View First Year Course Recommendations - Butler University

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View First Year Course Recommendations - Butler University

B U T L E R U N I V E R S I T Y

FALL 2012 FIRST–YEAR COURSE RECOMMENDATIONS


Course Options

Choice

(1, 2, or 3)

Class

Number Course & Section Course Title

Butler University Enrollment Worksheet

Credit

Hours Days Time

Example 2981 AR 210-02 Statistically Speaking 3 MWF 8:00 – 8:50 a.m.

Weekly Schedule

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7:00 a.m.

7:30 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

10:00 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:30 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

12:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

6:30 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

7:30 p.m.


Schedule of Classes

Fall 2012

Contents

General Information

Page

University Core Curriculum 4

First-Year Seminar Dr. Neville JH314B ext. 9676 4

Global and Historical Studies Dr. Geertsema FB212 ext. 6047 11

Area 1 (PCA, SW, TI) Dr. Mix FB008 ext. 6457

Area 2 (AR, NW, PWB) Dr. Ryan GH047 ext. 9977

Honors Program Dr. Morrel JH153 ext. 9273 21

Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement

Learning Resource Center Ms. Griggs JH136 ext. 9308 23

Liberal Arts and Sciences Dr. Howard JH237 ext. 9224 25

African Studies Dr. Jett JH347B ext. 8451

Anthropology Dr. Edwards JH349B ext. 9743 25

Biological Sciences Dr. Salsbury GH255 ext. 9879 25

Chemistry Dr. O’Reilly GH300 ext. 9806 26

Classical Studies Dr. van der Linden JH202I ext. 9976 26

Computer Science Dr. Sorenson FB158 ext. 9765 26

Economics Dr. Bennett HB228 ext. 9502

Engineering Dr. Kirsch GH347 ext. 9400 27

English Dr. Flanzbaum JH308C ext. 9860 27

Gender, Women and Dr. Deno JH349D ext. 9681 34

Sexuality Studies

History Dr. Edwards JH349B ext. 9743 30

International Studies Dr. Menendez JH371B ext. 9284 34

Mathematics/Actuarial Science Dr. Johnston JH270A ext. 8498 30

Modern Language, Dr. Carney JH392 ext. 8438 31

Literature and Culture

Peace Studies Dr. McEvoy-Levy JH347D ext. 9465 34

Philosophy and Religious Studies Dr. van der Linden JH202I ext. 9976 32

Physics and Astronomy Dr. Han GH239 ext. 9873 32

Political Science Dr. Jett JH347B ext. 8451 33

Psychology Dr. Dale JH298 ext. 9849 33

Science, Technology and Society Dr. Ryan GH047 ext. 9577 34

Sociology and Criminology Dr. Novak JH371E ext. 6176 33

College of Education Dr. Shelley JH171E ext. 9752 36

College of Business Prof. Rouse HB162 ext. 8816 37

College of Pharmacy and Dr. Andritz PB107 ext. 9322 39

Health Sciences

Jordan College of Fine Arts Dr. Caltabiano LH138E ext. 9231 40

Arts Administration Ms. Zurbuchen LH131 ext. 9567

Dance Mr. Attaway LH52 ext. 9346 40

Music Dr. Bolin LH225 ext. 9246 41

Theatre Mr. Fisher LH152 ext. 9659 43

Art Program Prof. Jarvis LH138G ext. 9961 40

College of Communication Dr. Neher FB218 ext. 9815 44

Creative Media and Entertainment Dr. Creech FB102 ext. 5975 44

Media, Rhetoric and Culture Dr. Harthcock FB112 ext. 5966

Journalism and Electronic Media Dr. Whitmore FB118C ext. 8080 44

Organizational Communication Dr. Waite FB242 ext. 9626 45

and Leadership

Strategic Communication: Dr. Rademacher FB238 ext. 9823 45

PR and Advertising Dr. Campbell FB214 ext.9367

Communication Sciences Dr. Reading JH274C ext. 9492 44

and Disorders

Air Force ROTC Jackie Harding (800) IUB-ROTC 35

Army ROTC Captain Ross McKee (317) 274-2644 35

1

Butler University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is

a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools


Academic Calendar for 2012–2013

Fall 2012

March 26–Apr 6 Advising for Fall 2012 registration

April 9–19

Self Service Registration for continuing

students

Aug. 15 W Last day to apply for admission

Aug. 19–21 S–T New student orientation

Aug. 22 W First day of instruction

Aug. 28 T Last day to add a course (5 p.m.)

Last day to file for December graduation

Sept. 3 M Labor Day holiday (no classes)

Sept. 5 W Last day to drop a course (5 p.m.)

Sept. 19 W Last day to change P/F to credit or credit to

P/F

Oct. 3 W Early term grades due in Registration and

Records

Oct. 11–12 R–F Fall Reading break (no classes)

Oct. 15–26 Advising begins for Spring 2013

registration

Oct. 29–Nov. 8 Spring Self Service Registration for

continuing students

Nov. 2 F Last day to withdraw or change to noncredit

Nov. 19–23

Thanksgiving holiday (no classes)

Dec. 7 F Last meeting of classes

Last day to file for May graduation

Dec. 8 S Reading day

Dec. 10–15 M–S Final examinations

Dec. 16 SU Winter Commencement

Dec. 18 T Grades due by 10 a.m. in Registration and

Records

Spring 2013

Oct. 15–26

Advising for Spring 2012 registration

Oct. 29–Nov. 8 Self Service Registration for continuing

students

Jan. 7 M Last day to apply for admission

Jan. 10–11 R–F New student orientation

Jan. 14 M First day of instruction

Jan. 18 M Last day to add a course (5 p.m.)

Jan. 21 M Martin Luther King holiday (no classes)

Jan. 28 M Last day to drop a course (5 p.m.)

Feb. 11 M Last day to change P/F to credit or credit to

P/F

Feb. 25 M Early term grades due in Registration and

Records by 10 a.m.

March 11–15 M–F Spring break (no classes)

March 25–April 5 Advising for Fall 2012 registration

March 29 F Last day to withdraw or change to noncredit

(5 p.m.)

April 8–18

Self Service Registration for continuing

students

April 29 M Last meeting of classes

April 30 T Reading day

May 1–7 W–T Final examinations

May 9 R Grades due by 10 a.m. in Registration and

Records

May 11 S Commencement

Summer 2013 Planning Dates

Summer I: May 13–June 21

Jan. 29 T Self Service Registration for continuing students

May 6 M Last day to apply for non-degree admission

May 13 M First Day of Class

May 27 M Memorial Day holiday (no classes)

June 21 F Last day of class

June 25 T Grades Due in Registration and Records by 10 a.m.

Summer II: June 24–August 2

Jan. 29 T Self Service Registration for continuing students

June 17 M Last day to apply for non-degree admission

June 24 M First day of class

July 4 R Independence Day holiday (no classes)

Aug. 2 F Last day of class

Aug. 6 T Grades Due in Registration and Records by 10 a.m.

Building Codes:

FB Fairbanks Center

FHEC Fieldhouse east classroom

FHFC Fieldhouse football classroom

FHWC Fieldhouse west classroom

FHWG Fieldhouse–west gym

FHBUB Fieldhouse, tennis bubble

GA Holcomb Garden House

GH Gallahue Hall

HB Holcomb Building

HO Holcomb Observatory

HR Health and Recreation Center

IL Irwin Library

JCX Jordan College Annex (formerly Jordan Academy of

Dance)

JH J ordan Hall

LH Lilly Hall

METH Methodist Hospital

PB Pharmacy Building

Changes to the Schedule of Classes

The most up to date class schedules are located online. Current

schedules can be viewed on the web in two ways. http://www.butler.

edu/CourseSearch allows you to browse all the courses in a subject,

or search for a particular course by searching for the course title,

the instructor name, or the subject and catalog number. You can

link to special topic titles and course catalog descriptions. The

enrollment limit and available seat count is shown, but may be up

to an hour behind actual figures. If you are a student, faculty member

or staff member at Butler, you may also use the secure inquiry on

My.Butler.edu. Log in, then go to My Student Data Home, then

Academics Home. Select View Schedule of Classes and provide the

desired semester code. With this search facility you can also look for

classes that are scheduled at a certain time during the week and the

enrollment status is always current.

Final examinations

Fall 2012. Final examinations in 4-, 5- and 6-hour courses are

three hours in length; other courses have two-hour examinations.

Examinations in one or two-hour courses are arranged by the instructor.

Examinations are normally held in the room regularly occupied by the

2


class. All day class examinations, with the exception of GHS 201–209,

BI 120 and MA 106–107 will begin and end according to the schedule

below.

Classes that do not start on the hour are placed in an examination

period by the hour of the start of the class and by the first day of

the class. For example, classes that meet on Tuesday and Thursday

at 9:35–10:50 a.m. are scheduled into the 9 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday

examination period.

Special Examinations:


from 4:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.


evening, December 10, from 6–9 p.m.

8 a.m.

9 a.m.

10 a.m.

Monday

Dec. 10, 2012

M–F 9 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

Tuesday

Dec. 11, 2012

MWF 9 a.m.

3 cr hr classes M–F 1 p.m.

Final

4–6 cr hr

8–10 a.m.

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

MWF 1 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

8–10 a.m.

Wednesday

Dec. 12, 2012

TR 11 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

TR 11 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

8–10 a.m.


December 11, from 7–9 p.m.


December 15.

Evening-class examinations. Classes that start at 4 p.m. or later

follow the evening examination schedule. For classes meeting once

a week, the examination should be given on one evening. For

classesmeeting twice a week, the examination should be given in one

evening if possible or two if necessary. Evening class examinations

begin on Monday, December 10, and end on Saturday, December

15. Evening class examinations are normally held in the room regularly

occupied by the class. All evening examinations will begin at

the same time as the usual class starting time and will end according

to the lengths of examinations listed. Because of the wide variety of

starting and ending times of evening classes, conflicts of examination

times are possible; therefore, instructors and students should consult

on times of examinations and adjust their schedules accordingly.

Thursday

Dec. 13, 2012

TR 2 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 8–10 a.m.

Friday

Dec. 14, 2012

MWF 3 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 8–10 a.m.

Saturday

Dec. 15, 2012

M–F 8 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

MWF 8 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

8–10 a.m.

11 a.m.

TR 3 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 10:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

TR 8 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 10:15-12:15 p.m.

12 p.m.

1 p.m.

2 p.m.

3 p.m.

TR 9 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

TR 9 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

TR 1 p.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

TR 1 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

M–F 10 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

MWF 10 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

M–F 11 p.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

MWF 11 a.m.

3 cr hr classes M–F 12 p.m.

Final

4-6 cr hr

1–3 p.m.

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

MWF

12 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

MWF 2 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

4 p.m.

5 p.m.

GHS 201–209

Final 4:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

6 p.m.

7 p.m.

8 p.m.

MA 106/107

Final 6–9 p.m.

BI 120/122

Final 7–9 p.m.

9 p.m.

3


University

Core Curriculum

First Year Seminar

First-Year Seminars: The First-Year Seminars are for entering

first-year students new to Butler. Completing FYS 101 in the fall,

and FYS 102 in the spring, fulfills first year core requirements.

3268 FYS 101 01 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Popa, Tiberiu M

Philosophy of Love & Friendship

This course is meant chiefly as an introduction to the philosophy

of love and friendship. It is not a philosophy course

strictly speaking, though, and we will tackle plenty of literary

and sacred texts - among other things - that are relevant

to our topic and that encourage reflection on the nature of

love and friendship. Our survey of some of the most influential

views on the subject will be decidedly interdisciplinary,

and we will consider carefully the connections between

love and topics as diverse as morality, personal identity and

mysticism. During the second half of this course (i.e. in the

spring of 2013) we will also explore a range of types of love

and attachment that are not (or not only) interpersonal: patriotism,

adherence to certain ideologies, consumerism etc.

3279 FYS 101 02 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Whitmeyer II, Virgil G

Philosophy, Psychology & Persons (PPP)

Is Star Trek’s Commander Data a person? What about Hal,

the computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey? In this course we

will think about just what it means to be a person. We will

examine what philosophers have historically thought makes

us persons. Using various media (including books, films, and

lab work) we will also consider how this question has been

transformed by more recent advances in psychology, robotics,

and other cognitive sciences. An important question will

be whether human beings are the only persons, or whether

other things like non-human animals and robots might qualify.

Finally we’ll explore the relation of these questions about

personhood to other things we care about — like rationality,

autonomy, responsibility and free will.

3281 FYS 101 03 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Whitmeyer II, Virgil G

Philosophy, Psychology & Persons (PPP)

Is Star Trek’s Commander Data a person? What about Hal,

the computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey? In this course we

will think about just what it means to be a person. We will

examine what philosophers have historically thought makes

us persons. Using various media (including books, films, and

lab work) we will also consider how this question has been

transformed by more recent advances in psychology, robotics,

and other cognitive sciences. An important question will

be whether human beings are the only persons, or whether

other things like non-human animals and robots might qualify.

Finally we’ll explore the relation of these questions about

personhood to other things we care about — like rationality,

autonomy, responsibility and free will.

3293 FYS 101 04 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 1-2:15

McGrath, James

Faith, Doubt and Reason

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Faith Doubt and Reason. Reading and discussion of classic

philosophical religious and literary texts exploring the ways

in which human beings have reflected on their relationship

to God; the world and their fellow human beings. In the first

semester (‘The Search for God’), we will focus on how human

beings have sought to know and understand God and

the world and on how that search has shaped the way humans

define themselves. In the second semester (‘The Search

for Community’), we will focus on how human beings have

sought to define themselves in terms of the various communities

to which they belong, including families and clans,

ethnic communities, nations and faith communities. The

interaction and interconnections of faith, doubt and reason

will receive attention in both semesters.

3294 FYS 101 05 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Brabant, Margaret A

Sex & Politics: Helen of Troy

The story of Helen of Troy literally and figuratively embodies

the struggle between sex and politics and the human propensity

to forsake politics for war. In this course, we will examine

how the myth of Helen is intimately connected with misogynistic

attitudes, romantic and sexual fantasies, and notions of

political power that may been seen throughout twenty-eight

centuries of the telling and retelling of the story of the “face

that launched a thousand ships.” Course readings include

Bettany Hughes’ Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore;

Euripides’ Helen; Aeschylus’ Oresteia, among others. Those

who take this topic in the fall will not be permitted to repeat

the topic for FYS102 credit.

4 University Core Curriculum


3295 FYS 101 06 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Turner, Robin

Travelers and Tourists

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Studying travel and tourism allows us to look deeply at ourselves,

our communities, and the world. When we leave home

for a day, for a few weeks, or for many months, we have the

opportunity to engage with the unfamiliar, to engage directly

with difference, and to develop new perspectives. But travel

and tourism are not innocent. Tourism involves privilege—

the ability to choose to go somewhere else—and tourism

affects “natives”—those people who live in the places to

which we travel—as well as travelers. Travel brings people

into what Mary Louise Pratt calls the “contact zone,” a space

in which people with different histories, experiences, and unequal

power and privilege encounter and affect one another.

In this two semester seminar, we will examine travel and

tourism from multiple perspectives, reading, discussing,

and analyzing popular media, travel literature, and scholarly

texts to examine the complex relationships between tourists

and toured, tourism, society, and political economy. This

seminar is part of the Collaborative for Critical Inquiry into

Issues of Race, Gender & Sexuality.

3303 FYS 101 07 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Laurent-Faesi, Stephan

Spellbound: The Quest for Magic in

Fiction & Arts

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Spellbound: The Quest for Magic in Speculative Fiction and

the Arts. Throughout the ages, the fascination with the otherworldly,

the supernatural, the magical element has been a

great source of inspiration for writers, choreographers, musicians,

and other artists. From the tales of 1001 Nights to A

Mid-summer Night’s Dream, from The Lord of the Rings to

contemporary fantasy literature, magic is ever-present, sometimes

for the good, now and again in the purpose of evil.

Similarly, the art of dance abounds with tales of the fantastic;

musicians have given a voice to many a fairy tale; and artists

have painted or sculpted countless mythological figures. This

course will explore the many faces of this quest for magic

in an inter-disciplinary way, with selected readings from the

genre of fantasy literature, viewings of masterworks of ballet

and modern dance, and musical examples from great symphonic

and operatic works.

3304 FYS 101 08 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Brooks, Lisa E

La Musica!: Classical Music in Society

Students will consider the relevance of classical music to

21st century American life. We will study classical music as

a “product” and ourselves as “consumers”. Finally, we will

focus on the music of a particular society-Nazi Germanyto

examine even broader implications of music, including

propaganda and censorship. Semester one is not a prerequisite

to semester two.

3308 FYS 101 09 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Bigelow, Bruce

Roots and Regions: Cultural Regionalism

in America

Students will read and write about fiction and nonfiction

that reflect the cultural regions of the United States. In the

fall we will examine literature from the Midwest, the South,

and the Northeast. In the spring semester we will shift

our focus to Southern California, Texas, and the Pacific

Northwest. Two questions we will consider are, do we find

regionalism an important influence on our identities and

where is home or homeland for us, and why? Semester one

is not a prerequisite to semester two.

3324 FYS 101 10 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Geib, George W

Gettysburg in History & Memory

Our topics are the battle of Gettysburg and Lincoln’s powerful

address. We will use primary sources and two Pulitzer-

Prize winning texts to help you develop your thinking and

writing skills.

3353 FYS 101 11 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

Eureka, I’ve Found It!

This course develops an appreciation for deductive analytic

reasoning and the discovery of new ideas, especially in

modern science and mathematics. It will describe ten great

breakthroughs in history and the individuals who made each

one, including (the beginning date of discovery is also given):

Special Relativity (early 1900s); the Course of Planets (ca.

1667); the Modern Formulation of Infinity (ca. 1850); the

Way to Calculate Probabilities (1654); the Pythagorean Theorem

and Properties of Whole Numbers (ca. BCE 300); the

Square Root of -1 (1806); Non-Euclidean Geometry (late

1800s); the Solution to Cubic Equations (1539); How to

Shoot Rockets to the Moon (1969), the Method of Statistical

Experimentation (1925); and a Secure Method to Send Your

Credit Card Number Over the Internet (1973). Students

will write papers telling the story of these events.

3416 FYS 101 12 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Brown, Bonnie K

Writing on Drugs

This course will introduce students to the study of literary

texts and the social contexts from which they emerge by way

of the stories we tell about drug use and addiction. As we

examine how authors make use of their experience to shape

their lives and their texts, we will investigate the relationship

between drugs, self, and community in order to understand

the force of representation and how societies code and codify

the use of psychotropic substances. Who gets to write the

narrative of drugs? How is drug use gendered? In what ways

do writers from different cultures or social classes depict their

experience of addiction? Ultimately we want to understand

how drugs inhabit culture and how cultures shape the meanings

of drugs.

5 University Core Curriculum


3431 FYS 101 13 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 9-10:15 Colavito, Joseph J

Scary Stories

The Metaphor of the Zombie

Readers of zombie literature and followers of zombie film

will verify the ease by which the zombie contagion spreads,

infecting all through bites, splatters, and exchanges of bodily

fluids. This metaphor is our starting point for analysis of the

zombie metaphor and its subsequent appearances in thought,

scholarship, and practices, in a wide variety of disciplines.

We’ll start by examining the tradition of the zombie as it

originates in the spiritual side of various cultures, moving

then to consider how the zombie functions in social, political,

economic, and intellectual spheres. We’ll culminate with

developing our own applications of, and antidotes for, the

zombie contagion as it threatens areas of our own interest.

3433 FYS 101 14 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Hofstetter, Angela D

The Call of the Wild

Drawings of horses, stags, and bulls on the caves of Lascaux

illustrate that animals have captured the human imagination

since the dawn of the Paleolithic era as food, workers, companions,

and fellow warriors: our path to modernity tells

the tales of a relationship paradoxically fraught with violence

and love. The intensity of this primordial fascination erupted

with new vehemence in nineteenth-century America, England,

and France as discussions of transmutation (what became

evolution) destabilized the already fragile line distinguishing

man and beast. This First Year Seminar adopts an

interdisciplinary approach to how questions of animals and

animality were developed across both generic and national

boundaries: the burgeoning fields of anthropology, zoology,

and sociology will be read alongside art and literature of the

period. In addition to the controversial writings of Charles

Darwin, Carol Adams, and Marc Bekoff, texts will include

Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” Robert

Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,

Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty, Jack London’s The Call of the

Wild, and Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

3434 FYS 101 15 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Hofstetter, Angela D

The Call of the Wild

Drawings of horses, stags, and bulls on the caves of Lascaux

illustrate that animals have captured the human imagination

since the dawn of the Paleolithic era as food, workers, companions,

and fellow warriors: our path to modernity tells

the tales of a relationship paradoxically fraught with violence

and love. The intensity of this primordial fascination erupted

with new vehemence in nineteenth-century America,

England, and France as discussions of transmutation (what

became evolution) destabilized the already fragile line distinguishing

man and beast. This First Year Seminar adopts an

interdisciplinary approach to how questions of animals and

animality were developed across both generic and national

boundaries: the burgeoning fields of anthropology, zoology,

and sociology will be read alongside art and literature of the

period. In addition to the controversial writings of Charles

Darwin, Carol Adams, and Marc Bekoff, texts will include

Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” Robert

Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,

Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty, Jack London’s The Call of the

Wild, and Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

3435 FYS 101 16 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Hofstetter, Angela D

The Call of the Wild

Drawings of horses, stags, and bulls on the caves of Lascaux

illustrate that animals have captured the human imagination

since the dawn of the Paleolithic era as food, workers, companions,

and fellow warriors: our path to modernity tells

the tales of a relationship paradoxically fraught with violence

and love. The intensity of this primordial fascination erupted

with new vehemence in nineteenth-century America, England,

and France as discussions of transmutation (what became

evolution) destabilized the already fragile line distinguishing

man and beast. This First Year Seminar adopts an

interdisciplinary approach to how questions of animals and

animality were developed across both generic and national

boundaries: the burgeoning fields of anthropology, zoology,

and sociology will be read alongside art and literature of the

period. In addition to the controversial writings of Charles

Darwin, Carol Adams, and Marc Bekoff, texts will include

Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” Robert

Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,

Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty, Jack London’s The Call of the

Wild, and Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

3437 FYS 101 17 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Lynch, Alessandra J

Imaginative Sojourns

This course is the first semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester

two, but students who enroll in this topic in the fall

are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

In this course we will be reading texts from various genres

(personal essay, memoir, graphic “novel,” and poetry), each

focusing on some aspect of the Self- self-image, self and community,

self and culture. We will discuss how self-expression

manifests itself in each genre--how each genre reveals or

clarifies particular insights about the self. The class will be

discussion-based, but students will keep a journal, respond

to a variety of writing prompts and write essays triggered by

the readings.

3438 FYS 101 18 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Lynch, Alessandra J

Imaginative Sojourns

This course is the first semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester

two, but students who enroll in this topic in the fall

are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

In this course we will be reading texts from various genres

(personal essay, memoir, graphic “novel,” and poetry), each

focusing on some aspect of the Self- self-image, self and community,

self and culture. We will discuss how self-expression

manifests itself in each genre--how each genre reveals or

clarifies particular insights about the self. The class will be

discussion-based, but students will keep a journal, respond

to a variety of writing prompts and write essays triggered by

the readings.

6 University Core Curriculum


3439 FYS 101 19 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Lynch, Alessandra J

Imaginative Sojourns

This course is the first semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester

two, but students who enroll in this topic in the fall

are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

In this course we will be reading texts from various genres

(personal essay, memoir, graphic “novel,” and poetry), each

focusing on some aspect of the Self- self-image, self and community,

self and culture. We will discuss how self-expression

manifests itself in each genre--how each genre reveals or

clarifies particular insights about the self. The class will be

discussion-based, but students will keep a journal, respond

to a variety of writing prompts and write essays triggered by

the readings.

3440 FYS 101 20 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Neville, Susan S

Contemporary Writers

This course is the first semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester

two, but students who enroll in this topic in the fall

are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

A year-long course focusing on the works of contemporary

writers. Texts for the course will be chosen primarily from

the works of writers who will be coming to campus during

the year as part of the Visiting Writers Series, the James J.

Woods Science Writers Series, and other events and series

that bring writers to campus. In the course of reading and

discussing the works of contemporary writers, students will

cultivate the skills necessary for critical thinking, oral communication,

and effective writing. The course will also serve

as an introduction to the vitality of the liberal arts. Class

will involve discussion, student presentations, and writing

strategies.

3441 FYS 101 21 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Reeves, Carol A

Farm, Town, Suburb, City: Where We Live

and How we Think

Through reading classic and contemporary American novels

and stories set on farms, towns, suburbs and cities, we

will explore how these places affect our psyche and our political

values. In the process, we will make the familiar —

the kind of place where we grew up — seem strange, by examining

it from a different perspective. We will also make

the strange — the place we did not grow up — familiar by

discovering connections we can make with its inhabitants.

Where is the best place to live? We will ask, and in doing so,

we will find out more about ourselves and others.

3443 FYS 101 22 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05 Ries, Rebecca S

The Heroic Temper

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Homer lays the groundwork for an examination of the epic

heroes, with his very personal attention to the lives and

characters of his chosen heroes in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Central to our concern in this seminar will be our own

examination of these poems especially with an eye towards

understanding what keeps generation after generation not

only reading these classic epics but reworking the heroic form

as well as the heroic themes. Besides our reading the Homeric

epics, we will study the modern applications of them in

film - such as Troy, Ulysses, and O Brother Where Art Thou?

Semester two will look at further reworking of the Homeric

model, with Roman works such as Virgil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s

Metamorphoses, among others.

3444 FYS 101 23 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Ries, Rebecca S

Shakespearean Temper

The Shakespearean Temper. Shakespeare -The best playwright

in the world- either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral,

pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical,

tragical-comical-historical-pastoral” . . . this is the only man!

Ben Johnson says of Shakespeare that “He was not of an

age but for all time” and that will serve as our entry into an

examination of one particular artist, William Shakespeare.

Within the artificial world of his dramas he will supply the

very real values, morals, and expectations of his time as they

compete with the individual’s experience and his or her desire.

Shakespeare’s characters must weigh their allegiancesto

whom? And at what cost? In this course, in addition to

reading some of the most famous of his plays, students will

also come to an understanding of what it means to be a man

or woman in this historic culture. We may also be able to

answer for ourselves whether or not Johnson is right-that

Shakespeare is indeed for our time too, that the concerns of

Shakespeare’s day do indeed translate to our own.

3445 FYS 101 24 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Ries, Rebecca S

Shakespearean Temper

The Shakespearean Temper. Shakespeare -The best playwright

in the world- either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral,

pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical,

tragical-comical-historical-pastoral” . . . this is the only man!

Ben Johnson says of Shakespeare that “He was not of an

age but for all time” and that will serve as our entry into an

examination of one particular artist, William Shakespeare.

Within the artificial world of his dramas he will supply the

very real values, morals, and expectations of his time as they

compete with the individual’s experience and his or her desire.

Shakespeare’s characters must weigh their allegiancesto

whom? And at what cost? In this course, in addition to

reading some of the most famous of his plays, students will

also come to an understanding of what it means to be a man

or woman in this historic culture. We may also be able to

answer for ourselves whether or not Johnson is right-that

Shakespeare is indeed for our time too, that the concerns of

Shakespeare’s day do indeed translate to our own.

3448 FYS 101 25 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological

7 University Core Curriculum


geography of youth culture through literature, music, film,

and art. This is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather

an ongoing inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion,

coming-of-age, and generational battles. Semester one

will examine the rise of youth culture through 1975.

3449 FYS 101 26 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological

geography of youth culture through literature, music, film,

and art. This is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather

an ongoing inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion,

coming-of-age, and generational battles. Semester one

will examine the rise of youth culture through 1975.

3450 FYS 101 27 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological

geography of youth culture through literature, music, film,

and art. This is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather

an ongoing inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion,

coming-of-age, and generational battles. Semester one

will examine the rise of youth culture through 1975.

3451 FYS 101 28 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Watts, William H

All about the Bike

On both the local and the international level, cycling is going

through a renaissance. Three years ago, Indianapolis had

virtually no bicycle lanes; the city now has over sixty miles

of lanes. Increasingly, both health experts and urban planners

point to cycling as a tangible means of enhancing the

quality of our lives. In this year-long course, we will consider

this cycling renaissance in its historical and cultural context.

Students will have the opportunity to go on group rides and

develop their own personal cycling plan to fulfill the Physical

Well Being requirement, and the course will include a service

learning component in which students will work with local

bicycle advocacy groups and thereby satisfy the Indianapolis

Community Requirement of the Core Curriculum.

3529 FYS 101 29 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Forhan, Chris

Contemporary Writers

The goal of the First Year Seminar is to immerse you in the

culture of a liberal arts education and help you develop your

skills in reading, writing, oral communication, and critical

thinking. These activities are recursive: they interact with

and reinforce each other. Therefore, we will continually be

engaging in all of them, with an emphasis on reading texts

analytically, discussing them together with purpose and intellectual

engagement, and writing essays about—or at least

inspired by—the assigned literature. Most of our reading will

be of works by fiction writers and poets scheduled to appear

this semester in Butler’s Visiting Writers Series; in discussing

these works, we will focus not only on what they are about

but on how they are written—our analysis of them will

illuminate the strategies writers employ to make their work

complex and memorable. An essential course requirement is

attendance at several evening readings by the authors whose

work we are studying, and we will also have a chance to meet

and talk with many of these writers when they visit campus.

3530 FYS 101 30 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Forhan, Chris

Contemporary Writers

The goal of the First Year Seminar is to immerse you in the

culture of a liberal arts education and help you develop your

skills in reading, writing, oral communication, and critical

thinking. These activities are recursive: they interact with

and reinforce each other. Therefore, we will continually be

engaging in all of them, with an emphasis on reading texts

analytically, discussing them together with purpose and intellectual

engagement, and writing essays about—or at least

inspired by—the assigned literature. Most of our reading will

be of works by fiction writers and poets scheduled to appear

this semester in Butler’s Visiting Writers Series; in discussing

these works, we will focus not only on what they are about

but on how they are written—our analysis of them will

illuminate the strategies writers employ to make their work

complex and memorable. An essential course requirement is

attendance at several evening readings by the authors whose

work we are studying, and we will also have a chance to meet

and talk with many of these writers when they visit campus.

3534 FYS 101 31 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Corpus, Deborah A

Identity & Cultr: Coming of Age in a

Changng World

Identity and Culture: Coming of Age in a Changing World.

What tells us who we are? How does one develop an image

of self? Students will use the lenses of literature, psychological

theory, art, and history to examine depictions of “coming

of age” across cultures and time periods. Aristotle wrote,

“The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of

things, but their inward significance.” Through this seminar,

students will use “art” in its broadest sense to explore the significance

of “coming of age.” Semester I: Coming of Age in

America. Semester II: Coming of Age in Other Cultures and

Other Times. Semester one is not a prerequisite for semester

two.

3580 FYS 101 32 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Smith, Christine M

Rebels with a Cause

This First Year Seminar will analyze challenges to authority,

with attention to the way those challenges are reflected in

fiction and non-fiction. Larger questions such as — what

constitutes a rebellion? why and how do we rebel? what role

does the rebel serve in society? — these will become topics

for discussion and writing integrated with the texts used. In

the course of reading and discussing these works of literature,

students will cultivate the skills necessary for critical thinking,

oral communication, and effective writing. The course

will also serve as an introduction to the vitality of the liberal

8 University Core Curriculum


arts. As a seminar the class will be structured around student

discussion as well as student presentations, in class writing

and writing workshops. The second semester will consider

the American Civil War, called at its outset the War of the

Rebellion, will emphasize the common soldier and his family,

and will require a genealogy project. Semester one is not

prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring.

3581 FYS 101 33 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Smith, Christine M

Rebels with a Cause

This First Year Seminar will analyze challenges to authority,

with attention to the way those challenges are reflected in

fiction and non-fiction. Larger questions such as — what

constitutes a rebellion? why and how do we rebel? what role

does the rebel serve in society? — these will become topics

for discussion and writing integrated with the texts used. In

the course of reading and discussing these works of literature,

students will cultivate the skills necessary for critical thinking,

oral communication, and effective writing. The course

will also serve as an introduction to the vitality of the liberal

arts. As a seminar the class will be structured around student

discussion as well as student presentations, in class writing

and writing workshops. The second semester will consider

the American Civil War, called at its outset the War of the

Rebellion, will emphasize the common soldier and his family,

and will require a genealogy project. Semester one is not

prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring.

3582 FYS 101 34 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Vecera, Grant

The Art of Literature Now

This course is the first semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to

semester two, but students who enroll in this topic in the

fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

We will study recently published essays and short stories

from the Best American Series in order to better understand

ourselves and the human condition at large. Such texts will

function to some extent as models for the types of writing

students will perform, but the texts will also function as artifacts

with which we can hopefully make deep & complex

philosophical, psychological, social, religious, historical,

political, & aesthetic inquiries intrinsic to the liberal arts

tradition. Because the texts will be almost exclusively American,

cultural criticism will pervade our intellectual investigations,

and students will obtain many opportunities to reflect

upon their roles and identities as members of various communities

and as earthlings.

3583 FYS 101 35 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Vecera, Grant

The Art of Literature Now

This course is the first semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to

semester two, but students who enroll in this topic in the

fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

We will study recently published essays and short stories

from the Best American Series in order to better understand

ourselves and the human condition at large. Such texts will

function to some extent as models for the types of writing

students will perform, but the texts will also function as artifacts

with which we can hopefully make deep & complex

philosophical, psychological, social, religious, historical,

political, & aesthetic inquiries intrinsic to the liberal arts tradition.

Because the texts will be almost exclusively American,

cultural criticism will pervade our intellectual investigations,

and students will obtain many opportunities to reflect upon

their roles and identities as members of various communities

and as earthlings.

3593 FYS 101 36 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Dunn, Mindy

Re-enchantment:The Grimm Truth

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Once upon a time, in lands all over the world, fairy tales were

passed on through generations, carried over continents by

the voices of storytellers. This semester we will be re-learning

how to read fairy tales, working to uncover the layers of

meaning hidden to us by our modern eyes too readily satisfied

by the obvious morals of Disney movies; will ask why

fairy tales are important, why their shelf lives are so long; will

investigate how the tales themselves have shape-shifted from

the oral into text and media and how this affects their worth;

all while asking ourselves what is a fairy tale? Our second

semester will take a giant leap from the fantasy of fairy tale

into the genres of reality: creative non-fiction and memoir.

This course is the first-semester offering of the year-long

First-Year Seminar.

3594 FYS 101 37 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Dunn, Mindy

Re-enchantment:The Grimm Truth

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Once upon a time, in lands all over the world, fairy tales were

passed on through generations, carried over continents by

the voices of storytellers. This semester we will be re-learning

how to read fairy tales, working to uncover the layers of

meaning hidden to us by our modern eyes too readily satisfied

by the obvious morals of Disney movies; will ask why

fairy tales are important, why their shelf lives are so long; will

investigate how the tales themselves have shape-shifted from

the oral into text and media and how this affects their worth;

all while asking ourselves what is a fairy tale? Our second semester

will take a giant leap from the fantasy of fairy tale into

the genres of reality: creative non-fiction and memoir. This

course is the first-semester offering of the year-long First-Year

Seminar.

3616 FYS 101 38 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Rodman, Laura

Change Agents, Leaders, Decision-Making

And You

In this class we will examine the role and characteristics of

change agents and leaders on the individual, community and

organizational level within a society. Modern day, historical,

9 University Core Curriculum


fictional and personal perspectives will be explored, examined

and compared. We will consider the dilemmas involved

in ethical decision-making and examine the choices change

agents and leaders make. The student will have the opportunity

to reflect on their own decision-making process and

their roles as change agents and leaders.

3617 FYS 101 39 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Furuness, Bryan Mark

Seriously Funny

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Comedy can be serious stuff, as rich and dark and heartbreaking

a path toward meaning as anything more sober.

When it’s done right, the ridiculous is the sublime. In this

course, we’ll look at serious stuff in a funny way, and funny

stuff in a serious way, all to explore the question of whether

comedy is a valid way to create meaning, raise serious questions,

and make social commentary. Texts for this class will

include works by Kurt Vonnegut, Lorrie Moore, Ambrose

Bierce, and Chris Rock.

3618 FYS 101 40 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05 Furuness, Bryan Mark

Seriously Funny

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Comedy can be serious stuff, as rich and dark and heartbreaking

a path toward meaning as anything more sober.

When it’s done right, the ridiculous is the sublime. In this

course, we’ll look at serious stuff in a funny way, and funny

stuff in a serious way, all to explore the question of whether

comedy is a valid way to create meaning, raise serious questions,

and make social commentary. Texts for this class will

include works by Kurt Vonnegut, Lorrie Moore, Ambrose

Bierce, and Chris Rock.

3619 FYS 101 41 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Furuness, Bryan Mark

Seriously Funny

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Comedy can be serious stuff, as rich and dark and heartbreaking

a path toward meaning as anything more sober.

When it’s done right, the ridiculous is the sublime. In this

course, we’ll look at serious stuff in a funny way, and funny

stuff in a serious way, all to explore the question of whether

comedy is a valid way to create meaning, raise serious questions,

and make social commentary. Texts for this class will

include works by Kurt Vonnegut, Lorrie Moore, Ambrose

Bierce, and Chris Rock.

3620 FYS 101 42 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Furuness, Bryan Mark

Seriously Funny

This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. Semester one is a prerequisite for semester two.

Comedy can be serious stuff, as rich and dark and heartbreaking

a path toward meaning as anything more sober.

When it’s done right, the ridiculous is the sublime. In this

course, we’ll look at serious stuff in a funny way, and funny

stuff in a serious way, all to explore the question of whether

comedy is a valid way to create meaning, raise serious questions,

and make social commentary. Texts for this class will

include works by Kurt Vonnegut, Lorrie Moore, Ambrose

Bierce, and Chris Rock.

3635 FYS 101 43 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05

Keating, James

Looking for Shangri-La

Semester one is not prerequisite to semester two. Students

who enroll in this section in the fall are expected to enroll

in this section in the spring.

Looking for Shangri-La. This year-long seminar will explore

the works of several important writers in their search for

their Shangri-La--the perfect personal expression in the fictions

they create. Shangri-La is, of course, elusive for all of

them, and our work will be to examine where their searches

have taken them and the legacies they have left behind,

found in their novels, plays, prose, and poetry. The writers

for our study will likely include William Shakespeare, Mary

Shelley, Joseph Conrad, and Graham Greene, among others.

3636 FYS 101 44 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05

Reeves, Carol

Farm, Town, Suburb, City: Where We Live

and How We Think

Through reading classic and contemporary American novels

and stories set on farms, towns, suburbs and cities, we will

explore how these places affect our psyche and our political

values. In the process, we will make the familiar—the kind

of place where we grew up—seem strange, by examining it

from a different perspective. We will also make the strange—

the place we did not grow up—familiar by discovering connections

we can make with its inhabitants. Where is the best

place to live? we will ask, and in doing so, we will find out

more about ourselves and others.

3637 FYS 101 45 First-Year Seminar 3, U

MW 1-2:15

Cornell, John

Our Millennia: A History of the World in

8 Questions

Where do we come from? What makes us human? What

happens to us when we die? How are men and women different?

What makes a good society? What is the best form

of government? Is morality relative? What will the future be

like?

This course adopts a philosophic approach to world history.

For each millennium from 5000 bce to the present, we will

focus on a single pivotal event, asking one of our questions.

We then will examine different testimony — from different

ages--upon that core issue. When asking “where do we

come from?”, for example, we will evaluate creation myths,

cosmological calendars, evolution, even the precise dating of

human creation to 4004 bce (by James Ussher, 17th century),

as different ways of conceptualizing human origins. Each

unit culminates in a student project using historical texts to

build contemporary answers.

10 University Core Curriculum


3638 FYS 101 46 First-Year Seminar 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Wright, Mary Jo

Metamorphosis

In this course, we’ll use the frameworks of literature, performing

arts, liberal arts, and technology to enter into conversation

around the central topic of metamorphosis and

its stages and how this process applies to our community,

our world, and us. We will study a variety of novels, such

as The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and Frankenstein

by Mary Shelley, graphic novels, media clips, videos and

other resources as we explore our topic. We may even dissect

a grasshopper or two! This course is designed to help you

develop the skills necessary for critical reading and thinking,

oral communication, and writing. In accordance with the

liberal arts curriculum at Butler University, this seminar will

encourage you to ask the most significant of questions: who

you are, what shapes your identity, and where you are in this

process of metamorphosis.

Global and Historical Studies

This University core curriculum requirement is a sequence of courses

taken in the sophomore year.

Core Courses

Analytic Reasoning

3338 AR 210-MA 01 Statistically Speaking 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Echols, Lacey P

Who needs statistics in the 21st century? Anyone looking

critically at numerical information who does not want to

be misled by incorrect or inappropriate calculations or anyone

dealing with issues in their environment, state/nation,

or career would benefit from studying the methodology of

statistics. These problems include finding ways to improve

our environment and living standards or studies conducted

in an effort to fight diseases. This course is an introduction

to applied statistics in the natural, social and managerial sciences

through the use of current environmental and global

issues. Topics include sampling, data analysis, experimental

design and the use of computer-based statistical software.

3339 AR 210-MA 02 Statistically Speaking 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Echols, Lacey P

Who needs statistics in the 21st century? Anyone looking

critically at numerical information who does not want to

be misled by incorrect or inappropriate calculations or anyone

dealing with issues in their environment, state/nation,

or career would benefit from studying the methodology of

statistics. These problems include finding ways to improve

our environment and living standards or studies conducted

in an effort to fight diseases. This course is an introduction

to applied statistics in the natural, social and managerial sciences

through the use of current environmental and global

issues. Topics include sampling, data analysis, experimental

design and the use of computer-based statistical software.

3340 AR 210-MA 03 Statistically Speaking 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Echols, Lacey P

Who needs statistics in the 21st century? Anyone looking

critically at numerical information who does not want to

be misled by incorrect or inappropriate calculations or anyone

dealing with issues in their environment, state/nation,

or career would benefit from studying the methodology of

statistics. These problems include finding ways to improve

our environment and living standards or studies conducted

in an effort to fight diseases. This course is an introduction

to applied statistics in the natural, social and managerial sciences

through the use of current environmental and global

issues. Topics include sampling, data analysis, experimental

design and the use of computer-based statistical software.

3341 AR 211-MA 01 Codes & Secret Messages 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Holmes, Karen

How can sensitive information such as credit card numbers

or military strategy be exchanged between two people

without being intercepted by a third party? Are there ways

to detect and correct errors resulting from a mistyped identification

number or a scratched CD? Can information be

exchanged securely among multiple individuals without

anyone revealing his or her own decryption scheme? In this

course, students will investigate various strategies for storing

and transmitting information accurately, efficiently, and

securely. Students will design several types of ciphers for

sending secret messages, construct various error detecting

and error-correcting codes, and implement secure public-key

cryptosystems for exchanging messages with classmates. As

these issues are explored, students will discover the need for

mathematical notions such as modular arithmetic, permutations

and combinations, probability and statistics, vectors

and matrices, and formal logic. Students will also become

aware of the central role played by cryptology and coding

throughout history and modern society.

3342 AR 211-MA 02 Codes & Secret Messages 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Holmes, Karen

How can sensitive information such as credit card numbers

or military strategy be exchanged between two people

without being intercepted by a third party? Are there ways

to detect and correct errors resulting from a mistyped identification

number or a scratched CD? Can information be

exchanged securely among multiple individuals without

anyone revealing his or her own decryption scheme? In this

course, students will investigate various strategies for storing

and transmitting information accurately, efficiently, and

securely. Students will design several types of ciphers for

sending secret messages, construct various error detecting

and error-correcting codes, and implement secure public-key

cryptosystems for exchanging messages with classmates. As

these issues are explored, students will discover the need for

mathematical notions such as modular arithmetic, permutations

and combinations, probability and statistics, vectors

and matrices, and formal logic. Students will also become

aware of the central role played by cryptology and coding

throughout history and modern society.

3347 AR 212-MA 01 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Holmes, Karen

Why do we play games? Whatever the reason, games are a

big piece of life. The world has played games for a long, long

time - every time period, every culture. We will study games

and gambling in our culture as well as those in other cultures.

To better understand games, the students will study probability

theory and its application to gaming. Applications

11 University Core Curriculum


include casino games, lotteries, racing, wagering systems, as

well as other games. Some analytical tools that will arise during

the course are counting methods, expected value, trees,

gambler’s ruin, and distributions.

3349 AR 212-MA 02 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Holmes, Karen

Why do we play games? Whatever the reason, games are a

big piece of life. The world has played games for a long, long

time - every time period, every culture. We will study games

and gambling in our culture as well as those in other cultures.

To better understand games, the students will study probability

theory and its application to gaming. Applications

include casino games, lotteries, racing, wagering systems, as

well as other games. Some analytical tools that will arise during

the course are counting methods, expected value, trees,

gambler’s ruin, and distributions.

3348 AR 212-MA 03 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

MWF 1-1:50

Chen, Zhihong

Why do we play games? Whatever the reason, games are a

big piece of life. The world has played games for a long, long

time - every time period, every culture. We will study games

and gambling in our culture as well as those in other cultures.

To better understand games, the students will study probability

theory and its application to gaming. Applications

include casino games, lotteries, racing, wagering systems, as

well as other games. Some analytical tools that will arise during

the course are counting methods, expected value, trees,

gambler’s ruin, and distributions.

3579 AR 212-MA 04 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

Why do we play games? Whatever the reason, games are a

big piece of life. The world has played games for a long, long

time - every time period, every culture. We will study games

and gambling in our culture as well as those in other cultures.

To better understand games, the students will study probability

theory and its application to gaming. Applications

include casino games, lotteries, racing, wagering systems,

as well as other games. Some analytical tools that will arise

during the course are counting methods, expected value,

trees, gambler’s ruin, and distributions.

3025 AR 220-CS 01 Robot Programming 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Linos, Panos K

This introductory programming course features personal robots

that can move, draw, and take digital pictures. Robot

behaviors are programmed and controlled remotely using a

high-level language such as Python from a desktop or laptop

computer. Topics include conditional execution, repetition,

defining functions, and using arrays.

3026 AR 220-CS 02 Robot Programming 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05

Staff

This introductory programming course features personal robots

that can move, draw, and take digital pictures. Robot

behaviors are programmed and controlled remotely using a

high-level language such as Python from a desktop or laptop

computer. Topics include conditional execution, repetition,

defining functions, and using arrays.

3270 AR 231-PL 01 Principles of Reasoning 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Popa, Tiberiu M

A survey of principles of reasoning used in a variety of disciplines,

including philosophy, mathematics, statistics, the

natural and social sciences, and law. Attention also will be

paid to how to recognize and avoid fallacies”

The Natural World

3162 NW 200-BI 01 Biology and Society 5, U

T 2:25-3:15

Staff

TR 11-12:15

3163 NW 200-BI 01A Laboratory 0, U

T 3:25-5:15

Staff

This course will examine current societal issues with biological

connections, the role scientistsand others play toward

helping us understanding these issues, and the underlying

biological concepts for each topic. Course includes lecture

and laboratory components. A course for non-science majors

only.

3166 NW 202-BI 01 The World of Plants 5, U

MWF 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

R 9-9:50

3167 NW 202-BI 01A Laboratory 0, U

R 10-11:50

Meadows, Marva

Introduction to Plant biology. How the anatomy and physiology

of diverse plants help them to survive, reproduce and

benefit humans and ecosystems. Lecture and laboratory. A

course for non-science majors.

3168 NW 202-BI 02 The World of Plants 5, U

MWF 10-10:50 Meadows, Marva

R 2:25-3:15

3170 NW 202-BI 02A Laboratory 0, U

R 3:25-5:15 Meadows, Marva

Introduction to Plant biology. How the anatomy and physiology

of diverse plants help them to survive, reproduce and

benefit humans and ecosystems. Lecture and laboratory. A

course for non-science majors.

3164 NW 203-BI 01 Genetics & Evolution 5, U

TR 11-12:15 Dolan, Thomas E

W 2-2:50

3165 NW 203-BI 01A Laboratory 0, U

W 3-4:50

Dolan, Thomas E

A study of the significant concepts in molecular, organismal

and population genetics and the theory of evolution. All topics

will be taught within their historical and contemporary

contexts. Lecture and laboratory. A course for non-science

majors.

3032 NW 205-BI 01 Urban Ecology 5, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Carter, Timothy L

R 2:25-3:15

3033 NW 205-BI 01A Laboratory 0, U

R 3:25-5:15 Carter, Timothy L

The majority of the world’s population now lives in urban

areas, but only recently have environmental scientists begun

to explore the ecology in and of cities. This course uses the

city of Indianapolis as a case study to understand the effect

that cities have on the environment, the processes that take

place in the urban ecosystem, and the opportunities cities

12 University Core Curriculum


hold for ecological restoration. Lecure and laboratory. A

course for non-science majors.

3034 NW 205-BI 02 Urban Ecology 5, U

MWF 11-11:50 Ryan, Travis James

T 2:25-3:15

3035 NW 205-BI 02A Laboratory 0,U

T 3:25-5:15 Ryan, Travis James

The majority of the world’s population now lives in urban

areas, but only recently have environmental scientists begun

to explore the ecology in and of cities. This course uses the

city of Indianapolis as a case study to understand the effect

that cities have on the environment, the processes that take

place in the urban ecosystem, and the opportunities cities

hold for ecological restoration. Lecure and laboratory. A

course for non-science majors.

3036 NW 206-BI 01 Life, Death and Immortality 5,U

MWF 1-1:50 Ockerman, Angela Vaye

W 2-2:50

3037 NW 206-BI 01A Laboratory 0,U

W 3-4:50 Ockerman, Angela Vaye

A patient on a 1951 “colored” ward unknowingly contributed

to science, changing medicine forever. Exploring the

underlying biology/genetics through lecture and laboratories,

we’ll also review the ethical, socio-economic, racial and

gender issues related to these HeLa cells, including a community

outreach project which may be used to satisfy the

ICR.

3595 NW 206-BI 02 Life, Death and Immortality 5,U

MWF 1-1:50 Kowalski, Jennifer

W 2-2:50

3527 NW 206-BI 02A Laboratory 0,U

W 3-4:50

Kowalski, Jennifer

A patient on a 1951 “colored” ward unknowingly contributed

to science, changing medicine forever. Exploring the underlying

biology/genetics through lecture and laboratories,

we’ll also review the ethical, socio-economic, racial and gender

issues related to these HeLa cells, including a community

outreach project which may be used to satisfy the ICR.

3027 NW 210-CH 01 Chemistry and Society 5,U

MTWF 11-11:50 LeGreve, Tracy

3028 NW 210-CH 01A Laboratory 0,U

M 2:25-4:15

LeGreve, Tracy

Chemistry and Society is a study of chemistry and its applications

to and impact on society. Four hours of lecture/

discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit not

applicable toward a major in chemistry.

3369 NW 261-BI-I 01 Food: Pasture, Table, Bod &Mind 5,U

MWF 1-1:50 Lineweaver, Tara M

M 2-2:50

3370 NW 261-BI-I 01A Laboratory 0,U

M 3-5

Lineweaver, Tara M

This course about food will encourage society to consider

how food connects to both society and to science and how

society and science connect to one another. By using a framework

of pasture, table, body and mind, we will explore the

ecological relationship between a healthy environment and

growing healthy food, the factors that influence our food

choices, the constituents of food and how they contribute to

our physical well being, and the ways in which society and

culture influence our eating habits. A course for non-science

majors.

Perspectives in the Creative Arts

1468 PCA 200-ART 01 Introduction to Visual Art 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Staff

This course combines the study of visual art (art history, art

criticism and aesthetics) with studio art experience (the elements

of art and the principles of design put into practice). A

wide variety of media are considered, including those sometimes

termed ‘popular culture’ film, television, advertising art

and web design-in addition to more traditional forms such as

painting and sculpture. Students develop a critical awareness

of art and develop a vocabulary with which to describe their

own and others’ work. The coursework is primarily composed

of class discussion, written assignments and creative

projects.

1469 PCA 200-ART 02 Introduction to Visual Art 3, U

M 2:25-5:05

Staff

This course combines the study of visual art (art history, art

criticism and aesthetics) with studio art experience (the elements

of art and the principles of design put into practice). A

wide variety of media are considered, including those sometimes

termed ‘popular culture’ film, television, advertising art

and web design-in addition to more traditional forms such as

painting and sculpture. Students develop a critical awareness

of art and develop a vocabulary with which to describe their

own and others’ work. The coursework is primarily composed

of class discussion, written assignments and creative

projects.

1473 PCA 221-DA 01 Latin Dances, African Roots 3, U

W 5:30-8

McGuire, Susan

Latin Dances, African Roots. An introduction to and overview

of the national dances of Cuba, Brazil, Argentina and

Peru. We will study the influence of indigenous cultures,

colonization, and the Atlantic slave trade on the development

of dances such as Samba, Rumba, Tango, Capoeira,

and popular dance and culture, as well as examining current

practice in light of the political and social changes that have

occurred in these countries since 1900. We will approach the

course subject using films, texts, and, of course, by dancing.

We will gain first hand knowledge of, and appreciation for,

dance in these cultures and how it relates to an appreciation

of dance in our culture. All students are welcome.

3429 PCA 232-EN 01 Seeing the World & the Self 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Goldsmith, Jason

When you look out the window do you see a tree or the

rhythmic sway of dark line and bright color? Do you see a

field of grass or waves of innumerable greens? This course

will encourage you to see the world through the eyes of an

artist by focusing on the natural world. To achieve this we

will examine a variety of formats including poetry, the personal

essay, painting, and photography in relation to key

aesthetic concepts such as the sublime, the beautiful, and

the picturesque. We will juxtapose contemporary writers

and artists with those from earlier periods to demonstrate

how the way we see the world is culturally determined. We

will complement our readings with trips to nearby museums

13 University Core Curriculum


(IMA), galleries, and the studios of local artists. In addition,

we will take advantage of such local natural resources as the

grounds of the IMA, the canal walk, and Holcomb Gardens,

where you will find the raw material for your own reflection

and creative expression.

3430 PCA 232-EN 02 Seeing the World & the Self 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Goldsmith, Jason

When you look out the window do you see a tree or the

rhythmic sway of dark line and bright color? Do you see a

field of grass or waves of innumerable greens? This course

will encourage you to see the world through the eyes of an

artist by focusing on the natural world. To achieve this we

will examine a variety of formats including poetry, the personal

essay, painting, and photography in relation to key

aesthetic concepts such as the sublime, the beautiful, and

the picturesque. We will juxtapose contemporary writers

and artists with those from earlier periods to demonstrate

how the way we see the world is culturally determined. We

will complement our readings with trips to nearby museums

(IMA), galleries, and the studios of local artists. In addition,

we will take advantage of such local natural resources as the

grounds of the IMA, the canal walk, and Holcomb Gardens,

where you will find the raw material for your own reflection

and creative expression.

1483 PCA 241-MU 01 Music in Action 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Brooks, Lisa E

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western civilization

as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend

live performances; participate in written exercises and class

activities relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1471 PCA 241-MU 02 Music in Action 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Mulholland, James Q

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1472 PCA 241-MU 03 Music in Action 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Mulholland, James Q

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western civilization

as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend

live performances; participate in written exercises and class

activities relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1474 PCA 241-MU 04 Music in Action 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Mulholland, James Q

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1475 PCA 241-MU 05 Music in Action 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 DeRusha, Stanley E

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1476 PCA 241-MU 06 Music in Action 3, U

W 5:30-8

Grubb, William

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human

condition and as such, a key element in developing an

understanding of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1477 PCA 241-MU 07 Music in Action 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Murray, David P

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

14 University Core Curriculum


1478 PCA 241-MU 08 Music in Action 3, U

MW 12:30-2:30 Leck, Henry H

F 12:30-1:50

This section of Music in Action gives the student an opportunity

to sing in University Choir as part of their core

requirement. In order to enroll for this course you must

have had a successful experience in a high school choir. You

will learn about various composers, stylistic differences and

historical perspectives. Each student will sing in University

Choir 12:30-1:50pm MWF. Than an additional time MW

1:50-2:30pm, will be spent discussing, writing and reflecting

upon this experience.

1479 PCA 241-MU 09 Music in Action 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Sanborn, Timothy

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1480 PCA 241-MU 10 Music in Action 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Sanborn, Timothy

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western

civilization as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend live

performances; participate in written exercises and class activities

relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

1484 PCA 241-MU 11 Music in Action 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Sanborn, Timothy

The arts are a fundamental expression of the human condition

and as such, a key element in developing an understanding

of cultures. This course provides both an historical

overview of music and its development within Western civilization

as well as an exploration of what gives music its

meaning and emotional charge. Students will examine and

discuss music from a variety of historical periods; attend

live performances; participate in written exercises and class

activities relating music to the socio-cultural environment in

which it was created; investigate the lives and ideas of leading

composers and artists; and engage in creative projects.

3367 PCA 262-CLA 01 Greek Art & Myth 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40

Staff

Art illuminates myth; myth makes sense of art. Students

will acquire a sense of the major periods of western art, will

consider artistic questions large (is art subjective? is there a

proper subject matter for art?) and small (what is contrapposto?),

will study in some depth about sixty artistic images,

mostly Greek, and will become acquainted with a set of

Greek myths. The course will include a museum visit, a skit,

and a creative art project.

Physical Well Being

1494 PWB 101 01 Ballroom Dance Sport 1, U

F 9-10:50

Ablog, Colleen S

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction

to the International and American Style of Ballroom, Latin,

and Social dancing. The primary focus is to teach and reinforce

the life-long health and wellness benefits of partnership

dancing including physical activity and fitness, stress reduction,

intra and interpersonal relationships, and self-efficacy.

No dance experience required.

1502 PWB 101 02 Ballroom Dance Sport 1, U

F 11-12:50 Ablog Jr, Angelo G

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction

to the International and American Style of Ballroom, Latin,

and Social dancing. The primary focus is to teach and reinforce

the life-long health and wellness benefits of partnership

dancing including physical activity and fitness, stress reduction,

intra and interpersonal relationships, and self-efficacy.

No dance experience required.

3602 PWB 102 01 Israeli Dancing 1, U

MW 2-2:50

Staff

This course reflects cultural diversity and dance infusion of

Israel. Dance as a lifetime movement activity is the primary

emphasis with additional focus on a variety of dance performance,

dance as a socially constructed pastime, lyrical interpretation,

dance history, biblical and liturgical connections,

and Hebrew and Arabic languages. No previous dance experience

necessary.

1510 PWB 103-DA 01 Beginning Ballet 2 (non-majors) 1, U

MF 8-8:50

Ladner, Jennifer A

Basic ballet technique in the recognized classic form. (For

students who have had no previous training. Not applicable

to the dance major; open to all other students). Two meetings

per week.

1511 PWB 104-DA 01 Begining Jazz 1, U

TR 8-8:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

Basic jazz styles and forms for non-majors. No prerequisite.

Two meetings per week.

1512 PWB 105-DA 01 Intermediate/Advanced Jazz 1, U

TR 9:35-10:25 Ladner, Jennifer A

Intermediate/Advanced jazz styles and forms for non-majors.

Two meetings per week.

1513 PWB 106-DA 01 Modern Dance (non-majors) 1, U

MF 9-9:50

Ladner, Jennifer A

Dance technique as a combination of movement improvisation

and modern technique emphasizing qualities of movement

in space and time. (Not applicable to dance majors;

open to all other students). Two meetings per week.

1490 PWB 121-PE 01 Beginning Tennis 1, U

MW 9-9:50 Williams, Pamela R

This course is designed for the novice or advanced beginner

tennis player to develop competent or proficient tennis

skills, and to develop confidence in the game of tennis that

can be enjoyed across a lifespan. The students will also learn

to apply rules, regulations, and courtesies of tennis governed

by the United States Tennis Association (USTA) and the

15 University Core Curriculum


International Tennis Federation (ITF). No tennis experience

necessary.

1497 PWB 121-PE 02 Beginning Tennis 1, U

MW 8-8:50 Williams, Pamela R

This course is designed for the novice or advanced beginner

tennis player to develop competent or proficient tennis

skills, and to develop confidence in the game of tennis that

can be enjoyed across a lifespan. The students will also learn

to apply rules, regulations, and courtesies of tennis governed

by the United States Tennis Association (USTA) and the International

Tennis Federation (ITF). No tennis experience

necessary.

1515 PWB 121-PE 03 Beginning Tennis 1, U

MW 11-11:50 Williams, Pamela R

This course is designed for the novice or advanced beginner

tennis player to develop competent or proficient tennis

skills, and to develop confidence in the game of tennis that

can be enjoyed across a lifespan. The students will also learn

to apply rules, regulations, and courtesies of tennis governed

by the United States Tennis Association (USTA) and the International

Tennis Federation (ITF). No tennis experience

necessary.

1498 PWB 122-PE 01 Advanced Tennis 1, U

MW 10-10:50 Williams, Pamela R

This course is designed to advance player development for

the intermediate and advanced tennis player both physically

and mentally. Primary focus will be on advanced tennis

strategies and tactics for both singles and doubles. Skill

proficiency, a focus on fitness, and tactical and strategic decision

making during match play conditions are intended to

enhance sport enjoyment, personal challenge, and a more

sophisticated appreciation of tennis that will promote good

health and increased quality of life.

1492 PWB 124-PE 01 Basketball 1, U

MW 11-11:50 Hayes, Ashley B

1514 PWB 124-PE 02 Basketball 1, U

MW 10-10:50 Archey, Darnell Lee

1493 PWB 125-PE 01 T’ai Chi 1, U

MW 12-12:50 Heinz, Michael

T’ai Chi is a traditional Chinese system of stress relief and

exercise rooted in the martial arts. Recognizing and relieving

stress in conjunction with increasing strength, balance, and

coordination contribute to body and mind development.

This balanced approach to wellness promotes good health,

encourages lifespan physical activity, and an overall quality

of life.

1501 PWB 125-PE 02 T’ai Chi 1, U

MW 11-11:50 Heinz, Michael

T’ai Chi is a traditional Chinese system of stress relief and

exercise rooted in the martial arts. Recognizing and relieving

stress in conjunction with increasing strength, balance, and

coordination contribute to body and mind development.

This balanced approach to wellness promotes good health,

encourages lifespan physical activity, and an overall quality

of life.

1503 PWB 126-PE 01 Buda Khi 1, U

TR 2:30-3:20

Easley, Lester

Buda Khi is a unique combination of aerobic, muscular

strength, and flexibility training that combines martial arts

with overall physical conditioning. The purpose of this

16 University Core Curriculum

course is for students to develop physical, mental, and emotional

productivity that will enhance confidence and motivation

that contributes towards health, wellness, and individual

goal achievement.

1509 PWB 126-PE 02 Buda Khi 1, U

TR 1-1:50

Easley, Lester

Buda Khi is a unique combination of aerobic, muscular

strength, and flexibility training that combines martial arts

with overall physical conditioning. The purpose of this

course is for students to develop physical, mental, and emotional

productivity that will enhance confidence and motivation

that contributes towards health, wellness, and individual

goal achievement.

1516 PWB 126-PE 03 Buda Khi 1, U

TR 12-12:50

Easley, Lester

Buda Khi is a unique combination of aerobic, muscular

strength, and flexibility training that combines martial arts

with overall physical conditioning. The purpose of this

course is for students to develop physical, mental, and emotional

productivity that will enhance confidence and motivation

that contributes towards health, wellness, and individual

goal achievement.

1507 PWB 127-PE 01 Weighing in on Optimal Health 1, U

MW 10-10:50

Staff

Many college students battle body weight and body image

issues. Optimal health requires more than exercise and

proper nutrition. This course takes a holistic, quality of life

approach to promote a physically active lifestyle as a healthy

and sustaining approach to weight management across a

lifespan.

1491 PWB 129-PE 01 Strength and Conditioning 1, U

MW 10-10:50

Staff

1504 PWB 129-PE 02 Strength and Conditioning 1, U

MW 9-9:50

Staff

1505 PWB 129-PE 03 Strength and Conditioning 1, U

TR 9:35-10:25

Staff

1517 PWB 135-PE 01 Spinning 1, U

MW 3-3:50

Peak, Amy S

Spinning is an intense form of indoor cycling. This course

will utilize twice weekly spinning sessions to improve and

maintain physical fitness. You will sweat and have fun in this

class! We will also explore other health related topics such

as nutrition, sleep, stress management, healthy relationships,

sex, and alcohol.

1495 PWB 140 01 Marching Band 1, U

MW 5:15-6:45 McCullough, David H

F 4:15-6:45

Marching Band. Butler University’s Marching Band understands

and appreciates its dual role in providing quality

spirited performances on behalf of the university and the

development of its member’s musicianship, movement skills

and personal wellness. The objective of this course is to

develop and instill in its members a life-long love of music

making and the development of good habits of personal

wellness and physical activity.

1496 PWB 141 01 Cheerleading 1, U

TR

Troyer, Jamie L

This course is designed to advance the overall well-being for

members of the Butler cheerleading squad. Cheerleading is

a sport-related activity that requires proficient gymnastics,


tumbling, and rhythmic skills for individuals and groups.

Emphases will be on skillful performance, sufficient levels

of health-related physical fitness, application of fitness principles,

proper nutrition, safety, interpersonal relationships,

and community awareness that contribute to the centrality

of health, wellness and the pursuit of a good life.

1506 PWB 160 01 Women’s Self Defense 1, U

TR 11-11:50 Ryan, Andrew N

3525 PWB 161 01 Sports Fishing 1, U

TR 11-11:50

Farley, Steven T

This course is designed to increase student awareness of

the potential for lifelong health and wellness through Sport

Fishing. Students will develop related skills and knowledge

that make a unique contribution to an overall quality of

life through recreation. Instruction will be appropriate for

the beginning and experienced angler. Areas of study will

include fish identification and habitat, casting techniques,

equipment selection, and safety while accessing the fishable

waters in the Butler and Indianapolis communities.

1499 PWB 162S 01 Wagging, Walking, and Wellness 1, U

M 1-2:50

Farley, Lisa A

This course is designed to foster life-long habits of good

health and multidimensional wellness by integrating physical

activity, civic awareness, and community service. Emphasis

will be on personal and social responsibility for optimal

quality of life. Students will partner with the Humane Society

of Indianapolis to provide physical activity and play for

the animals, learning through service to the community,

improved fitness and awareness that health and wellness are

central to living a good life.

1500 PWB 162S 02 Wagging, Walking, and Wellness 1, U

W 1-2:50

Farley, Lisa A

This course is designed to foster life-long habits of good

health and multidimensional wellness by integrating physical

activity, civic awareness, and community service. Emphasis

will be on personal and social responsibility for optimal

quality of life. Students will partner with the Humane Society

of Indianapolis to provide physical activity and play for

the animals, learning through service to the community,

improved fitness and awareness that health and wellness are

central to living a good life.

1508 PWB 166 01 Intercollegiate Athletics 1, U

TBA

Goetz, Beth

This course is designed to advance sport-specific knowledge,

optimal skill levels, health and motor performance fitness,

and personal wellness towards sustaining a health-enhancing

and physically active lifestyle.

The Social World

3318 SW 200-SO 01 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 11-11:30

Cline, Krista

Health & Illness-Soc Perspect

This course exams the social contexts of health, illness, and

medical care. It introduces the beginning student to underlying

regularities in human social behavior and to the analysis

of society through the specific topic of health and illness.

Lectures and readings analyze society in terms of theory, culture,

socialization, and such societal institutions as sex and

gender, family, and the media.

3320 SW 200-SO 02 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 1-1:50

Cline, Krista

Gender: A Sociological Perspec

This course examines the social contexts of gender, gender

roles, and gendered behavior in society. It introduces the beginning

student to underlying regularities in human social

behavior and to the analysis of society through the specific

topic of gender. Lectures and readings analyze society in

terms of theory, culture, socialization, and major social institutions

as family and media.

3322 SW 200-SO 03 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Scott, Marvin B

Race & Ethnicity-Soc Perspect

This course is designed for students interested in understanding

how racism affects our social institutions and interactions.

We will take a close look at prejudices and myths about

race and our own beliefs, behaviors, and biases. During the

semester, case studies and readings will be used to help students

understand ethnic relations and the unique creation of

race within societies. Issues of inequality as related to institutions

will be discussed along with ethnic values and socialization.

3323 SW 200-SO 04 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Scott, Marvin B

Race & Ethnicity-Soc Perspect

This course is designed for students interested in understanding

how racism affects our social institutions and interactions.

We will take a close look at prejudices and myths

about race and our own beliefs, behaviors, and biases. During

the semester, case studies and readings will be used to help

students understand ethnic relations and the unique creation

of race within societies. Issues of inequality as related

to institutions will be discussed along with ethnic values and

socialization.

3329 SW 200-SO 05 Understanding Society 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Novak, Katherine B

Inequalities-Soc Perspective

Life is not fair. Some people are born into circumstances

which present them with advantages or a head start in life.

Others are born into circumstances where the deck seems to

be stacked against them. These inequalities frequently coincide

with factors such as race, class, and gender, and affect

relationships between individuals, groups, communities, and

even nations. Sociology has a long-standing interest in understanding

how such processes occur and are maintained.

In this course, we examine key sociological theories and concepts

with an eye toward advantages and disadvantages in

experiences in society.

3331 SW 200-SO 06 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Vincent, Sarah Marie

Family-A Sociological Perspect

In this course, we will move beyond our personal notions of

family and use a sociological perspective to explore family

life. Throughout the course we will apply general sociological

concepts, including culture, socialization, and stratification,

to the study of families. We will explore the social forces

that impact the structure of the family and analyze family

dynamics within society at both a macro and micro level.

17 University Core Curriculum


Additionally, we will identify family systems and subsystems,

the impact of pop-culture on the family, and governmental

policies affecting the home.

3408 SW 215-AN 01 Being Human:Anthro Approaches 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

Cultural anthropology is a discipline focused on how humans

create meaning, forge alliances, and assert differences. This

course allows students to explore conceptual, theoretical,

methodological, and ethical issues central to the anthropological

study of what it means to be human and make meaning in

the world.

3406 SW 215-AN 02 Being Human:Anthro Approaches 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Shahrokhi, Sholeh

Cultural anthropology is a discipline focused on how humans

create meaning, forge alliances, and assert differences. This

course allows students to explore conceptual, theoretical,

methodological, and ethical issues central to the anthropological

study of what it means to be human and make meaning in

the world.

3047 SW 220-COB 01 The Economy and Society 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Kirk, Bob

This course examines important concepts of microeconomics

and macroeconomics and analyzes issues such as energy

prices, prescription drug costs, pollution and globalization

of markets using these concepts. It explores how economic

life is intertwined with a society’s culture, politics, values and

history. Further, it considers the limitations of the economic

methodology to place economics in a context with the other

social sciences.

3371 SW 225-PS 01 Humans and the Natural Environ 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 O’Malley, Alison

Understanding how people think about and interact with

nature is crucial for promoting both human well-being and

environmental sustainability. We will apply psychological

research on human cognitive, emotional, and behavioral

responses to nature in hopes of fostering interaction with

nature and encouraging conservation-oriented behavior at

both individual and societal levels.

3372 SW 225-PS 02 Humans and the Natural Environ 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 O’Malley, Alison

Understanding how people think about and interact with

nature is crucial for promoting both human well-being and

environmental sustainability. We will apply psychological

research on human cognitive, emotional, and behavioral

responses to nature in hopes of fostering interaction with

nature and encouraging conservation-oriented behavior at

both individual and societal levels.

3048 SW 232-GWS 01 Intersections of Identity 3, U

MW 11-12:15 Clarkson, Nicholas

This course will explore the social construction of difference

and inequality with particular focus on race, gender, sexuality

and class (primarily) in the United States. From a critical-cultural

perspective, this course will examine systems of

inequality, domination, privilege and oppression. This course

will equip students with the ability to interrogate dominant

ideology and develop an understanding of how systems of inequality

impact everyone’s daily lives. Students will also explore

avenues for positive social change and justice.

3050 SW 250-PS 01 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

An introduction to the general principles and facts of behavior,

cognition and emotion as established by the methods of

social science.

3051 SW 250-PS 02 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

An introduction to the general principles and facts of behavior,

cognition and emotion as established by the methods of

social science.

3052 SW 250-PS 03 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Staff

An introduction to the general principles and facts of behavior,

cognition and emotion as established by the methods of

social science.

3053 SW 250-PS 04 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

An introduction to the general principles and facts of behavior,

cognition and emotion as established by the methods of

social science.

3054 SW 250-PS 05 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Bohannon III, Neil

An introduction to the general principles and facts of behavior,

cognition and emotion as established by the methods of

social science.

3495 SW 250-PS 06 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Bohannon III, Neil

An introduction to the general principles and facts of behavior,

cognition and emotion as established by the methods of

social science.

3354 SW 260-RL 01 Sects in the City 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Bauman, Chad

A basic introduction to the religions and religious communities

of Indianapolis, and an exploration of prominent issues

and themes related to our city’s (and our country’s) increasing

religious diversity.

3056 SW 261S-RX 01 Health Disparities 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Ryder, Priscilla T

This course will allow undergraduate students to examine

current population-level health issues and the unequal distribution

of health through an introduction to the broad and

exciting field of public health and health equity. The course

will explore the varying historical, environmental, social, cultural,

and political determinants of the health of the people of

the United States, emphasizing health of vulnerable populations.

It will provide students with a unique opportunity to

think critically about ways of identifying and addressing current

health issues and the unequal distribution of health status

throughout the population. In this interactive course, students

are encouraged to explore public health issues in their area of

study and examine solutions for the same.

3461 SW 266-COM 01 Media Literacy 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Hoerl, Kristen

From a media literacy perspective, students will develop an

understanding of media production, products and audiences;

the constraints media systems operate within, and cultural

implications of media and media systems. Prerequisite: Sophomore

or higher standing. Non-majors must have permission

of Media Arts Department Chair.

18 University Core Curriculum


3466 SW 266-COM 02 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Swenson, Kristin

From a media literacy perspective, students will develop an

understanding of media production, products and audiences;

the constraints media systems operate within, and cultural

implications of media and media systems. Prerequisite: Sophomore

or higher standing. Non-majors must have permission

of Media Arts Department Chair.

3467 SW 266-COM 03 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Kelly, Casey Ryan

From a media literacy perspective, students will develop an

understanding of media production, products and audiences;

the constraints media systems operate within, and cultural

implications of media and media systems. Prerequisite: Sophomore

or higher standing. Non-majors must have permission

of Media Arts Department Chair.

3468 SW 266-COM 04 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40

Savage, Ann M

From a media literacy perspective, students will develop an

understanding of media production, products and audiences;

the constraints media systems operate within, and cultural

implications of media and media systems. Prerequisite: Sophomore

or higher standing. Non-majors must have permission

of Media Arts Department Chair.

3549 SW 266-COM 05 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Swenson, Kristin

From a media literacy perspective, students will develop an

understanding of media production, products and audiences;

the constraints media systems operate within,

and cultural implications of media and media systems.

Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing. Non-majors

must have permission of Media Arts Department Chair.

3049 SW 270-IS 02 Understanding Global Issues 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Oprisko, Robert

The course addresses the intensification of Globalization

during the first decade of the 21st century. It introduces

students to contemporary issues related to globalization.

Texts & Ideas

3364 TI 200-CLA 01 Roman Perspectives 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Bungard, Christopher

This course will examine civic engagement in the Roman

world, both as a pagan and Christian capital for the West.

We will undertake this investigation by looking at a variety

of original sources translated into English. As we examine the

texts of these authors, we will also have the opportunity to

think about how the ideas of the ancient Romans have influenced

cultures from Britain, France, and Spain in the West to

the shores of North Africa to the civilizations of the Eastern

Mediterranean.

3366 TI 201-CLA 01 Ancient Greek Perspectives 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

An examination of areas of ancient Greek culture. Sources

include texts of poetry, history, drama, law, medicine, and

philosophy, as well as works of art. Themes will vary depending

on the professor. Possible themes: deep thinking and free

thinking, participating in democracy, gender roles, warfare

and empire.

3059 TI 210-EN 01 Inquiries in Am Lit & His I 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

This course will be organized around a theme in early American

literature, and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding

of major works, authors and literary movements of

the period. Texts for the course will come primarily from the

period up to the American Civil War, and both the texts and

the authors studied will be placed within their larger literary

and cultural contexts. Particular themes for the course will be

published each semester in the schedule of classes.

This course offers an introduction to the field of American

literature prior to 1860. We often overlook the diversity

and complexity of early literary and cultural life in the “new

world,” forgetting that to speak of American literature at this

time is to imply a field that is not only stylistically diverse

but also radically multiethnic, multilingual, and transatlantic.

Focusing on writing in English, this course will respect

the variety of these perspectives while bringing them into a

provisional conversation with one another. We will spend considerable

time addressing the material practices of reading and

writing literature, the role of written texts in forming communities,

and the way that these texts shaped the development of

a specifically “American” identity.

3060 TI 210-EN 02 Inquiries in Am Lit & His I 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

This course will be organized around a theme in early American

literature, and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding

of major works, authors and literary movements of

the period. Texts for the course will come primarily from the

period up to the American Civil War, and both the texts and

the authors studied will be placed within their larger literary

and cultural contexts. Particular themes for the course will be

published each semester in the schedule of classes.

This course offers an introduction to the field of American

literature prior to 1860. We often overlook the diversity

and complexity of early literary and cultural life in the

“new world,” forgetting that to speak of American literature

at this time is to imply a field that is not only stylistically

diverse but also radically multiethnic, multilingual, and

transatlantic. Focusing on writing in English, this course will

respect the variety of these perspectives while bringing them

into a provisional conversation with one another. We will

spend considerable time addressing the material practices of

reading and writing literature, the role of written texts in

forming communities, and the way that these texts shaped the

development of a specifically “American” identity.

3531 TI 211-EN 01 Inquiries in Am Lit & His II 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Sutherlin, Susan J

The course will be organized around American literature after

the Civil War with emphasis on major literary works and

authors reflecting selected cultural and social movements from

1860 to the present.

3543 TI 212-EN 01 Inquiries in Brit Lit & His I 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Watts, William H

This course will be organized around early British literature,

and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding of major

works, authors and literary movements of the period. Texts

for the course will come primarily from the period up to 1800,

and both the texts and the authors studied will be placed

19 University Core Curriculum


within their larger literary and cultural contexts. Particular

themes for the course will be published each semester in the

schedule of classes.

Woman, Man and God in Early British Literature. We will focus

in this course on texts that represent, either directly or indirectly,

relationships between men and women and the relationship

of humanity to God. Central texts for the course will

include ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’, ‘The Book of

Margery Kempe’, Sidney’s ‘Astrophil and Stella’ and Milton’s

‘Paradise Lost’. As we trace out the theme of the course we will

also study the diversity of literary forms and traditions in British

Literature from the Middle Ages to the early 18th century.

3544 TI 212-EN 02 Inquiries in Brit Lit & His I 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Watts, William H

Woman, Man and God in Early British Literature. We will focus

in this course on texts that represent, either directly or indirectly,

relationships between men and women and the relationship

of humanity to God. Central texts for the course will

include ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’, ‘The Book of

Margery Kempe’, Sidney’s ‘Astrophil and Stella’ and Milton’s

‘Paradise Lost’. As we trace out the theme of the course we will

also study the diversity of literary forms and traditions in British

Literature from the Middle Ages to the early 18th century.

3065 TI 214-EN 01 Shakespeare 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Gregory, Marshall

Reading Shakespeare: An Education in

Language, Ideas and Emotions

Reading Shakespeare: An Education In Language, Ideas, and

Emotions - This course is designed to help students educate

and strengthen their capacities for imaginative construction,

analytical inquiry, introspective interrogation, linguistic

subtlety, moral and ethical deliberation, aesthetic responsiveness,

and social interaction through the reading of a selection

of Shakespeare’s sonnets and plays. The course will include

some cross comparison between the plays’ verbal texts and

film productions, but the films will be treated as secondary to

the literature. The intellectual content of the class will focus

on Shakespeare’s representation of the fundamental dynamics

among three variables in human life crucial to the quality

of everyone’s everyday life: social order, political authority,

and personal responsibility. Class work will entail some

lectures, much discussion, student presentations, short papers

(with critiques and revisions), and tests.

3539 TI 214-EN 02 Shakespeare 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Colavito, Joseph J

Shakespeare’s works are among the most timeless within the

Western Canon, and often function as templates for work in

ensuing ages. New performances, with new actors, populate

the history of the theater. The film industry has not ignored

the timelessness of Shakespeare’s works, and a variety of filmmakers

have used the immortal bard as a source for their inspiration.

But what happens when the filmmaker modifies

the work of Shakespeare? What results from changing the setting,

or the language, or the structure of Shakespeare’s work?

This course will explore the process of adapting Shakespeare

for the screen, with particular attention afforded recent films

that, while inspired by Shakespearean works, take liberties

with them, thus producing different artifacts that may, or

may not, be the equivalent of the original sources. The syllabus

is under construction, but works under consideration

may include Love’s Labor’s Lost, Macbeth, Hamlet, Othello, As

You Like it, Coriolanus, The Tempest, and A Midsummer Night’s

Dream, along with their selected cinematic counterparts (and

perhaps some films inspired by Shakespeare’s works). Students

taking the class will need to have possession of, or access to,

the means of renting and viewing films outside of class.

3272 TI 242-PL 01 Marginalized in America 3, U

W 2:25-4:55 Dulckeit, Katharina

Marginalized in America: Gender at the Intersection of Race

and Class. This course introduces the student to the philosophical

method and skills of thinking out problems and

issues that confront women in contemporary American society,

viewed from the intersection of gender, race and class.

3273 TI 243-PL 01 Knowledge and Reality 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Dulckeit, Katharina

Fundamental philosophical questions about knowledge and

reality will be studied through the analysis of classical and contemporary

texts. Topics may include skepticism, the relationship

between faith and reason, the nature of mind, free will,

the nature and existence of the external world, and the nature

and existence of God.

3284 TI 243-PL 02 Knowledge and Reality 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Whitmeyer II, Virgil G

Fundamental philosophical questions about knowledge and

reality will be studied through the analysis of classical and contemporary

texts. Topics may include skepticism, the relationship

between faith and reason, the nature of mind, free will,

the nature and existence of the external world, and the nature

and existence of God.

3267 TI 244-PL 01 Ethics,The Good Life,& Society 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05 van der Linden, Harry

Fundamental philosophical questions about right conduct,

virtues and vices, the good life and social policy will be examined

on basis of classical and contemporary texts. Topics include

issues of personal and social ethics, such as forgiveness,

tolerance and hate speech, abortion, animal rights, and world

poverty. Theories of justice, human rights, and meta-ethical

topics may also be covered.

3278 TI 244-PL 02 Ethics,The Good Life,& Society 3, U

MW 1-2:15 McGowan, Richard J

Fundamental philosophical questions about right conduct,

virtues and vices, the good life and social policy will be examined

on basis of classical and contemporary texts. Topics include

issues of personal and social ethics, such as forgiveness,

tolerance and hate speech, abortion, animal rights, and world

poverty. Theories of justice, human rights, and meta-ethical

topics may also be covered.

3288 TI 244-PL 03 Ethics,The Good Life,& Society 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Watson, Whitten S

Fundamental philosophical questions about right conduct,

virtues and vices, the good life and social policy will be examined

on basis of classical and contemporary texts. Topics include

issues of personal and social ethics, such as forgiveness,

tolerance and hate speech, abortion, animal rights, and world

poverty. Theories of justice, human rights, and meta-ethical

topics may also be covered.

20 University Core Curriculum


3351 TI 250-RL 01 Religions of the World 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Bauman, Chad

An introduction to the texts, practices, and ideas of the world’s

major religious traditions, including Hinduism, Buddhism,

Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam,

and the indigenous traditions of Africa and the Americas.

3355 TI 251-RL 01 The Bible 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 McGrath, James

Introduction to the content, historical context, methods of

study, religious ideas and cultural influence of the Jewish and

Christian scriptures.

3362 TI 251-RL 02 The Bible 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Snyder, Glen Evan

Introduction to the content, historical context, methods of

study, religious ideas and cultural influence of the Jewish and

Christian scriptures.

3363 TI 251-RL 03 The Bible 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Snyder, Glen Evan

Introduction to the content, historical context, methods of

study, religious ideas and cultural influence of the Jewish and

Christian scriptures.

3063 TI 262S 01 Self and Service 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Hochman, Arthur W

Brown, Bernadette K

In this course, students will read texts that explore the self and

the concept of service. Readings will examine the world of

children and senior citizens. Sample authors include: Alexie,

Updike, and Junot Diaz. Students will create oral and written

histories of themselves and a person (child or senior) they

serve. This 3 credit hour course is designated service learning

(at least 20 hrs service required) with a child or senior.

Indianapolis Community Requirement

3063 TI 262S 01 Self and Service 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Hochman, Arthur W

Brown, Bernadette K

3166 NW 202-BI 01S The World of Plants 5, U

MWF 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

R 9-9:50

3167 NW 202-BI 01A Laboratory 0, U

R 10-11:50

Meadows, Marva

3168 NW 202-BI 02S The World of Plants 5, U

MWF 10-10:50 Meadows, Marva

R 2:25-3:15

3170 NW 202-BI 02A Laboratory 0, U

R 3:25-5:15 Meadows, Marva

1627 CS 282S 01 EPICS 1 Service Learning 2, U

MW 3:50-4:40

Gupta, Ankur

3074 CS 283S 01 EPICS 1 Service Learning 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05

Gupta, Ankur

2171 PO 141S 01 Intro International Politics 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Ooi, Su-Mei

3532 PO 141S 02 Intro International Politics 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Ooi, Su-Mei

2173 PO 201S 01 Research and Analysis 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Turner, Robin

2604 ED 227S 01 Intro to Mid-Sec Students/Scho 3, U

W 12:30-3:30

Staff

21 University Core Curriculum

2652 ED 228S 01 Content Area Lit in Mid-Sec Cu 3, U

MW 9-10:15

Staff

1499 PWB 162S 01 Wagging, Walking, and Wellness 1, U

M 1-2:50

Farley, Lisa A

1500 PWB 162S 02 Wagging, Walking, and Wellness 1, U

W 1-2:50

Farley, Lisa A

2787 PX 200S 01 Intro to Professional Practice 2, U

R 1-1:50

Devine, Trish

2890 PX 200S 02 Intro to Professional Practice 2, U

R 1-1:50

Staff

2894 PX 200S 03 Intro to Professional Practice 2, U

F 1-1:50

Staff

3056 SW 261S-RX 01 Health Disparities 3, U

MW 1-2:15

Ryder, Priscilla

3191 ES 104-I 01 Jordan Jazz 1, U

TR 4-5:30

Brimmer, Tim R

2360 CSD 238S 01S American Sign Language 3 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05 Carlstrand, Glenn

3483 CSD 238S 50S American Sign Language 3 3, U

MW 5:15-6:30 Carlstrand, Glenn

Honors Courses

2936 HN 110 01 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, U

MWF 9-9:50

Valliere, Paul R

Faith, Doubt, and Reason

In the first semester of this year-long course, we read and discuss

philosophical, religious and literary texts, exploring the

ways in which human beings have reflected on their relationship

to God, the world, and their fellow human beings. We

explore the nature of and relationship between faith, doubt

and reason.

In the second semester of this year-long course, we read and

discuss philosophical, religious and literary texts, exploring

how human beings define themselves in terms of the various

communities to which they belong. We examine different explanations

of injustice and prescriptions for creating a more

just world.

*Note: This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in the companion

course HN 111 01 in the spring. Upon completion

of HN 110 and HN 111, students will have earned six core

credits and two honors credits. Honors credit will not be

awarded unless students complete both the fall and spring

semesters of this course.

2938 HN 110 02 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, U

TR 1-2:15 Bungard, Christopher

The Heroic Temper: Homer

In this First Year Seminar, we will study Homer’s ancient epic

poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, taking us face to face with

two seminal stories that record the way that the ancient mind

sought to understand the workings of man as he found himself

in conflict with his world-not only his military adversaries,

but his fellow warriors, his friends, his family, those whom he

loves, and, of course, his gods. What it means to be a hero in

this culture, what it means to be singled out as the chosen one,

often surprises a modern reader because of the caricature of

the modern-day superhero.

As we read, write, and talk about the Iliad and Odyssey, one of

our primary goals will be to come to an understanding of this


ancient culture through what they valued as recorded in the

mythology surrounding their heroes. As we come to this understanding,

we will also be thinking about our own culture.

How far removed are we from the obstacles confronting the

Greeks? What in their experience continues to overlap with

our own? What can these ancient heroes teach us about the

human condition? Why do we continue to read stories that are

over 2500 years old?

Note: This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in the companion

course HN 111 03 for the spring. Upon completion

of HN 110 and HN 111, students will have earned

six core credits and two honors credits. Honors credit will

not be awarded unless students complete both the fall and

spring semesters of this course.

2946 HN 110 03 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Ries, Rebecca S

Heroic Temper I:Study of Homer’s Illiad

and Odyssey

Honors Students. Homer lays the groundwork for an examination

of the epic hero and the Trojan War saga, with his very

personal attention to the lives and characters of the men and

women who people the Iliad and the Odyssey. Central to our

concern in this seminar will be our examination of these poems

with an eye towards understanding what keeps generation

after generation not only reading these classic epics but reworking

the heroic form and the heroic themes. In our study,

we will include a few Greek tragedies that also use the Trojan

War as their backdrop. Besides our reading the Homeric epics,

we will study a few modern applications of them in film

— such as Troy, Ulysses, and O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Semester two will look at further reworking of the Homeric

model, with the Roman works: Virgil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s

Metamorphoses. This course is the first semester offering of

the year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Students

who enroll in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this

topic in the spring.

*Note: This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in the companion

course HN 111 03 in the spring. Upon completion

of HN 110 and HN 111, students will have earned

six core credits and two honors credits. Honors credit will

not be awarded unless students complete both the fall and

spring semesters of this course.

3623 HN 110 04 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, U

MWF 10-10:50 Lantzer, Jason

Revisiting the Cabin

A minister’s daughter is not the sort of person usually associated

with launching a war, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was no ordinary

woman. The first section of the course will look at the

impact Uncle Tom’s Cabin had on the United States, both as

it headed toward the Civil War and to the present. What was

it about this story, a work of fiction, which so angered Southerners

and captivated Northerners? Why was it that President

Abraham Lincoln called Stowe “the little woman who started

the big war”? Who was Harriet Beecher Stowe anyway? In the

second section of the course, the focus will shift to accounts

written by actual slaves who actually gained their freedom in

ways that Stowe recounted in fictional terms. The purpose is

to not only study and contextualize the genre of historic literature,

but also to see how well Stowe did (or not) in capturing

what was really occurring in the world beyond her book.

In order to accomplish this, students will read a variety of

book and other primary sources, blending resources and ideas

from across the Liberal Arts. As the instructor, I will use lecture,

“hands on activities” and discussion to convey context

and insight. This course allows student to not only read one of

the best-selling books of the 19th century, but to place within

its historic context (both in terms of academic history as well

as with the genre of the slave narrative itself).

*Note: This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in the companion

course HN 111 in the spring. Upon completion of

HN 110 and HN 111, students will have earned six core

credits and two honors credits. Honors credit will not be

awarded unless students complete both the fall and spring

semesters of this course.

3624 HN 110 05 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, U

MW 1-2:15

Flood, Royce E

Greek and Roman History

Many elements of Western culture were born in Classical

Greece and ancient Rome. In this honors first year seminar,

we will study these two civilizations, learning about their historical

development, the everyday lives of their citizens, their

religions, arts and technical achievements, and exploring our

debt to them. Extensive reading of literature; significant writing

assignments.

*Note: This is a two-semester course. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in the companion

course HN 111 in the spring. Upon completion of

HN 110 and HN 111, students will have earned six core

credits and two honors credits. Honors credit will not be

awarded unless students complete both the fall and spring

semesters of this course.

2939 HN 200 01 In-Depth Honors Seminar 2, U

W 4:15-5:55

Valliere, Paul R

Dr. Zhivago

Through attentive reading and in-depth class discussions, students

in this course will examine Doctor Zhivago, a novel of

love, revolution, suffering and redemption by Boris Pasternak

(1890-1960), winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature (1958).

The course also affords an opportunity to reflect on the history

of Russia in modern times and on Russia’s contribution

to modern civilization.

2945 HN 200 02 In-Depth Honors Seminar 2, U

W 2:25-4:05 Guerriero, Sam J

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Novels

The course will examine the science fiction works of Isaac

Asimov and relate four of his novels to the rise and fall of empires

in a generic sense as well as a reference to the history of

the United States as a world power. Isaac Asimov who passed

away in 1992 was one of the most prolific science fiction &

science writers in America. The four books listed below describe

the Fall of an Empire and the Rise in a different format

of a Second Foundation/pseudo-empire. The course instructor

will use concepts from United States History to compare

the ideas presented in the novels with historical events.

22 University Core Curriculum


3550 HN 200 03 In-Depth Honors Seminar 2, U

TR 9:35-10:25 Winings, Roseanne

Looking Deeper

This is not your typical art history class! What does art have

to do with your everyday life? With the ways you learn and

grow? How does thinking about meaning in art relate to other

kinds of thinking you do - in science or English classes? In

your relationships with others? What is the difference between

learning about a work of art and having a personal experience

with a work of art - an aesthetic experience?

Explore the nature of art, from paintings in the Western tradition

to multimedia installations by contemporary artists on

view at the Indianapolis Museum of Art and other local museums

and galleries. What can we learn from being in the same

room as an object? Over time, how does the importance of

an object change? How is the experience of an object altered

through virtual discovery and exploration? Expect to spend

time in the galleries, participating in class discussions and visiting

other art venues in the Indianapolis area. This course

requires no previous art knowledge.

3551 HN 200 04 In-Depth Honors Seminar 2, U

R 2:25-4:05 Dunn, Mindy

Spinning Straw into Gold

Have you ever read the story of Sleeping Beauty? Has anyone

ever told you the story of Beauty and the Beast out

loud, from memory? Did you know fairy tales were NOT

written for children? Once upon a time, in lands all over the

world, these and other Disneyfied fairy tale classics existed

in forms we would not recognize today. This class will focus

on complicating the definition of fairy tales as we’ve become

accustomed to in animated features and children’s books, asking

you to become simultaneously dis- and re-enchanted with

the stories you grew up with, and many you’ve never encountered

before. We will begin learning about the history of fairy

tales and re-master the skills to uncover the many layers of

meaning hidden and simplified by Disney films through intensive

study of Little Red Riding Hood and other classics.

Because fairy tales were substantially transmitted orally by

women (but re-written and published by men), and because a

great deal of the fairy tales our culture have been particularly

attracted to are indeed about women (princesses, evil queens

and stepmothers, damsels in distress and witches) we will devote

a unit to applying a critical feminist reading to stories

such as Snow White and Cinderella. We will also explore a

Jungian approach to fairy tales, as well as seek out some modern

adaptations of old favorites. Projects will include lengthy

group presentations, peer-to-peer journals, a research paper

and a final project asking students to complete a creative interpretation

of the fairy tale of their choice. Expect substantial

reading, class discussion and student led-learning.

3560 HN 200 05 In-Depth Honors Seminar 2, U

MW 1-1:50 Lantzer, Jason

American Civil War at 150

At the end of 2010, the United States began commemorating

the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. As this anniversary

reminds us, this conflict continues to define the nation long

after the last gun went silent. It remains a war that Americans

cannot seem to get enough about. As such, this course

will provide students with the opportunity to look at issues

relating to the coming, fighting, and aftermath of the war.

23 University Core Curriculum

Students will read and discuss common books over the course

of the semester, as well primary sources on a weekly basis.

They will also look for connections between Butler University

(founded just a few years before the war in part by Hoosier

abolitionists) and those who served in the conflict, which will

in turn be a part of the universityís efforts at remembering this

all important conflict.

Learning Resource Center

2966 LC 100 01 Strategies for Success 1, U

T 11-11:50

Staff

This course is designed to offer tools and techniques to

enhance academic success at the college level. Topics may

include time and self management, effective classroom strategies,

goal setting, and academic planning. The course will

involve discussion and reflection on the proven strategies for

creating greater academic, professional, and personal success.

This section is open to all students.

3346 LC 100 02 Strategies for Success 1, U

R 11-11:50

Staff

Available only by permission of Learning Resource Center.

This course is designed to offer tools and techniques to enhance

academic success at the college level. Topics may include

time and self management, effective classroom strategies,

goal setting, and academic planning. The course will

involve discussion and reflection on the proven strategies for

creating greater academic, professional, and personal success.

Additionally, this section will cover U.S. Academic expectations

and issues of intercultural communication.

2967 LC 100 03 Strategies for Success 1, U

R 11-11:50 Williams, Linda Brooks

Available only by permission of Student Disability Services.

This course is designed to offer tools and techniques to

enhance academic success at the college level. Topics may

include time and self management, effective classroom strategies,

goal setting, and academic planning. The course will

involve discussion and reflection on the proven strategies for

creating greater academic, professional, and personal success.

2968 LC 103 01 Exploratory Studies 2, U

TBD

Staff

This course is designed to teach life-long career planning

skills critical to both a smooth and successful transition from

college to the workplace. Assignments will include job search

fundamentals including skills identification, resume and cover

letter composition, practice interviews, and career research.

Additionally, students will learn to navigate the many transitions

and challenges faced by new graduates. This class is

intended for junior and senior students.

2969 LC 103 02 Exploratory Studies 2, U

TBD

Staff

This course is specifically designed for first year Exploratory

Studies Majors. Decision making, self-assessment, academic

exploration, and career planning are the foundational components.

The course encourages students to reflect upon assessments,

personal values, skills, interests, and decision making

styles while being exposed to various academic fields of study.

Students apply this knowledge to investigate suitable career

options.


2970 LC 103 03 Exploratory Studies 2, U

TBD

Staff

This course is specifically designed for first year Exploratory

Studies Majors. Decision making, self-assessment, academic

exploration, and career planning are the foundational components.

The course encourages students to reflect upon assessments,

personal values, skills, interests, and decision making

styles while being exposed to various academic fields of study.

Students apply this knowledge to investigate suitable career

options.

2972 LC 103 04 Exploratory Studies 2, U

TBD

Staff

This course is specifically designed for first year Exploratory

Studies Majors. Decision making, self-assessment, academic

exploration, and career planning are the foundational components.

The course encourages students to reflect upon assessments,

personal values, skills, interests, and decision making

styles while being exposed to various academic fields of study.

Students apply this knowledge to investigate suitable career

options.

2971 LC 103 05 Exploratory Studies 2, U

TBD

Staff

This course is specifically designed for first year Exploratory

Studies Majors. Decision making, self-assessment, academic

exploration, and career planning are the foundational components.

The course encourages students to reflect upon assessments,

personal values, skills, interests, and decision making

styles while being exposed to various academic fields of study.

Students apply this knowledge to investigate suitable career

options.

24 University Core Curriculum


College of Liberal

Arts and Sciences

Anthropology

3314 AN 101 01 First Year Seminar 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Cornell, John S

Close Encounters

This course will introduce students to basic theories and

methods in the disciplines of anthropology and history

through the exploration of past and present cultural encounters

and exchanges, and the diverse responses they engendered.

Topics will range across time and space and focus on

exploration, trade, colonialism, imperialism, and current

cross-cultural interactions. This course does not count toward

core credit.

3408 SW 215-AN 01 Being Human:Anthro Approaches 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

3406 SW 215-AN 02 Being Human:Anthro Approaches 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Shahrokhi, Sholeh

Biology

2003 BI 105 01 Introductory Cell Biology 3, U

MWF 1-1:50

Gerecke, Erin E

3108 BI 105 02 Introductory Cell Biology 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Meadows, Marva

3604 BI 111 01 Contemporary Issues in Biology 3, U

M 12-12:50

Gerecke, Erin E

3605 BI 111 01A Laboratory

T 9-10:50

Gerecke, Erin E

3606 BI 111 01B Laboratory

T 2:25-4:15

Gerecke, Erin E

3607 BI 111 02 Contemporary Issues in Biology 3, U

W 12-12:50

Gerecke, Erin E

3608 BI 111 02A Laboratory

R 9-10:50

Gerecke, Erin E

3609 BI 111 02B Laboratory

R 2:25-4:15

Gerecke, Erin E

3610 BI 111 03 Contemporary Issues in Biology 3, U

T 12-12:50

Hauck, Nat

3611 BI 111 03A Laboratory

R 1-2:50

Hauck, Nat

3612 BI 111 03B Laboratory

R 3-4:50

Hauck, Nat

2004 BI 120 01 Principles of Biology 1 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Osborne, Charissa D

2011 BI 121 01 Biological Investigations 1 2, U

T 8-10:50 Osborne, Charissa D

25 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3596 BI 202 01 Cellular and Molecular Biology 4, U

MWF 10-10:50 Kowalski, Jennifer

3597 BI 202 01A Laboratory 0, U

T 2:25-5:15 Kowalski, Jennifer

3598 BI 202 02 Cellular and Molecular Biology 4, U

MWF 8-8:50

Villani, Philip

3599 BI 202 02A Laboratory 0, U

W 2-4:50

Villani, Philip

3600 BI 202 03 Cellular and Molecular Biology 4, U

MWF 9-9:50

Villani, Philip

3601 BI 202 03A Laboratory 0, U

R 2:25-5:15

Villani, Philip

3115 BI 257 01 Human Anatomy and Physiology 5, U

MWF 9-9:50 Osborne, Charissa D

R 8-8:50

3116 BI 257 01A Laboratory 0, U

R 9-10:50 Osborne, Charissa D

3162 NW 200-BI 01 Biology and Society 5, U

T 2:25-3:15

Staff

TR 11-12:15

3163 NW 200-BI 01A Biology and Society 0, U

T 3:25-5:15

Staff

3166 NW 202-BI 01S The World of Plants 5, U

MWF 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

R 9-9:50

3167 NW 202-BI 01A The World of Plants 0, U

R 10-11:50

Meadows, Marva

3168 NW 202-BI 02S The World of Plants 5, U

MWF 10-10:50 Meadows, Marva

R 2:25-3:15

3170 NW 202-BI 02A The World of Plants 0, U

R 3:25-5:15 Meadows, Marva

3164 NW 203-BI 01 Genetics & Evolution 5, U

TR 11-12:15 Dolan, Thomas E

W 2-2:50

3165 NW 203-BI 01A Genetics & Evolution 0, U

W 3-4:50

Dolan, Thomas E

3032 NW 205-BI 01 Urban Ecology 5, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Carter, Timothy L

R 2:25-3:15

3033 NW 205-BI 01A Urban Ecology 0, U

R 3:25-5:15 Carter, Timothy L

3034 NW 205-BI 02 Urban Ecology 5, U

MWF 11-11:50 Ryan, Travis James

T 2:25-3:15


3035 NW 205-BI 02A Urban Ecology 0, U

T 3:25-5:15 Ryan, Travis James

3036 NW 206-BI 01 Life, Death and Immortality 5, U

MWF 1-1:50 Ockerman, Angela Vaye

W 2-2:50

3037 NW 206-BI 01A Life, Death and Immortality 0, U

W 3-4:50 Ockerman, Angela Vaye

3595 NW 206-BI 02 Life, Death and Immortality 5, U

MWF 1-1:50 Kowalski, Jennifer

W 2-2:50

3527 NW 206-BI 02A Life, Death and Immortality 0, U

W 3-4:50

Kowalski, Jennifer

3369 NW 261-BI-I 01 Food:Pasture, Table, Bod &Mind 5, U

MWF 1-1:50 Lineweaver, Tara M

M 2-2:50

3370 NW 261-BI-I 01A Food:Pasture, Table, Bod &Mind 0,U

M 3-5

Lineweaver, Tara M

Chemistry

1518 CH 105 01 General Chemistry 5, U

MTWR 9-9:50

Staff

1519 CH 105 01A Laboratory 0, U

R 2-4:50

Staff

1520 CH 105 01B Laboratory 0, U

F 8-10:50

Staff

1522 CH 105 01C Laboratory 0, U

F 1-3:50

Staff

1521 CH 105 02 General Chemistry 5, U

MWRF 8-8:50

Staff

1595 CH 105 02D Laboratory 0, U

R 9-11:50

Staff

1596 CH 105 02E Laboratory 0, U

T 9-11:50

Staff

1523 CH 105 02F Laboratory 0, U

M 2-4:50

Staff

1524 CH 105 03 General Chemistry 5, U

MTWR 11-11:50

Staff

1525 CH 105 03G Laboratory 0, U

M 2-4:50

Staff

1526 CH 105 03H Laboratory 0, U

T 2-4:50

Staff

1577 CH 105 03I Laboratory 0, U

W 2-4:50

Staff

1576 CH 105 04 General Chemistry 5, U

MTWF 1-1:50

Staff

1578 CH 105 04J Laboratory 0, U

R 9-11:50

Staff

1597 CH 105 04K Laboratory 0, U

W 2-4:50

Staff

1598 CH 105 04L Laboratory 0, U

T 2-4:50

Staff

1599 CH 105 05 General Chemistry 5, U

MWRF 9-9:50

Staff

1600 CH 105 05M Laboratory 0, U

R 2-4:50

Staff

1601 CH 105 05N Laboratory 0, U

T 9-11:50

Staff

1613 CH 105 05O Laboratory 0, U

F 1-3:50

Staff

1527 CH 107 01 Advanced General Chemistry 6, U

M-F 11-11:50 Hopkins, Todd

1528 CH 107 01A Laboratory 0, U

M 1-4:50

Hopkins, Todd

1529 CH 107 01B Laboratory 0, U

T 1-4:50

Hopkins, Todd

3027 NW 210-CH 01 Chemistry and Society 5, U

MTWF 11-11:50 LeGreve, Tracy

3028 NW 210-CH 01A Chemistry and Society 0, U

M 2:25-4:15

LeGreve, Tracy

Classical Studies

3367 PCA 262-CLA 01 Greek Art & Myth 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40

Staff

Art illuminates myth; myth makes sense of art. Students

will acquire a sense of the major periods of western art, will

consider artistic questions large (is art subjective? is there a

proper subject matter for art?) and small (what is contrapposto?),

will study in some depth about sixty artistic images,

mostly Greek, and will become acquainted with a set of

Greek myths. The course will include a museum visit, a skit,

and a creative art project.

3364 TI 200-CLA 01 Roman Perspectives 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Bungard, Christopher

This course will examine civic engagement in the Roman

world, both as a pagan and Christian capital for the West.

We will undertake this investigation by looking at a variety

of original sources translated into English. As we examine

the texts of these authors, we will also have the opportunity

to think about how the ideas of the ancient Romans have

influenced cultures from Britain, France, and Spain in the

West to the shores of North Africa to the civilizations of the

Eastern Mediterranean.

3366 TI 201-CLA 01 Ancient Greek Perspectives 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

An examination of areas of ancient Greek culture. Sources

include texts of poetry, history, drama, law, medicine, and

philosophy, as well as works of art. Themes will vary depending

on the professor. Possible themes: deep thinking and free

thinking, participating in democracy, gender roles, warfare

and empire.

Latin

3365 LT 101 50 Elementary Latin 1 4, U

TR 6:30-8:20 Gilmarten, William A

3373 LT 203 01 Intermediate Latin 1 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Bungard, Christopher

A course at the intermediate level, with emphasis on vocabulary

acquisition. Material will be chosen for accessibility.

Readings may include: Cicero’s orations, Virgil’s Aeneid,

Pliny’s Letters. Prerequisite: LT 101 and 102 or placement at

the 200 level.

Computer Science

1619 CS 142 01 Intro to Comp. Sci. and Prog. 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Sorenson, Jonathan P

For Math and Science majors – will use the

supercomputer

26 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


1620 CS 142 02 Intro to Comp. Sci. and Prog. 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Chen, Zhihong

For Math and Science majors – will use the

supercomputer

1618 CS 151 01 Foundation of Computer Science 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40

Gupta, Ankur

1627 CS 282S 01 EPICS 1 Service Learning 2, U

MW 3:50-4:40

Gupta, Ankur

Class meets in FB148

3074 CS 283S 01 EPICS 1 Service Learning 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05

Gupta, Ankur

3025 AR 220-CS 01 Robot Programming 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Linos, Panos K

This introductory programming course features personal

robots that can move, draw, and take digital pictures. Robot

behaviors are programmed and controlled remotely using a

high-level language such as Python from a desktop or laptop

computer. Topics include conditional execution, repetition,

defining functions, and using arrays.

3026 AR 220-CS 02 Robot Programming 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05

Staff

This introductory programming course features personal robots

that can move, draw, and take digital pictures. Robot

behaviors are programmed and controlled remotely using a

high-level language such as Python from a desktop or laptop

computer. Topics include conditional execution, repetition,

defining functions, and using arrays.

Software Engineering

1636 SE 267 01 Business Application Dev. 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Linos, Panos K

3072 SE 267 02 Business Application Dev. 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Linos, Panos K

Dual Degree Engineering IUPUI

1679 DD 190 01 Elementary Engineering Design 3, U

T 9:35-10:50 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1679 DD 190 01 U

R 9:35-10:50 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1680 DD 190 02 Elementary Engineering Design 3, U

T 11-12:15 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1680 DD 190 02 U

R 11-12:15 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1688 DD 250TCM 01 Selected Topics in Technical C 1, U

TBA McCormick, Jessica Risley

Career Planning in Engineering

This course will meet for half of the semester: 10/18-12/10

1691 DD 270ECE 01 Intro to Digital System Design 4, U

MW 4:30-5:45 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1691 DD 270ECE 01 U

M 6-8:50 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1663 DD 274ME 01 Basic Mechanics 2 3, U

TR 6:30-7:45 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1663 DD 274ME 01 U

T 8-8:50 McCormick, Jessica Risley

1690 DD 297 01 Engineering Topics 1, U

W 3-4:15 McCormick, Jessica Risley

MATLAB

1717 DD 297 02 Engineering Topics 1, U

W 4:30-5:45 McCormick, Jessica Risley

MATLAB

English

3545 EN 101 01 Writing Tutorial 3, U

TBA

Staff

3546 EN 101 02 Writing Tutorial 3, U

TBA

Staff

3547 EN 101 03 Writing Tutorial 3, U

TBA

Staff

3548 EN 101 04 Writing Tutorial 3, U

TBA

Staff

3630 EN 185 01 Intro to Discipline of English 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Walsh, William P

Introduction to the Discipline of English. The course will be

built around study of three major genres (poetry, fiction and

drama). Through close reading, class discussion and writing

we will exercise our ability to interpret, argue for interpretations

and appreciate diverse interpretations. At the same

time we will gain practical knowledge of literary terms and

become acquainted with major approaches in critical theory.

3399 EN 201 01 Advanced Composition 3, U

TBA

Reeves, Carol A

1741 EN 218 50W Intro Creative Writing: Poetry 3, U

W 5-7:45

Lynch, Alessandra J

Introduction to Poetry

This course is an introduction to poetry writing. We will

practice using various essential poetic techniques, and we will

sometimes critique your drafts in a workshop setting in order

to guide you toward meaningful revisions. However, our

main focus will be on process, not product. We will study

published work and engage in impromptu writing exercises

in class in order to become attentive to the key elements that

make for memorable poems, as well as to help you sneak

up on those parts of yourself-your memory, your powers of

observation, and your imagination-from which such writing

comes.

1770 EN 219 01W Intro Creative Writing: Prose 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05

Spyra, Ania

Prose

Introduction to Prose: Image and Text - In this class you will

use images — postcards, old photographs, drawings, film

stills etc. — as a way to jumpstart your writing. Through

daily writing practice you will experiment with form, structure,

point of view, and the many possibilities of imagery as

well as explore various forms of creative nonfiction, including

memoir and travel writing. You’ll start by exploring the

larger genre of creative nonfiction and its various forms in a

diverse set of readings and exercises, including a series of daily

warm-ups. You’ll do a number of dynamic in-class writing

exercises to help you develop material and personal style, and

hone your craft as creative prose writers. Much of our time

will be spent in response groups and full-class workshops.

27 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


3418 EN 219 02 Intro Creative Writing: Prose 3, U

MWF 11-11:50

Staff

3510 EN 245 01 Inquiries in Am Lit & His 1 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

This course will be organized around a theme in early American

literature, and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding

of major works, authors and literary movements of

the period. Texts for the course will come primarily from the

period up to the American Civil War, and both the texts and

the authors studied will be placed within their larger literary

and cultural contexts. Particular themes for the course will be

published each semester in the schedule of classes.

This course offers an introduction to the field of American

literature prior to 1860. We often overlook the diversity

and complexity of early literary and cultural life in the “new

world,” forgetting that to speak of American literature at this

time is to imply a field that is not only stylistically diverse

but also radically multiethnic, multilingual, and transatlantic.

Focusing on writing in English, this course will respect

the variety of these perspectives while bringing them into

a provisional conversation with one another. We will spend

considerable time addressing the material practices of reading

and writing literature, the role of written texts in forming

communities, and the way that these texts shaped the development

of a specifically “American” identity.

3514 EN 245 02 Inquiries in Am Lit & His 1 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

This course will be organized around a theme in early American

literature, and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding

of major works, authors and literary movements of

the period. Texts for the course will come primarily from the

period up to the American Civil War, and both the texts and

the authors studied will be placed within their larger literary

and cultural contexts. Particular themes for the course will be

published each semester in the schedule of classes.

This course offers an introduction to the field of American

literature prior to 1860. We often overlook the diversity

and complexity of early literary and cultural life in the “new

world,” forgetting that to speak of American literature at this

time is to imply a field that is not only stylistically diverse

but also radically multiethnic, multilingual, and transatlantic.

Focusing on writing in English, this course will respect

the variety of these perspectives while bringing them into

a provisional conversation with one another. We will spend

considerable time addressing the material practices of reading

and writing literature, the role of written texts in forming

communities, and the way that these texts shaped the development

of a specifically “American” identity.

3518 EN 246 01 Inquiries in Am Lit & His 2 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Sutherlin, Susan J

The course will be organized around American literature after

the Civil War with emphasis on major literary works and

authors reflecting selected cultural and social movements

from 1860 to the present.

3515 EN 265 01 Inquiries in Brit Lit & His 1 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Watts, William H

This course will be organized around early British literature,

and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding of major

works, authors and literary movements of the period.

Texts for the course will come primarily from the period up

to 1800, and both the texts and the authors studied will be

placed within their larger literary and cultural contexts. Particular

themes for the course will be published each semester

in the schedule of classes.

Woman, Man and God in Early British Literature. We will

focus in this course on texts that represent, either directly or

indirectly, relationships between men and women and the

relationship of humanity to God. Central texts for the course

will include ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’, ‘The

Book of Margery Kempe’, Sidney’s ‘Astrophil and Stella’ and

Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’. As we trace out the theme of the

course we will also study the diversity of literary forms and

traditions in British Literature from the Middle Ages to the

early 18th century.

3535 EN 265 02 Inquiries in Brit Lit & His 1 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Watts, William H

This course will be organized around early British literature,

and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding of

major works, authors and literary movements of the period.

Texts for the course will come primarily from the period up

to 1800, and both the texts and the authors studied will be

placed within their larger literary and cultural contexts. Particular

themes for the course will be published each semester

in the schedule of classes.

Woman, Man and God in Early British Literature. We will

focus in this course on texts that represent, either directly or

indirectly, relationships between men and women and the

relationship of humanity to God. Central texts for the course

will include ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’, ‘The

Book of Margery Kempe’, Sidney’s ‘Astrophil and Stella’ and

Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’. As we trace out the theme of the

course we will also study the diversity of literary forms and

traditions in British Literature from the Middle Ages to the

early 18th century.

3429 PCA 232-EN 01 Seeing the World & the Self 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Goldsmith, Jason

When you look out the window do you see a tree or the

rhythmic sway of dark line and bright color? Do you see a

field of grass or waves of innumerable greens? This course

will encourage you to see the world through the eyes of an

artist by focusing on the natural world. To achieve this we

will examine a variety of formats including poetry, the personal

essay, painting, and photography in relation to key

aesthetic concepts such as the sublime, the beautiful, and

the picturesque. We will juxtapose contemporary writers

and artists with those from earlier periods to demonstrate

how the way we see the world is culturally determined. We

will complement our readings with trips to nearby museums

(IMA), galleries, and the studios of local artists. In addition,

we will take advantage of such local natural resources as the

grounds of the IMA, the canal walk, and Holcomb Gardens,

where you will find the raw material for your own reflection

and creative expression.

3430 PCA 232-EN 02 Seeing the World & the Self 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Goldsmith, Jason

When you look out the window do you see a tree or the

rhythmic sway of dark line and bright color? Do you see a

field of grass or waves of innumerable greens? This course

28 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


will encourage you to see the world through the eyes of an

artist by focusing on the natural world. To achieve this we

will examine a variety of formats including poetry, the personal

essay, painting, and photography in relation to key

aesthetic concepts such as the sublime, the beautiful, and

the picturesque. We will juxtapose contemporary writers

and artists with those from earlier periods to demonstrate

how the way we see the world is culturally determined. We

will complement our readings with trips to nearby museums

(IMA), galleries, and the studios of local artists. In addition,

we will take advantage of such local natural resources as the

grounds of the IMA, the canal walk, and Holcomb Gardens,

where you will find the raw material for your own reflection

and creative expression.

3059 TI 210-EN 01 Inquiries in Am Lit & His I 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

This course will be organized around a theme in early American

literature, and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding

of major works, authors and literary movements of

the period. Texts for the course will come primarily from the

period up to the American Civil War, and both the texts and

the authors studied will be placed within their larger literary

and cultural contexts. Particular themes for the course will be

published each semester in the schedule of classes.

This course offers an introduction to the field of American

literature prior to 1860. We often overlook the diversity

and complexity of early literary and cultural life in the “new

world,” forgetting that to speak of American literature at this

time is to imply a field that is not only stylistically diverse

but also radically multiethnic, multilingual, and transatlantic.

Focusing on writing in English, this course will respect

the variety of these perspectives while bringing them into

a provisional conversation with one another. We will spend

considerable time addressing the material practices of reading

and writing literature, the role of written texts in forming

communities, and the way that these texts shaped the development

of a specifically “American” identity.

3060 TI 210-EN 02 Inquiries in Am Lit & His I 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

The Roots of American Identity

This course will be organized around a theme in early American

literature, and thereby seek to increase students’ understanding

of major works, authors and literary movements of

the period. Texts for the course will come primarily from the

period up to the American Civil War, and both the texts and

the authors studied will be placed within their larger literary

and cultural contexts. Particular themes for the course will be

published each semester in the schedule of classes.

This course offers an introduction to the field of American

literature prior to 1860. We often overlook the diversity

and complexity of early literary and cultural life in the “new

world,” forgetting that to speak of American literature at this

time is to imply a field that is not only stylistically diverse

but also radically multiethnic, multilingual, and transatlantic.

Focusing on writing in English, this course will respect

the variety of these perspectives while bringing them into

a provisional conversation with one another. We will spend

considerable time addressing the material practices of reading

and writing literature, the role of written texts in forming

communities, and the way that these texts shaped the development

of a specifically “American” identity.

3531 TI 211-EN 01 Inquiries in Am Lit & His II 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Sutherlin, Susan J

The course will be organized around American literature after

the Civil War with emphasis on major literary works and

authors reflecting selected cultural and social movements

from 1860 to the present.

3543 TI 212-EN 01 Inquiries in Brit Lit & His I 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Watts, William H

Woman, Man and God in Early British Literature. We will

focus in this course on texts that represent, either directly or

indirectly, relationships between men and women and the

relationship of humanity to God. Central texts for the course

will include ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’, ‘The

Book of Margery Kempe’, Sidney’s ‘Astrophil and Stella’ and

Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’. As we trace out the theme of the

course we will also study the diversity of literary forms and

traditions in British Literature from the Middle Ages to the

early 18th century.

3544 TI 212-EN 02 Inquiries in Brit Lit & His I 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Watts, William H

Woman, Man and God in Early British Literature. We will

focus in this course on texts that represent, either directly or

indirectly, relationships between men and women and the

relationship of humanity to God. Central texts for the course

will include ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’, ‘The

Book of Margery Kempe’, Sidney’s ‘Astrophil and Stella’ and

Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’. As we trace out the theme of the

course we will also study the diversity of literary forms and

traditions in British Literature from the Middle Ages to the

early 18th century.

3065 TI 214-EN 01 Shakespeare 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Gregory, Marshall

Reading Shakesphere: An Education in

Language, Ideas, and Emotions

Reading Shakespeare: An Education In Language, Ideas, and

Emotions - This course is designed to help students educate

and strengthen their capacities for imaginative construction,

analytical inquiry, introspective interrogation, linguistic

subtlety, moral and ethical deliberation, aesthetic responsiveness,

and social interaction through the reading of a selection

of Shakespeare’s sonnets and plays. The course will include

some cross comparison between the plays’ verbal texts and

film productions, but the films will be treated as secondary to

the literature. The intellectual content of the class will focus

on Shakespeare’s representation of the fundamental dynamics

among three variables in human life crucial to the quality

of everyone’s everyday life: social order, political authority,

and personal responsibility. Class work will entail some lectures,

much discussion, student presentations, short papers

(with critiques and revisions), and tests.

3539 TI 214-EN 02 Shakespeare 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Colavito, Joseph J

Shakespeare’s works are among the most timeless within the

Western Canon, and often function as templates for work in

ensuing ages. New performances, with new actors, populate

the history of the theater. The film industry has not ignored

29 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


the timelessness of Shakespeare’s works, and a variety of filmmakers

have used the immortal bard as a source for their

inspiration. But what happens when the filmmaker modifies

the work of Shakespeare? What results from changing

the setting, or the language, or the structure of Shakespeare’s

work? This course will explore the process of adapting Shakespeare

for the screen, with particular attention afforded recent

films that, while inspired by Shakespearean works, take

liberties with them, thus producing different artifacts that

may, or may not, be the equivalent of the original sources.

The syllabus is under construction, but works under consideration

may include Love’s Labor’s Lost, Macbeth, Hamlet,

Othello, As You Like it, Coriolanus, The Tempest, and A Midsummer

Night’s Dream, along with their selected cinematic

counterparts (and perhaps some films inspired by Shakespeare’s

works). Students taking the class will need to have

possession of, or access to, the means of renting and viewing

films outside of class.

Geography

2076 GE 109 01 Cultural Geography 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Bigelow, Bruce

Regions of the World

History

3315 HST 101 01 First Year Seminar 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Cornell, John S

Close Encounters

This course will introduce students to basic theories and

methods in the disciplines of anthropology and history

through the exploration of past and present cultural encounters

and exchanges, and the diverse responses they engendered.

Topics will range across time and space and focus on

exploration, trade, colonialism, imperialism, and current

cross-cultural interactions. This course does not count toward

core credit.

3409 HST 111 01 Introductory Seminar 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Swanson, Scott G

Discovery of the Individual

3403 HST 205 01 Questions in History 3, U

TBA

Staff

Questions in History: Sex & Sexuality

in Latin Ame

3390 HST 205 02 Questions in History 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Ramsbottom, John

The Great War

3319 HST 212 01 American Visions 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Deno, Vivian

American Visions explores the broad thematics of US history

as experienced by both ordinary and extraordinary Americans.

The course is organized around an exploration of the

ongoing centrality of consumption to American culture,

politics, and society. Minor themes of the course include:

1. The struggle by marginalized groups to gain a share of

“freedom and liberty”;

2. An analysis of the rhetorics of social change through fiction,

poetry, song, film, and the visual arts.

3. The rise, fall, and return of populism in US history;

4. Suburbia as a metaphor [“its about property values”] for

20th century and ongoing struggles over race, gender and

class in the US.

Mathematics

2080 MA 101 01 Algebra 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

2081 MA 101 02 Algebra 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

2082 MA 101 03 Algebra 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

2083 MA 102 01 Precalculus 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Staff

2084 MA 102 02 Precalculus 3, U

MWF 1-1:50

Staff

2085 MA 102 03 Precalculus 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Wilson, Chris

2086 MA 102 04 Precalculus 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Wilson, Chris

2087 MA 106 01 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 9-9:50 Carpenter, Amos J

2088 MA 106 02 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 10-10:50

Krohn, Mary

2089 MA 106 03 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 10-10:50 Gaisser, John W

2090 MA 106 04 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 11-11:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

3350 MA 106 05 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 12-12:50

Krohn, Mary

2092 MA 106 06 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 12-12:50 Graham, Kelsie

2093 MA 106 07 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1 5, U

M-F 1-1:50 Leatherman, Duane L

2094 MA 107 01 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 2 4, U

MTWF 9-9:50 Sharma, Prem L

2095 MA 107 02 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 2 4, U

MTWF 10-10:50

Staff

2096 MA 125 01 Business Calculus 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Krohn, Mary

2097 MA 125 02 Business Calculus 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

2098 MA 125 03 Business Calculus 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Leatherman, Duane L

2099 MA 125 04 Business Calculus 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

2100 MA 125 05 Business Calculus 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Leatherman, Duane L

2228 MA 125 06 Business Calculus 3, U

MWF 2-2:50 Leatherman, Duane L

2102 MA 162 01 Statistical Methods 4, U

MTWF 9-9:50 Graham, Kelsie

2101 MA 162 02 Statistical Methods 4, U

MTWF 10-10:50 Graham, Kelsie

2103 MA 205 01 Discrete Mathematics 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Sharma, Prem L

2104 MA 205 02 Discrete Mathematics 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Gaisser, John W

2105 MA 208 01 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 3 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

30 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


2106 MA 208 02 Calculus & Analytic Geometry 3 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Carpenter, Amos J

2107 MA 215 01 Linear Algebra 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Wahl, Rebecca G

2108 MA 215 02 Linear Algebra 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Wahl, Rebecca G

3338 AR 210-MA 01 Statistically Speaking 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Echols, Lacey P

3339 AR 210-MA 02 Statistically Speaking 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Echols, Lacey P

3340 AR 210-MA 03 Statistically Speaking 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Echols, Lacey P

3341 AR 211-MA 01 Codes & Secret Messages 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Holmes, Karen

3342 AR 211-MA 02 Codes & Secret Messages 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Holmes, Karen

3347 AR 212-MA 01 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Holmes, Karen

3349 AR 212-MA 02 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Holmes, Karen

3348 AR 212-MA 03 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

MWF 1-1:50

Chen, Zhihong

3579 AR 212-MA 04 Win, Lose or Draw 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

Modern Languages, Literature and Cultures

Chinese

1872 CN 101 01 Beginning Chinese 1 4, U

MTWR 10-10:50 Liu, Xiaoqing

2161 CN 101 02 Beginning Chinese 1 4, U

MTWR 1-1:50

Staff

1873 CN 203 01 Intermediate Chinese 1 4, U

MTWR 11-11:50 Liu, Xiaoqing

2162 CN 305 01 Advanced Chinese 1 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Staff

French

1832 FR 101 01 Beginning French 1 4, U

MTWR 10-10:55

Staff

1833 FR 102 01 Beginning French 2 4, U

MTWR 11-11:50

Staff

1834 FR 203 01 Intermediate French 1 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Staff

1837 FR 203 02 Intermediate French 1 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Sureau-Hale,

Eloise Charlotte

1835 FR 204 01 Intermediate French 2 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Riggs, Larry W

1836 FR 204 02 Intermediate French 2 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Riggs, Larry W

2262 FR 300 01 Oral and Written Communication 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

2263 FR 300 02 Oral and Written Communication 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Sureau-Hale,

Eloise Charlotte

3325 FR 325 01 Intro to French Linguistics 3, U

MW 1-2:15

Sureau-Hale,

Eloise Charlotte

3326 FR 334 01 Intro to Francophone Cultures 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

3327 FR 475 01 20th-Century French Drama 3, U

MW 11-12:15 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

German

1869 GR 101 01 Beginning German 1 4, U

MTWR 10-10:50 Stigter, Michelle

1870 GR 203 01 Intermediate German 1 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Painitz, Sarah

1871 GR 203 02 Intermediate German 1 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Painitz, Sarah

3423 GR 310 01 German Written Communication 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Painitz, Sarah

3425 GR 360 01 German Film 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Painitz, Sarah

3066 TI 225-GR 01 Lit Responses to Two World War 3, U

MWF 2-2:50

Painitz, Sarah

Spanish

1838 SP 101 01 Beginning Spanish 1 4, U

TWRF 8-8:50

Staff

1866 SP 101 50 Beginning Spanish 1 4, U

TR 6-7:40

Staff

1855 SP 102 01 First Year Spanish 4, U

TWRF 9-9:50

Staff

1858 SP 102 50 First Year Spanish 4, U

TR 6-7:40

Staff

1839 SP 203 01 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Staff

1840 SP 203 02 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

1841 SP 203 03 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Rodriguez, Juan

1842 SP 203 04 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Rodriguez, Juan

1843 SP 203 05 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Staff

1844 SP 203 06 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

1857 SP 203 07 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

1853 SP 203 08 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

MWF 11-11:50

Staff

1867 SP 203 09 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Willem, Linda M

1859 SP 203 50 Intermediate Spanish 1 3, U

TR 6-7:15

Staff

1845 SP 204 01 Intermediate Spanish 2 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Staff

3426 SP 204 02 Intermediate Spanish 2 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40

Staff

1846 SP 204 03 Intermediate Spanish 2 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Staff

1847 SP 204 04 Intermediate Spanish 2 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

1854 SP 204 05 Intermediate Spanish 2 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

1860 SP 204 50 Intermediate Spanish 2 3, U

MW 6-7:15

Staff

31 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


1848 SP 305 01 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Willem, Linda M

1849 SP 305 02 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Willem, Linda M

1850 SP 305 03 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

2218 SP 305 04 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

1851 SP 310 01 Spanish Written Communication 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Goens, Liliana T

1852 SP 310 02 Spanish Written Communication 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Goens, Liliana T

1856 SP 320S 01SW Service Learning in Spanish 3, U

T 11-12:30

Goens, Liliana T

2165 SP 320S 02SW Service Learning in Spanish 3, U

R 11-12:30

Goens, Liliana T

1863 SP 325 01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Quintanilla, Alex

Hispanic Linguistics

Hispanic Linguistics. Overview of the history, phonetics,

syntax, acquisition and language variation in Spanish (theories,

analysis and application), conducted in Spanish.

3427 SP 325 02 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Quintanilla, Alex

Hispanic Linguistics

3452 SP 355 01 Span Amer Culture:S America 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

3453 SP 355 02 Span Amer Culture:S America 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

3454 SP 370 01 Topics Contemp Hisp Societies 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Rodriguez, Juan

Guadalajara Mexico Study Tour

3455 SP 370 02 Topics Contemp Hisp Societies 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Rodriguez, Juan

Guadalajara Mexico Study Tour

3456 SP 445 01 Topics in Hispanic Linguistics 3, U

T 2:25-5:05 Quintanilla, Alex

3457 SP 445 02 Topics in Hispanic Linguistics 3, U

R 2:25-5:05

Staff

3536 SP 490 02 Seminar 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Carney, Terri M

Chicas Raras-Span Lit & Film

1864 SP 490 50 Seminar 3, U

TBA

Gabiola, Irune del Rio

Lat America & Spain: Artistic

Connections

Comparative analysis of Spanish and Latin American artistic

and literary movements, with a focus on trans-Atlantic

relations and the rise of such movements as romanticism,

realism, modernism, and historical Avant - Gardes (impressionism,

surrealism- cubism- etc. ).

Philosophy

3272 TI 242-PL 01 Marginalized in America 3, U

W 2:25-4:55 Dulckeit, Katharina

Marginalized in America: Gender at the Intersection of Race

and Class. This course introduces the student to the philosophical

method and skills of thinking out problems and

issues that confront women in contemporary American society,

viewed from the intersection of gender, race and class.

32 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3273 TI 243-PL 01 Knowledge and Reality 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Dulckeit, Katharina

Fundamental philosophical questions about knowledge and

reality will be studied through the analysis of classical and

contemporary texts. Topics may include skepticism, the relationship

between faith and reason, the nature of mind, free

will, the nature and existence of the external world, and the

nature and existence of God.

3284 TI 243-PL 02 Knowledge and Reality 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Whitmeyer II, Virgil G

3267 TI 244-PL 01 Ethics, The Good Life,& Society 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05 van der Linden, Harry

3288 TI 244-PL 03 Ethics, The Good Life,& Society 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Watson, Whitten S

Fundamental philosophical questions about right conduct,

virtues and vices, the good life and social policy will be examined

on basis of classical and contemporary texts. Topics

include issues of personal and social ethics, such as forgiveness,

tolerance and hate speech, abortion, animal rights, and

world poverty. Theories of justice, human rights, and metaethical

topics may also be covered.

3278 TI 244-PL 02 Ethics, The Good Life,& Society 3, U

MW 1-2:15 McGowan, Richard J

3270 AR 231-PL 01 Principles of Reasoning 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Popa, Tiberiu M

A survey of principles of reasoning used in a variety of disciplines,

including philosophy, mathematics, statistics, the

natural and social sciences, and law. Attention also will be

paid to how to recognize and avoid fallacies”

Religion

3354 SW 260-RL 01 Sects in the City 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Bauman, Chad

A basic introduction to the religions and religious communities

of Indianapolis, and an exploration of prominent issues

and themes related to our city’s (and our country’s) increasing

religious diversity.

3351 TI 250-RL 01 Religions of the World 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Bauman, Chad

An introduction to the texts, practices, and ideas of the

world’s major religious traditions, including Hinduism,

Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism,

Christianity, Islam, and the indigenous traditions of Africa

and the Americas.

3355 TI 251-RL 01 The Bible 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 McGrath, James

Introduction to the content, historical context, methods of

study, religious ideas and cultural influence of the Jewish and

Christian scriptures.

3362 TI 251-RL 02 The Bible 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Snyder, Glen Evan

3363 TI 251-RL 03 The Bible 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Snyder, Glen Evan

Physics

1875 PH 107 01 Elementary Physics 1 4, U

MWF 12-12:50 Ordonez, Gonzalo

T 12-12:50

1876 PH 107 01A Elementary Physics 1 0, U

R 10-11:50 Ordonez, Gonzalo


1877 PH 107 01B Elementary Physics 1 0, U

R 1-2:50

Ordonez, Gonzalo

1887 PH 107 02 Elementary Physics 1 4, U

MRF 10-10:50 Poor, Jennifer L

W 10-10:50

1886 PH 107 02A Elementary Physics 1 0, U

T 1-2:50

Poor, Jennifer L

1878 PH 107 02B Elementary Physics 1 0, U

T 3-4:50

Ordonez, Gonzalo

1879 PH 201 01 Intro to Analytical Physics 5, U

M-F 11-11:50

Kosik, Dan W

1880 PH 201 01A Intro to Analytical Physics 0, U

T 1:30-3:20

Kosik, Dan W

1882 PH 201 01B Intro to Analytical Physics 0, U

T 3:30-5:20

Kosik, Dan W

1890 PH 201 01C Intro to Analytical Physics 0, U

T 5:30-7:20

Kosik, Dan W

3038 NW 262-PH 01 The Physical World 5, U

MTW 5:15-6:25

Staff

3039 NW 262-PH 01A The Physical World 0, U

W 6:30-8:20

Staff

3040 NW 262-PH 01B The Physical World 0, U

R 5:15-7:05

Staff

Astronomy

1874 AS 100 50 The Astronomical Universe 3, U

M 6:30-8:50

Staff

2047 AS 311 01 Astrophysics 1 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Murphy, Brian W

3041 NW 263-AS 01 The Astronomical Universe 5, U

MWRF 11-11:50 Murphy, Brian W

3042 NW 263-AS 01A The Astronomical Universe 0, U

T 9-10:50

Murphy, Brian W

3043 NW 263-AS 01B The Astronomical Universe 0, U

T 11-12:50 Murphy, Brian W

Political Science

2169 PO 102 01 Introduction to Peace Studies 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 McEvoy-Levy, Siobhan M

2170 PO 131 01 Introduction to US Politics 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Staff

2171 PO 141S 01 Intro International Politics 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Ooi, Su-Mei

3532 PO 141S 02 Intro International Politics 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Ooi, Su-Mei

2173 PO 201S 01 Research and Analysis 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Turner, Robin

3561 PO 210 01 Basic Political Thought 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Brabant, Margaret A

2174 PO 220 01 Community Mediation 3, U

T 2:25-5:35 Auchter, Craig W

Psychology

2049 PS 202 01 Learning 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Martin, Joel

2050 PS 210 01 Research Methods/Statistics I 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Gingerich, Mandy

2051 PS 210 02 Research Methods/Statistics I 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Gingerich, Mandy

2052 PS 211 01 Research Methods/Statistics II 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 O’Malley, Alison

2053 PS 235 01 Biological Bases of Behavior 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Lineweaver, Tara T

3371 SW 225-PS 01 Humans and the Natural Environ 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 O’Malley, Alison

3372 SW 225-PS 02 Humans and the Natural Environ 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 O’Malley, Alison

3050 SW 250-PS 01 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

3051 SW 250-PS 02 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

3052 SW 250-PS 03 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Staff

3053 SW 250-PS 04 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

3054 SW 250-PS 05 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Bohannon III, Neil

3495 SW 250-PS 06 Psychological Inquiry 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Bohannon III, Neil

Sociology and Criminology

2155 SO 205 01 Contemporary Social Issues 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Colburn Jr, Kenneth D

3318 SW 200-SO 01 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 11-11:50

Cline, Krista

Health & Illness-Soc Perspect

This course exams the social contexts of health, illness, and

medical care. It introduces the beginning student to underlying

regularities in human social behavior and to the analysis

of society through the specific topic of health and illness.

Lectures and readings analyze society in terms of theory, culture,

socialization, and such societal institutions as sex and

gender, family, and the media.

3320 SW 200-SO 02 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 1-1:50

Cline, Krista

Gender: A Sociological Perspec

This course examines the social contexts of gender, gender

roles, and gendered behavior in society. It introduces the beginning

student to underlying regularities in human social

behavior and to the analysis of society through the specific

topic of gender. Lectures and readings analyze society in

terms of theory, culture, socialization, and major social institutions

as family and media.

3322 SW 200-SO 03 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Scott, Marvin B

Race & Ethnicity-Soc Perspect

This course is designed for students interested in understanding

how racism affects our social institutions and interactions.

We will take a close look at prejudices and myths

about race and our own beliefs, behaviors, and biases. During

the semester, case studies and readings will be used to help

students understand ethnic relations and the unique creation

of race within societies. Issues of inequality as related

to institutions will be discussed along with ethnic values and

socialization.

33 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


3323 SW 200-SO 04 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Scott, Marvin B

Race & Ethnicity-Soc Perspect

This course is designed for students interested in understanding

how racism affects our social institutions and interactions.

We will take a close look at prejudices and myths

about race and our own beliefs, behaviors, and biases. During

the semester, case studies and readings will be used to help

students understand ethnic relations and the unique creation

of race within societies. Issues of inequality as related

to institutions will be discussed along with ethnic values and

socialization.

3329 SW 200-SO 05 Understanding Society 3, U

TR 1-2:15 Novak, Katherine B

Inequalities-Soc Perspective

Life is not fair. Some people are born into circumstances which

present them with advantages or a head start in life. Others are

born into circumstances where the deck seems to be stacked

against them. These inequalities frequently coincide with factors

such as race, class, and gender, and affect relationships

between individuals, groups, communities, and even nations.

Sociology has a long-standing interest in understanding how

such processes occur and are maintained. In this course, we

examine key sociological theories and concepts with an eye

toward advantages and disadvantages in experiences in society.

3331 SW 200-SO 06 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Vincent, Sarah Marie

Family-A Sociological Perspect

In this course, we will move beyond our personal notions of

family and use a sociological perspective to explore family life.

Throughout the course we will apply general sociological concepts,

including culture, socialization, and stratification, to

the study of families. We will explore the social forces that impact

the structure of the family and analyze family dynamics

within society at both a macro and micro level. Additionally,

we will identify family systems and subsystems, the impact of

pop-culture on the family, and governmental policies affecting

the home.

International Studies

I. Core A

1823 IS 101 01 Intro International Studies 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Oprisko, Robert

2171 PO 141S 01 Intro International Politics 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Ooi, Su-Mei

3532 PO 141S 02 Intro International Politics 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Ooi, Su-Mei

3049 SW 270-IS 02 Understanding Global Issues 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Oprisko, Robert

3351 TI 250-RL 01 Religions of the World 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Bauman, Chad

3047 SW 220-COB 01 The Economy and Society 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Kirk, Bob

Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

3422 GWS 102 01 Intersections of Identity 3, U

MW 11-12:15 Clarkson, Nicholas

3424 GWS 202 01 Resist for Social Change 3, U

T 6-8:40 Beloso, Brooke Meredith

3048 SW 232-GWS 01 Intersections of Identity 3, U

MW 11-12:15 Clarkson, Nicholas

This course will explore the social construction of difference

and inequality with particular focus on race, gender, sexuality

and class (primarily) in the United States. From a critical-cultural

perspective, this course will examine systems of

inequality, domination, privilege and oppression. This course

will equip students with the ability to interrogate dominant

ideology and develop an understanding of how systems of inequality

impact everyone’s daily lives. Students will also explore

avenues for positive social change and justice.

Related classes for Gender Studies credit; see departmental listing

for more information

3403 HST 205 01 Questions in History 3, U

TBA

Staff

Questions in History: Sex & Sexuality

in Latin America

3320 SW 200-SO 02 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Cline, Krista

Gender: A Sociological Perspec

This course examines the social contexts of gender, gender

roles, and gendered behavior in society. It introduces the beginning

student to underlying regularities in human social behavior

and to the analysis of society through the specific topic

of gender. Lectures and readings analyze society in terms of

theory, culture, socialization, and major social institutions as

family and media.

3272 TI 242-PL 01 Marginalized in America 3, U

W 2:25-4:55 Dulckeit, Katharina

Peace Studies

Core Classes

2169 PO 102 01 Introduction to Peace Studies 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 McEvoy-Levy, Siobhan M

2174 PO 220 01 Community Mediation 3, U

T 2:25-5:35 Auchter, Craig W

Electives

3424 GWS 202 01 Resist for Social Change 3, U

T 6-8:40 Beloso, Brooke Meredith

Science, Technology & Society

Related classes for STS credit; see departmental listing for more

information.

1627 CS 282S 01 EPICS 1 Service Learning 2, U

MW 3:50-4:40

Gupta, Ankur

3074 CS 283S 01 EPICS 1 Service Learning 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05

Gupta, Ankur

2050 PS 210 01 Research Methods/Statistics I 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Gingerich, Mandy

2051 PS 210 02 Research Methods/Statistics I 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Gingerich, Mandy

34 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


2052 PS 211 01 Research Methods/Statistics II 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 O’Malley, Alison

3318 SW 200-SO 01 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Cline, Krista

Health & Illness-Soc Perspect

3320 SW 200-SO 02 Understanding Society 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Cline, Krista

Gender: A Sociological Perspec

3371 SW 225-PS 01 Humans and the Natural Environ 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 O’Malley, Alison

3372 SW 225-PS 02 Humans and the Natural Environ 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 O’Malley, Alison

3056 SW 261S-RX 01 Health Disparities 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Ryder, Priscilla T

2443 MS 265 01 Information Technology 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Davidson, Jason L

2444 MS 265 02 Information Technology 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Davidson, Jason L

3386 MS 265 03 Information Technology 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

2445 MS 265 04 Information Technology 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Arling, Priscilla

Air Force ROTC

2958 AI 101 01 The Air Force Today 1 2, U

R 1:25-2:15

Staff

T 11:15-12:05

2959 AI 101 02 The Air Force Today 1 2, U

R 2:30-3:20

Staff

R 3:35-5:35

2960 AI 201 01 The Development of Air Power 1 2, U

W 10:10-11

Staff

R 3:35-5:35

2961 AI 201 02 The Development of Air Power 1 2, U

R 3:35-5:35

Staff

M 3:35-4:25

Army ROTC

2954 RZ 101 01 Foundations of Officership 1, U

W 3:30-4:20

McKee, Ross

2955 RZ 201 01 Individ Leadership Studies 2, U

T 9-10:50

McKee, Ross

35 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


College of Education

Educational Foundations

2609 ED 112 01 Intro to Profession of Tchng 2, U

T 9:35-11:15 Kandel, Brooke E

Students in this section must also be enrolled in ED 245 01

2610 ED 112 02 Intro to Profession of Tchng 2, U

R 9:35-11:15 Bloom, Stephen J

& Lecklider, Debra R

2624 ED 112 03 Intro to Profession of Tchng 2, U

T 12:35-2:15

Staff

Students in this section must also be enrolled in ED 245 03.

2634 ED 112 04 Intro to Profession of Tchng 2, U

R 12:35-2:15

Staff

2574 ED 241 01 Developmental Theory & App: Ed 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Staff

2575 ED 241 02 Developmental Theory & App: Ed 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

2576 ED 241 03 Developmental Theory & App: Ed 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Esteves, Kelli J

2577 ED 242 01 Educ Children w/ Special Needs 2, U

MW 1-1:50

Abbott, Daniel

2606 ED 242 02 Educ Children w/ Special Needs 2, U

MW 11-11:50 Abbott, Daniel

2630 ED 242 03 Educ Children w/ Special Needs 2, U

W 4:30-5:45

Staff

2661 ED 243 01 Methods & Mat: Strat for Teach 3, U

M 4:30-7 Knipstein, Theresa A

2581 ED 244 01 Concepts of Education 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Guerriero, Sam J

2582 ED 244 02 Concepts of Education 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Guerriero, Sam J

2583 ED 244 03 Concepts of Education 3, U

M 4:30-7

Staff

2578 ED 245 01 Intro to Computers in Educ 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Mauer, Matt M

Students in this section must also be enrolled in ED 112 01.

2579 ED 245 02 Intro to Computers in Educ 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Maurer, Matt M

This course will be more instructed towards the elementary

program.

2580 ED 245 03 Intro to Computers in Educ 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Maurer, Matt M

Students in this section must also be enrolled in ED 112 03

2632 ED 245 04 Intro to Computers in Educ 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Maurer, Matt M

This course will be more instructed towards the Middle

Secondary/Physical Education programs.

Early/Middle Childhood

2584 ED 206 01 Intro Early/Mid Childhood Ed 3, U

T 12:30-3:30 Hochman, Arthur W

Middle/Secondary Education

2604 ED 227S 01 Intro to Mid-Sec Students/Scho 3, U

W 12:30-3:30

Staff

2652 ED 228S 01 Content Area Lit in Mid-Sec Cu 3, U

MW 9-10:15

Staff

Physical Education

See Core Curriculum for Physical Well-Being courses

2593 PE 127 01 Intro Health PE Recreatn Dance 2, U

MW 8-8:50

Staff

2594 PE 128 01 Intro to Health Education 2, U

MW 9-9:50

Farley, Lisa A

2645 PE 202 01 Skills Series: Basketball/Socc 1, U

MW 1-1:50

Reagan, Brian

2641 PE 204 01 Skills Series: Tennis/Badmintn 1, U

TR 11-11:50

Reagan, Brian

2648 PE 205 01 Skills Series: Ult Frisb/TmHBl 1, U

TR 12-12:50

Staff

2651 PE 207 01 Skills Series: Weight Trng/Fit 1, U

MW 12-12:50

Staff

2640 PE 218 01 Water Safety Instructor 2, U

F 10-12

Landwehr, Todd J

2595 PE 235 01 Educational Gymnastics 2, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Harden, Annette C

2644 PE 253 01 Motor Learning 2, U

MW 11-11:50

Reagan, Brian

2646 PE 297 01 Orient to Internships in PE 3, U

F 9-11:50

Reagan, Brian

36 College of Education


College of Business

Accounting

2424 AC 203 01 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Sander, James F

2448 AC 203 02 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Sander, James F

2425 AC 203 03 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

MW 5:45-7

Staff

2452 AC 203 04 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Wilson, George

2477 AC 203 05 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Wilson, George

2457 AC 203 06 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Updyke, Karel A

2548 AC 203 07 Introduction to Accounting 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05 Updyke, Karel A

3375 AC 204 01 Introduction to Accounting II 3, U

MW 1-2:15

Rouse, Pamela J

2513 AC 204 02 Introduction to Accounting II 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Rouse, Pamela J

2549 AC 204 03 Introduction to Accounting II 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05

Kelly, Anne

Business Administration

2514 COB 101 01 Profess. & Career Development I 0, U

TR 5:30-7:30 Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2515 COB 201 01 Profess & Career Devel II 0, U

W 7:30-8:50 Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2516 COB 201 02 Profess & Career Devel II 0, U

W 4-5:30

Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2517 COB 201 03 Profess & Career Devel II 0, U

T 4-5:30

Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2518 COB 201 04 Profess & Career Devel II 0, U

T 5:30-7

Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2534 COB 201 05 Profess & Career Devel II 0, U

W 4-5:30

Wolfsie, MaryEllen

Economics

2429 EC 231 01 Principles of Microeconomics 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Litkowski, Thomas

2430 EC 231 02 Principles of Microeconomics 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Litkowski, Thomas

2431 EC 231 03 Principles of Microeconomics 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Litkowski, Thomas

2432 EC 231 04 Principles of Microeconomics 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Paulson Gjerde, Kathy A

2454 EC 231 05 Principles of Microeconomics 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Paulson Gjerde, Kathy A

2555 EC 231 06 Principles of Microeconomics 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Rodman, Laura M

2433 EC 232 01 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Main, Robert S

2527 EC 232 02 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Main, Robert S

Legal Studies

3381 LE 263 01 Legal Environment of Business 3, U

MWF 11-11:50

Staff

3382 LE 263 02 Legal Environment of Business 3, U

MWF 12-12:50

Staff

3383 LE 263 03 Legal Environment of Business 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Staff

3504 LE 264 01 Business Ethics 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 McGowan, Richard J

3505 LE 264 02 Business Ethics 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 McGowan, Richard J

3506 LE 264 03 Business Ethics 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 McGowan, Richard J

3507 LE 264 04 Business Ethics 3, U

MWF 12-12:50

Staff

Management

2459 MG 101 01 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 McKneight, James Robert

F 2:25-4:15

2460 MG 101 02 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 McKneight, James Robert

F 2:25-4:15

2461 MG 101 03 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

F 2:25-4:15 McKneight, James Robert

2462 MG 101 04 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Fernhaber, Stephanie A

F 2:25-4:15

2463 MG 101 05 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

MWF 12-12:50 Fernhaber, Stephanie A

F 2:25-4:15

37 College of Business


2512 MG 101 06 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Fernhaber, Stephanie A

F 2:25-4:15

2533 MG 101 07 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

TR 8-9:15

King, Kathryn W

F 2:25-4:15

2558 MG 101 08 Freshman Business Experience 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 King, Kathryn W

F 2:25-4:15

2464 MG 201 01 Real Business Experience 1 3, U

MWF 8-8:50

Finn, Zach

2465 MG 201 02 Real Business Experience 1 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Finn, Zach

2482 MG 201 03 Real Business Experience 1 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05 Williams, Denise E

2483 MG 201 04 Real Business Experience 1 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Halstead, Richard

2484 MG 201 05 Real Business Experience 1 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Halstead, Richard

2563 MG 202 01 Real Business Experience 2 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Halstead, Richard

Marketing

2446 MK 280 01 Principles of Marketing 3, U

TR 8-9:15 Shupe, Gina Marie

Management Science

2494 MS 100 01 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MWF 12-12:50 Davidson, Jason L

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2495 MS 100 02 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MWF 1-1:50 Davidson, Jason L

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2496 MS 100 03 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MWF 12-12:50 Davidson, Jason L

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2497 MS 100 04 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MWF 1-1:50 Davidson, Jason L

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2498 MS 100 05 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MWF 12-12:50 Davidson, Jason L

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2499 MS 100 06 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MWF 1-1:50 Davidson, Jason L

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2500 MS 100 07 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MW 5:45-7 Novotny, Jill Ann

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2501 MS 100 08 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MW 5:45-7 Novotny, Jill Ann

Students must attend all class sessions in order to pass the

course. Instructors will not make any exceptions to this

policy.

2543 MS 100 09 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

MW 5:45-7 Novotny, Jill Ann

2559 MS 100 10 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, U

S 9:30-12:10

Staff

2466 MS 264 01 Statistics 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Fetter Jr, Richard E

2474 MS 264 02 Statistics 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Fetter Jr, Richard E

2530 MS 264 03 Statistics 3, U

MWF 11-11:50

Staff

2443 MS 265 01 Information Technology 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 Davidson, Jason L

2444 MS 265 02 Information Technology 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Davidson, Jason L

3386 MS 265 03 Information Technology 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

2445 MS 265 04 Information Technology 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Arling, Priscilla

2508 MS 265 05 Information Technology 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Arling, Priscilla

38 College of Business


College of Pharmacy

and Health Sciences

PreProfessional Health Science

2675 PX 100 01 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

M 2:25-3:40 Enz, Stephanie L

2676 PX 100 02 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

M 2:25-3:40

Staff

2677 PX 100 03 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

T 2:25-3:40 Hrubey, Todd W

2678 PX 100 04 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

T 2:25-3:40

Peak, Amy S

2872 PX 100 05 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

W 2:25-3:40

Devine, Trish

2840 PX 100 06 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

W 2:25-3:40 Kennedy, Laurence A

2679 PX 100 07 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

R 2:25-3:40 Van Tyle, Jeanne H

2680 PX 100 08 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

R 2:25-3:40

Staff

2802 PX 100 09 Health Sciences Seminar 1, U

TBA

Staff

2787 PX 200S 01 Intro to Professional Practice 2, U

R 1-1:50

Devine, Trish

2890 PX 200S 02 Intro to Professional Practice 2, U

R 1-1:50

Staff

2894 PX 200S 03 Intro to Professional Practice 2, U

F 1-1:50

Staff

39 College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences


Jordan College

of Fine Arts

Jordan College

Freshmen

1003 JC 100 03 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Creech, Kenneth

Media Arts Majors

1004 JC 100 04 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Thoreson, Glen V

Theatre Majors

1078 JC 100 05 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts Administration Majors

1417 JC 100 07 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Jarvis, Michelle M

Art Program Majors

Sophomores

1219 JC 200 04 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Thoreson, Glen V

Theatre Majors

1220 JC 200 05 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts Administration Majors

1355 JC 200 06 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Taylor, Christine A

Media Arts Majors

1418 JC 200 07 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Jarvis, Michelle M

Art Program Majors

Art

1387 ART 105 01 Introduction to Visual Culture 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Staff

1410 ART 107 01 Drawing 3, U

TR 2:25-5:05

Rao, Gautam

Permission of Instructor only

Dance

Courses open to non-majors

1012 DA 101 01 Beginning Ballet 1 1, U

MF 8-8:50

Ladner, Jennifer A

1013 DA 103 01 Beginning Jazz 1, U

TR 8-8:50

Ladner, Jennifer A

1014 DA 105 01 Intermediate/Advanced Jazz 1, U

TR 9:35-10:25 Ladner, Jennifer A

1015 DA 107 01 Modern Dance (non-majors) 1, U

MF 9-9:50

Ladner, Jennifer A

1309 DA 201 01 Intermediate Ballet (non-major 1, U

MF 7:30-8:50 Wong, Roberta Anne

Courses Reserved for Dance Majors

Studio Courses

1245 DA 109 01 Professional Practices 0, U

F 3:40-4:30

Attaway, Larry A

1300 DA 111 01 Ballet Technique 1 2, U

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30

1301 DA 113 01 Ballet Technique 2 Freshman 2, U

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30

1311 DA 213 01 Ballet Technique 2 2, U

TR 1-2:30

Attaway, Larry A

MWF 2-3:30

1302 DA 115 01 Ballet Technique 3 2, U

TR 1-2:30

Attaway, Larry A

MWF 12:20-1:50

1312 DA 215 01 Ballet Technique 3 2, U

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30

1303 DA 117 01 Ballet Technique 4 2, U

TR 1-2:30

Attaway, Larry A

MWF 12:20-1:50

1313 DA 217 01 Ballet Technique 4 2, U

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30

1304 DA 119 01 Ballet Technique - Men 1, U

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

1314 DA 219 01 Ballet Technique Men 1, U

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

1305 DA 121 01 Pointe 1 1, U

MW 3:40-4:40 Attaway, Larry A

40 Jordan College of Fine Arts


1315 DA 221 01 Pointe 1 1, U

MW 3:40-4:40 Attaway, Larry A

1306 DA 123 01 Pointe 2 1, U

TR 2:40-3:40 Attaway, Larry A

1316 DA 223 01 Pointe 2 1, U

TR 2:40-3:40 Attaway, Larry A

1307 DA 125 01 Pas de Deux 1 1, U

M 3:40-4:40 Reid, Derek Enrico

Permission of Instructor required

1317 DA 225 01 Pas de Deux 2 1, U

M 3:40-4:40 Cholewa, Marek

Permission of Instructor required

1308 DA 127 01 Men’s Allegro Technique 1 1, U

TR 2:40-3:40 Cholewa, Marek

1318 DA 227 01 Men’s Allegro Technique 2 1, U

TR 2:40-3:40 Cholewa, Marek

3252 DA 131 01 Modern Technique 1 1, U

TR 11-12:30 McGuire, Susan

3255 DA 231 01 Modern Technique 2 1, U

TR 9-10:30

McGuire, Susan

1021 DA 141 01 Jazz 1 1, U

MF 11-12:15 Pratt, Cynthia A

1319 DA 241 01 Jazz 2 1, U

MWF 10-10:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

1023 DA 151 01 Butler Ballet - Freshman 1, U

M 4:45-5:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 3:45-6

S 8-5

1024 DA 251 01 Butler Ballet - Sophomore 1, U

M 4:45-5:30 Attaway, Larry A

S 8-5

TR 3:45-6

1246 DA 255 01 Butler Chamber Dance 1, U

TBA

Attaway, Larry A

1022 DA 247 01 Character Dance-Slavic 1, U

MF 11-11:50 Cholewa, Marek

Dance Academics and Theatrical Courses

1016 DA 161 01 Body Placement 1 1, U

TR 10-10:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

3254 DA 166 02 Masterworks of Dance 2, U

MWF 8-8:50 Laurent-Faesi, Stephan

1027 DA 261 01 Laban Movement Analysis 2, U

MWF 9-9:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

Open to Non-majors with consent of the department chair.

3253 DA 190 01 Performance Attendance 0, U

TBA

Attaway, Larry A

1310 DA 211 01 Ballet Technique 1 2, U

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30

1020 DA 233 01 Improvisation 1 1, U

F 3:40-5

McGuire, Susan

3256 DA 263 01 Music for Dance - Theory 1, U

TR 8-8:50

Attaway, Larry A

Applied Music

Though not listed below, applied music in voice and many instruments

is available, space permitting. Consult the online schedule or

with JCFA for appropriate course numbers. An Individual Music

Instruction fee of $260 per credit hour will be charged for all private

instruction. This is in addition to tuition.

Courses for Non-Majors

1249 AM 125 01 Guitar Class 1 1, U

W 3-3:50

Terrell, Brett

1289 AM 127 01 Voice Class 1 1, U

MW 8-8:50 Rickards, Steven L

1432 AM 127 02 Voice Class 1 1, U

MW 9-9:50 Rickards, Steven L

1291 AM 130 01 World Drumming Class 1, U

MW 2:30-3:30 Crabiel, Jon A

3117 AM 134 01 Jazz Keyboard Skills 1, U

TBA

Walters, Gary

Courses for Dance Majors

1037 AM 11 01 Keyboard Skills 1 1, U

TR 8-8:50

Mobley, Jenny

DANCE MJRS ONLY

1038 AM 11 02 Keyboard Skills 1 1, U

TR 9-9:50

Mobley, Jenny

1039 AM 13 50 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

MW 5:40-6:30 Mobley, Jenny

DANCE MJRS ONLY

1448 AM 13 51 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

F 5:10-6

Mobley, Jenny

W 4:40-5:30

Courses for Music Majors

1040 AM 21 01 Keyboard Skills 1 1, U

MW 9-9:50

Mobley, Jenny

1041 AM 21 02 Keyboard Skills 1 1, U

MW 10-10:50

Mobley, Jenny

1340 AM 21 03 Keyboard Skills 1 1, U

MW 1-1:50

Mobley, Jenny

1042 AM 21 04 Keyboard Skills 1 1, U

TR 2-2:50

Mobley, Jenny

1043 AM 23 01 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

MW 11-11:50

Mobley, Jenny

1398 AM 23 02 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

MW 12-12:50

Mobley, Jenny

1044 AM 23 03 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

MW 3-3:50

Mobley, Jenny

1045 AM 23 04 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

TR 10-10:50

Mobley, Jenny

41 Jordan College of Fine Arts


1350 AM 23 05 Keyboard Skills 3 1, U

TR 12-12:50

Mobley, Jenny

1337 AM 151 01 Bassoon Reed Making 1 1, U

TBA

Spaniol, Douglas E

1391 AM 193 01 Secondary Applied Jazz Studies 1, U

TBA

Pivec, Matthew J

1338 AM 251 01 Bassoon Reed Making II 1, U

TBA

Spaniol, Douglas E

1392 AM 293 01 Applied Jazz Studies 2, U

TBA

Pivec, Matthew J

Ensemble

Freshman/Sophomore Registrations

3118 ES 100 01 Fundamentals of Chamber Music 1, U

T 4-5:30

Brooks, Davis H

3119 ES 101 02 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Brooks, Lisa E

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3120 ES 101 03 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Brooks, Lisa E

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3121 ES 101 04 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Boyd, Kate

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3122 ES 101 05 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Clark, Richard A

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3123 ES 101 07 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Grubb, William

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3124 ES 101 08 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Lewis, Gail D

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3125 ES 101 09 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Murray, David P

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3126 ES 101 10 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Shapiro, Larry D

3127 ES 101 11 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Spaniol, Douglas E

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

1462 ES 101 13 Chamber Music 1, U

TBA

Smith, Malcolm W

For pre-formed groups with this instructor as coach

3128 ES 102 01 Chamber Music: Guitar 1, U

TBA

Terrell, Brett

3129 ES 103 01 Chamber Music: AJSQ 1, U

TBA

Brightman, Nicholas M

Chamber Music-Woodwind Sax Quartet

3191 ES 104-I 01 Jordan Jazz 1, U

TR 4-5:30

Brimmer, Tim R

3130 ES 105 01 Madrigal Singers 1, U

TR 4-5:30

Blosser, Daniel C

3131 ES 106 01 Chamber Music: Percussion Ens 1, U

TR 11-12:30

Crabiel, Jon A

3132 ES 108 50 New Music Ensemble 1, U

R 7:15-9:45

Felice, Frank

42 Jordan College of Fine Arts

3133 ES 117 01 University Choir 1, U

MWF 12:30-1:50 Leck, Henry H

3134 ES 118 01 University Chorale 1, U

MWF 12:30-1:50

Stark, Eric

3135 ES 119 01 University Marching Band 1, U

MW 5:15-6:45 McCullough, David H

F 4:15-6:45

3136 ES 120 01 University Wind Ensemble 1, U

TR 2:30-4 Grechesky, Robert N

F 2-4

3137 ES 122 50 University Symphony 1, U

W 7-10

Clark, Richard A

M 2-5

3138 ES 124 01 Jazz Ensemble 1, U

MW 12-1:45 Pivec, Matthew J

3139 ES 124 02 Jazz Ensemble 1, U

MW 12-1:45

Walters, Gary

1466 ES 127 01 Jazz Combo 1, U

R 5:30-7

Pivec, Matthew J

3141 ES 127 02 Jazz Combo 1, U

TBA

Walters, Gary

3140 ES 127 03 Jazz Combo 1, U

TBA

Walters, Gary

3219 ES 127 04 Jazz Combo 1, U

TBA

Pivec, Matthew J

Music Education

1230 ME 101 01 Foundations in Music Education 2, U

TR 10-10:50 Dimmick, Penny G

1356 ME 160 01 Practicum in Music Education 1, U

TBA

Dimmick, Penny G

1357 ME 161 01 Practicum in Music Education 2, U

TBA

Dimmick, Penny G

3222 ME 190 01 Percussion Techniques I 1, U

TR 9-9:50 Dimmick, Penny G

3223 ME 190 02 Percussion Techniques I 1, U

TR 8-8:50 Queen, Jeffrey Allen

3224 ME 193 01 Instru Techniques Class I 1, U

TR 8-8:50

Nobles, Ronald

3225 ME 291 01 Brass Techniques 1 1, U

TR 8-8:50

Lewis, Gail D

3226 ME 299 01 Music Ed Upper Division Exam 0, U

TBA

Bolin, Daniel P

Music History

1397 MH 111 01 Historical Survey of Music 3, U

MWF 8-8:50 DeRusha, Stanley E

DANCE MJRS ONLY

Music Lyric Theatre

1269 MLT 110 01 Lyric Theatre Workshop 1, U

TRF 2-4 Studebaker, Thomas Wesley

Music Theory

1063 MT 101 02 Theory 1 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Sanborn, Timothy

1064 MT 101 03 Theory 1 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Gillespie, Jeffrey L


1223 MT 101 04 Theory 1 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Gillespie, Jeffrey L

3236 MT 111 01 Aural Skills 1 1, U

MW 11-11:50

Staff

3237 MT 111 02 Aural Skills 1 1, U

MW 12-12:50

Staff

3238 MT 111 03 Aural Skills 1 1, U

TR 9-9:50

Staff

3239 MT 111 04 Aural Skills 1 1, U

TR 10-10:50

Staff

3240 MT 111 05 Aural Skills 1 1, U

TR 11-11:50

Staff

3241 MT 111 06 Aural Skills 1 1, U

TR 12-12:50

Staff

1286 MT 119 01 Introduction to Composition 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Schelle, Michael

1065 MT 201 01 Theory 3 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Kunda, Keith

1066 MT 201 02 Theory 3 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Jones, Rusty

1228 MT 201 03 Theory 3 3, U

MWF 11-11:50

Jones, Rusty

3242 MT 211 01 Aural Skills 3 1, U

MW 8-8:50

Staff

3243 MT 211 02 Aural Skills 3 1, U

TR 9-9:50

Staff

3244 MT 211 03 Aural Skills 3 1, U

TR 10-10:50

Staff

3245 MT 211 04 Aural Skills 3 1, U

TR 11-11:50

Staff

3104 TH 203 01 Voice for the Actor 2 2, U

TR 11-12:30 Timmerman, Diane M

3084 TH 212 01 Stage Movement 3 1, U

R 9-10:50

Staff

3103 TH 213 01 Acting 3 3, U

MW 11-12:50 Timmerman, Diane M

3088 TH 220 01 Stage Management 2, U

M 4:30-5:30

Staff

3100 TH 231 01 Stagecraft 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Thoreson, Glen V

3089 TH 232 01 Stage Lighting 1 3, U

TR 9:30-10:50 Koharchik, Rob M

Theatre

Courses open to non-majors

3087 TH 110 01 Introduction to Acting 3, U

MW 11-12:30

Staff

Courses for Theatre Majors

3097 TH 100 01 Professional Theatre Practices 0, U

TBA

Thoreson, Glen V

3098 TH 100 02 Professional Theatre Practices 0, U

TBA

Thoreson, Glen V

3102 TH 111 01 Acting 1 3, U

MW 9-10:50 Timmerman, Diane M

3083 TH 113 01 The Idea of Theatre 2, U

W 2:25-4:45

Fisher, William

3093 TH 123 01 Makeup 2, U

T 2:30-4:20 Meaden, Wendy J

3091 TH 200 01 Production Fundamentals 2, U

TR 11-12:15 Malone, Angela D

3101 TH 200 02 Production Fundamentals 2, U

TR 11-12:15 Thoreson, Glen V

3096 TH 200 03 Production Fundamentals 2, U

TR 11-12:15 Sipe, Catherine Ann

3086 TH 201 01 Stage Movement 1, U

F 9-10:50

Hoppe, Mary H

3085 TH 201 02 Stage Movement 1, U

F 11-12:50

Hoppe, Mary H

43 Jordan College of Fine Arts


College of Communication

CCOM Required Courses

2378 COM 101 01 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, U

MWF 10-10:50

Staff

This is Butler University’s basic public speaking course.

2379 COM 101 02 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, U

MWF 9-9:50

Staff

This is Butler University’s basic public speaking course.

2380 COM 101 03 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, U

TR 3:50-5:05

Staff

This is Butler University’s basic public speaking course.

2381 COM 101 04 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Staff

This is Butler University’s basic public speaking course.

2382 COM 101 05 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, U

TR 5:15-6:30

Staff

This is Butler University’s basic public speaking course.

2393 COM 101 06 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Staff

This is Butler University’s basic public speaking course.

3461 SW 266-COM 01 Media Literacy 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Hoerl, Kristen

3466 SW 266-COM 02 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Swenson, Kristin

3467 SW 266-COM 03 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Kelly, Casey Ryan

3468 SW 266-COM 04 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40

Savage, Ann M

3549 SW 266-COM 05 Media Literacy 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Swenson, Kristin

Communication Sciences & Disorders

2390 CSD 138 01 American Sign Language 1 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40

Staff

2359 CSD 231 01 Intro to Comm Sci & Disorders 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Reading, Suzanne P

2411 CSD 231 02 Intro to Comm Sci & Disorders 3, U

MWF 11-11:50 Reading, Suzanne P

2360 CSD 238S 01S American Sign Language 3 3, U

MW 3:50-5:05

Staff

3483 CSD 238S 50S American Sign Language 3 3, U

MW 5:15-6:30

Staff

Creative Media & Entertainment

2330 CME 106 01 Survey of Digital Media 3, U

MW 1-2:15

Odom, James W

3109 CME 106 02 Survey of Digital Media 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Odom, James W

2414 CME 107 01 Music Skills for Rec Ind Studi 3, U

MWF 10-10:50 Armstrong, Cutler

2342 CME 109 01 Survey of the Recording Indust 3, U

MWF 1-1:50 Armstrong, Cutler

2346 CME 109 02 Survey of the Recording Indust 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Creech, Kenneth

2333 CME 130 01 Production Lab 1, U

TBA

Taylor, Christine A

2348 CME 130 02 Production Lab 1, U

TBA

Anderson, Ian Z

2313 CME 201 01 Audio Production 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Anderson, Ian Z

2314 CME 201 02 Audio Production 3, U

TR 11-12:15 Armstrong, Cutler

2315 CME 202 01 Multi-Camera Studio Production 3, U

W 2:25-5:05 Taylor, Christine A

2345 CME 202 01A Laboratory 0, U

TBA

Taylor, Christine A

2331 CME 215 01 Video Editing 3, U

MW 2:25-3:40 Taylor, Christine A

2338 CME 219 01 Design for World Wide Web 3, U

TR 2:25-3:40 Odom, James W

2353 CME 220 01 Audio Lab: Independent Study 1, U

TBA

Anderson, Ian Z

2343 CME 220 02 Audio Lab: Independent Study 1, U

TBA

Harris, Mark

Remote Audio

2415 CME 222 01 History of the Recording Indus 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Armstrong, Cutler

Journalism

2272 JR 112 01 News Writing Print 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50 Whitmore, Nancy J

2273 JR 112 02 News Writing Print 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Geertsema, Margaretha

2354 JR 112 03 News Writing Print 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Staff

2295 JR 112 04 News Writing Print 3, U

TR 5:15-6:30

Staff

44 College of Communication


2310 JR 112 05 News Writing Print 3, U

MW 11-12:15

Staff

2325 JR 113 01 News Writing Electronic 3, U

TR 11-12:15

Bridge, Scott E

2274 JR 212 01 Multimedia Journalism I 3, U

M 2:25-5:05 McKown, Loni Smith

2316 JR 213 01 Electronic Journalism 3, U

TR 1-2:15

Bridge, Scott E

Organizational Communication

& Leadership

3485 ORG 215 01 Speech For Business 2, U

MW 9-9:50 Crawford, Janis K

3486 ORG 215 02 Speech For Business 2, U

MW 10-10:50

Sandin, Paul J

3487 ORG 215 03 Speech For Business 2, U

TR 9:35-10:25 Crawford, Janis K

3488 ORG 215 04 Speech For Business 2, U

TR 11:30-12:15 Crawford, Janis K

3489 ORG 215 50 Speech For Business 2, U

W 6:30-8:40

Staff

3490 ORG 215 51 Speech For Business 2, U

R 6:30-8:40

Staff

3491 ORG 270 01 Intro to Organizational Commun 3, U

TBA

Staff

Strategic Communication

3470 STR 222 01 Principles of Strategic Comm 3, U

MWF 9-9:50 Rademacher, Mark A

3471 STR 222 02 Principles of Strategic Comm 3, U

TR 9:35-10:50

Wang, Kevin

3472 STR 228 01 Promotional Writing 3, U

W 2:25-5:05

Wang, Kevin

3473 STR 228 02 Promotional Writing 3, U

TR 8-9:15

Campbell, Rose G

2408 STR 251 01 Design & Production for STR 3, U

MW 11-12:15 Pellerano, Armando

2281 STR 251 02 Design & Production for STR 3, U

MW 1-2:15 Pellerano, Armando

45 College of Communication

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