the RA/AVA on duty or hall office. RAs/AVAs will make periodic building

rounds and will confront noise and disruptive behavior.

Residence life will set minimum quiet hours standards for finals week, but hall government may choose

to extend these hours.

Painting

Students are not permitted to paint their individual rooms/apartments.

Pets

Only freshwater fish are permitted in the residence halls/university apartment buildings. Tanks may be

no larger than 20 gallons.

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Physical and sexual abuse

Butler University will not tolerate any forms of physical and sexual abuse, fighting or intimidation in

the residence halls, and perpetrators will be dealt with severely. Students are encouraged to report instances of

sexual assault or battery to the office of the vice president for student affairs, Butler University Police Department,

residence life staff, the victim advocate or other University officials (for additional information see

"Rights and Responsibilities" section).

Pictures and posters

Use of double-sided tape, duct tape, masking tape, Scotch tape, nails, tacks, etc., to hang posters and pictures

in individual rooms/apartments is prohibited. Residence life staff will supply acceptable adhesive at

check-in. Students wishing to hang posters and flyers in residence halls/university apartment buildings

must receive authorization from the Programs for Leadership and Service Education office and residence life

coordinator.

Quiet/Courtesy hours

Quiet and courtesy hours have been created to give each student the right to read and study free from

undue interference, excessive noise or other disturbances and the right to sleep without undue disturbance

from hallway noise, roommate’s guests, etc.

Courtesy hours exist 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Each student is expected to be courteous of

other students’ schedules and keep music, noise, etc., to a reasonable level. If a student is asked by another

student or staff member to be quieter, the student is required to turn down their music, move conversations

out of the hallway, or whatever action is necessary to reduce the noise.

Quiet hours are from 10 p.m.-8 a.m., Sunday through Thursday and midnight-8 a.m., Friday and

Saturday. During these times, it is expected that all students refrain from creating noise that can be heard

outside of the individual’s rooms/apartment. Violations of quiet hours will result in disciplinary action.

Right to entry

The University has the right, without restrictions, to allow authorized personnel to enter student

rooms/apartments. When such entry is deemed necessary, the University will seek within all reasonable

bounds to protect the student's privacy interests. Such actions, when they are warranted, are taken on behalf

of all unit residents to guarantee their safety and welfare

Authorized personnel of the University are charged with the responsibility of inspecting Universityowned

or related property, including residential units, at any time when there is sufficient reason. Inspections

may be conducted for the following reasons: (a) to ensure that units are free of fire or safety hazards; (b)

to determine whether a student is complying with the terms of a room and board contract; (c) to prevent acts

of vandalism; (d) to prevent violations of university regulations when evidence suggests that such violations

may occur. Authorized personnel include the president of Butler University and the vice president for student

affairs or designee(s).

The rooms of students in residence halls/university apartment buildings may be entered whenever

authorized personnel of the University have reason to believe that guests are present at times other than

authorized. Rooms also may be entered by authorized University personnel to complete maintenance and

repair work. Rooms may also be entered for routine residence life activities, such as hall closings, health and

safety inspections or the preparation of rooms for incoming room occupants.

Authorized University personnel may search students’ rooms to remove items that are in violation of

University, federal, state or municipal law or regulations. The residence life staff or Butler University police

department staff may search personal possessions of students with specific authorization from the president

or the vice president for student affairs. A reasonable effort shall be made to have the students in question

present if their rooms/apartments are to be searched. "Reasonable effort" includes such action as consulting

with a resident assistant, checking class schedules to locate students or providing prior notice.

Room and unit agreements

The RAs may assist residents in creating room and unit agreements to establish additional guidelines for

behavior and activities for their community. Students may decide to extend quiet or restrict visitation hours,

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as well as establishing norms for unit activities and involvement. Unit agreements will be posted in each hall

and violations of such agreements will be handled through the University student conduct system.

Room changes

Room assignments are intended to be permanent for the length of the contract period. In situations

where problems arise, students should contact their RAs/AVAs or residence life coordinators. If a problem

arises, the RA/AVA or residence life coordinator will help students to work on roommate differences and to

reach compromises.

No room change can be made without approval of the residence life coordinator or assistant director of

residence life. Unauthorized room switches are not permitted and will result in an improper checkout charge.

Changes will not be granted based on race, national origin, sexual orientation or religious preference. Room

changes cannot be made within the first two weeks of either semester or last three weeks of spring semester.

Room condition report

Upon moving into a room, a student will receive a room condition report (RCR) that describes the

move-in condition of the room. The room condition report will be used upon checkout to assess damages

and charges incurred throughout the length of stay. The student must read, sign, date and return this report

to his or her RA or AVA within 24 hours.

Roommate/Floormate rights

Each individual’s enjoyment in his or her residence hall/apartment complex will depend largely on the

thoughtful consideration practiced by everyone. In regard to the conduct of other residents, each resident has

these basic rights.

• The right to read and study free from undo interference, excessive noise or other disturbances.

• The right to sleep without undue disturbance from hallway noise, roommate’s guests, etc.

• The right to expect that a roommate will respect one’s personal belongings.

• The right to a clean environment in which to live.

• The right to free access to one’s room and facilities without pressure from a roommate.

• The right to personal privacy.

• The right to host guests with the expectation that guests are to respect the rights of the host’s roommate

and hall mates.

• The right to be heard if grievances arise.

• The right to be free from fear of intimidation, physical and/or emotional harm.

• The right to expect cooperation in the use of the telephone or other shared items of the

room/apartment

R.S.V.P.: Report Student Vandalism Promptly

R.S.V.P. is an incentive program. It allows residence life to keep RAs/AVAs and RLCs informed on a

monthly basis regarding the amount of damage that is being incurred in public areas due to vandalism. It is

the responsibility of the residents of either the unit or the entire hall to cover the costs of repairs to public

areas that are damaged during the course of the year.

The cost of damages can be kept down if students who see other students damage public areas REPORT

these incidents to their RA/AVA or RLC. If individuals can be identified, then the damages can be charged

to the individuals responsible for the damage rather than the entire unit or hall.

Each semester, a certain amount of money is set aside per person for a unit damages fund and per person

for an all-hall damages fund. If the group stays below the "set aside" amount, then the hall government

and/or the RLC will be able to use this difference to make improvements to the residence hall on a hall improvement

project following the approval of the director of residence life. The projects should be submitted

and approved on a per semester basis.

Smoking

As a result of a spring 2003 student initiative, smoking is not permitted in the common areas of the

residence halls such as lounges, lobbies and hallways. Smoking is also not allowed in any student rooms

in any on campus residence. Smoking on campus is only allowed beyond 20 feet from the exterior door of

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campus buildings, including residence halls/university apartment buildings. The rights of non-smokers to a

smoke-free environment always takes precedence over the desire of smokers to smoke. Residence life will attempt

to make room assignments to honor any requests for smoking/non-smoking roommates. Any residents

who are found to be smoking in their rooms will be subject to the campus disciplinary process and

appropriate sanctions.

Soliciting/Selling

Door-to-door solicitation in the residence halls/university apartment buildings is prohibited. Residents

should immediately report any solicitation activities to the hall office and/or the Butler University police department.

Any campus organization that wants to sell items in the residence hall lobby must see the residence

life coordinator for approval.

Sports equipment

The use of sports equipment and playing sports in hallways or rooms are not permitted. Each hall has

recreational facilities and an exercise room. Equipment for use in public recreation areas can be checked out at

the hall office.

Storage

Storage facilities are extremely limited, available on a first-come, first-served basis to students returning

to the residence halls and available only to students who live outside Indiana and the surrounding states and

is limited to four enclosed boxes. No student may store anything without the approval of the residence life

coordinator. Carpets, televisions, stereos, refrigerators or appliances cannot be stored. The residence life coordinator

of the building where the resident currently lives should be contacted to make storage arrangements.

Butler University does not assume liability for any items stored throughout the academic year or over

the summer.

Telephones

Because so many residents prefer to bring their own telephones, phones are not provided. Basic telephone

service, along with voice mail, is included in the room rate. To make long-distance calls from room

phones, students are assigned a long-distance access code from the telecommunications department. The telecommunications

department must be contacted in order to deactivate an assigned long distance access code.

Long-distance charges will be billed to students monthly. Incoming collect calls may not be accepted on

University phones.

Students may use calling cards from room phones and hall pay phones. Calling instructions are as follow:

• on-campus call, dial the last four digits

• off-campus call, dial 7 and the seven-digit number

• long distance call, dial 7 + 1 + area code + seven-digit number + individual Butler long-distance access

code

• international call, dial 7 + 011 + (country code) + (city code) + telephone number + individual

Butler long-distance access code.

Important phone tips

• Guard against fraud. For students´ protection, new procedures and equipment enable the telephone

company to detect and investigate fraudulent calls. Indiana state law provides that no person shall

defraud the telephone company of lawful charges. Upon conviction, violators are subject to imprisonment

for one year or to a fine of up to $1,000 or both.

• It is not possible to bill long distance calls to room telephone numbers, or to accept incoming collect

calls charged to room telephone numbers.

• A Butler access code is for individual use and should not be given to another student. Do not bill

calls to another student’s access code number, to a fictitious number or to a revoked number.

• If you receive prank or harassing calls, please report this to an RA, AVA and/or the Butler University

police department.

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• Requests for phone jack repairs should be made to the RA or hall office. Students will be charged for

damages to room phone jacks that appear upon checkout from the residence hall.

Trash/Housekeeping

Students are responsible for cleaning and removing trash from their own rooms/apartments. Trash

rooms are located on each floor in the residence halls. Dumpsters are located in the parking lots of each university

apartment building. Vacuum cleaners and some cleaning supplies can be checked out at the hall offices.

Housekeepers clean public bathrooms and lounge areas daily.

Unauthorized presence

Unauthorized presence in residence halls/university apartment buildings or a restricted area, including

housekeeping closets, roof, another resident’s room, suite or apartment mechanical room or other secured

area is prohibited.

Vending areas

Vending areas are located in each residence hall. If money is lost in a faulty machine, students can receive

refunds from the student accounts window in Jordan Hall. Any problems with machines should be reported

to the hall office immediately.

Visitation

The residence halls should be a place where students can sleep and study without having to sacrifice

these needs to their roommate’s desire to entertain friends. Students in the residence halls are expected to act

with respect for the rights of others, and no visitation privilege should supersede another’s right to sleep or

study in his/her room.

Visitation is a privilege and all residents of a room/apartment/suite must approve of any guests. If one

resident does not desire a guest to be in the room/apartment/suite, then the guest should leave. The visitation

policy is in place to make sure students are able to study and have a safe living environment. A guest is

defined as a person who is not assigned to your specific living area and who is visiting you. Guests may not

infringe on the rights of roommate/suitemates or other students and must observe and follow all residence

life policies. Guests must be escorted at all times while in the halls and must be identified as visiting a specific

student living in the residence halls/university apartment buildings. All students are responsible for

their guests and their actions. Any infringement of policy by a guest will be the responsibility of the guest as

well as the student host and the guest may be removed/banned from the halls/university apartment buildings

at residence life staff discretion.

Visitation is the hours which a student may have a guest present in his/her room/apartment. These

hours vary between the halls and are outlined below:

Ross and Schwitzer Hall

• 10–2 a.m. Sunday through Thursday

• Friday and Saturday 24-hour visitation

Residential College, University Terrace and Apartment Village

• These residences have 24-hour visitation during the entire week.

• Individual units may elect to shorten visitation hours.

After these hours, members of the opposite sex are permitted in designated 24-hour visitation areas. Parents

or legal guardians of a student may visit the private living areas at any time the residence halls are open,

provided their son or daughter accompanies them. Students must escort their parents or legal guardians to

and from the private living areas.

Windows

Students may not remove window screens or curtains. Decorations or any other item may not be affixed

in any way to the interior or exterior of the window. Students are prohibited from hanging or throwing any

object from a residence hall window. Students and/or guests are not allowed to enter or exit through windows.

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Safety and Security

Security

The maintenance of a safe and secure residence hall environment is everyone's responsibility. To this

end, the admittance of unauthorized persons to residence halls is prohibited. Residents should always lock

their room and apartment doors to ensure personal safety and security of their property. To enhance the

safety and security of all hall residents, residents' property as well as University property, Butler University

police will conduct patrols of the residence halls/university apartment buildings on a periodic basis. Officers

are fully commissioned and have the same authority as other law enforcement officers. For emergency situations

requiring police, medical or firefight response, call 9-1-1. For non-emergency assistance, call BUPD at

940-9396. Additionally the following safety tips should be followed:

1. Never prop residence hall/University apartment building or Greek house doors open or let others

prop them open. Close and latch any door you find propped.

2. Always carry your key and ID card with you and make sure doors lock after they enter.

3. Do not let others in through a door you have opened. Residence hall/University apartment students

should immediately report to their RA, AVA, RLC or hall office staff if they see anyone propping a

door or letting strangers into a stairwell.

4. Never walk alone on campus after dark. Organize your travel so you can walk with a group of

friends. Choose a well-lit pathway for travel. For an escort on campus contact BUPD at ext. 9396.

5. Report suspicious persons or activities to BUPD at ext. 9396. If you suspect you are being followed

or if you fear a suspicious person, move to a brightly lit area or toward other people.

6. If you are a victim of a crime, immediately report the incident to BUPD at ext. 9396 and to your

RA/AVA/RLC. Your immediate report may be instrumental in apprehending the individual and/or

recovering your loss.

7. Residence hall/university apartment students should never leave their rooms/apartments without

locking their doors.

8. Never leave your keys and possessions unattended in a lounge, hallway, laundry room or other common

space. Secure valuables in a locked place.

9. Check your family insurance to see if your possessions are covered while you have them on campus.

If you are not adequately covered, consider personal property insurance.

10. Write down brand names, purchase prices and dates, and serial numbers of all valuables and name,

account number and expiration date of all credit cards. This information should be kept separate

from other valuables and in a safe location. Report immediately any theft or loss to BUPD.

Abuse of safety equipment

Safety and security equipment is placed in the residence halls/university apartment buildings for your

protection. Tampering with such equipment (exit signage, standard/emergency lighting, fire alarm

horns/strobes) will endanger not only your life but also the life of everyone in the building. Participating in

any activity that may compromise building security or safety will result in disciplinary action and/or criminal

charges. If there is a fire:

1. If you see a fire or smell smoke, pull the nearest building alarm immediately.

2. Leave the building.

3. Call BUPD at ext. 9396.

If you get trapped in a room when there is a fire, close the doors and seal cracks and vents. Hang an object

in front of the window (bed sheet, jacket) and/or telephone for help. If above the first floor do not open

the window until instructed by rescue personnel.

At the beginning of the semester, familiarize yourself with the emergency and evacuation procedures, and

the locations of exit stairwells and doors. Plan more than one exit route. If you hear a fire alarm, you are required

to immediately exit the building. Never use an elevator in a fire emergency. When notified of severe

weather, proceed quickly and calmly to the inner most area on the lower levels of the building, away from

windows.

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GREEK LIFE

Greek life refers to Butler’s social fraternities and sororities. Membership is a popular option for many

Butler students with approximately 34 percent of undergraduates choosing to become members of the Greek

community. Butler is home to 16 inter/national Greek organizations, known as “chapters.” Of the 16 chapters,

14 offer housing. Alumni/ae play an active role in assisting the members enhance personal development

through academic, leadership, philanthropic and social programming. Participation within a Greek chapter

gives members a unique opportunity to build close relationships and lifelong friendships.

Between 30 and 80 sophomores, juniors and seniors live in each Greek chapter facility. All chapter

houses are staffed with a house director who is responsible for the management of the house. All chapter

houses are owned by an alumni/ae board or national corporation board. Living arrangements vary regarding

the occupancy of the facility, individual rooms and provision of meal service.

The director of Greek life and orientation programs is a full-time staff member who works with and advises

the Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic Association (governing bodies of the fraternities and sororities),

as well as Order of Omega honor society. The director also serves as a liaison between the University

and the chapters, (inter)national headquarters staff, alumni/ae volunteers, house directors, faculty, staff, parents

and community organizations. The office of Greek Life and Orientation Programs is in Atherton Union,

Room 312. The director is available to help anyone who has questions or would like to know more about

fraternity or sorority life.

Alcohol Guidelines

For specific guidelines and regulations pertaining to Greek chapters, refer to each Inter/national organization's

alcohol policy, the Greek social event policy and the University alcohol policy. All policies are available

from the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

Members of Greek chapters and their guests are expected to obey state and federal laws, Butler University

policies and the chapter’s inter/national alcohol policy. In addition, every member should know his or her

chapter's inter/national policy regarding alcohol. Infractions of any of these policies will result in action by

the University, the respective council and/or the inter/national fraternal organization.

Alcohol beverages many not be served or consumed outside or on the house premises unless the procedures

for an approved party with a third-party vendor are followed.

Alcohol beverages and containers should not be visible from outside the chapter house. (See the "Rights

and Responsibilities" section of the student handbook for complete alcohol guidelines.)

Campus and Community Relations

Greek chapter houses are privately owned residences. Sophomores and juniors may be permitted to live

in a chapter house of which they are members to satisfy the University’s residential requirement. The housing

environments provide a unique living experience that supports the educational mission of the university

and the residential environment of the

surrounding neighborhood. Therefore, it is essential that a chapter and its individual members follow these

guidelines to promote good campus and community relations.

• Landscaping and house exteriors will be maintained on a regular basis.

• Dumpsters and surrounding areas will be clean and sanitary.

• Music and noise will be kept at reasonable levels and comply with local noise ordinances.

• The chapter and individuals will respond appropriately to complaints.

• Individuals will be respectful of the rights of others who are trying to sleep and study.

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Grade Requirements, men’s and women’s fraternity

An academic standing and membership report for each fraternity and sorority will be compiled at the

end of each semester. Any organization that has a collective GPA less than 2.25 will be notified that it is on

academic probation for the following semester. If an organization that has been on probation the previous

semester again falls below 2.25, that organization will then be placed on social probation for the following

semester or semesters until the cumulative average reaches 2.25 or better. Social probation for any organization

under this policy will mean that all scheduled activities will be suspended during the probationary period.

The only exceptions will be (1) the organization may participate in formal recruitment; (2) the organization

may pledge new members; and (3) the organization may have formal initiation as detailed by the respective

national organization for eligible members.

In addition, the interfraternity council mandates that all men’s fraternities attain a collective GPA above

the all-men’s average. Failure to meet this requirement may result in a probationary status.

Greek Alcohol and Social Event Policy

Mission

In recognition of the concern for the health and safety of our members, Butler University's Greek community

hopes to navigate a course to safe and responsible behavior at fraternity/sorority sponsored social

functions involving alcohol, and in doing so, reduce the threat of alcohol abuse and its related maladies in

addition to providing a safe and responsible environment for social functions that may or may not involve

alcohol.

For Social Events involving the Availability of Alcohol

General (alcohol available):

I. The possession, use and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages, while on chapter premises,

during an official chapter event, or in any situation sponsored or endorsed by the chapter must

be in compliance with any and all applicable laws of the state of Indiana and Marion County, as

II.

III.

IV.

well as the Butler University Rules of Conduct and Butler University Alcohol Policy.

This policy is intended to supplement individual chapters' social and risk management policies.

Chapters are encouraged to be aware of and informed regarding current policies, laws, regulations

or rules that relate to the use of alcohol.

Pursuant to all NIC, NPC and FIPG regulations, no chapter funds may be used to purchase alcohol;

“slush funds” or “house beer” will not be permitted in any instance.

No chapter shall provide or allow any alcohol at membership recruitment activities or activities

involving new members. (See also IFC and Panhellenic Association recruitment rules.)

V. Alcoholic beverages may not be served on or consumed outside of the chapter house on fraternity

house premises except for during registered parties in an enclosed area involving a tent.

Outside events with amplified sound must end by 11 p.m. Sound must be contained indoors

after 11 p.m.

VI.

“Open parties” are prohibited; at no time shall the hosting fraternity allow any individual into

the social function without first confirming their 'invitation' by way of checking the guest list

approved by the director of Greek life and orientation programs. Individuals shall not be added

to the guest list during the event.

VII. Social events involving alcohol may be held only on Friday and Saturday nights. All parties

must end by 3 a.m., except outside events involving amplified sound – which must end by 11

p.m. to comply with the city noise ordinance. Alcohol sales must end at 2 a.m. No parties can

be held during university reading days or University finals week.

VIII. All events must be properly registered by the Friday one week prior to the date of the event. (See

the policy's 'Registration' section for the specific registration requirements.)

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XI.

IX. Any social function/event involving the distribution and consumption of alcohol must employ a

third-party vendor, who is responsible for:

A. Said "Vendor" shall provide limits of general liability of not less than $1,000,000, combined

single limit for bodily injury or property damage per occurrence and an aggregate

of no less than $1,000,000. Coverage shall also include liquor liability with a limit of no

less that $1,000,000. Coverage shall also include liquor liability with a limit of no less

than $1,000,000. Said insurance shall provide workers compensation coverage to comply

with the statutory requirements and provide employer’s liability of not less than

$100,000, each accident; $100,000, each employee by disease; and $500,000, per policy

by disease. Proof of such insurance shall be provided by certificate of insurance not

less than seven (7) days prior to the event. Insurance shall be written by a company with

BEST’s rating of A, VII or better.

B. Containing and distributing all alcohol beverages.

C. Confirming legal drinking age (21) of the guests to whom they sell alcohol every time

alcohol is purchased.

D. All alcohol distribution on a per drink basis with cash exchange.

E. Alcoholic drinks are limited to beer, wine coolers and mixed drinks containing only one

type of alcohol. Shots of hard liquor and mixed drinks containing more than one type of

alcohol (e.g., “Long Island Iced Tea”) are prohibited.

F. Dutiful monitoring of alcohol consumption and if necessary, subsequent denial of alcohol

in cases of, but not limited to: unruly behavior, apparent alcohol abuse, severe intoxication,

or any other situation, left to their discretion which would indicate the need to deny

individuals the ability to purchase alcohol.

The use of any alternate method of alcohol distribution (e.g., BYOB, house distribution, individual

room distribution, etc.) other than that of a third-party vendor is strictly prohibited.

X. The attendance list, submitted in conjunction with the registration form (see 'Registration'),

must be strictly monitored by no fewer than two individual

members of the chapter sponsoring the event. Under no circumstances should the list used during

the event deviate from the attendance list that was previously submitted and approved. The

monitors will be currently enrolled Butler undergraduate students and are responsible for confirming

invitations and preventing any individual from entering/exiting a social event with alcohol.

The director of Greek life and orientation programs may grant permission for the chapter’s

hired security personnel to monitor the list when arranged in advance.

In accordance with state law, no one under the age of 18 is allowed where

alcohol is furnished.

XII. Signs must be posted at the entrance to the event, near the alcohol distribution site, by any public/house

phone and in bathrooms stating:

Emergency phone numbers, specifically:

1. Butler University Police Dept. (ext. 9396)

2. Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Dept. (911)

3. Indianapolis Fire Dept. (911)

XIII. There must be a minimum of four sobriety monitors present at any social event involving alcohol

distribution; sobriety monitors, selected from the chapters sponsoring the function must

not consume any alcoholic or otherwise intoxicating substances for the duration of the event so

that they may assist in the case of an emergency or any other situation necessitating their aid.

(Each sponsoring chapter should provide at least one such monitor.)

XIV. Adequate, non-alcoholic food and beverage alternatives (e.g., soft drink, pretzels, chips, bottled

water, etc.) must be present and readily accessible at all social events involving alcohol distribution.

Water fountains and soft drink machines are not considered adequate accessibility.

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XV.

These guidelines shall be in effect throughout the calendar year.

Security

I. All chapters hosting/sponsoring a social function where alcoholic beverages are being sold and

consumed are required to provide security for the event. There must be a minimum of two offduty

Indianapolis police officers (or from a security company acknowledged by BUPD).

II. Two members of the hosting fraternity's officer corps are to meet the hired security officers at the

BUPD office no later than fifteen minutes prior to the start of the function. At that time the

hosting fraternity, BUPD officers or the BUPD shift supervisor (or most senior officer on

duty), will outline the specific needs and expectation regarding the event.

III. For larger events, discretion is given to the BUPD-approved security on how much personnel

they would like to have. A minimum of two officers is required. (An average of one officer for

every 100 people expected is recommended.)

Registration

A social event that necessitates registration is one that meets one or more of the following criteria:

• The event was planned or pre-meditated

• The event was discussed during a chapter or executive committee meeting, or was advertised

by any means (e.g., word of mouth, chapter listserv, invitations, T-shirts, Facebook, text

messaging, etc.)

• Chapter funds were used in any way

• An objective observer would construe the function as chapter-related

I. All on-campus social functions and individual in-house “date functions” must be registered by

noon on the Friday of the week preceding the date of the event.

II. Social events with alcohol present may only be held on either Friday or Saturday night. (Functions

not involving the availability of alcohol, which can also occur on Thursday nights, must

also be registered with the director of Greek life and orientation programs.)

III. Any chapter wishing to sponsor a registered social function must have all IFC and/or Panhellenic

Association dues paid in full (this includes fines and other fees). All chapters with outstanding

debts at the time of registration will not be permitted to sponsor an event.

IV.

Sponsorship for any single social event must be in accordance with all sponsoring chapters’ national

policies in terms of the number of chapters/organizations that can sponsor an event and if

a chapter/organization is allowed to participate depending on the nature of the event and where

the event will take place.

V. The hosting fraternity of the social event should complete the Event Registration Form (posted

outside the Office of Greek Life and Orientation Programs) — detailing the sponsoring chapters,

date of the function, location of the function and approximate time of the function. The

completed form is to be returned to the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

VI.

The hosting fraternity must attach a “master copy” of the complete attendance list for the event

by the Wednesday before the function. Each sponsoring chapter/organization, including the

hosting fraternity, must submit an individual attendance list, with the name of the chapter/organization

at the top of each page.

a. The attendance list must be typed and in alphabetical order by last name.

b. The total number of individuals on the master list (members of all participating chapters

plus guests) must not exceed state fire code occupancy restriction for the hosting chapter's

house, if the event will occur inside the chapter house.

c. If the event will occur outside, the total number of individuals allowed in attendance must

not exceed the fire code occupancy restriction for the areas designated and must not exceed

the ratio of three guests: one member.

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d. For events hosted outside the chapter house, the area must be enclosed (e.g. tent or privacy

fence) with an unobstructed exit. For events involving a third-party vendor, the outdoor

area must be confined to a tent.

VII. Third-party registration is handled directly through the Office of Greek Life and Orientation

Programs; a copy of the contract agreed upon by the hosting fraternity and vendor, [along with

the Vendor/Host Agreement] (including proof of the vendor's certificate of insurance), are to be

faxed to the director of Greek life and orientation programs no less than seven days immediately

prior to the date of the event.

VIII. Upon completion of the registration process, each Thursday afternoon, the director of Greek life

and orientation programs will notify BUPD, the dean of student life, the presidents of all chapters

sponsoring the function and any other office/individual to whom the weekend social schedule

is pertinent, officially confirming the completion of the registration process.

Investigation

The dean of student life and director of Greek life and orientation programs reserve the right to conduct

an investigation and pursue formal University conduct charges, regardless of the outcome of the

appeal before the Greek conduct board.

Policy coverage

No policy can cover all possible situations that may arise. When this policy is not specific in a certain

point, chapters are to conduct their activities in the spirit of social responsibility embodied in this

policy. Chapters in violation of this policy's intent will be subject to review by the Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic

Association adjudication, the director of Greek life and orientation programs and/or the

dean of student life.

For social events not involving the availability of alcohol

I. Social events may be held only on Thursday, Friday or Saturday nights. All parties must end by

3 a.m., except outside events involving amplified sound – which must end by 11 p.m. to comply

with the city noise ordinance. No parties can be held during University reading days or

University finals week.

II. All on-campus social functions and individual in-house “date functions” must be registered by

noon on the Friday of the week preceding the date of the event. (See the policy's 'Registration'

section for the specific registration requirements.)

III. Signs must be posted at the entrance to the event, by any public/house phone and in bathrooms

stating:

Emergency phone numbers, specifically:

1. Butler University Police Dept.

2. Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Dept.

3. Indianapolis Fire Dept.

IV. Adequate food and beverage alternatives (e.g., soft drink, pretzels, chips, bottled water, etc.)

must be present and readily accessible at all social events. Water fountains and soft drink machines

are not considered adequate accessibility.

V. These guidelines shall be in effect throughout the calendar year.

Security

Security and an attendance list are not required for socials at which alcohol is not available, unless

deemed necessary for specific social events

Registration

A social event that necessitates registration is one that meets one or more of the following criteria:

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• The event was planned or pre-meditated

• The event was discussed during a chapter or executive committee meeting, or was advertised

by any means (e.g., word of mouth, chapter listserv, invitations, T-shirts, Facebook, text

messaging, etc.)

• Chapter funds were used in any way

• An objective observer would construe the function as fraternity-related

I. All on-campus social functions and individual in-house “date functions” must be registered by

noon on the Friday of the week preceding the date of the event.

II.

III.

II.

III.

VI.

Functions must be registered with the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

Any chapter wishing to sponsor a registered social function must have all IFC and/or Panhellenic

Association dues paid in full (this includes fines and other fees). All chapters with outstanding

debts at the time of registration will not be permitted to sponsor an event.

Sponsorship for any single social event must be in accordance with all sponsoring chapters’ national

policies in terms of the number of chapters/organizations that can sponsor an event and if

a chapter/organization is allowed to give money towards the function depending on what type of

event it is and where the event takes place.

The hosting fraternity of the social event should complete the Event Registration Form (posted

outside the office of Greek life and orientation programs and orientation programs) — detailing

the sponsoring chapters, date of the function, location of the function and approximate time of

the function. The completed form is to be returned to the director of Greek life and orientation

programs.

Upon completion of the registration process, each Thursday afternoon, the director of Greek life

and orientation programs will notify BUPD, the dean of student life, the presidents of all chapters

sponsoring the function and any other office/individual to whom the weekend social schedule

is pertinent, officially confirming the completion of the registration process.

Investigation

I. The dean of student life and director of Greek life and orientation programs have the right to

conduct an investigation and pursue formal university conduct charges, regardless of the outcome

of a hearing before the Greek judicial board.

II.

See the Greek judicial board Constitution for procedures and rules on conduct hearings, sanctions

and appeals.

Policy coverage

No policy can cover all possible situations that may arise. When this policy is not specific in a certain

point, chapters are to conduct their activities in the spirit of social responsibility embodied in this policy.

Chapters in violation of this policy's intent will be subject to review by the Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic

Association adjudication, the director of Greek life and orientation programs and/or the dean

of student life.

Greek Conduct Process

Greek organizations, which may receive conduct charges for allegedly violating campus policies, state law

or their respective council’s constitution and bylaws, are entitled to a hearing. The initial campus hearing

committee includes the dean of student life and the director of Greek life and orientation programs in conjunction

with the judicial vice presidents from Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic Association. Within

the councils, a Greek conduct board shall also be in place. For more information, contact the director of

Greek life and orientation programs.

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Hazing and Initiation Practices

All Greek chapters are expected to abide by their inter/national guidelines and policies regarding hazing

and/or initiation practices. The university has right to investigate any practices that are at odds with the hazing

policies outlined in the “Rights and Responsibilities” section of the student handbook, section XIII., and

the inter/national organization’s new member/associate/pledge program. New members are prohibited from

moving into a Greek chapter house at any time during the new member period unless prior approval is obtained

from the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

King and Queen Contests

All Greek organizations must comply with the Butler University Rules of Conduct found in the “Rights

and Responsibilities” section of the student handbook which states: (There shall be no) “disorderly conduct,

or reckless, intimidating, lewd, indecent or obscene conduct or expression on university-owned or related

property, at university-sponsored or university-supervised functions or against a representative of the University.”

Organizations failing to comply will be subject to conduct proceedings. This includes but is not

limited to events, activities, programs and king/queen contests. In addition, the Panhellenic Association has

developed minimum standards for its constituent groups regarding participation in queen contests and lip

sync competitions.

Questions, fraternities and sororities

What are Panhellenic and IFC?

The Panhellenic Association (Panhel) and the Interfraternity Council (IFC) are the governing bodies of

the sororities and fraternities. Students from respective Greek chapters are elected each year to serve as executive

officers for Panhel and IFC. Each chapter is represented by a delegate at the weekly council meetings.

Chapters pay council dues, which are used to finance formal recruitment activities, speakers, Greek Week,

philanthropy projects, educational and leadership programs.

What are city-wide chapters?

The term ‘city-wide chapters’ refers to nine national fraternities and sororities belonging to the National

Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), or the historically Black Greek organizations. As the name implies, membership

in a chapter is not limited to students from just one campus, but may include students from several

campuses in Indianapolis/Central Indiana. Undergraduate chapter members work closely with a city’s

Graduate Chapter in all aspects of the chapter life.

The Alpha Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho was founded at Butler in 1922. In addition, Butler students

belong to other NPHC city-wide chapters, which are not recognized Butler student organizations. Information

about any of the NPHC organizations is available from the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

Why should I join a fraternity or sorority?

You may have some unanswered questions going through your mind whether you are a first year student,

a continuing student, or a transfer student.

• Will I fit in and make friends?

• Will I succeed academically?

• Will I get lost in the crowd and become just another number?

• Will I be able to get involved on campus and enhance my leadership skills?

• Will I be able to get a good job when I graduate?

• Where can I find other people who like to do the same things that I do?

These concerns are very common. Everyone likes to belong to and feel a part of something. Fraternities

and sororities offer you the chance to meet people who share your interests and values as natural friends.

Fraternities and sororities can help you find your niche on campus, be your home away from home, offer

resources to help you achieve your academic goals, encourage you to get involved in campus organiza-

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tions, let you play on that winning intramural team and give you a group of friends that will cheer you on

when you're successful and who will support you when the going gets tough.

How do I join?

Butler Greeks participate in deferred recruitment, meaning that the membership process is deferred until

at least the second semester of a student’s freshman year. The IFC and Panhellenic Association formal recruitment

processes start before the beginning of the spring semester and are open to all students who have

achieved the required academic minimum during the fall semester. Participation requirements for formal

recruitment can be found in the formal recruitment guides or on the Greek Life and Orientation Programs

web site, www.butler.edu/greek-life. City-wide NPHC organizations also require potential members to have

successfully completed a minimum number of hours with a required minimum GPA.

During panhellenic formal recruitment, the mutual selection process starts with a tour of all of the sorority

chapter houses on the first day. Beginning the second day, chapter events are by invitation only. Potential

members are instructed as to the number of invitations they may accept per day. Following the last recruitment

event on the fourth day (Preference Night), each woman will select the organizations from which she

would be willing to accept an invitation to join (bid). The list of each potential member’s choices and each

chapter’s bids are entered into a computer program and the results are distributed the following day, Bid

Day.

Men's formal recruitment follows a similar format. The first day is comprised of tours of the chapter

houses. During this time, each potential member begins the process of meeting chapter members and gaining

a better understanding of the chapter's values and expectations. The other three days are devoted to meeting

more of the brotherhood and learning about each chapter’s programs and values. Fraternity chapters issue

invitations to join on Bid Day.

Some fraternities and sororities will be looking for members in the fall. Please remember that only second

semester freshmen and upper-class students are able to participate in fall open recruitment. A list of recruitment

chairpersons is available in the office of Greek life and orientation programs as well as an open recruitment

events calendar listing all of the functions for each chapter occurring during the fall semester.

Membership selection for the NPHC chapters is independent of IFC and Panhellenic Association formal

recruitment. The process has different stages and is not completed within just a few days. For more information,

contact the director of Greek life and orientation programs.

Joining a Greek organization is a lifelong commitment and needs to be taken seriously. You need to ask

questions and find out what the chapters value most. It is important to ask questions about what each chapter

will expect in regards to time requirements, financial commitments and academic expectations. You have

every right to know this information before joining any of the organizations.

Do members need to have certain GPAs?

To participate in formal recruitment, students must have successfully completed a minimum of 12

hours with a 2.75 average for panhellenic recruitment or a 2.3 average for IFC recruitment.

Each chapter, including NPHC chapters, has academic guidelines that can affect pledge/associate and active

membership status. To find out each chapter’s specific GPA, please contact the director of Greek life and orientation

programs.

If I join a housed chapter, when do I move in?

All first year students are required to spend their first year in one of the residence halls or qualify for

commuter status. Sophomores and juniors are also required to live in the residence halls or have commuter

status unless they affiliate with a Greek organization and live in their respective chapter house. Upper-class

students or transfer students who pledge/associate with a Greek organization may have the option to move

into the chapter house for the spring semester if space is available.

Who are the house directors?

Having a house director is a university requirement for all Greek chapter housing. House directors are

hired by the respective alumni/ae house corporation board and are responsible for much of the house management.

Their duties can include menu planning, bookkeeping, budgeting, household maintenance and

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staff supervision. House directors bring a wealth of experience to the chapters and are utilized as resources by

both members and alumni/ae.

How much does it cost to join a fraternity or sorority?

Each chapter has certain one-time fees paid by new/associate/pledged members when they join. Initiated

members pay semester dues that cover national insurance fees, membership fees and other costs.

For students moving into a chapter house, your room and board costs are comparable to the residence

halls. Detailed information is available from the director of Greek life and orientation programs and each

chapter, as well as the Greek life and orientation programs website, www.butler.edu/greek-life.

Statement of Alcohol-Free Recruitment

Because of action taken by the North American Interfraternity Conference in summer 1987, Butler University

policy states that the serving or consumption of alcohol during summer and formal recruitment parties

is strictly prohibited. No alcohol or illegal drug use by students participating in Greek recruitment will be

tolerated. If a potential new member is in possession of alcohol or drugs or is causing a disturbance while

under the influence of alcohol or drugs during formal recruitment week, he or she will be removed from the

process. If a chapter supplies alcohol to potential new members, the chapter will be subject to a conduct

hearing.

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RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

I. About Rights and Responsibilities

Each member of a community is afforded certain rights. Likewise, each member has responsibilities

to the members of that community. The Butler University community has established rights as well rules

and regulations to promote the orderly conduct of its educational program. As a private educational institution,

Butler University is committed to educating its students academically, encouraging their personal development,

and promoting their welfare. The University community can best perform its educational mission

when students share with other members of the community the responsibility for orderly conduct in an

environment of mutual respect. The administration of a conduct system is concerned not only with protecting

the safety and well being of the campus as a whole, but also with assuring that each student’s rights are

recognized.

The Butler University student conduct system, which consists of hearing officers, a campus student

conduct board, a University appeals board, the dean of student life, the dean of student services, the vice

president for student affairs (hereinafter “vice president”) and the president of the University, has as its aim

the fair and consistent treatment of student conduct cases brought to its attention. In order to ensure the protection

of the rights of the student, the University adheres to certain recognized procedures. These procedures

are described under “Student Conduct System,” section XVII.

II. University Rules of Conduct

Upon being admitted, a student assumes an obligation to conduct himself/herself in a manner compatible

with the University’s functions as an educational institution. Misconduct for which students may be

subject to sanctions falls into the following categories:

1. Violation of the University’s published policies, regulations, or Rules of Conduct set out herein,

including, but not limited to, those governing alcoholic beverages, academic dishonesty, campus

solicitation, harassment, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, student organizations, or use of

University facilities.

2. Disruption of teaching, research, administrative, or student conduct procedures or other University

activities, including its public functions, or other authorized activities on or off University

premises.

3. Involvement in behavior which could or does result in physical injury, destruction of University

property or that of a third party, or obstruction of the normal functioning of the University.

4. Attempted or actual theft, unauthorized possession of another's property, dishonesty, or knowingly

furnishing false information to the University.

5. Violation of rules governing residential units or of those regulations and guidelines established

by the individual residential units.

6. Physical, mental, or verbal abuse of any person or any conduct that threatens or endangers the

health or safety of any such person on University-owned or related property, or at any University-sponsored

and/or supervised functions.

7. Unauthorized entry, occupancy, or use of University facilities.

8. Disorderly conduct, or reckless, intimidating, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct or expression

on University-owned or related property, or at University-sponsored or supervised functions or

against a representative of the University.

9. Unauthorized use, possession, or distribution of any controlled substance or illegal drug, including,

but not limited to, marijuana, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), or cocaine.

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10. Unauthorized use or possession of explosives, firearms, firecrackers, fireworks, a paintball gun,

other weapons, or dangerous chemicals.

11. Smoking in classrooms, laboratories, residence halls, or in other prohibited areas.

12. Failure to comply with directions of University officials acting in the performance of their duties.

13. Use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages except as expressly permitted by law and

Butler University regulations; public intoxication.

14. Violation of any criminal law while enrolled in the University: federal, state, or municipal.

III. Student Acceptance of Regulations

Upon being admitted to the University, the student agrees to accept and comply with these rules and

regulations. The guidelines and policies contained within this section have been established for the protection,

safety, and well-being of the entire University community and are set forth in writing in order to give

students general notice of prohibited conduct. The guidelines and policies should be read broadly and are

not designed to define misconduct in exhaustive terms.

IV. Student Group Responsibility

Butler University student organizations are expected to adhere to all applicable institutional regulations.

Failure to do so may result in student conduct action being initiated against the group; consequently,

policies, procedures, and sanctions set forth in this section apply to student organizations collectively, as well

as to individual students. Officers of the student organizations are responsible for assuring compliance of all

of their members with regulations and for representation when student conduct proceedings are initiated

against the group.

V. Academic Integrity

Butler University is an academic community. It exists for the sake of the advancement of knowledge;

the pursuit of truth; the intellectual, ethical and social development of students, and the general well being of

society. All members of our community have an obligation to themselves, to their peers and to the institution

to uphold the integrity of Butler University. In the area of academic integrity, this means that one’s

work should be one’s own and that the instructor’s evaluation should be based on the student’s own efforts

and understanding. When the standards of academic integrity are breached, mutual trust is undermined, the

ideals of personal responsibility and autonomy are violated, teaching and learning are severely compromised,

and other goals of the academic community cannot be realized.

Students are responsible for being fully aware of what constitutes academic dishonesty; claims of ignorance

cannot be used to justify or rationalize dishonest acts. Academic dishonesty can take a number of

forms, including but not limited to cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, facilitation, and interference:

Cheating includes receiving or giving help on papers, experiments, reports, compositions, projects,

or examinations without the instructor’s permission. It also includes submitting part of or all of the

completed assignment of another person as one’s own work. Of special note and concern is the use

of purchased research papers. It is a violation of the regulations of Butler University for a student to

purchase a term paper. Cheating is also using unauthorized materials and aids, such as books, one’s

own notes or those of another, and calculators during an examination.

Plagiarism is the fraudulent misrepresentation of any part of another person’s work as one’s own.

Submitting any writing, including take-home exams, that does not properly acknowledge the quoting

or paraphrasing of another person’s words, or that fails to give proper credit for another person’s

ideas, opinion, or theory is plagiarism. Any unacknowledged use of sources to which one is indebted

including but not limited to, music, video, audio, theatre projects, compositions, web site,

and computer software constitutes plagiarism.

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Fabrication is the falsification or invention of information or data in reports, lab results, bibliographies,

or any other academic undertaking.

Facilitating academic dishonesty involves assisting someone in an act of dishonesty.

Interference includes the theft, alteration, destruction, or obstruction of another student’s work. Interference

may take the form of the theft, defacements, or destruction of resources, e.g., library periodicals

and books, so as to deprive other students of information.

The requirements of academic integrity also extend to academic activities involving computers and

networks and unethical/unprofessional conduct specific to academic programs. (See “Computer Use Policy,”

Section VI)

A person who violates the standards of academic integrity undermines the values integral to the educational

mission of Butler University. Academic dishonesty is a serious offense, harming both the community

and the perpetrator, and Butler University has, accordingly, adopted procedures for dealing with possible

instances of academic dishonesty. A college may also adopt its own procedures for dealing with academic

integrity issues. In such a case, the college's procedure may be followed in addition to or as an alternative to

the procedures set forth below:

The Student’s Act of Academic Dishonesty Takes Place in a Course in Which the Student is

Enrolled

[Note: “days,” as used throughout the student handbook, except where otherwise stated, means “calendar

days.” The reference “dean” may also refer to the dean’s designee. ]

1. Imposition of sanctions by the instructor.

(a) The instructor has a conference with the student. The instructor should explain the nature

and basis of the allegation of academic dishonesty. The student must be provided with the

opportunity to respond.

(b) The instructor has the option of consulting his or her department chair in order to determine

whether an infraction has occurred, if a penalty should be imposed, and, if so,

what it should be. The department chair may attend the conference with the student.

Deans of the colleges without department chairs may appoint a faculty consultant for the

same purpose. The instructor may apply other procedures formally agreed to within his

or her college.

(c) If the instructor concludes that the alleged infraction did take place, the instructor will report

this in writing to the student, generally within seven (7) days after the conference. A

copy of the report will be sent to the dean of student services. The report will state the nature

of the offense, the penalty imposed, and how the decision can be appealed. The report

will also inform the student that the vice president for student affairs may impose an

additional penalty (as determined by the procedures stated in V.3).

(d) The instructor may impose a penalty ranging from lowering the grade for an assignment

or test to failing the assignment, the test, or the course. The Office of Registration and Records

should be informed immediately when the penalty is an “F” for the course, so that

the student may not withdraw from the course and receive a “W.” This grade may be

changed subject to the outcome of an appeal.

2. Imposition of sanctions by the dean of the student’s college.

(a) The instructor may request that the dean of the student’s college handle the allegation of

academic dishonesty. The instructor may opt for this course of action either before or after

a conference with the student accused of academic dishonesty. In either case, if the dean

decides to handle the allegation of academic dishonesty, the dean will have a conference

with the student, explain the nature and basis of the allegation and provide the student

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with the opportunity to respond. The dean may invite the instructor to attend the conference.

(b) If the dean concludes that the student did commit the alleged infraction, the dean will

impose a penalty and follow the procedures described in V.1 (c) and V.1 (d).

3. Actions by the vice president for student affairs.

(a) After receiving a report of an act of academic dishonesty, the vice president for student affairs

must examine whether the student has a previous record of academic dishonesty in

order to determine if additional action should be taken. If further action is taken, the vice

president must report his/her decision in writing to the student, generally within 10

days. A copy of the report will be sent to the dean of the student’s college. The report will

mention how the action can be appealed.

(b) If the student has no previous record of academic dishonesty, the dean of student services

or the vice president for student affairs may advise the student to have a conference with

the dean of his college with the purpose of assisting the student in finding ways of realizing

academic success without dishonesty.

(c) If the student has a record of one prior offense the student is required to have a conference

with the dean of his or her college.

(d) If the student has a record of two prior offenses the student will be immediately suspended

for the semester in which the last offense took place. If that semester has already

passed, the student will be suspended for the semester following the one during which

the last offense occurred.

(e) If the student has a record of three prior offenses, the student will be immediately dismissed

from the University.

4. Appeal

(a) If the student seeks to appeal the penalty imposed by the instructor the student should

initiate the appeal in writing to the dean of her/his college within seven (7) days after

receiving the instructor’s report stating the penalty. The dean will have a conference with

the student, generally within 10 days after receiving the notice of appeal. The student will

be informed in writing of the dean’s, action generally within seven (7) days after the

conference. The report will mention how the decision can be appealed. A copy of the

report will be sent to the instructor and the dean of student services.

(b) If the student seeks to appeal an action by the dean of his/her college, or by the vice president

for student affairs, the student must initiate the appeal in writing to the dean of student

services within seven (7) days after receiving the written report stating the action.

(c) The appeals board shall conduct a hearing only if two (2) or more members of the board,

or its chair, believe that the student may have suffered some injustice due to substantive

or procedural error (such as availability of new evidence, demonstrable bias in earlier decision

led to a fundamentally unfair decision, etc.). After submitting the appeal, the student

will be informed in writing whether a hearing will be held. The student is generally

given at least seven (7) days to prepare for the hearing.

(d) The appeals board will make its own rules for the conduct of hearings, which will be consistent

with the provisions contained in the student handbook.

(e) The appeals board may modify any appealed decision, as it deems appropriate. The decision

of the appeals board will be reported in writing to the student generally within seven

(7) business days after the hearing. A copy of the report will be sent to the instructor, the

dean of the student’s college, and the dean of student services.

(f) The president may hear appeals involving a penalty of either suspension or dismissal.

The president may, at his/her discretion, hear any other appeal by the student in regard

to actions of the Appeals or Student Conduct Boards.

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(For additional information, see Section XVII, “Appeal Process”)

The Student’s Act of Academic Dishonesty is Not Related to a Course in Which the Student

is Enrolled

1. The instructor whose course is involved has a conference with the student and the dean of the

student’s college. If the allegation of academic dishonesty is reported by a person other than the

instructor whose course is involved, this person may be invited to attend the conference.

2. If the dean concludes after consultation with the instructor, that the alleged infraction did take

place, this will be reported in writing to the student, generally within seven (7) days after the

conference with the student. A copy of the report will be sent to the dean of student services.

The report will state the nature of the offense and how the decision can be appealed. The report

will also inform the student that the vice president for student affairs may impose a penalty if

prior offenses have been recorded.

3. The vice president for student affairs will take further action according to the procedures stated

in the preceding section, “Appeal” 3(a)-(e).

4. The student may appeal according to the procedures outlined in the preceding section, “Appeal,”

4(a)-(f).

The Student’s Act of Dishonesty Takes Place in a Computer Facility

System managers or other individuals will report any possible instance of academic dishonesty

that takes place in a computer facility to the dean of student services, who will decide which of

the procedures for academic dishonesty should be followed.

Professional Conduct

1. Allegations of unethical or unprofessional conduct of a student enrolled in or applying to a professional

degree program may be addressed by the dean of the appropriate college according to

the policies and procedures of the college. A student found to be in violation of the college’s

policies may be subject to a grading sanction as well as suspension or termination from their

professional degree program.

2. A student may be subject to sanctions under both the University’s Rules of Conduct and a college’s

professional conduct policies.

3. If the dean of the college concludes that the alleged infraction did take place, the instructor will

report this in writing to the student generally within seven (7) days after the conference. The

report will state the nature of the offense, the penalty imposed, and how the decision can be appealed.

A copy of the report will be sent to the dean of student services.

4. The student may appeal according to the procedures outlined above under Appeal 4(a)-(f).

VI. Computer Use Policy

The purpose of the following is to specify computer use policies for Butler University and may be

revised or supplemented by Information Resources.

1. The goal of the University is to provide adequate computer facilities for support of teaching and research

for all faculty, students and staff, and to update these facilities as needed to keep the University

competitive.

2. Access to a Butler University computer system or network is not in itself a right, but a privilege

granted with the understanding that there are responsibilities to ensure fairness to all other users.

Inappropriate use may result in withdrawal of this privilege, academic discipline and/or prosecution

through the appropriate civil or criminal justice system.

3. It is the policy of the University to abide by all applicable laws governing computer software use,

privacy, copyright, and recognition of intellectual property.

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4. Information Resources will maintain and update detailed procedures and guidelines for computer

hardware and software use on campus. Procedures, guidelines and changes to this policy will be presented

to the Information Management Council for review and follow the standard University protocol

for policy approval.

Computer Privacy

1. Student, faculty and staff privacy on multi-user computers means that each account, and the

content of files associated with that account, are assigned to the designated user(s); they must not

be used or intruded upon by anyone else without the explicit permission of the designated

owner. Each owner is responsible for any and all activity that occurs through the use of their

password.

2. Pursuant to the Electronic and Communications Privacy Act of 1989, Title 18, United States

Code, Sections 2510 and following, notice is hereby given that there are no facilities provided by

the University that guarantee the confidentiality of files. The computing system administrator,

and his or her designates, may have the ability to view all messages and files of any user. However,

it is not the routine policy of the administrator to view others’ files, and the general policy

is to keep files private, even though such privacy cannot be guaranteed.

3. Computer access for faculty and staff is primarily for educational and University business purposes.

Computer access for students is primarily for educational purposes. In general, educational

use is interpreted loosely; however, abuse for economic gain or uses of the computer or

network that adversely affects others will not be tolerated. Personal use of computer access not for

economic gain, such as entertainment, is allowed but only if it does not interfere with or disrupt

University business or the educational use of others. If a problem becomes evident or there is a

complaint regarding usage of networks or University computers, Butler has the right to review

the contents of computer memory and storage, trace information, backups, file server accounts

and any central multi-user computer account contents, to determine your complicity. Butler has

the right to restrict activities that are deemed to interfere with the normal operation of the network.

4. Use of files or other software that is solely for the purpose of pestering other persons is generally

considered just cause for administrative action. Possession of software solely intended to compromise

system security or performance is also prohibited.

5. Accounts on Butler multi-user computers and servers are usually identified as personal information

access points. Although various users may sometimes share data within the computer,

the “login” access point is considered personal. A “Username” identifies a particular person and

is for the exclusive use of that person. Each user agrees not to share his or her password with

others. If a user believes his password has been revealed to others, he or she should change it

immediately, or if unable to change it, contact the information resources staff for assistance. Any

use of a personal account by someone other than the designated owner should be reported immediately

to Information Resources.

6. Additional guidelines for faculty and staff desktop computers:

(a) A personal computer in an office is as private as a desk or filing cabinet. The information

resources staff (including any student assistants) will make every attempt to honor this.

(b) Information resources personnel will only view or copy data files on a faculty/staff personal

computer upon invitation by the faculty/staff member, or as part of a technical

problem analysis or resolution. In addition, personnel may be invited to copy data for the

purposes of system backup. If personnel need to access a faculty/staff computer for installation

and updates, they will attempt to notify the appropriate faculty/staff member. If access

is urgently needed to control a network problem, and the faculty/staff member cannot

be reached, the computer staff will contact the appropriate dean or supervisor’s office for

access.

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(c)

(d)

Whenever information resources personnel go into a faculty or staff office without the faculty/staff

member present, they should leave a message indicating why they were there

and what was done.

It is the faculty or staff member’s responsibility to contact Information Resources regarding

deletion of files upon termination of employment at Butler. Any mail system specific

files abandoned by a user will be deleted. Any other files abandoned will be deleted or

retained for use by the University as determined by the Chief Information Officer or

his/her delegate.

7. Student accounts and any associated files are subject to deletion at the beginning of the next fall

or spring term for which the student fails to register.

Electronic Mail

1. The purpose of electronic mail is to enhance communication. Therefore, it is important that all

faculty/staff members be connected to the system and that a system be selected that will ease

communication between different types of computers.

2. Pursuant to the Electronic and Communications Privacy Act of 1989, Title 18, United States

Code, Sections 2510 and following, notice is hereby given that there are no facilities provided by

the University for sending or receiving confidential messages. The computing system administrator,

and his or her designates, may have the ability to view all messages and files of any user.

However, it is not the routine policy of the administrator to review messages, and the general

policy is to keep messages private, even though such privacy cannot be guaranteed.

3. Privacy of messages routed off campus is not within the control of Butler University.

4. Electronic mail addressed to a Butler network address for a student, faculty or staff member who

is no longer attending or employed by the University will be deleted. There will be no attempt

made to ascertain the contents of messages, whether previously read by the addressee or not.

5. Electronic mail is required to carry a valid “from” name of the individual who sent it. Mail represented

as being from someone other than the sender will be considered a violation of these

guidelines that can result in student conduct action.

External Network Use 1

1. The Internet connection at Butler is for the use of persons legitimately affiliated with Butler

University or affiliate organizations, to facilitate the exchange of information consistent with the

academic, educational and research purposes of its members.

2. Use of external networks shall:

(a) Avoid interfering with the work of other users of the networks. Messages that are likely to

result in the loss of recipients’ work or systems are prohibited.

(b) Avoid disrupting the network host systems (nodes).

(c) Avoid disrupting network services.

3. Users of external networks are expected to be responsible in their use:

(a) “Chain letters,” “broadcasting” messages to lists or individuals, and other types of use that

would cause congestion of the networks or otherwise interfere with the work of others are

not allowed.

(b)

External networks are not to be used from Butler for commercial purposes, such as marketing,

reselling bandwidth, or business transactions between commercial organizations.

4. Any communication that violates applicable laws and regulations is not allowed. In particular,

any messages and data sent to destinations outside the U.S. must satisfy the Department of

Commerce regulations (either be within the GTDA guidelines for information that may be generally

transmitted or have the required license).

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(a) A number of websites exist today that make it easy to download music and video files

from the Internet. However, many of these materials available for download are illegal duplications

and made available without permission of the copyright owner. Downloading

and other duplication of copyrighted materials is only legal with the permission of: the actual

copyright owner; or a legitimate claim of “fair use.” Therefore, music and/or video

files nay not be downloaded or otherwise copied from the Internet without the specific

written approval of an authorized officer of the University. When such downloads are

authorized, you must promptly check any downloaded files of software for viruses.

Software Licensing

1. Butler University’s policy is to license all software used on campus according to applicable law.

In order to maintain documentation of compliance with these laws, the department of information

resources must maintain certain records on all faculty/staff software acquisition and track information

about our investment in software.

2. The information resources department will retain original distribution media, and other proofs

of purchase when applicable, for all University-owned software. The proof of purchase is often

needed for software upgrades and/or to establish proof of legal license. Media also provide protection

for the University’s investment if a faculty/staff member leaves and the software is transferred

to a new person. Media allows for re-installation and/or personalization of the software for

the new user and can serve as a form of backup for the original user if the application software is

accidentally corrupted or destroyed.

3. Software license rules must be followed regardless of the physical location of the software that is

used and the access method used to activate the software.

4. Faculty/staff members may also use personally purchased software on the University systems

providing:

(a) The software is used according to its license requirements.

(b) The software is registered with the department of information resources along with a

signed statement or copies of appropriate proof of purchase of license.

(c) The software does not adversely react with other University software installed on the system, or

violate any licensing requirements of the University software.

(d) The software does not adversely affect operation, traffic or security of the network and its other

computer nodes.

(e) Operation and/or consulting assistance is not needed for successful use of the software.

Scanning Documents

1. It is Butler’s policy to comply with any federal, state, or local regulation related to electronic

scanning of documents, including “fair use” policies on copyrighted material.

2. Under guidelines from the U.S. government it is stated that anyone who scans “sensitive documents”

risks “Constructive Seizure” of their computer equipment, up to $25,000 in fines, or

up to 15 years imprisonment. These guidelines define “sensitive documents” to include the following:

(a) Money

(b) Federal Reserve notes

(c) U.S. postage stamps

(d) Foreign postage stamps

(e) Revenue stamps

(f) Other negotiable valuated articles (for example, checks, bonds, and securities)

1 Adapted from the Acceptable Use Policy of the Corporation for Research and Educational Networking

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(g) Identification documents (for example, driver’s license and governmental identification

documents)

Academic Integrity Related to Computer Use

1. Academic dishonesty takes many forms and the wide use of computers and networks on campus

raise some particularly important issues. In general, computer users that attempt to violate copyright,

violate privacy, steal software, plagiarize others’ work, or gain more than their fair share of

resources may be subject to discipline. To have a fair share of resources means that each person

uses only his or her allocated resources and makes no attempt to degrade system performance or

use special knowledge to gain more than his or her fair share.

2. Note that there are some hardcopy documents that can be copied in limited quantities under

copyright “fair use” rules but MAY NOT be then converted to digital form and distributed

electronically.

3. Academic dishonesty will be handled based upon the academic integrity guidelines as outlined

in the University, college and departmental policies.

4. A violation of responsibilities or a breach of academic honesty could result in the denial of computer

system and network access along with any other student conduct action.

5. The University may also choose to prosecute violators through civil or criminal justice systems.

Note that violations in use of networks may also result in prosecution by operators of the remote

compromised node. When violations involve networks crossing state lines, federal law enforcement

agencies may become involved.

Relocation of Computer Hardware, Software, or Network Connections

1. Participation of information resources staff is required for any of the following related to faculty,

staff or computer classroom systems:

(a) Relocation of a system on campus, unless the system is explicitly designated as a portable system.

Movement of hardware requires update of records for insurance, inventory and warranty.

Consideration of network connection availability and network record updates must be

made. Special moving procedures for certain equipment may be required to prevent damage.

(b) Hardware configuration changes and repairs, including swapping of keyboards, monitors, etc.

This is required for many of the same reasons given in (a), above, plus warranty or service

agreements may be affected or voided due to re-configuration, or may require an “authorized”

repair person to maintain protection.

(c) Reassignment of a system to another person. Software license records require updating for such

a transfer. Correct records are also needed to locate systems that require software updates

and/or needed to be offered software updates. System may have been acquired with funds

restricted to certain uses.

(d) Transfer of licensed software application programs to, from or between computers. The rea-

(e)

sons are the same as those for (b) above.

Computer attachment or detachment from the network. This is to avoid network disturbances

or failures, and for update of records required to locate malfunctioning equipment

on network.

2. Desktop computer systems should not be removed from campus unless by special arrangement.

Dean’s and chief information officer’s approvals required. Record updates are required for insurance

and inventory. Insurance liability must be considered and financial responsibility

agreed upon by all parties.

3. If faculty/staff member leaves the University, he or she is expected to leave behind all hardware,

software, accessories and documentation that were provided by the University, and notify

Information Resources.

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Upgrades

It is desirable for faculty and staff to have the latest version of selected major software packages on

an annual basis. Information resources will budget for campus-wide software such as our standard

operating system and office tools. However, it is the faculty or staff member’s responsibility

to see that expenditures are planned for in the appropriate departmental or college budget for

all department-specific tools. Faculty members who wish to have particular software applications

or updates available in student labs should make these requests through their college dean.

System Backups

1. In order to provide a means for recovering from hardware failure, data corruption, or disaster,

the department of information resources will be responsible for the regular backup of data stored

on the central campus servers. The backup of devices either housed in a location not specified by

information resources or not maintained by Information Resources is the responsibility of the

individual department or user.

2. System backups are NOT for data archival. Any archival of data is the responsibility of the individual

departments and should be maintained either on a central server, or stored on stable, removable

media.

3. A regular backup schedule will be followed. Information resources will maintain a regular

schedule of backups, which will be published on the department’s web page.

4. Backup media will be retained for a maximum of three years.

5. Once the storage period for the backup has expired, the media will either be re-used or destroyed.

6. Data that are critical to the operation of the University should be stored on a central server that is

regularly backed up.

Student Personal Systems

1. Butler will allow students to connect their own devices to the campus network provided that

they meet the following requirements:

(a) They conform to the standards set forth by information resources. These standards will be

available in a public location such as the department’s web page.

(b) They do not require any modification to the existing campus network.

(c) They do not interfere with the normal operation of the campus network.

2. Each individual is responsible for the maintenance of their own hardware and software and the

data stored on it.

3. Butler is not responsible for any damage done to the device through the network connection.

This includes but is not limited to power surges, computer viruses or malicious acts from other

users.

4. Any device connected to the network must be operated in accordance with all applicable local,

state, federal and international laws, including but not limited to software license agreements and

copyright.

5. Students who violate this policy may lose their ability to connect any device to the network as

well as computer access.

Purchasing Personal Computer Systems

Butler maintains a discount program for staff or students wishing to purchase computer equipment

for personal use. See the Information Resource website for current procedures.

VII. Alcohol Policy

Butler students are expected to obey the state and local law concerning the use of alcoholic beverages.

Alcoholic beverages are prohibited in all common areas, academic buildings, the auditorium in Clowes Memorial

Hall, the Butler Bowl, Hinkle Fieldhouse and the Health and Recreation Complex (HRC), without

the expressed authorization of the department head responsible for the administration of that facility.

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Authorization must be obtained from the vice president for student affairs to serve or consume alcoholic beverages

in Atherton Union, the west gym, Robertson Hall, certain outdoor locations, and in public areas on

the premises of a residential unit. In order to obtain such approval, a written request detailing the time, location,

number of participants, and the exact nature of the event must be submitted to the vice president’s office

15 business days in advance of the event. In addition, no special mention, pictorial or otherwise, of the

fact that alcohol will be present may be made when advertising such events.

Use of Alcoholic Beverages

1. All Butler students are responsible for complying with state and local laws. Attention is called to

the Indiana alcoholic beverages law (Indiana Code 7.1-5):

(a) No person under 21 years of age may use or be in possession of alcoholic beverages.

(b) Persons 21 or over may not make alcoholic beverages available to minors.

(c) Misrepresentation of age for the purpose of purchasing alcoholic beverages is a violation of

state law.

(d) Excerpts of Indiana alcoholic beverage law:

i. It is a class C infraction for a minor to make a false statement of his/her age, or to

present or offer false or fraudulent evidence of majority or identity, to a permittee

for the purpose of ordering, purchasing, attempting to purchase or otherwise procuring

or attempting to procure an alcoholic beverage. A minor who uses a false or

altered driver’s license as evidence of majority under this section shall have his/her

driver’s license revoked for a period of up to one year in addition to any other penalty

imposed by law.

ii. It is a class C misdemeanor for a person to sell, give, or furnish to a minor false or

fraudulent evidence of majority or identity with the intent to violate a provision of

this law.

iii. It is a class C infraction for a minor to have in his/her possession false or fraudulent

evidence of majority or identity with the intent to violate a provision of this

law.

iv. It is a class C misdemeanor for a minor to knowingly: (a) possess an alcoholic beverage;

(b) consume it; or (c) transport it on a public highway when not accompanied

by at least one of his parents or guardians.

v. It is a class C misdemeanor for a person to recklessly sell, barter, exchange, provide

or furnish an alcoholic beverage to a minor.

vi. It is a class C infraction for a person 21 years of age or older to knowingly induce a

minor to unlawfully possess an alcoholic beverage.

vii. It is a class C misdemeanor for a minor to recklessly be in a tavern, bar or other

public place where alcoholic beverages are sold, bartered, exchanged, given away,

provided or furnished. A minor violating this law shall have his/her driver’s license

revoked for a period of up to one year, in addition to any other penalty imposed

by law.

(e) Excerpts from Indiana criminal procedure laws:

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(b)

i. Class C infractions are punishable by the imposition of a fine of up to $500. In

addition, the suspension of one’s driver’s license may also occur.

ii. Class C misdemeanors are punishable by imprisonment for not more than 60

days. In addition, a fine of not more than $500 may be imposed. In addition to

Indiana State law and University policy, members of student organizations shall be

subject to the following guidelines concerning the possession and consumption of

alcoholic beverages on University-related premises. Recommendations also are listed

that will enhance the ability of student organizations to better self-regulate events.

2. Alcoholic beverages are prohibited in all common areas, academic buildings, the auditorium in

Clowes Memorial Hall, the Butler Bowl, Hinkle Fieldhouse and the Health and Recreation

Complex (HRC), without the expressed authorization of the department head responsible for

the administration of that facility.

(a) Authorization must be obtained from the vice president for student affairs to serve or consume

alcoholic beverages in Atherton Union, the west gym, Robertson Hall, certain outdoor

locations and in public areas on the premises of a residential unit.

In order to obtain such approval, a written request detailing the time, location, number of

participants and the exact nature of the event must be submitted to the vice president’s office

15 business days in advance of the event. In addition, no special mention, pictorial or

otherwise, of the fact that alcohol will be present may be made when advertising such

events.

Furnishing and/or Consuming Alcohol

1. Alcohol may not be furnished or consumed on University-owned property unless authorization

for a specific event is obtained from the vice president for student affairs. On a case-by-case basis,

an organization may petition the vice president to allow the serving and consuming of alcoholic

beverages outside the physical structure of a building in prescribed areas. This request

must be submitted to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs in writing at least 15

business days in advance of the event.

2. Alcoholic beverages may not be furnished or consumed outside a residence hall except in cases

noted above.

3. Residence hall students 21 years of age and their guests 21 years of age or older may possess and

consume alcoholic beverages on an individual basis in the privacy of their own rooms, with

their room doors closed. Alcohol may not be possessed or consumed in the presence of individuals

20 years of age and younger.

4. No University funds or monies from student organization accounts may be used to purchase alcoholic

beverages, without the authorization of the vice president for student affairs.

Group Use of Alcohol Guidelines

1. The guidelines are not designed to encourage or discourage alcohol consumption. Rather, they

establish parameters for alcohol use that are consistent with applicable laws and allow for social

interaction and personal expression without infringing on the rights and property of others. The

guidelines exist because the University believes that healthy, positive social interaction is an integral

part of the educational process. The guidelines will enable organizations to maintain high

standards that directly contribute to a positive living-learning environment.

2. The planning and execution of a social event is the responsibility of all organized groups participating

in the function. If a planned social event involves two or more student groups, the

appropriate officers of the groups will participate in the planning and implementation of that

event, regardless of where the event will occur. Conduct sanctions resulting from violations of

the University’s Rules of Conduct will be individualized for each case. Individual(s) alleged to

violate this policy may face University as well as legal action.

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Sponsoring Events at Which Alcohol May Be Furnished

1. On-campus social events

(a) A campus wide social event is defined as an event that is held on campus with a third

party vendor, an enclosed alcohol area, security officers in attendance, and limited to current

Butler University students and their guests.

Open on campus events do not require a guest list; however a Butler ID must be shown

for admission. Guests of Butler University students must enter with the host and possess

a valid driver’s license or other state issued ID.

(b) Registration of on campus social events – These social events should be registered a minimum

of 15 business days in advance of the event. The event registration form and

proposal must be completed and signed by the director of PuLSE or director of Greek life

(for social fraternities/sororities), vice president for student affairs or designee, manager of

catering, conferences and special events and president(s) or responsible officer(s) of the

sponsoring organization(s).

2. Closed social events

(a) These events are defined as an event that is held by any student organization and designated

as such on the event registration form

(b) A guest list should be submitted along with the completed event registration form for any

closed event.

(c) Each sponsoring organization must submit their guest list on paper that includes the organization’s

name at the top. The guests’ names must be in alphabetical order by last

name of the student/guest.

(d) Registration of a closed social event on campus – These social events should be registered

a minimum of 15 business days in advance of the event. The event registration form

must be completed and signed by the presidents or responsible officer(s) of the sponsoring

organization(s) and submitted to the PuLSE office.

3. Minimum requirements for sponsoring events

(a) All organizations wishing to sponsor an event must be in good standing with the University

and any governing organizations. An organization is not in good standing if it is subject

to probation or any pending sanctions or has a zero or negative student organization

account balance with the PuLSE office.

(b) A maximum of four organizations may co-sponsor any single social event.

4. Capacity of facility

(a) The number of people who can be invited to a social event in a particular facility will be

established by the physical limitations of the facility. A state fire marshal will examine the

facility and determine capacity for facility. Verification of that fire marshal’s inspection

should be on file in the Office for the Vice President of Student Affairs and PuLSE office.

Alcohol at outside events shall be contained to a specified area marked by boundaries.

5. Timing of event

(a) No social events with alcohol may be held on days other than Friday or Saturday. No social

events shall be scheduled during reading days. (Reading days are defined and listed

on the University calendar.) Social events held outdoors will end at 11 p.m. Indoor social

events may continue until 3 a.m., with security officers present and sound contained

within the facility. Alcohol may be furnished until 2 a.m. All parties run the risk of being

terminated for excessive noise or alcohol violations.

6. Furnishing alcohol at social events

(a) Any social event involving the distribution and consumption of alcohol must employ a

third-party social event vendor:

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(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

The “vendor” shall provide limits of general liability of not less than $1,000,000 combined

single limit for bodily injury or property damage per occurrence and an aggregate

of no less than $1,000,000. Coverage shall also include liquor liability with a limit of no

less than $1,000,000. Said insurance shall provide workers compensation coverage to

comply with the statutory requirements and provide employer’s liability of not less than

$100,000, each accident; $100,000, each employee by disease; and $500,000, per policy

by disease. Proof of such insurance shall be provided by certificate of insurance not

less than seven (7) days prior to the event. Insurance shall be written by a company with

a BEST’s rating of A, VII or better.

Alcoholic beverages may only be furnished in cans or plastic cups.

Available alcohol will consist of beer and wine.

Dutiful monitoring of alcohol consumption and, if necessary, subsequent denial of alcohol

in cases of, but not limited to: unruly behavior, apparent alcohol abuse, severe intoxication,

or any other situation, left to their discretion which would indicate the need to

deny individuals the ability to purchase alcohol.

All alcohol distribution shall be exchanged for a ticket on a per drink basis. The ticket can

be purchased through a cashier furnished by the third party vendor.

(g) The third party vendor assumes responsibility for confirming legal drinking age (21

years of age) of the people to whom they provide wristbands and alcohol every time alcohol

is distributed.

(h)

(i)

(j)

Individuals 21 and older with a wristband would be allowed the equivalent of one beer or

wine cooler per hour, as determined by the number of tabs on the wristband. Individuals

that gain entry into the event during the last hour of the furnishing of alcohol will

only be given wristbands with two tabs on it.

Third party vendors dispensing alcohol may not serve more than one 12 oz. beer or wine

cooler to an individual at a time.

The use of any alternate method of alcohol distribution (e.g., BYOB, etc.), other than third

party vendor, is strictly prohibited.

7. Limited attendance

(a)

(b)

(c)

Only Butler students or a guest of a Butler University student may attend an event at

which alcoholic beverages are furnished. Prior to gaining admittance, Butler students

must present a Butler ID card. Students’ guests will be required to present valid driver’s

license as proof of their age and must be signed in as a guest of the student.

At a closed social event, the guest list will be used at the door to verify the ages of guests.

Individuals 21 years of age or older may receive a wristband and shall be checked off as

having received one and only one wristband per event. Security personnel will be involved

with checking the guest list, checking IDs of people admitted to the social event

and confirming that those to whom they give wristbands are of legal age.

Intoxicated individuals shall not be admitted to the event. No one may bring alcohol into

the event. In accordance with state law, no one under the age of 18 is admitted where alcohol

is furnished.

8. Guest responsibility

(a)

By placing a guest’s name on a guest list for a social event and admitting him/her to the

social event, the individual Butler host and the student organization(s) hosting the event

assume responsibility for that guest’s behavior.

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9. Advertising

(a) Advertising for an on campus social event should include the statement “Beverages Available,

Butler University ID required.” Guests of BU students must present a pictorial

driver’s license for admittance.

10. Overcrowding

(a) When a social event becomes overcrowded, as specified by the fire code, organization

members should not allow any more attendees into the facility. As attendees leave, new arrivals

may be allowed into the event. Contact BUPD (ext. 911or 9396) if assistance is

needed.

11. Monitoring an event

(a) Food and non-alcoholic alternative beverages (excluding a water fountain and/or a soft

drink machine) must be provided at all events at which alcoholic beverages are consumed.

(b) The service area must be secured or defined in a manner that ensures only those persons

who are 21 or over will be furnished alcoholic beverages. In accordance with state law, no

one under the age of 18 is allowed where alcohol is furnished.

(c) The University police should be contacted immediately if assistance is needed while

monitoring an event.

(d) Under no circumstances can alcoholic beverages be sold on a per-drink basis or distributed

unless a third-party vendor is employed.

(e) It is recommended that alcohol only be furnished in a well-lit area.

(f) There must be a minimum of four (4) sobriety monitors present at any social event involving

alcohol distribution. Sobriety monitors, selected from the organization sponsoring

the function must not consume any alcohol for the duration of the event so that they may

assist in the case of an emergency or any other situation necessitating their aid. Each sponsoring

organization should provide at least one (1) sobriety monitor. Sobriety monitors

shall be visible and available throughout the social event to monitor access at doors and

observe general behavior.

12. Security

(a) Arrangements must be made to hire officers to help monitor the event. The security officers

must be from a licensed, bonded, and insured security firm or may be off-duty police

officers; however, they must be certified to work a Butler function by BUPD and the

Vice President for Student Affairs. A minimum of two (2) officers must be hired for the

duration of the event. BUPD will determine the number of officers needed for the event

and they typically use the ratio of one officer per 100 expected attendees, although the

type of event will also be considered. Security arrangements should be completed at least

15 business days before the event.

(b) One security officer should be involved in checking IDs and providing wristbands to

people 21 years and older.

(c) One security officer must be stationed near the alcohol serving area.

(d) Officers make periodic rounds through the social event area.

(e) An officer of the sponsoring organization is to meet the hired security officers at the

BUPD office in Jordan Hall no later than 15 minutes before the start of the function. At

this time BUPD and the organization officer will outline the specific security needs and

expectations regarding the event.

(f) Security must remain at the social event until it is closed and people are dispersed.

(g) Event organizers must ensure that security officers submit a Post Party Report to BUPD.

VIII. Greek Life Social Event Policy

See Greek Alcohol and Social Event Policy on page 81.

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IX.

Regulation on Use of Sound Amplification Devices

The University has an obligation to itself and to the community surrounding the campus to provide

an environment conducive to the normal functioning of both. The right to express oneself is limited by its

effect on other people. All members of the Butler community, as well as outside groups that use our facilities,

must accept this responsibility.

This regulation is not intended to limit the use of sound amplification devices as part of Universitysponsored

and scheduled activities, nor does it restrict individuals or groups simply because an activity is

likely to create sounds that go beyond the immediate area of origin. At the same time, however, the indiscriminate

and unregulated use of sound amplification devices in the buildings and on the campus and

grounds of Butler University is detrimental to and seriously disrupts and impedes the University in accomplishing

its functions, mission and obligations as an educational institution.

1. “Sound amplification devices” as used in this regulation mean any electrically operated or assisted

device for amplifying sound including, but not limited to, public address systems, bullhorns,

music or voice amplifiers, megaphones or any combination thereof.

2. The use of sound amplification devices in buildings, on the campus or any site of the University,

whether owned by the University or under its control, is prohibited unless approval is first

obtained from the vice president for student affairs or his designated representative. Amplification

devices used for the purpose of classroom teaching are exempted from this regulation.

3. The use of sound amplification devices will be limited from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. to comply with

the city’s noise ordinance. Approval for the use of sound amplification may be granted when the

time, location, manner, and extent of amplification will not:

(a)

(b)

(c)

Unreasonably interfere with the academic pursuits or business activities of students, faculty,

employees, and guests of the University; and

Unreasonably interfere with residents living in the Butler-Tarkington community.

Any exception to this policy must be approved by the vice president for student affairs.

Violation of this regulation will be subject to appropriate action by the University.

X. Drug-free Community Policy

The illegal or abusive use of alcohol and other drugs by members of the campus community jeopardizes

the safety of the individual and the community, and is contrary to the academic learning process. Butler

University is committed to having a campus that is free of the illegal or abusive use of alcohol and other

drugs. In keeping with this commitment it is the policy of the University that the illegal or abusive use of

alcohol and other drugs is prohibited on University property or as part of University activities. In order to

inform all University students of their responsibilities as set forth in the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses

Act Amendments of 1989, the following information is provided:

1. The Butler University Rules of Conduct prohibit the unauthorized use, possession, or distribution

of any controlled substance or illegal drug.

2. Conduct sanctions the University may sanctions for violations of the University drug and alcohol

policies include dismissal, suspension, probation, restitution, suspension from University

housing and forfeiture of financial assistance, or such other sanctions as deemed appropriate by

the University. Students may be accountable to both civil authorities and the University for acts

that constitute violations of law and University policy. Student conduct action at the University

will normally proceed during the pending of criminal proceedings and will not be subject to

challenge on the ground that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed

or reduced.

3. Applicable legal sanctions under federal, state, and local law state that it is unlawful to possess a

controlled substance, including marijuana, cocaine, LSD, PCP, heroin, designer drugs, etc.

(Federal Law Title 21 USC, Sections 841, 844, 845). The penalty for simple possession of

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XI.

such substances is a fine and/or imprisonment. The penalties increase if the possession includes

intent to manufacture, distribute, or dispense a controlled substance, especially if it is near a

public or private elementary, vocational or secondary school, or a public or private college or

University. Violators of this law may also be subject to civil penalties.

4. It is a violation of Indiana state law for anyone under the age of 21 to use or possess alcoholic

beverages or to misrepresent their age for the purpose of purchasing alcoholic beverages. It is

also unlawful for someone over the age of 21 to make alcoholic beverages available to someone

under 21. Sanctions for the violation of this law may include a fine and/or imprisonment. Additionally,

it is a violation of Indiana state law for anyone to use, possess, manufacture, distribute

or dispense controlled substances (Ind. Code Sec. 35-48-4-1 et seq.). Penalties include

fines and/or imprisonment. Again, penalties increase if such activities take place near public

parks, housing projects, or schools.

5. Health risks associated with the use of illegal drugs and abuse of alcohol are staggering. The

abuse of alcohol and other drugs is now recognized as the number one public health problem in

the United States. Approximately 30 percent of all admissions to general hospitals and 50 percent

to psychiatric hospitals have detectable substance abuse. Substance abuse accounts for approximately

150,000 deaths annually. This includes death from stroke, diseases of the heart,

and liver and all drug and alcohol related suicides, homicides and accidents. The abuse of substances

also increases risk of ulcers, birth defects, and a diminished immune system. Studies of

college students have also found a correlation between the use of alcohol and other drugs and an

increased risk of violent and irresponsible behavior and academic failure.

6. The University encourages students who are experiencing substance abuse problems to seek assistance

from resources available to them on campus, as well as from agencies and self-help

groups available in the community. A list of these resources is available from Health Services

and Counseling and Consultation Services located in the HRC, (317) 940-9385.

Grievance Policy

The University recognizes that situations may arise in which a student believes he/she has been

treated unjustly. All members of the University community should attempt to resolve grievances as soon as

possible as, typically, the opportunity to gather information and for mutually satisfactory resolution is greatest

at the earliest point in time. Students may choose to consult with a member of the student affairs staff to

determine how best to address their concern. Students who are concerned about an academic/faculty issue

may discuss the concerns directly with the instructor, the department chair, or the dean of their college. Students

who are concerned about a matter not related to academics/faculty should address them with the director

or dean responsible for the area of concern. If these steps do not achieve a resolution, the student may

contact the president, provost or vice president for student affairs for assistance. Please refer to specific sections

of the student handbook for more information on grievances involving student conduct, academic integrity,

and harassment.

XII. Harassment, Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Harassment Policies

Harassment

Butler University is committed to maintaining a respectful educational environment, free from harassment.

Harassment of any kind is not acceptable behavior at Butler; it is inconsistent with the commitment

to excellence that characterizes Butler University’s activities. Alleged violations of this policy may result in

referral to the University student conduct system. In addition, those who engage in harassing behavior may

be subject to criminal prosecution under appropriate federal, state, or municipal law. Action taken by the

University through the University’s student conduct process does not preclude the pursuit of criminal or

civil action.

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1. The University may discipline any student if he or she is found to have committed the following

misconduct on University-owned or related property or at University-sponsored and/or supervised

functions.

(a) Any verbal or physical behavior, such as disparaging comment, epithet, slur, or expressive

behavior, that is directed at a particular person or group of persons, and which creates

an offensive or hostile environment or one which creates an environment wherein the verbal

or physical behavior is inherently likely to provoke a violent reaction whether or not it

actually does so. Harassment may take the form of name calling, notes, invasion of a reasonable

expectation of privacy, obscene messages on voice mail or other electronic communication,

signs, slurs, or jokes that demean an individual or group. Harassment also

occurs when an individual is threatened with bodily injury, or when the security of an

individual’s possessions or place of residence is threatened. The above verbal behavior,

some of which is generally referred to as “fighting words” is considered to be of such

slight social value that any benefit that may be derived from these words is clearly outweighed

by their costs to order and morality. Such words include, but are not limited to,

those terms widely recognized to be derogatory references to race, ethnicity, national origin,

religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and other personal characteristics or legally-protected

categories.

(b) Behavior by any student that materially disrupts another’s educational pursuits or educational

process, invades the rights of others, or otherwise disrupts the regular and essential

operation of the University. In enforcing the above rule, the University may subject a student’s

speech or conduct to reasonable and nondiscriminatory time, place, and manner

restrictions which are narrowly tailored and which leave open ample alternative means of

communication.

(c) Participation in a campus demonstration which:

i. Disrupts the normal operations of the University and infringes on the rights of

other members of the University community;

ii. Leads or incites others to imminent unlawful action or which is likely to incite such

action;

iii. Disrupts the scheduled and/or normal activities within any campus building or

area; or

iv. Unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement, either pedestrian or vehicular,

on campus.

(d) Behavior of any kind that:

i. Involves an express or implied threat to interfere with an individual’s personal

safety, academic efforts, employment or participation in University-sponsored functions

and causes that person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is

about to occur.

ii. Interferes with an individual’s personal safety, academic efforts, employment, reasonable

expectation of privacy, or participation in University-sponsored functions

and causes that person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is about to

occur.

2. The sanction or sanctions imposed by the University upon a student may be enhanced when it

is found that the student has:

(a)

(b)

Violated the regulations in the Rules of Conduct (Section II), and

Intentionally selected the person or persons against whom the underlying violation was

committed, or selected the property which was damaged, or violated other provisions of

the Rules of Conduct, because of the personal characteristics or status of that person or

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group of persons. Intent shall be determined by consideration of all relevant circumstances.

3. This policy is in not intended to limit academic freedom or the free and open expression of

ideas.

Sexual Misconduct

Sexual misconduct, such as non-consensual sexual intercourse, non-consensual sexual contact, mutually

incapacitated sexual contact or intercourse, and sexual exploitation, is a serious offense that has major

consequences for the victim, the alleged offender, as well as for the campus community. It is the intent of

Butler University to create and maintain an environment in which all members are treated with respect and

dignity, and which is free from sexual misconduct. Butler University will not tolerate any inappropriate sexual

behavior and therefore has developed this policy prohibiting such incidents. This policy applies to

groups as well as to individuals.

Definitions:

Non-consensual sexual intercourse: Any sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal); however slight;

with any object; by a man or woman upon a man or a woman; without effective consent.

Non-consensual sexual contact: Any sexual touching; however slight; with any object; by a man or a

woman upon a man or a woman without effective consent.

Mutually incapacitated sexual contact or intercourse: Any sexual contact or intercourse (anal, oral, or

vaginal); however slight; with any object; occurring between people who are incapacitated or under

the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Sexual exploitation: When a student takes nonconsensual, unjust, or abusive sexual advantage of another;

for his/her own advantage or benefit; or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being

exploited; and that behavior does not otherwise constitute non-consensual sexual intercourse,

non-consensual sexual contact, and sexual harassment.

Effective consent: Informed; freely and actively given; mutually understandable words or actions;

which indicate a willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a type of sexual misconduct and involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests

for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct when:

1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s

employment or status in a course, program or activity; or

2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment

or educational decisions affecting such an individual. In addition, sexual harassment includes,

but is not limited to, physical assault of another individual, realized and unwelcome

sexual encounters, and indecent exposure. It may include unnecessary and unwelcome touching

of another person’s body. This conduct is completely unacceptable and will be dealt with severely.

Evidence of sexual harassment will be found when conduct has occurred which has had the purpose

or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile,

or offensive environment for work or learning. A University finding of sexual harassment behavior involves

the conclusion that the alleged conduct was sufficiently pervasive or severe to alter the conditions of a

student’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity and that it created an abusive working or

educational environment.

Examples of conduct that may constitute sexual harassment behavior include direct and unwelcome

propositions of a sexual nature; unwelcome and persistent pressure or suggestions, or unwelcome requests,

for social-sexual encounters, or sexual favors. Sexual harassment behavior may occur on or off the University’s

property. It may involve a pattern of conduct, which is intended deliberately to discomfort or humiliate

another person through comments of a sexual nature or sexually explicit statements, jokes, questions, and

similar actions.

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A male or a female may be the victim of sexual harassment and a female as well as a male may be the

harasser or wrongdoer.

A person who is a witness to or indirect recipient of the unwelcome sexual conduct or behavior directed

toward another person, or a person with knowledge of conduct or behavior that he/she believes may

constitute sexual harassment may use the reporting procedures set forth below. If the situation creates an intimidating,

hostile, or offensive working or academic environment for the indirect recipient, he/she may pursue

the reporting procedures outlined below.

Education and Services

1. A victim advocate is available 24-hours to provide support and information to victims of sexual

assault and/or harassment. Confidential services are offered by Counseling and Consultation

Services. Information regarding the options of medical and counseling services and student conduct

complaint procedures are presented to anyone who seeks assistance following an incident of

alleged sexual misconduct or harassment.(See the web: www.butler.edu/health-education)

2. Harassment (in all forms), sexual misconduct, non-consensual sexual intercourse, nonconsensual

sexual contact, and sexual exploitation are tied closely to learned roles. It is necessary for

men and women to learn more about this issue and the means for addressing problems as they

arise. The University encourages education on the subjects of sexual harassment, and sexual

misconduct. These efforts focus on prevention and education efforts for all students, faculty, and

staff. Anyone interested in learning more or obtaining information on these issues can contact

the Health Education and Outreach Programs Office HRC 101, the Office of the Vice President

for Student Affairs, AU 200, Counseling and Consultation Services, HRC 120, or the Butler

University Police Department, 525 W. Hampton. In addition, the Human Resources Management

and Development Office in Jordan Hall can give students, faculty, and staff complete

information on policies related to sexual harassment and sexual misconduct.

Intervention

Butler University will offer resources to support the accuser and the alleged offender, and will

utilize the University’s fact-finding and conduct procedures. In addition, the University will, as

appropriate, inform members of the Butler community when an incident has been reported.

The procedures to implement this policy will take into account the need to investigate charges

that may be filed and the privacy rights of all involved. When appropriate, Counseling and

Consultation Services and the Office of Student Affairs will provide outreach and support to

faculty, staff, and students affected by a particular incident.

Timeline for Reporting

Prompt reporting is strongly encouraged as it becomes more difficult to compile information relating

to a complaint as the time increases between the alleged incident(s) and the report of the

incident(s). Consequently, the reporting procedure should be initiated as soon as possible and

generally not later than one year after the alleged incident(s).

Reporting Procedure

1. The accuser should report the incident to the attention of the appropriate University officials.

Appropriate University officials include but are not limited to the vice president for student affairs,

BUPD, or the executive director of human resources management and development. The

appropriate University official will listen to the complaint, document it, and inform the accuser

of the options regarding procedures that can be utilized. Accusations related to the conduct of

students will be addressed through the vice president for Student Affairs. Accusations related to

the conduct of faculty, staff, or non-students working on campus will be addressed through

Human Resources Management and Development. Accusations related to a person who is a student

and an employee may be addressed through both areas.

2. Options to address harassment, sexual misconduct, and sexual harassment, related to student

behavior include:

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(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

A University official may discuss the allegations with the alleged offender, without revealing

the identity of the accuser unless it is unavoidable or the accuser’s consent has been

given. Although it is desirable to have the accuser consent to the discussion between the

University official and the alleged offender, the University official may determine that it is

necessary to engage in a discussion with the alleged offender and take remedial action in

order to properly address the report and to fulfill the University’s responsibilities.

The University may pursue the matter through the University’s student conduct process.

In order to pursue this process, a written complaint alleging behavior which constitutes

sexual harassment or sexual misconduct should be prepared by either the accuser or an

appropriate University official listed above. This complaint may be filed with BUPD or

the executive director of human resources management and development if the alleged behavior

relates to faculty or staff; with the Vice President for Student Affairs if it relates to

student behavior. (See one of the above mentioned University officials for the details that

need to be included in a written complaint.)

Upon receiving a written complaint, the alleged offender will be informed of the complaint

by the appropriate University official, unless it is determined that the accuser may

be harmed in some manner by immediate notice or unless the University determines that

immediate notice to the alleged offender is not appropriate. When the alleged offender is

given notice of the complaint, he/she will also be advised as to the procedures that will be

undertaken in respect to the complaint, including any procedures for a hearing. If

immediate measures need to be taken to separate the alleged offender and accuser, such

measures will be taken after consultation between appropriate University officials.

The appropriate University officials shall initiate an investigation to determine whether a

violation of University policies has occurred. A student conduct hearing is typically part

of this investigatory process. As appropriate, the accuser will be kept informed during the

process. The alleged offender and accuser are afforded the same opportunity to have an

advisor and parent/guardian present at a conduct proceeding. The alleged offender and accuser

are informed of the outcome of the student conduct proceeding. The accuser may

pursue criminal/civil action against the alleged offender regardless of the University’s action.

Options to address harassment, sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, and sexually inappropriate

behavior related to faculty/staff or non-student behavior should be discussed

with the executive director of human resources management and development or the vice

president for student affairs (For specific information as to how investigations are conducted,

please see the executive director of human resources management and development

or the vice president for student affairs.

Responsibility of the University Community

1. All levels of the University community have a special responsibility for implementation of this

policy. If behaviors that violate this policy are observed, the person(s) observing such behavior(s)

should bring the matter(s) to the attention of the vice president for student affairs (Atherton

Union, room 200), executive director of human resources management and development of

the University (Jordan Hall, room 108), or BUPD for appropriate action.

Sanctions

Sexual harassment and sexual misconduct are considered serious offenses by the University and

will result in serious consequences for the offender. University sanctions will be imposed in accordance

with appropriate University processes upon persons found to have violated these policies.

The executive director of human resources management and development can provide information

regarding possible sanctions for faculty/staff and non-employees. Sanctions against

students found to have violated these policies can include, but are not limited to, suspension,

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dismissal and/or separation from the University. Alleged violators may also be subject to prosecution

under relevant local and/or federal law.

XIII. Hazing and Pre-initiation Activities

1. Hazing is any action taken or situation created intentionally that places an expectation on a person

joining or maintaining full status in a group that is not consistent with requirements for

membership, team rules, university regulations and policies, and/or fraternal law or ritual, as

applicable. Conduct that may be considered hazing is as follows:

(a) Has the potential to produce emotional, psychological or physical discomfort, embarrassment,

harassment or ridicule

(b) Can occur on or off campus

(c) Can occur regardless of the person’s willingness to participate

(d) Is prohibited by the criminal code of the State of Indiana

2. Butler University believes that hazing is non-productive, violates students’ rights, and has no

place in the campus community. Hazing activity may lead to disciplinary action for individuals

as well as a student group, organization, or team.

3. It is impossible to list all possible hazing behaviors because many are context-specific. The following

list provides categorical examples of hazing traditions:

Subtle hazing – behaviors that emphasize a power imbalance between members of the group

and those who desire to be accepted. Subtle hazing typically involves activities or attitudes that

breach reasonable standards for mutual respect. Some examples:

(a) Deception

(b) Requiring new members to perform duties not assigned to other members

(c) Deprivation of privileges granted to other members

(d) Expecting certain items to always be in one’s possession

(e) Requiring new members to refer to members with titles (e.g., Mr., Miss) while new members

are identified by a term instead of by name

(f) Use/misuse of ritual symbolism outside of organization’s approved ceremonies

(g) Walking/running/sitting/standing in formation

Harassment hazing – behaviors that cause emotional anguish or physical discomfort required

of those joining the group. Harassment hazing confuses and frustrates, and causes undue stress

for those joining the group. Some examples:

(a) Verbal abuse

(b) Intimidation or implied threats

(c) Personal servitude

(d) Sleep deprivation

(e) Degrading or humiliating activities

(f) Interference with personal hygiene

Violent hazing – behaviors that have the potential to cause physical and/or emotional or psychological

harm. Some examples:

(a) Forced/coerced ingestion of alcohol or any other substance

(b) Beating or paddling

(c) Branding

(d) Abuse or mistreatment of animals

(e) Public nudity

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(f) Expecting illegal activity including property theft or damage

(g) Bondage

(h) Abduction or kidnapping

(i) Exposure to weather extremes without appropriate protection

4. Students should be aware that Indiana has enacted a state law prohibiting hazing. See the full

text at http://www.in.gov/legislative/ (search Indiana Code IC 35-42-2-2).

5. Violations of this policy should be reported to the Butler University police department and/or

the Vice President for Student Affairs.

XIV. Animal Abuse

Students may not use animals in pranks or otherwise for amusement or ceremony in connection

with any University function or activity. Violation of this policy or any other abuse of animals shall be

grounds for student conduct action. For purposes of this policy, the term “animal” includes any wild or

domesticated, warm-blooded or cold-blooded animal or insect.

XV. Clery Act – “Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus

Crime Statistics Act”

The University desires to create a safe environment in which students can learn and develop. In

compliance with the Clery Act, the Butler University Police Department (BUPD) compiles an annual security

report. This report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred

on campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by Butler University;

and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report also

includes institutional policies concerning campus security, alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting

of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. You can obtain a copy of this report by contacting the

BUPD.

XVI. Sex Crimes Prevention Act

This act amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration

Act to require sex offenders already required to register in a state, to provide notice, as required under

state law, to each institution of higher education in that state at which that person is employed, carries on

a vocation, or is employed.

The Indiana statewide Sex Offender Registry can be accessed via the Internet at

http://www.state.in.us/serv/cji_sor/.

XVII. Student Conduct System

Preamble

The student conduct process is an extension of the educational mission of the University. The process

is intended to educate students about appropriate behavior and the potential consequences of their actions

and choices. It promotes learning, personal responsibility, self-discipline, respect for others and self, and the

support of the educational values of our community.

The board of trustees of Butler University charges the University president with ultimate responsibility

for all matters of student conduct. In an atmosphere of mutual respect, this responsibility has traditionally

been shared by members of the Butler community – students, faculty and administration alike. In

accordance with the spirit of this preamble the following student conduct code is set forth for the Butler

University community.

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Introduction

The Butler University student conduct system consists of administrative hearings/dispositions, administrative

appeals, a Student Conduct Board, a University Appeals Board and appeals to the president.

Below is an outline of the student conduct system:

Student conduct system summary

Administrative hearings/disposition

Temporary suspension

Residential life policies and regulations

Campus Appeals/Student Conduct Board

Bringing of charges

Rights of parties

Hearing procedures

Appeal process

Sanctions

The University and public law

Student conduct records

The procedures set forth herein shall be followed in any conduct proceedings brought against a student

or student group, subject to the institutional authority and legal obligation of the board of trustees and

the authority delegated to the president to exercise jurisdiction over all or any student conduct matters of the

University. The vice president for student affairs serves as the primary officer responsible for addressing unacceptable

conduct or action by any student that involves infraction of University rules and regulations. The

vice president may designate other staff members to assume various roles within the conduct system. “Vice

president” in this section should be read as “vice president or designee.”

The vice president will initiate conduct action in accordance with these procedures. These proceedings

are not to be construed as legalistic judicial trials, but care shall be taken to provide a fundamentally fair

process for the review of a student’s conduct. Alleged violations of University rules and regulations may be

brought to the attention of the vice president by any member of the University community. The vice president

or designated hearing officer shall investigate reported student misconduct, initiate formal conduct procedures

when warranted and, after giving the student written notice of the charges, provide the student the

opportunity to present his/her own version of the incident or occurrence.

The vice president may (a) conduct the initial hearing, (b) appoint a hearing officer for the initial

hearing, or (c) transfer jurisdiction to the Student Conduct Board for the initial hearing. The hearing officer

may discuss the situation with or advise any student whose conduct is called into question, and students

shall attend such meetings as requested by the hearing officer or dean of student services.

The conduct of a person, who is a student and an employee, may be reviewed under this code, the

employee conduct code, or both, and may be subject to sanctions in both capacities.

The University has the right to review the off campus conduct of students when such conduct is alleged

to compromise the University’s integrity or reputation; to threaten the health or safety of members of the

campus community; and/or to interfere with the normal operation of the University.

Proposed changes in the student conduct system may be submitted to the vice president for student

affairs. The vice president may consult with any University group affected by a change. Examples of University

groups include, but are not limited to, the campus Student Conduct Board and student government

association.

The “parties” to a student conduct hearing are the student(s) or organization alleged to have violated

the University’s rules and the representative from the vice president for student affairs office. A person alleging

the violation(s) is considered a “witness,” and thus does not have a right to appeal a student conduct decision.

The word “student” includes all persons taking courses at Butler University, both full-time and

part-time, pursuing undergraduate or graduate studies and those who attend post-secondary institutions

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other than Butler University and reside in Butler University residence halls. Students who are not officially

enrolled for a particular term but who have a continuing relationship with the University are considered

“students.”

Student Conduct System Summary

The following presents an illustration of the practical application of the student conduct system as

introduced above. Examples of common violations of regulations are provided. However, this summary is

merely representative and is not intended as an all-inclusive list of violations or consequences. A student may

be found responsible for a violation of the Rules of Conduct if they attempt, facilitate, or engage in the proscribed

conduct.

Temporary Suspension

The vice president may temporarily suspend a student from the University or a residence hall pending

student conduct procedures when the presence of a student on campus is deemed by the vice president

as an actual or potential disruption of the University or when the student's presence may constitute a danger

to the health, safety, or welfare of the University, to property, to others, or to the student himself/herself. The

vice president will notify the student in writing of his or her temporary suspension. If the student should

desire to challenge any such finding of the vice president or the reliability of the information utilized in making

such finding, he/she may do so by appearing before the vice president for that purpose only, within five

(5) days of notice of such temporary suspension. [As used in the Student Conduct System section of the student

handbook, “days” means “calendar days,” except where otherwise provided.]

Administrative Disposition

After investigation, the hearing officer shall have the authority to determine whether the student is

responsible or not responsible for the violation and the hearing officer shall assign an appropriate sanction.

The decision is based on the totality of the information available to the hearing officer. The hearing officer

will find the party responsible if he/she reasonably concludes that it is more likely than not that the party

violated University rules. If, following the disposition of an administrative hearing, the student wishes to

appeal the disposition, he/she will submit a written appeal to the dean of student services within seven (7)

days of notification of the hearing officer's decision.

The dean of student life or dean of student services shall resolve those cases which are not concluded

by the last day of classes in May, subject to the right of the student to appeal to the vice president for student

affairs. The vice president may appoint, at his or her discretion, an ad hoc appellate board to review cases that

may result in suspension or dismissal of the student.

Residential Life Policies and Regulations

Students shall comply with policies and regulations relating to fire, health, safety, and maintenance

standards, as well as with the terms and conditions of the residence and board agreement. The Rules of

Conduct and the residential life policies and regulations should be construed to complement each other.

Campus Appeals/Student Conduct Board

1. Membership – Student Conduct Board

(a) The Student Conduct Board shall consist of eight (8) regular members, seven (7) voting

members and one, the chair, a non-voting member. Three (3) non-voting alternates also

shall be designated. An alternate member may be present, but shall not participate in the

hearings and arguments and shall not have a vote unless he/she becomes qualified to serve

as a regular member as a result of the resignation, disqualification, or disability of a regular

member. The board will consist of:

i. Five (5) regular members and two alternates shall be degree-seeking students designated

pursuant to the procedure set out in “Selection of Board Members.” The

terms of the student regular members shall be two years and should be staggered so

that not more than three students would normally be replaced in any year.

ii. Two (2) regular members and one (1) alternate should be full-time members of

the teaching faculty from at least two of the colleges of the University who shall serve

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iii.

iv.

for terms of two years, so staggered that not more than two members would normally

be replaced in any year. (They shall be nominated by the faculty senate executive

committee.)

One member shall be a member of the administration who shall be nominated by

the staff assembly and appointed by the president to serve two years. This individual

shall be the non-voting chair as described above. They may be appointed for

successive terms.

If any person so selected refuses to or ceases to serve, his/her successor shall be designated

by the applicable method above outlined. Persons shall not be barred from

serving successive or subsequent terms.

(b) Should the chair be absent, a regular faculty member or administrator shall act as chair.

(c) Any member of the Student Conduct Board who fails without valid excuse to appear at two

(2) meetings of the board shall be replaced permanently by an alternate, and a new alternate

shall be selected in accordance with the provisions of the following section “Jurisdiction.”

If, however, the board finds that such absences were justified, it may vote to retain

such member.

2. Jurisdiction – Student Conduct Board

(a)

(b)

(c)

Any case referred to the campus Student Conduct Board by the vice president or appealed

by a charged party who has had a decision rendered against him/her in an administrative

hearing, may be reviewed by the Student Conduct Board. The Student Conduct Board

may sustain or modify the decision of the previous hearing in whatever way it deems appropriate,

including either increasing or reducing the sanctions.

The Student Conduct Board shall have appellate jurisdiction to render a decision in cases

in which written and timely appeals have been submitted by the charged party from a

decision of the initial administrative hearing.

Appeals submitted at the end of the spring term may be reviewed and decided by the vice

president for student affairs. The vice president may make any change he/she feels is appropriate,

including remanding the case to the prior decision maker. In most cases the

vice president will base his/her decision on the written record and letter of appeal.

3. Membership – Appeals Board

(a)

(b)

The University Appeals Board shall consist of six (6) regular members and four (4) alternates

designated as follows:

i. Three (3) regular members and two (2) alternates shall be degree-seeking students

designated pursuant to the procedure set out in 5 (below).

ii.

Two (2) regular members and two (2) alternates shall be full-time members of the

teaching faculty designated by the faculty assembly executive committee and ratified

by the faculty assembly to serve for two years with terms staggered so that not more

than two members would normally be replaced in any year. The members of each

group, regular and alternates shall be selected from different colleges of the University.

iii. One (1) regular member shall be a member of the administration and shall be appointed

by the president to serve two years.

iv. Persons shall not be barred from serving successive or subsequent years.

The president shall appoint from the board a faculty member or administrator as the

chair of the University Appeals Board. Should the chair be absent, a regular faculty member

or administrator shall act as chair. Any member of the University Appeals Board who

fails without valid excuse to appear at two (2) meetings of the board shall be replaced

permanently by an alternate, and a new alternate shall be selected in the manner as above

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provided. If, however, the board finds that the absence is justified, it may vote to retain

that member.

4. Jurisdiction – Appeals Board

(a)

The University Appeals Board shall have jurisdiction to determine all timely appeals involving

charges of academic dishonesty.

5. Selection of Board Members

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

The student members of the Student Conduct Board and the appeals board shall be

nominated by a selection committee, organized and appointed by the student government

association according to the following process.

The student government association shall nominate and solicit nominations for the positions

on the Student Conduct Boards for three (3) consecutive meetings. The names of

the nominees and their resumes will be sent to the selection committee.

From this list the selection committee shall interview any qualified candidates to ascertain

their qualifications and select the number needed to fill vacancies in any of the following

positions: five (5) regular members and two (2) alternate members to serve on the campus

Student Conduct Board, and three (3) regular members and two (2) alternates to

serve on the University Appeals Board.

The names of the students selected to fill these positions will be returned to the student

government association for final approval. The proposed candidates will be voted on individually

and must receive three-fourths of the assembly’s vote to be approved. In the

event any of the proposed candidates fail to be approved by the assembly, the selection

committee will select the number of new candidates needed and present such candidates to

the assembly for the same approval process explained above.

The selection committee shall assign the approved candidates to positions on the boards

in accordance with the process outlined in this section. Both the selection committee and

the student government association shall seek to make the boards representative of the student

population.

Members of the selection committee shall not be eligible to serve on either the campus

Student Conduct Board or the University Appeals Board.

Members are not selected to serve on either of the boards, specifically. They may hear

cases that come before either board.

The selection process for new board members will generally be completed by

October 1.

6. Selection of Faculty Board Members

(a) Faculty members are designated by the Faculty Senate Executive Committee and ratified

by the faculty senate to serve on the boards.

(b) Faculty members are not selected to serve on either of the board’s specifically. They may

hear cases that come before either board.

Bringing of Charges Before the Student Conduct/Appeals Board

1. The vice president will represent the University in all matters concerning University violations

that come before the Student Conduct Board and University Appeals Board.

2. The vice president shall serve in a liaison capacity between the University and both the campus

Student Conduct Board and the University Appeals Board; provided, however, the same member

of the vice president’s staff shall not act for the University in bringing the charge and in the

same case act for the vice president’s office in advising the campus Student Conduct Board or

University Appeals Board.

3. The dean of student services or dean of student life may confer with the accused to explain their

rights, the conduct of the hearing, and may assist in notifying witnesses.

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4. In the event of a hearing before the Student Conduct or Appeals Board, the vice president will

notify the student charged in writing of:

(a) The specific University rule or regulation that he/she is charged with violating.

(b) The nature of the conduct with which he/she is charged.

(c) The time and place of the Student Conduct Board conference.

5. If the charged student fails to appear or testify after having been given proper notice, the hearing

may be conducted in his/her absence based on the available information.

Rights of a Party

1. A party in a student conduct hearing may be assisted by an adviser. The adviser may act in an

advisory capacity only and may not actively participate in the procedures (e.g., advisers can not

question witnesses, provide opening or closing statements, file briefs, etc.). An adviser will not

be permitted to interfere with any procedure or hearing.

2. A party shall be given at least seven (7) days written notice of the hearing, excluding official

University vacations. A charged student may waive this notice requirement. A request for additional

time to prepare must be filed in writing with the hearing officer or dean of student services

within the above-stipulated seven (7) day time period. The campus Student Conduct Board

will convene and vote as to whether a continuance will be granted.

3. A party shall have the right to challenge, for cause, the membership of any member or members

of the campus Student Conduct Board or the University Appeals Board due to prejudice or

conflict of interest. The challenge must be stated in writing and presented to the board promptly

after the party has received notice of the hearing. The board shall deliberate in private and determine

by majority vote whether the member or members so challenged shall be excluded from

participating in the proceeding. Whether the challenged member or members shall have a vote

on the issue of their participation shall be determined by other members of the board. Members

against whom challenges are sustained shall be replaced by alternates.

4. Hearings are presumed closed, unless all participants agree to the presence of others. If a closed

hearing is held, all aspects of the hearing, including all pleas, evidence, argument, and discussion

among the members of the board shall be deemed confidential. A closed hearing shall be

restricted to the board, the party, an adviser to a party, the witnesses, and any personnel deemed

essential by the board to the work of the board. In the case of an individual student hearing, the

student may also request that his parent/guardian be present. By participating in a closed hearing

all students and members of the faculty or staff shall be deemed to have agreed to:

(a) Maintain the strict confidentiality of all aspects of the proceeding during the entire course

of the proceeding, including the period of any and all appeals, and;

(b) Accept severe sanctions in the event any such person is found to have breached the confidentiality

in any way. Whether such a person has breached the confidentiality and the

sanctions to be imposed, if any, shall be determined by the vice president, the method of

arriving at such decision remaining entirely in the judgment of the vice president.

(c) Provided, however, the party and his or her advisers shall not be so restricted that the

preparation of their respective cases to be presented to the board is impaired. Provided

further, the board in its discretion may declare any hearing to be closed at any time it

deems it necessary to assure a fair hearing to any party.

5. Within three (3) days of the receipt of a written request from a party, the hearing officer or dean

of student services shall furnish the names of all persons known to him or her to be either possible

witnesses or persons who have knowledge of relevant facts that might be material to the

controversy. Failure to comply in a timely manner with any such request shall be grounds for a

continuance by the party making the request, before the scheduled hearing date.

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6. A party shall have the right to hear and ask questions of witnesses; opportunity to be informed

of the content of all written statements or other evidence; and to rebut any such evidence or challenge

its value.

7. Upon timely request, a party is entitled to obtain a written statement of the results and findings

of the hearing.

8. No member of the University community may publicly release a summary of the proceedings of

any board without the prior written approval of all parties, all participants in the hearing, and

the vice president. The decision of the board may be made public, but the accused student's

name shall not be released.

9. In the case where the hearing officer/body determines that a person has been the victim of a

crime of violence (as the term is defined by federal, state, or local law), that person will be informed

of the outcome of the hearing. That person will be expected to maintain the same level of

confidentiality as all persons related to the hearing.

10. The party has a right to one appeal, except in cases involving suspension or dismissal from the

University. (See “Appeal Process”)

11. Procedures for on-campus student conduct action in cases of alleged sexual harassment or

misconduct: (See also “Harassment, Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Harassment Policies” beginning

on page 105.

(a) The accuser and accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have an advisor and parent/guardian

present during the campus proceeding.

(b) Both the accuser and the accused will be informed of the final outcome of any campus

student conduct proceeding alleging sexual harassment or misconduct.

(h) When reasonably available, the accuser and accused will have the option of changing academic

and living situations after an alleged sexual harassment or misconduct incident, if

requested.

(i)

Students are reminded and encouraged to notify proper law enforcement authorities,

such as BUPD, of any sexual misconduct. Allegations may be pursued through law

enforcement channels as well as University conduct procedures. One may contact the Victim

Advocate (910-5572) or the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs to discuss

these options and receive assistance in notifying the proper authorities.

Hearing Procedures for the Student Conduct or Appeals Board

1. Each board shall make its own rules for the conduct of its hearings, but the rules must include

the following:

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

Provisions shall incorporate the rights described in “Rights of a Party.”

A quorum for the campus Student Conduct Board shall consist of five (5) regular members,

at least one (1) of whom shall be a faculty member or administrator. Three (3)

regular members or their alternates shall be present to constitute a quorum for the University

Appeals Board. Absent or disqualified members shall be replaced by alternates.

The person bringing the charge shall have the right to present evidence in support of the

charge first. The accused shall then have the right to present his/her evidence in defense of

the charge. Such evidence shall then be followed by rebuttal evidence, if any, in the same

order.

Formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable, nor shall deviations from prescribed

procedures necessarily invalidate a decision or proceeding unless significant prejudice to a

party may result.

2. After all the evidence has been heard and arguments concluded the board shall convene in private

session to decide whether the student is responsible for the alleged violation, and to determine

the penalty, if any. All decisions shall be made by majority vote. The board will consider

the totality of the information presented at the hearing in reaching its decision. For a finding of

117


“responsible”, the board must reasonably conclude that it is more likely than not that the student

violated University rules.

3. Written statement of the results and findings of the board and the sanctions imposed, if any,

shall be sent to those charged, generally within14 days of the hearing.

4. All decisions made by administrative means and by the campus and University boards are ultimately

recommendations to the University president who is charged with administering all

student conduct matters.

Appeal Process

At various levels of this conduct system, a party is granted rights of appeals from rulings with which

he or she disagrees. A party’s written appeal must be submitted within seven (7) days after receiving

notice of the prior hearing outcome. The appeal must identify the substantive or procedural error

creating an injustice, and which warrants an appeal of the prior decision, not simply his/her disagreement

with the prior decision. A party’s right to appeal shall be exhausted after one appeal except

in cases in which the punishment imposed is either suspension or dismissal from the University,

in which cases the party accused shall have all right of appeal provided herein including final

appeal to the president.

1. Generally, the Student Conduct Board shall hear appeals from the initial administrative hearing.

The Student Conduct Board may modify the decision of the hearing officer in whatever form it

deems appropriate.

2. The University Appeals Board may consider, upon the timely written appeal from a student,

appeals of deans’ decisions regarding academic dishonesty (See

V. “Academic Integrity”).

3. The Student Conduct and University Appeals Boards shall make their own rules for the conduct

of hearings, which shall be consistent with the provisions contained herein.

4. The president may hear final appeals involving a penalty of either suspension or dismissal. The

president may, at his or her sole discretion, review any other student conduct matter. The president’s

decision is final.

Sanctions

1. The sanctions below may be imposed by hearing officers, the campus Student Conduct Board,

University Appeals Board, the director of residence life, the dean of student services, the dean of

student life, the vice president for student affairs, or the president.

Warning letter: An official letter sent to a student who has violated a University rule or to whom

a letter should be sent to warn the student regarding failure to comply with University

rules or regulations in the future. A copy of this letter shall be placed in the student’s

conduct file. If the student’s parents are responsible for his/her financial obligations to the

University, a copy of this letter may also be sent to them.

Probation: The terms of the probation shall be for a specified period and may include restriction

of participation in co-curricular activities.

Restitution: The student is required to provide reimbursement for (a) damage to, destruction of,

or misappropriation of, University property or property of any person or the University

premises, (b) for personal or other injuries inflicted. Restitution may be ordered by the

appropriate University official or University adjudicatory body in connection with, or in

lieu of, other sanctions that are imposed.

Other Sanctions: Other sanctions may include, but are not limited to student conduct hold

and/or notation on transcripts, forfeiture of financial assistance, restrictions on student

privileges, monetary fines, extra work hours (e.g., in residence halls), community restoration,

reflection paper, research assignment, completion of an educational program, referral

for alcohol or drug assessment, letter of apology, or personal apology.

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Suspension: The student is suspended from continuing at the University for a specified period.

The student shall reapply if he or she wishes to return to the University after the suspension

expires.

Suspension from the Residence Halls: The student is indefinitely or for a specified period of time

banned from living in or entering a residential facility.

Dismissal: The student is dismissed permanently from the University. This sanction is noted on

the student’s transcript.

Deferred Suspension: A definite period of observation and review occurs during deferred suspension

from the University or residence halls. If a student is found responsible for a violation

during this time, suspension will take effect immediately.

2. Failure to observe any imposed sanctions shall constitute a basis for additional sanctions. The

University may withhold grades, registration, or transcripts until all sanctions have been fulfilled.

3. Notwithstanding the provisions of the University’s refund policies, if any student conduct action

results in the suspension or dismissal of a student, the University may refuse to refund, in

whole or in part, such student’s tuition and fees.

4. Student conduct action taken against a student shall become a part of the student’s educational

and/or personnel records. Such records shall be considered in determining the appropriate

sanction in a particular case.

5. A student who is suspended or dismissed from the University may be provisionally withdrawn

from classes pending the outcome of the appeals process. If the process is not final by the time

semester grades are reported, the student will receive a grade of “I” pending the outcome of the

process.

The University and Public Law

1. Like all other citizens, students are subject to federal, state, and municipal law. In general, offenses

committed on campus will normally result in student conduct action by the University.

In some instances, however, government authorities may also be called and/or charges may be

filed through the appropriate court.

2. Students may be accountable to both civil and criminal authorities and to the University for acts

that constitute violations of federal, state, or municipal law and the written University rules,

regulations, and policies, regardless of whether or not such alleged acts occur on Universityowned

or related property or at a University-sponsored or University-supervised function. The

University may proceed with student conduct action, whether or not civil or criminal proceedings

have been instituted against the student for acts arising out of the same facts and circumstances.

The University student conduct proceedings will not be abated or subject to challenge

on the ground that the criminal charges involving the same incident are pending or have been

dismissed or reduced.

Student Conduct Records

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs maintains the education records related to student

conduct in accordance with the following:

1. Minor student conduct action

Student conduct action of a minor nature (e.g., written warning, conduct probation) is maintained

during the student’s attendance at the University and removed once the student graduates. If the

student discontinues enrollment at Butler (e.g., transfers to another institution, drops out) the record

is removed five (5) years after the student’s separation from the University.

2. Major student conduct action

(a) A student who is suspended from the University for conduct reasons should be provisionally

withdrawn from classes pending the outcome of the student conduct process. If

the process is not complete by the time semester grades must be submitted, the student

119


(b)

should receive a grade of "I," pending the outcome of the process. This allows her/him to

complete the course should the suspension or dismissal be reversed through the appeal

process. A student who is dismissed from the University for conduct reasons, will have

the conduct action noted on his/her transcript. A dismissal notation will never be removed

from the transcript. The notation shall read “Student not eligible to return.” Tuition

and fees for the semester in which she/he is suspended or dismissed may be forfeited

as determined by the University at its sole discretion.

Student conduct action that involves either dismissal from a housing unit or suspension

from the University is maintained for a period of five years from the date of the student’s

separation from the University. The record of a student who has been dismissed from the

University is maintained on a permanent basis in the Student Affairs office.

3. If records may be subject to government reporting they will be maintained as required by law.

4. Student conduct records may be released to Butler officials or faculty members if such information

is necessary in the discharge of their respective responsibilities.

5. A student’s conduct record, however, shall not be released to other sources outside the University

unless there is written consent from the student, except as specified in the Family Educational

Rights and Privacy Act or in accordance with law. (See Section XIX of the “Privacy Rights

of Students at Butler University”) If required to release records in compliance with student conduct

order or subpoena, the University will reasonably attempt to notify the student before

complying and in accordance with law.

XVIII. Greek Conduct Procedure

See Greek Conduct Process, page 85.

XIX.

Privacy Rights of Students at Butler University

Under Section 438 of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ("Act"), every Butler student is

guaranteed certain rights involving both the student’s own access to specified educational records and the

protection of personal information from unauthorized publication, release, or examination by others. The

entire section, together with guidelines as published in the Federal Register, is available for examination in

the Registration and Records office. The following summary indicates how the act pertains specifically to students

at Butler University.

The Student’s Right to Examine Records:

1. Every student officially enrolled at Butler is guaranteed the right to examine any education record

relating directly to the student that is maintained by any office or agent of the University. A

definition of “education record” together with the identification of certain types of records specifically

excluded is provided in the Act. Records at Butler classified as education records under

the guidelines, together with offices maintaining the records and University personnel authorized

access to the records, are listed under the heading “Education records maintained at Butler

University.”

2. Any Butler student or former student seeking to examine any of the records identified under the

heading mentioned in the above paragraph should complete and sign a request form available in

the registration and records office. An opportunity to examine the appropriate records, under

the supervision of the registration and records office or other authorized agent of the University,

will be provided at the earliest time mutually convenient to the student and the Butler authority,

but in no case later than 45 days after the date of the request.

3. If a student questions or challenges the content of any education record, the Butler official responsible

for the record will explain or interpret it and will correct any demonstrable error. If

120


the student feels that the record contains inaccurate, misleading or inappropriate information,

but cannot convince the responsible official that it should be changed, an appeal can be made to

the student’s dean, who will conduct a hearing and will render, in writing, the final decision as

to the content of the record. (Please note that the Act does not provide for the student to contest

the grade received in a course. The student may question whether the grade assigned has been

accurately recorded but not whether the student was entitled to a grade higher than that recorded

by the instructor.)

4. If anything in the education record includes information on more than one student, a given

student has the right to inspect and review, or to be informed of, only such part as related directly

to that student.

5. A student may not have access to any confidential letter or recommendation filed before January

1975 respecting admission, application for employment or receipt of an honor or honorary recognition.

A student may waive the right to examine such letters or recommendations written

subsequent to that date but retains the right to know the names of the persons whose letters or

statements are in the record.

The University’s Obligation to Protect the Student’s Right of Privacy:

1. Except as otherwise provided in 3 and 4 following, or through the written consent of the student,

the University agrees not to release education records or personally identifiable information

contained therein to anyone other than to Butler officials or faculty members who have been determined

to have legitimate educational interests in such documents, and to such other persons

or organizations as are identified in the act. A Butler official is a person employed by the University

in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or research or support staff position (including

law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the

University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on

the board of trustees; or a person serving on an official committee, such as a student conduct or

grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school

official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record if

the faculty or staff member is:

(a) performing a task that is specified in his/her position description or contract;

(b) performing a task related to a student’s education or to student conduct;

(c) providing a service or benefit related to the student or student’s family; or

(d) maintaining safety and security on campus.

If required to release records in compliance with student conduct order or subpoena, Butler will

make a reasonable effort to ensure that the student has been notified before complying and in accordance

with the Act.

2. Butler will maintain a record of all persons other than authorized University personnel who

have requested or obtained access to any student’s record, together with the reasons for their having

requested such access. The student has the right to examine the list of persons who have had

access to the files under the procedures detailed in the section Right to Examine Records, 2.

The University’s Right to Publish or Release Directory Information:

1. In order to compile and publish honors lists, programs, student directories, yearbooks, news

releases, and similar publications that traditionally serve the best interest of the student, Butler

has the right to release, for reasons deemed legitimate, the following information about any Butler

student unless that student has requested, as provided in 3.

2. The following information is designated as directory information. The University may share this

information, unless the student prevents the release as described in paragraph three below:

name; address; University electronic mail address; telephone listing; date and place of birth;

hometown; citizenship; family relationships; marital status; previous schools or training; academic

year; dates of attendance and/or graduation; major field of study or academic specialty; in-

121


structors and courses; participation in sports and other officially recognized activities (including

position, role, or function); membership in officially recognized honorary, professional, academic,

or social organizations; academic honors or achievements (e.g., dean’s list, 4.00 list);

special awards or recognitions received (e.g., scholarships, fellowships, assistantships, “outstanding

student” awards); offices or honorary positions to which elected or appointed; eligibility for

and performance records in athletics or other recognized forms of competition; height and

weight of members of athletic teams; place and nature of employment; post-graduation plans;

positions or achievements; hobbies, interests and community activities; publications or papers

presented; title of honors or graduate thesis; and, for students seeking employment on job interviews,

such additional information as has been furnished or cleared by the student with the understanding

that it will be used in connection with applications or employment inquiries. Religious

affiliation, if volunteered by the students, will be revealed to the Butler campus ministry

and local churches.

3. Any student wishing to prevent the release of the categories of directory information listed above

can do so by filling out and signing, within 10 days of the first class day of the academic year, a

form available in the Registration and Records Office. If a student makes such a request, the

University has the option of either (a) withholding all information of the types specified and

omitting the student’s name from any published list involving such information or (b) seeking

the student’s written permission to release the information.

Notification

1. Parent/Guardian: The vice president for student affairs or designee has the authority to notify

parents or guardians when students under the age of 21 are found to have committed violations

of University policies related to the possession, use, or distribution of alcohol or drugs. The notification

is permissive and at the discretion of the University. The notification of parents is indicated

when:

(a) the violation involved harm or threat of harm to persons or property;

(b) the violation involved an arrest in which the student was taken into custody;

(c) the violation resulted in the student being suspended from the University and/or dismissed

from residence halls;

(d) the student has shown a pattern of violations - even if they are minor. Two or more violations

associated with alcohol use would be reasonable cause for notice;

(e) the student who committed the violation became physically ill and/or required medical

(f)

intervention because of consumption of alcohol and/or drugs; and/or

the violation involved the possession of drugs.

Nothing in these guidelines shall prevent University officials from notifying parents or

guardians of a health or safety emergency, or when a student, under the age of 21, is involved

in a group activity off campus, in which the students' organization is found to

have violated University policy with respect to the use and/or consumption of alcohol or

drugs. Whenever possible, students will be informed that parental notification is planned

in advance of their parents receiving the notice. The notification of parents is simply an act

of notice and is not subject to appeal.

2. Other Notification: The vice president for student affairs or designee may disclose the name and

a summary of the information regarding the final outcome of hearing if the student is found to

have committed an act of violence.

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INDEX

Academics.................................................................................................................................................12

Academic adviser....................................................................................................................................... 12

Academic ineligibility................................................................................................................................12

Academic integrity..................................................................................................................................... 13

Academic load........................................................................................................................................... 13

Academic probation .................................................................................................................................. 14

Advanced placement.................................................................................................................................. 14

Advancement in the colleges ......................................................................................................................15

Atherton Union ........................................................................................................................................ 33

ATM........................................................................................................................................................33

Audit for Enrichment................................................................................................................................15

Band and spirit programs .........................................................................................................................33

Bicycles.....................................................................................................................................................33

Blackboard at Butler ................................................................................................................................. 15

Bookstore..................................................................................................................................................34

Building hours ......................................................................................................................................... 34

Campus addresses .................................................................................................................................... 11

Campus life..............................................................................................................................................33

Campus phone directory............................................................................................................................. 9

Campus resources....................................................................................................................................... 6

Clowes Memorial Hall ..............................................................................................................................34

Commencement....................................................................................................................................... 35

Computer lab and classroom facilities ........................................................................................................ 15

Computer purchases................................................................................................................................. 16

Convenience store ..................................................................................................................................... 35

Copies ......................................................................................................................................................35

Correspondence study...............................................................................................................................16

Counseling and Consultation Services ....................................................................................................... 35

Dean’s list.................................................................................................................................................16

Degree, application for...............................................................................................................................16

Degree, requirements ................................................................................................................................17

Dining Services......................................................................................................................................... 36

Disclaimer of liability.................................................................................................................................. 2

Discounts .................................................................................................................................................36

Diversity Programs ................................................................................................................................... 37

DVD rental kiosk...................................................................................................................................... 39

Efroymson Diversity Center......................................................................................................................38

Education records maintained at Butler University.....................................................................................17

Emergency telephone system .....................................................................................................................39

Enrollment ...............................................................................................................................................19

Equal Opportunity Statement...................................................................................................................... 2

Escort program.......................................................................................................................................... 39

Exploratory Studies Program .....................................................................................................................19

Final examinations .................................................................................................................................... 19

Financial aid..............................................................................................................................................39


Financial matters ....................................................................................................................................... 43

Grades ......................................................................................................................................................20

Grade point average................................................................................................................................... 20

Grade policies ........................................................................................................................................... 21

Greek Life .................................................................................................................................................80

Alcohol guidelines..............................................................................................................................80

Campus and community relations...................................................................................................... 80

Grade requirements, men’s and women’ fraternity ..............................................................................81

Greek alcohol and social event policy................................................................................................... 81

Greek conduct process ........................................................................................................................85

Hazing and initiation practices ............................................................................................................ 86

King and queen contests .....................................................................................................................86

Questions regarding fraternities and sororities .....................................................................................86

Statement of alcohol free recruitment.................................................................................................... 88

Grievance procedure.................................................................................................................................. 22

Health Services .......................................................................................................................................... 47

Health education and outreach...................................................................................................................49

Health officer............................................................................................................................................. 49

History of Butler University ........................................................................................................................ 3

Honors Program....................................................................................................................................... 22

Identification cards .................................................................................................................................... 50

Information Resources computing assistance..............................................................................................22

Information technology and access ............................................................................................................. 23

Intercollegiate athletics................................................................................................................................50

International students................................................................................................................................50

Internship and Career Services...................................................................................................................23

Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 1

Jordan College of Fine Arts’ Multisensory Learning Facility ....................................................................... 23

Late night event policies.............................................................................................................................51

Learning Resource Center..........................................................................................................................24

Butler Libraries ......................................................................................................................................... 26

Lost and found.......................................................................................................................................... 51

Mail..........................................................................................................................................................51

Motorist assistance program.......................................................................................................................51

Network infrastructure ..............................................................................................................................51

Non-credit................................................................................................................................................27

Off-Campus Students...............................................................................................................................52

Operation Identification ............................................................................................................................52

Parking.....................................................................................................................................................52

Peer education........................................................................................................................................... 52

Police Department, Butler University ........................................................................................................ 34

Post-Graduate Studies ...............................................................................................................................27

Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) ........................................................................... 52

Programs for Overseas Study.....................................................................................................................28

Recreation Department..............................................................................................................................53

Registering for classes................................................................................................................................. 29

Registration and withdrawals, changes of.................................................................................................... 30

Religious/Spiritual life at Butler .................................................................................................................54

Residence Life ........................................................................................................................................... 62


Community ...................................................................................................................................... 62

Diversity............................................................................................................................................ 62

Activities of residence halls..................................................................................................................62

Housing options ................................................................................................................................63

Staff in residence life............................................................................................................................65

Residence hall and housing policies .................................................................................................... 66

Policies/Procedures/Services of residence life........................................................................................69

Safety and security ..............................................................................................................................79

Rights and Responsibilities........................................................................................................................89

About rights and responsibilities ........................................................................................................ 89

University rules of conduct.................................................................................................................89

Student acceptance of regulations......................................................................................................... 90

Student group responsibility ..............................................................................................................90

Academic integrity..............................................................................................................................90

Computer use policy..........................................................................................................................93

Alcohol policy.................................................................................................................................... 98

Greek life social event policy..............................................................................................................103

Regulation on use of sound amplification devices ..............................................................................104

Drug-free community policy............................................................................................................104

Grievance policy...............................................................................................................................105

Harassment and sexual harassment/sexual misconduct policies..........................................................105

Hazing and pre-initiation activities....................................................................................................110

Animal abuse...................................................................................................................................111

Clery Act–

“Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act”.............111

Sex Crimes Prevention Act ...............................................................................................................111

Student conduct system....................................................................................................................111

Greek conduct procedure..................................................................................................................120

Privacy rights of students at Butler University ...................................................................................120

Space and event reservation ........................................................................................................................55

Starbucks Café........................................................................................................................................... 55

Student Affairs .......................................................................................................................................... 55

Student athletes ......................................................................................................................................... 30

Student Disability Services.........................................................................................................................30

Student organizations................................................................................................................................. 56

Student organizations: policies and procedures ..........................................................................................56

Studying...................................................................................................................................................30

Traditional events........................................................................................................................................ 4

Transcripts................................................................................................................................................31

Transfer credit........................................................................................................................................... 31

University administration............................................................................................................................ 6

University songs.......................................................................................................................................... 5

Vehicle registration .................................................................................................................................... 60

Victim Advocate........................................................................................................................................ 60

Volunteer Center....................................................................................................................................... 61

Withdrawals ............................................................................................................................................. 31

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