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scps.nyu.edu

design - School of Continuing and Professional Studies - New York ...

DESIGN

SUMMER 2011

The following information is taken from the

summer 2011 NYU-SCPS bulletin. Please

note that changes are made to course

schedules and locations, and new offerings

are added on a continuing basis.

Visit our website for the most up-to-date

program information: scps.nyu.edu


HOW TO REGISTER

Register now for the best course selection and availability. You may register during the semester

according to the schedules and procedures in the Registration section of this Bulletin. Courses begin

throughout the term.

SUMMER TERM

CALENDAR

WEB: scps.nyu.edu

24 HOURS A DAY

PAYMENT: Visa, MasterCard, Discover,

American Express

TELEPHONE: (212) 998-7150

Now through May 6:

Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m.*

Extended hours, May 9–27:

Monday –Thursday, 9 a.m.–7 p.m.;

Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

PAYMENT: Visa, MasterCard, Discover,

American Express

FAX: (212) 995-3060

24 HOURS A DAY

PAYMENT: Visa, MasterCard, Discover,

American Express

MAIL

Mail registrations are accepted throughout the

semester and must be postmarked at least two

weeks before the course start date. Use the postagepaid

registration form at the back of this Bulletin.

PAYMENT: Visa, MasterCard, Discover,

American Express

IN PERSON

145 Fourth Avenue, 2nd Floor

Now through May 6:

Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–6 p.m.;

Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.*

Extended hours, May 9–27:

Monday –Thursday, 9. a.m.–7 p.m.;

Friday, 9. a.m.–5 p.m.

PAYMENT: Visa, MasterCard, Discover,

American Express, check, or money

order

Summer Classes Begin

Monday, May 23

Memorial Day

Monday, May 30

All classes cancelled.

Independence Day

Monday, July 4

All classes cancelled.

NEED TO CHECK CLASS

LOCATIONS OR TIMES?

You can view course details, including class

locations, room numbers, dates, and times

through ALBERT, the NYU student information

services website, or by calling the number

below. Instructions for accessing ALBERT

are sent to students upon registration.

Call: (212) 998-7200

FOR MORE INFORMATION

HAVE A QUESTION? WE CAN HELP.

For more information on continuing education courses or certificates, we are available

to answer your questions in person, by phone, or by e-mail.

TELEPHONE: (212) 998-7200

Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–7 p.m.;

Friday until 5 p.m.*

E-MAIL: scpsinfo@nyu.edu

*Telephone and in-person registration may be suspended or altered due to holiday observance.

INFORMATION SESSIONS

Our information sessions and career nights offer

an opportunity to meet program staff, discuss

your interests, and address any questions.

NEED TO DROP A COURSE?

You may drop a course by mail or in person

(145 Fourth Avenue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY

10003); online anytime at scps.nyu.edu/drop;

and up until one day before the course start

date via ALBERT, the NYU student information

services website; or by fax (212-995-3060).

If you wish to withdraw from a course after

the first class has met, please consult our

refund policy in the Registration section of

this Bulletin.

Cover Art: James Grashow

Cover Art Photography: Robert Grant

Cover Design: FP Design NY, Inc.

ON THE COVER: JAMES GRASHOW

James Grashow was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1942 and has been

creating works of art that address themes of man, nature, and mortality

since the 1960s. The scale of his work ranges from large environmental

installations to the delicate and contained world of his house plants, where

homes and buildings replace flowers and buds in intricately constructed

bouquets. Grashow is also a well-known woodcut artist. His prints have

appeared regularly in the New York Times and many other well-known

publications. Grashow attended Pratt Institute, where he received a B.F.A.

and, after a year in Florence on a Fulbright Travel Grant for painting and

graphics, an M.F.A. Grashow lives and works in Connecticut with his wife.

New York University Bulletin (USPS 383-620),

Vol. CXI, No. 2, March 8, 2011

Published four times per year (January, March, July, November)

by New York University, 244 Greene Street, 2nd Floor,

New York, NY 10003-6651.

Periodicals postage paid at NY, NY and at additional entry offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New York University Bulletin,

244 Greene Street, 2nd Floor, NY, NY 10003-6651.

WEB SCPS.NYU.EDU | E-MAIL SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU


SCPS.NYU.EDU/DESIGN

DESIGN

Design plays a vital role in media today. Examine the art and craft

behind various creative fields, including graphic design for print and

the Web, interior design, and product design. Learn the principles

and emerging trends in design, as well as the latest software. Explore

your artistic sensibilities and develop your own visual style. Our wide

range of offerings helps you gain the skills required for a career in

the vibrant applied arts industries.

Our offerings in Design include:

• A range of noncredit courses that help strengthen your design skills

while refining your unique communication style.

• Summer Intensives: Web Design (page 4), Flash (page 4),

SolidWorks (page 5), and Interior Design (page 6).

• Professional certificate programs: Digital and Graphic Design

Production (page 3), Digital and Graphic Design (page 3), Web

Producing (page 4) Product Design (page 5), and Interior Design

(page 6).

• Master of Arts in Graphic Communications Management and

Technology, which helps students build expertise in

management practices and the utilization of technology in today’s

communications environments.

For more information, visit scps.nyu.edu/design or call (212) 998-7200.

CONTENTS

Design Fundamentals 1

Graphic Design for Print 2

INFORMATION SESSION

Design, Digital Arts,

and Film

Tuesday, 6–8 p.m., May 3

Kimmel Center for University Life

60 Washington Square South

DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS

Design fundamentals address the perennial question: Where do ideas come from? Discover

the forms, principles, and concepts common in all the design disciplines. Learn the stages

of the creative process and how they interconnect. Design fundamentals courses help you

to unlock your creativity and develop design thinking. Acquire a working knowledge of the

essential skills for effective design.

2D Design Principles

FUND1-CE9220/$495

W Sec. 1: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., May 24–June 14

(4 sessions). Heather Bradley

S Sec. 2: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., June 4–11

(2 sessions). John Davison

W Sec. 3: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., June 30–July 21

(4 sessions).

Appreciating visual grammar is the first

step toward creating work that resonates.

Understand the elements of form and the

principles of composition to better create

projects that attract the eye. Participate in

a series of exercises and critiques to deepen

your perceptions of the 2D picture plane,

and to hone your awareness of aesthetic

options. Learn how to effectively use the

elements of form, such as dot, line, shape,

value, and texture. Study the impact of

compositional approaches, such as dominance,

hierarchy, emphasis, balance, contrast,

tension, and rhythm.

Prospective and current students are invited to join us

for an evening of information about courses,

intensives, and certificates. For more information, call

(212) 998-7200.

Color Harmony

FUND1-CE9102/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., July 6–27

(4 sessions). Heather Bradley

S Sec. 2: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 23–30

(2 sessions). Ivan Freaner, owner, IF Creative

Studio.

Color can evoke a spectrum of emotional

responses, making it one of the most essential

subjects for budding designers to

explore. Study color from an aesthetic perspective

and examine which colors create a

cohesive color palette for a project, which

seem to recede or advance, which vibrate

when placed next to each other, and which

should be avoided when developing for international

audiences due to cultural perceptions.

Discover how the properties of

each color imbue your designs with meaning

and significance. Prerequisite: 2D

Design Principles/FUND1-CE9220

or equivalent knowledge.

Web Design 2

Product Design 5

Interior Design 5

Conceptualization

FUND1-CE9221/$495

W Sec. 1: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., June 18–25

(2 sessions). Peter DiBartolo

W Sec. 2: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., June 21–July 12

(4 sessions). Clive Jacobson

S Sec. 3: Mon. 6–9.30 p.m., July 11–Aug. 1

(4 sessions). Joseph Traylor, graphic designer.

Learn the methods that professionals use

throughout the creative process, and discover

how to generate powerful and effective

design concepts. Participate in a series

of design exercises, in-depth discussions,

and brainstorming sessions to deepen your

capacity for conceptual thinking. Experiment

with basic principles of drawing to refine

your design concepts and clearly communicate

ideas with clients. Using a sketchbook

and pencil, learn how to indicate

simple shapes to convey your ideas;

strengthen hand-eye coordination; and use

your creativity to generate original, powerful

ideas that effectively address your client’s

needs. Prerequisite: 2D Design Principles/

FUND1-CE9220 or equivalent knowledge.

Typography I: Letterform

FUND1-CE9015/$495

W Sec. 1: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 9–16

(2 sessions). Elizabeth Carey Smith

S Sec. 2: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., July 19–Aug. 9

(4 sessions). Clive Jacobson

Typography is a powerful communication

tool—its creative use sets great designers

apart from just good ones. Designed for

those interested in creating effective communications,

this course helps students develop

an understanding of the anatomy of

type, terminology, organization, and its relationship

with other graphic elements.

Explore how letterforms and clusters of

letters can convey meaning. Become aware

of how font choices impact messages and

compositions. Create typographic configurations

to sharpen perceptions of the characteristics

of type. Prerequisites: 2D Design

Principles/FUND1-CE9220 and

Conceptualization/FUND1-CE9221 or

equivalent knowledge.

S Meets in the Washington Square, Cooper Square,

Union Square vicinity.

W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St.

TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION: (212) 998-7200

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SCPS.NYU.EDU/DESIGN

Typography II: Families and Grids

FUND1-CE9016/$495

W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., July 28–Aug. 18

(4 sessions). Matthew Guemple

Designers rely on typographical styles to

express personality, convey a client’s brand

identity, and clearly communicate information

to audiences. Command of typography

is an essential skill honed through academic

exercises that require an appropriate blend

of practical knowledge and an ability to think

conceptually. Expand your knowledge of

typography, learning every facet of type,

font, and legibility, by solving a series of

advanced problems that incorporate both

display and text type, with and without

imagery. Create effective, powerful compositions

for your portfolio that will wow

any art director and give you a competitive

edge. Prerequisites: InDesign I: Foundations/

GDES1-CE9101 and Typography I/FUND1-

CE9015 or equivalent knowledge.

Brand Identity

FUND1-CE9105/$495

W Sec. 1: Mon. 6–9.30 p.m., June 6–27

(4 sessions). Dennis Ahlgrim, owner and

co-creative director, Ahlgrim/Sheppard.

For a company to succeed, it must

establish a personality, or brand identity,

that differentiates it in the marketplace.

Businesses depend on designers to develop

a unique look and feel to be carried across

multiple platforms, including print collateral,

websites, and broadcast media. A brand

image strategy is supported by color, logo,

and typography, then documented in a corporate

style guide. This course surveys how

visual imagery and metaphor define the elements

that make one brand outshine its

competitors. Class meets in a computer lab.

Prerequisites: Illustrator I: Foundations/

DDRW1-CE9004 and Typography I/

FUND1-CE9015 or equivalent knowledge.

Design: Past, Present, and Future

FUND1-CE9222/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., June 8–29

(4 sessions). Fred J. DeVito

Design in the present tense is a mirror of

the cultural climate; in the past tense, it is

a visual history lesson that expresses the

zeitgeist of a certain time. What are the

contextual forces that shape styles, trends,

and tastes? Discover past and present innovators;

learn how cultural events, technology,

and philosophy influence design;

shape your own design solutions; and anticipate

future trends with this new understanding.

Prerequisites: 2D Design Principles/

FUND1-CE9220, Conceptualization/

FUND1-CE9221, and Typography I/

FUND1-CE9015 or equivalent knowledge.

Make the Most

of Your Weekend

Find it difficult to fit anything

more into the work week?

Many design courses are

offered in accelerated

weekend formats.

GRAPHIC DESIGN FOR PRINT

Develop the skills necessary for a career in the nuanced print industry. Acquire technical

expertise in the industry-standard page layout program, learn about production processes,

and understand common systems. Once you have developed your eye for color, type, and

composition, create sample projects and begin to build a print design portfolio.

InDesign I: Foundations

GDES1-CE9101/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., May 25–June 15

(4 sessions). Joseph Caserto

W Sec. 2: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m.,

June 11–18 (2 sessions). Jenna Lucente,

graphic designer.

InDesign, a robust application so integrated

with Photoshop, Illustrator, and

Acrobat that it gives unparalleled control,

reduces production time. Students gain

hands-on experience through step-by-step

demonstrations, assignments, and exercises.

Learn to import text, manipulate graphics,

control colors, set master pages, work with

layers, print, export to a PDF, gather files

for a vendor, and store your documents.

Prerequisite: Color Systems/PHTG1-CE9223

or equivalent knowledge.

InDesign II: Essentials

GDES1-CE9254/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., June 22–July 13

(4 sessions). Joseph Caserto

Expand your current knowledge of

Adobe InDesign. Students explore topics

in depth, building on basic techniques to

bring beginner skills to an intermediate

level. Assignments and exercises include

constructing complex documents, which

contain multiple pages with several text

and graphic elements. Follow demonstrations

of drawing techniques, color and

gradients, and preflight. Learn tips and

shortcuts to boost your productivity.

Prerequisite: InDesign I: Foundations/

GDES1-CE9101 or equivalent knowledge.

Graphic Print Production:

Prepress to Binding

GDES1-CE9025/$495

W Sec. 1: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 9–16

(2 sessions). Dan Gimenez, former production

manager, Nest magazine.

W Sec. 2: Mon. 6–9.30 p.m., July 11–Aug. 1

(4 sessions). Stu Leventhal, president and chief

executive officer, Lexicon Communications.

The technical stages of proofing, printing,

finishing, and binding impact design and

planning. Learn how to determine the most

effective and cost efficient proofing methods

to avoid getting an inaccurate proof that alters

final results. Review printing methods

such as digital, letterpress, offset, and gravure.

Understand standardized formats like

signatures and envelopes; discover standard

folds, such as accordion and gatefold; and

see demonstrations on how to specify paper

or special substrates. Learn about Pantone

match color, metallic, and fluorescent inks.

Consider the environmentally friendly option

of aqueous coating, as well as binding

options, such as saddle stitch, perfect, and

sewn. Recommended: InDesign I: Foundations/

GDES1-CE9101 or equivalent knowledge.

Print Project Workflow

GDES1-CE9237/$295

W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., July 21–28

(2 sessions). Julie Yee, design director.

W Sec. 2: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., Aug. 6.

Understand the print project development

process, such as working with a variety of

project parameters and formats from

comps to timelines, and business cards to

graphic standards manuals. Learn to develop

a system of naming conventions and

file management to form an essential foundation

for building strategic and creative

work. Review how management of a campaign

involving multiple production processes

can affect design proposals. From

freelancers with a wide scope of client

work to in-house firms with high quantities

of multiple constituents projects, witness

demonstrations of how considered

organization of documents to deadlines

can impact efficiency, delivery, and revenue.

Prerequisite: InDesign I: Foundations/

GDES1-CE9101 or equivalent knowledge.

WEB DESIGN

Graphic designers for the Web are in great

demand. Learn the latest industry-standard

software, how to structure sites, and how to

ensure that audiences are able to easily

navigate your pages. Once you have developed

your eye for color, type, and composition,

create sample sites that are appealing,

memorable, and functional.

Dreamweaver I: Foundations

WDES1-CE9243/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., May 25–June 15

(4 sessions).

W Sec. 2: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., June 11–18

(2 sessions). Maria Rapetskaya

W Sec. 3: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., June 16–July 7

(4 sessions). Cathline Marshall

W Sec. 4: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 16–23

(2 sessions). Joseph Traylor, graphic designer.

With Adobe Dreamweaver, the design

and deployment of websites is easier

than ever. Learn how to create front-end

graphics, develop navigation, provide interactivity,

and design page layout for a professional-looking

website. An introduction

to editing graphics in Fireworks is covered,

along with its seamless integration into

Dreamweaver. Acquire hands-on practice

creating and using layout elements and

defining tables, rollovers, and basic SS.

As you create a project in Dreamweaver,

gain knowledge of current design and development

trends and learn best practices

for website implementation. Prerequisite:

Color Systems/PHTG1-CE9223 or equivalent

knowledge.

Master of Arts in Graphic Communications Management

and Technology

EDSF Excellence in Education Award recipient

Today virtually all organizations rely on the expertise of their graphic communications professionals to

develop strategies that lead successful companies. The NYU-SCPS Master of Arts in Graphic Communications

Management and Technology offers a rigorous and unique blend of management practices, cross-media

technologies, and integrated communications. Come join our media industry leaders and network of students,

alumni, and board members at the very top of this dynamic and rapidly expanding fi eld.

scps.nyu.edu/magc

New York University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. ©2010 New York University School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

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WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU

E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU


SCPS.NYU.EDU/DESIGN

CERTIFICATE IN DIGITAL AND

GRAPHIC DESIGN PRODUCTION

This introductory program helps students develop proficiency in the latest design technologies.

Whether you are interested in print or the Web, knowledge of color systems,

image manipulation, output, and production is essential. The program begins with

multidisciplinary courses to develop a strong foundation in technical basics, such as

operating systems and color, then allows students to choose a track given their particular

medium of interest—print/graphic production or Web production. The program

culminates in an industry-specific, project-planning course that lays the foundation

for how projects in the discipline are conceived and executed.

Note: This program is designed for students entering the field and is a prerequisite for students

who do not have a technical foundation and wish to begin the Certificate in Digital

and Graphic Design. Students must have proficiency with Mac OS, the industry standard

operating system. Courses are taught interchangeably using Mac and PC operating systems

and focus on applications.

Upon completion of the program, students have:

• A thorough understanding of the color systems for print and the Web.

• Proficiency with industry standard software applications.

• An understanding of the project planning process for either print or Web projects.

• Knowledge of applicable technical standards for working in either print/graphic

design or Web design.

• Basic competency in applicable technologies.

To earn the certificate, an average grade of B or higher is required in the successful

completion of six courses—two core courses and four industry-track requirements.

CORE COURSES

Color Systems/

PHTG1-CE9223

Photoshop I: Foundations/

PHTG1-CE9003

PRINT/GRAPHIC

PRODUCTION TRACK

Illustrator I: Foundations/

DDRW1-CE9004

InDesign I: Foundations/

GDES1-CE9101 (page 2)

Graphic Print Production: Prepress to

Binding/GDES1-CE9025 (page 2)

Print Project Workflow/

GDES1-CE9237 (page 2)

Dreamweaver II: Essentials

WDES1-CE9252/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., June 22–July 13

(4 sessions). John Benton, web designer.

Getting a dynamic website up and running

used to require advanced programming

skills. Now, Macromedia Dreamweaver allows

even novices to rapidly design and

deploy sites. Building on the skills learned

in Dreamweaver: Foundations, this course

progresses to more advanced SS/SSP,

behaviors, creating templates, developing

libraries, and automating workflows. While

the basics of back-end databases are

discussed, database programming is not

covered. Prerequisite: Dreamweaver I:

Foundations/WDES1-CE9243 or equivalent

knowledge.

W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St.

H Consult an advisor before registering.

WEB PRODUCTION TRACK

Dreamweaver I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9243 (page 2)

Flash I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9242 (this page)

Website Usability I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9245 (this page)

Information Architecture I:

Foundations/WDES1-CE9246

(page 4)

Note: This certificate has been revised.

Students who began this certificate prior to

fall 2010 have four years to complete the certificate

according to the requirements in the

NYU-SCPS Bulletin the semester they began.

See page 7 for certificate requirements and benefits.

Flash I: Foundations

WDES1-CE9242/$495

W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., May 26–

June 16 (4 sessions). Jonathan Schnapp,

developer and president, Schnapp Studio, Inc.

W Sec. 2: Sun. 9.30–5.30 p.m., June 5–12

(2 sessions). James Paul

W Sec. 3: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., June 21–July 12

(4 sessions). Van Shea Sedita

W Sec. 4: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m.,

July 16–23 (2 sessions). Sharon Clarke

W Sec. 5: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., July 21–Aug. 11

(4 sessions). Jean Pierre Dillard, founder and

principal, Funkmation Studios.

Adobe Flash, the leading animation and

interactivity software, is used for generating

Web graphics. Learn to create vectorbased

artwork and animate it in Flash.

Study the Flash interface, drawing and

color tools, animation basics, tweening,

symbols, and basic timeline-based scripting.

Make simple Flash files to embed into

webpages. Prerequisite: Color Systems/

PHTG1-CE9223 or equivalent knowledge.

CERTIFICATE IN DIGITAL

AND GRAPHIC DESIGN

This intermediate-level certificate combines design theory and skills training to provide

students with a thorough understanding of digital and graphic design for use in

print and on the Web. The program begins with multidisciplinary core courses that

develop a strong foundation in design principles, such as space, layout, color, typography,

and history. Students then choose a track in print/graphic design or Web design

and apply their foundation skills in project work and industry-related electives.

Note: This program is designed for students who have foundation skills in the applicable

technologies for their design discipline of interest. Courses are taught interchangeably using

Mac and PC operating systems in order to follow industry practices that focus on applications.

Students who do not have a technical foundation are advised to take the Certificate in

Digital and Graphic Design Production.

Upon completion of the program, students have the ability to:

• Solve design problems through brainstorming, visual storytelling, ideation,

and conceptual thinking.

• Use typography to create effective communications.

• Develop and strengthen design capabilities with unique style and vision.

• Apply the design process from concept to completion.

Print/Graphic Design Track: Students learn design theory and skills specific to print

media, such as books, magazines, brochures, posters, newspapers, and information graphics.

Web Design Track: Students learn Web and interactive design theory and skills and

apply them to projects with sophisticated user interfaces and a high degree of usability.

To earn the certificate, an average grade of B or higher is required, indicating successful

completion of seven courses—six core and one industry-track requirement.

CORE COURSES

2D Design Principles/

FUND1-CE9220 (page 1)

Conceptualization/

FUND1-CE9221 (page 1)

Color Harmony/

FUND1-CE9102 (page 1)

Typography I: Letterform/

FUND1-CE9015 (page 1)

Typography II: Families and Grids/

FUND1-CE9016 (page 2)

Brand Identity/

FUND1-CE9105 (page 2)

Flash II: Essentials

WDES1-CE9251/$495

W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., June 23–

July 14 (4 sessions). Jonathan Schnapp,

developer and president, Schnapp Studio, Inc.

Building on the skills learned in Flash I:

Foundations, this course concentrates on

working with text fields, movie clips, and

scripting in an effort to begin to develop

modular interactive Flash applications.

Effective use of variables, functions, ifthen

statements, and loops are explored

in ActionScript, Flash’s programming

language. Students use multiple contentorganization

techniques to develop a fully

interactive final project in Flash. Prerequisite:

Flash I: Foundations/WDES1-CE9242 or

equivalent knowledge.

Online Gallery

View student work at:

scps.nyu.edu/design-gallery

PRINT/GRAPHIC DESIGN TRACK

Print Design Theory and Practice/

GDES1-CE9239 (2011–2012)

WEB DESIGN TRACK

Web Design Theory and Practice/

WDES1-CE9248 (2011–2012)

Note: This certificate has been revised.

Students who began this certificate prior to

fall 2010 have four years to complete the certificate

according to the requirements in the

NYU-SCPS Bulletin the semester they began.

See page 7 for certificate requirements and benefits.

Website Usability I: Foundations

WDES1-CE9245/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., June 22–July 13

(4 sessions). Matthew Weber

W Sec. 2: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 30–

Aug. 6 (2 sessions). Tyler Cole

Usability is a crucial factor in a website’s

success. Discover proven methods for integrating

key elements, such as user-centered

design, information architecture, rapid prototyping,

and usability assessment, into the

development process. Learn best practices

in usability, including cost-effective methods

of user interface design, implementation,

and evaluation. Discover mental

models, usability lifecycle, interaction

styles, and user profiles and get hands-on

practice applying these methods in a variety

of environments. Ensure that products

meet the needs and expectations of the

people who use them, as well as of the

people who purchase and approve them.H

TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION: (212) 998-7200

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SCPS.NYU.EDU/DESIGN

Website Usability II: Essentials

WDES1-CE9056/$495

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.30 p.m., July 27–Aug. 17

(4 sessions). Matthew Weber

Explore techniques for creating a persuasive

experience built on real user needs.

Learn how to address the three universal

business objectives of public websites: driving

traffic, retaining users, and improving

conversion rates. Use Google Analytics to

further usability inquiry and discover user

trends; create multivariate tests where websites

literally fine-tune themselves; and

with search engine optimization, drive traffic

and increase usability. Students create an e-

commerce or other goal-oriented website.

Prerequisite: Website Usability I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9245 or equivalent knowledge.

Information Architecture I: Foundations

WDES1-CE9246/$295

W Sec. 1: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., June 21–28

(2 sessions).

W Sec. 2: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., July 19–26

(2 sessions). Anthony Ina, freelance user

experience designer.

W Sec. 3: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 23

Carl Collins

The skilled organization and flow of information

on a website ensures a positive user

experience. Learn to organize and categorize

large amounts of information and

successfully craft the user experience by

creating a logical organization and content

flow. Create sitemaps, flow diagrams, and

basic user tests to help determine nomenclature,

and wireframes that represent templates

with page elements and functional

specifications. Learn about templates and

how they aid user satisfaction while cutting

costs, and plan various methods of site navigation.

Students use Visio to produce at

least one set of wireframes and a sitemap.

Prerequisite: Flash I: Foundations/WDES1-

CE9242 or equivalent knowledge.

Information Architecture II: Essentials

WDES1-CE9305/$295

W Sec. 1: Sat. 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., Aug. 13.

Junu Wang

Expand your knowledge of sitemaps, flow

diagrams, and page elements to create more

sophisticated and functional webpages.

Explore Web design styles and ways to organize

and categorize large amounts of information.

Create dynamic models for a

successful user experience and develop a

functional webpage prototype. This course

is for those familiar with Flash, information

architecture, and Web design. Prerequisite:

Information Architecture I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9246 or equivalent knowledge.

Web Design

W Sec. 1: Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., July 11–29. James Bradley, founder and director,

WebServesUS, a nonprofit Internet technology group (week one); Angelique Waller, founder and

creative principal, Real Hard Work (week two); and Michael Lascarides, information architect

and senior developer, Alexander Interactive (week three).

Web designers are in great demand. Learn to create websites—from design to launch.

With this hands-on intensive, use your creative skills to design websites that are attractive,

compelling, and easy to navigate. Learn basic functions of these software programs

to prepare your webpages for publishing: Photoshop for graphics creation, Flash for

animation, and Dreamweaver for page design. Develop site maps, flow diagrams, wireframes,

navigation, and page templates. Progress to composing layouts and developing

styles guides. Create Web-appropriate graphics and icons. Consider integration of multimedia,

assess usability, and consider career and business issues. Students must have

experience with graphic software programs and strong computer skills. Students may

enroll in any one or all three weeks.

Week One—Software Basics: July 11–July 15, WDES1-CE9130/$1,495

Week Two—Project Development: July 18–22, WDES1-CE9131/$1,495

Week Three—Practicum: July 25–29, WDES1-CE9132/$1,495

Three–Week Intensive: July 11–29, WDES1-CE9134/$4,295

Flash

SUMMER INTENSIVES

WDES1-CE9066/$990

W Sec. 1: Mon.–Fri. 9.30 a.m.–3.30 p.m., June 27–July 1 (5 sessions).

Claudia Uscategui, founder and creative principal, CUdesign Studios.

Flash is a must-have tool for aspiring Web designers. Through hands-on practice,

students have the opportunity to become familiar with fundamental- to intermediatelevel

techniques. Used for generating Web graphics, enhancing interactivity, adding

animation, and integrating video into webpages, Adobe Flash is a vital component

and leading industry software for dynamic webpage design. Students acquire the skills

necessary to make simple Flash files to embed into webpages and develop a fully interactive

project. This intensive covers Flash interface and tools; creating and animating

vector artwork, and tweening; basic timeline scripting; working with text fields, movie

clips, and scripting for modular interactive Flash applications; and rudimentary actionscripting

using variables, if-then statements, functions, and loops.

For details on all our Summer Intensive programs, visit scps.nyu.edu/summer

or call (212) 998-7200.

Web Design Strategy

WDES1-CE9069/$495

W Sec. 1: Mon. 6–9.30 p.m., July 11–Aug. 1

(4 sessions). Rus Yusupov, creative partner,

Commercial Pop LLC.

Explore website development strategies

that help Web teams focus more effectively

on their clients’ objectives in order to increase

efficiency and effectiveness. A strategic

plan helps contain the scope of work,

directs the content creation process, provides

tactical direction to information architects,

and keeps developers focused on

the right features. Effective Web strategy

ensures that the tactics of website development

align with an organization’s mission.

Examine a range of Internet technologies,

gain insights into what users want, and

work to achieve measurable business objectives.

Topics include ensuring site architecture

and navigation support the site’s focus,

design that appeals to your target audience,

and integrating strategy development into

workflow and the decision-making process.

Prerequisites: Information Architecture

I: Foundations/WDES1-CE9246 and

Website Usability I: Foundations/WDES1-

CE9245 or equivalent knowledge.

Web Analytics for Digital Design

WDES1-CE9053/$495

W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., July 14–Aug. 4

(4 sessions).

Learn to design a website with the ability

to gather site data, making it possible to

determine website effectiveness and allowing

webmasters to assess achievement of

broad online business objectives. Improve

results by first defining key metrics to ensure

relevant measurements are taken, such

as shopping cart abandonment, customer

retention, advertising impressions, and

subscription conversion rates. Consider

available sites and applications that collect,

process, analyze, and visualize data for decision

making. Gather meaningful information

about user behavior, understand the

necessity of real-time reporting, and gain

insights into website traffic—including

how to isolate traffic subsets. Other topics

include providing first-party cookies;

tracking downloads; measuring Flash and

AJAX visits; and setting, then tracking,

product IDs. Prerequisites: Information

Architecture I: Foundations/WDES1-CE9246

and Website Usability I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9245 or equivalent knowledge.

CERTIFICATE IN

WEB PRODUCING

The growth of the Internet and the ongoing

integration of this communication

medium into daily life has brought about

huge structural changes in all areas of the

established media industry in the last

five years. As the old models of acquisition

and distribution of content continue

to evolve, entrepreneurial, creative content

producers are increasingly utilizing

the Internet as a platform for their work.

Upon completion of the certificate

program, students are able to:

• Analyze existing websites or develop a

new website to determine the clarity and

efficacy of a site’s organizational design.

• Develop procedures to assess users’ experience

in navigating and using a website.

• Apply their findings to determine ways

to improve a website’s effectiveness.

• Gain skills in project management, including

developing workflow processes

that are conducive to creating and producing

website content.

To earn the certificate, an average grade

of B or higher is required, indicating

successful completion of nine required

courses.

REQUIRED COURSES

Color Systems/

PHTG1-CE9223

Information Architecture I:

Foundations/WDES1-CE9246

(this page)

Information Architecture II:

Essentials/WDES1-CE9305

(this page)

Website Usability I: Foundations/

WDES1-CE9245 (page 3)

Website Usability II: Essentials/

WDES1-CE9056 (this page)

Web Producing/

PENT1-CE9147

Media Management/

EMGT1-CE9167 (2011–2012)

Producing for TV and New Media/

PENT1-CE9167 (2011–2012)

Law for Web Producers/

PRDC1-CE9166 (2011–2012)

See page 7 for certificate requirements and benefits.

E-Commerce Design

WDES1-CE9250/$495

W Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., June 16–July 7

(4 sessions). Anthony Ina, freelance user

experience designer.

This course prepares a new generation to

meet the challenges of an electronic economy.

Students gain an operational and

strategic perspective on current and emerging

technologies in business-to-consumer

and business-to-business e-commerce transactions,

learning to facilitate e-commerce

website design and manage secure e-commerce

funds transfers. Prerequisites: Flash I:

Foundations/WDES1-CE9242 and Dreamweaver

I: Foundations/WDES1-CE9243, or

equivalent knowledge.

4

WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU

E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU


PRODUCT DESIGN

Product design is a vital component in today’s

industrial design landscape. Product

designers combine art, science, and technology

to create aesthetically pleasing,

functional, and sustainable products. Learn

the software used to generate 2D and 3D

prototype renderings. Understand fundamental

principles, including how to generate

ideas and evaluate products.

Product Design Fundamentals

PDES1-CE9064/$655

N Sec. 1: Wed. 6.45–9.15 p.m., June 8–Aug. 3

(9 sessions). Steven Bellofatto

Every product that hits the market, from

iPods to industrial machinery, passes through

rigorous phases of design and prototyping

before it ever goes into production. Learn

how product development starts and see

how management, engineering, and industrial

design converge in the conception and

design of a physical product. Employing a

user-centered design approach, develop a

simple prototype, learn to identify customer

needs, define a product’s architecture,

and use proven methodologies to

design for manufacturing. Prerequisites: 2D

Design Principles/FUND1-CE9220 and

Conceptualization/FUND1-CE9221, or

equivalent knowledge.

SolidWorks

PDES1-CE9093/$895

M Sec. 1: Thurs. 6–9 p.m., June 2–July 21

(8 sessions). Alex Moskvin, senior design

engineer, The Royal Promotion Group.

SolidWorks is the industry standard 2D

and 3D computer program for industrial

design and other related fields. Learn how

to take advantage of this CAD software to

convey your product ideas while also creating

high quality technical drawings with

SolidWorks’ stunning rendering capabilities.

Prerequisites: 2D Design Principles/

FUND1-CE9220 and Conceptualization/

FUND1-CE9221, or equivalent knowledge.

Recommended: Product Design Fundamentals/

PDES1-CE9064 or equivalent knowledge.

Product Development

PDES1-CE9087/$575

V Sec. 1: Tues. 6.45–9.45 p.m., May 31–

July 19 (8 sessions). Marc A. Thorpe,

founder and principal, Third Eye Studios.

What are the factors shaping the evolution

of a product design? How can a designer

navigate through the necessary stages

without losing the essence of the original

concept? Learn how to steer a product in

a creative and innovative way through the

myriad of influences: market research,

consumer analysis, concept generation,

materials, design, prototyping, sourcing,

manufacturing, pricing, and presentation.

Through simulated real-world conditions,

discover how your original product could

be developed professionally and successfully.

Prerequisites: Product Design Fundamentals/

PDES1-CE9064 and Solidworks/

PDES1-CE9093, or equivalent knowledge.

CERTIFICATE IN

PRODUCT DESIGN

This certificate is for students interested

in gaining a comprehensive background

in product and industrial design. The

two introductory courses teach students

basic design skills and how to generate

ideas. Learn how to progress from concept

to creation in both an individual

product and when developing an entire

line. Following the completion of the

introductory courses, students gain a

basic knowledge of the various factors

involved in product design, including

manufacturing processes, material surveys,

and basic skills in SolidWorks, the

software used by industry professionals.

Upon completion of the program,

students possess:

• An understanding of the design process.

• The ability to take a concept from idea

through finished product.

• Proficiency in SolidWorks software.

To earn the certificate, an average grade of

B or higher is required, indicating successful

completion of six required courses.

REQUIRED COURSES

2D Design Principles/

FUND1-CE9220 (page 1)

Conceptualization/

FUND1-CE9221 (page 1)

Product Design Fundamentals/

PDES1-CE9064 (this page)

Materials and Manufacturing Processes/

PDES1-CE9089 (2011–2012)

SolidWorks/PDES1-CE9093 (this page)

Product Development/

PDES1-CE9087 (this page)

See page 7 for certificate requirements and benefits.

Packaging

PDES1-CE9107/$495

W Sec. 1: Mon. 6–9.30 p.m., June 6–27

(4 sessions). David Parsons, senior designer/

art director, Landor Associates.

A vital function of packaging is to protect

the product for its intended use, yet a visually

appealing and informative package

should also encourage potential buyers to

purchase the product. Package design starts

by identifying all the requirements: marketing

plans, shelf life, end-use, and environmental

concerns. This hands-on course

explores how design criteria, time targets,

resources, and cost constraints impact the

viability and success of a design.

Prerequisites: Illustrator: Fundamentals/

DDRW1-CE9004, 2D Design Principles/

FUND1-CE9220, and Conceptualization/

FUND1-CE9221, or equivalent knowledge.

SolidWorks

PDES1-CE9090/$1,195

W Sec. 1: Mon.–Wed., 9 a.m.–1 p.m., July 25–Aug. 10 (9 sessions).

David Stolzer, design research and strategy consultant.

SCPS.NYU.EDU/DESIGN

SUMMER INTENSIVE

Solidworks is the industry standard software for 2D and 3D industrial and product

design drawings. Learn the interface and basic functionalities of the program and build

upon your product design skills. Convey your product design ideas while discovering

the role Solidworks plays in the design process through its rendering capabilities and

ease in generating high quality, detailed technical drawings. Through a series of focused

exercises and projects, student learn how to build a 3D representation of a product they

have conceived. Topics include navigating the Solidworks interface, sketching skills,

assembly basics, and creating engineering drawings and design tables, as well as an introduction

to “revolve,” “sweep,” and “loft” functions.

For details on all our Summer Intensive programs, visit scps.nyu.edu/summer

or call (212) 998-7200.

INTERIOR DESIGN

As one of the major applied arts, interior

design is a vibrant industry, serving as a

crucial link between architecture and product

design. Learn space planning, effective

use of light, business practices, and sourcing

with an eye toward sustainability.

Understand color, drafting, and presentation

techniques. Build model rooms to solidify

and communicate your vision.

Instant Interior Design

NDES2-CS9106/$285

M Sec. 201: Thurs. 6.45–8.45 p.m., July 14–

Aug. 4 (4 sessions). Maureen Crilly, principal

and designer, Crilly Companies.

Gain a hands-on, how-to introduction to the

basics of interior design through a focused

series of challenging lessons. Participants

receive special design packets with floor plans

and templates designed to introduce concepts

of spatial enhancement, color, wall

treatments, furniture placement, and other

tricks of the trade that can be used in any

room. Bring a 12-inch ruler, pencil and eraser,

pen, and notebook to the first session. No grades

issued. Not applicable to the certificate program.

Interior Design: Manhattan Style

NDES2-CS9107/$285

M Sec. 201: Thurs. 6.45–8.45 p.m., June 2–23

(4 sessions).

Experience firsthand how top interior designers

and architects work with New York

City apartments—from small spaces lacking

views to high-rises where the view is

everything. Visit outstanding Manhattan

apartments where you meet accomplished

interior designers who explain the design

principles behind their decorating.

Understand how they approach issues of

lighting, color, furniture, storage, and

kitchen and bath designand pick up useful

ideas you can use at home. Past visits

with Interior Designer Hall of Fame designers

have included Laura Bohn, Scott

Bromley, and Bruce Bierman, and

Architectural Digest 100 designers such as

Stephanie Stokes, Clodagh, and Sam

Botero. No grades issued. Not applicable to

the certificate program.

Tiny Apartment, Quick Makeover

NDES2-CS9111/$295

W Sec. 201: Tues. 6.45–8.45 p.m., June 7–28

(4 sessions).

Develop a concrete plan to transform your

small space into an environment comfortable

for entertaining, working, and sleeping.

Discover how the use of color can

visually elongate and push back walls, creating

a feeling of spaciousness. Explore

how to streamline and store possessions to

support natural paths through your space.

Consider practical design strategies for

maximizing the use of space by learning

to designate areas by function, institute

quick-and-easy fixes to “fool” the eye, and

highlight the most attractive features.

Color and Pattern in Interior Design

NDES1-CE9140/$435

W Sec. 1: Tues. 6–9.30 p.m., July 5–26

(4 sessions). Susan J. Slotkis

Color is one of the most powerful tools available

to artists and designers. We respond to

color both emotionally and physically. It has

been said that most of the decisions people

make about purchases are based on color.

Less obvious, but just as intriguing, is the

way in which different patterns are used

for interiors. This course explores how colors

influence mood and convey a particular

style, how color and pattern have been used

in the past, what’s happening now, and

what’s on the horizon in the field.

Basic Drafting for Interior Design

NDES1-CE9143/$495

W Sec. 1: Tues. Thurs. 6–9.30 p.m., May 24–

June 2 (4 sessions). Ellen Schimmel Berns

An understanding of spatial relationships is

intrinsic to interior design. The other basic

requirement for interior designers is a deep

familiarity with architectural drawings—

such as floor plans, sections, elevations, detail

drawings, and isometric drawings—as

these elements truly define a space. Learn

basic drafting, space surveying, plan sketching,

and information recording, and utilize

lessons in scale, line weights, notations, and

dimensions. It is recommended to take this

course with Interior Design Studio I: Fundamental

Principles/NDES1-CE9155. See

online course description for supply list.

TO REGISTER: (212) 998-7150 FOR MORE INFORMATION: (212) 998-7200

5


SCPS.NYU.EDU/DESIGN

Interior Design Studio I:

Fundamental Principles

NDES1-CE9155/$645

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.45 p.m., June 1–July 6

(6 sessions).

W Sec. 2: Mon. 6–9.45 p.m., July 11–Aug. 15

(6 sessions). Shaumyika Sharma

Learn the basic principles of interior design

and begin to draw and draft your

ideas. Study key design principles, including

space planning and design composition,

furniture layouts and planning, the

application of color, and the use of materials.

Explore the elements of design (color,

texture, materials, pattern, and light) as applied

to interiors; develop basic drafting

skills; and learn how designers take projects

from concept to completion. Develop

a foundation for understanding the design

process, and for cultivating your ability to

think through potential problems.

Prerequisite: Basic Drafting for Interior

Designers/NDES1-CE9143. It is recommended

that students take Interior Design

Industry/NDES1-CE9142 with this course.

Lighting for Interior Designers

NDES1-CE9152/$645

W Sec. 1: Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., June 5–26

(4 sessions).

Light has the power to dramatically transform

space, influence user experience, and

affect overall mood. Learn how to utilize

space-transforming light techniques in

your own apartment, retail store, or exhibition

space. The effects of light and shadow

are studied through concepts and tools

such as good design, creating a lighting

plan, and layering. Learn about lamping,

beam spread, color effects, illumination

and calculation, and light manipulation.

Electricity, voltage, wiring, breakers, fuses,

and switches are also studied. For the final

project, redesign the lighting of a space

from concept and methodology to final

layout. This course can be taken simultaneously

with Interior Design Studio I:

Fundamental Principles/NDES1-CE9155.

Interior Design Industry

NDES1-CE9142/$495

W Sec. 1: Sat. Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., July 9–10

(2 sessions). Susan J. Slotkis, designer and

sole proprietor, Profiles-Personalized Interiors;

allied member, ASID.

Whether you’re considering an interior design

career by starting your own company

or by joining an existing firm, acquire a

working knowledge of the principles and

business practices of interior designers first.

Topics include an overview of the industry,

governmental standards and professional

requirements, design project phases and

scope, standard fees and compensation, the

essence of good working relationships with

clients, and letters of agreement and contracts.

We also discuss the elements of

purchasing, including estimates; quotes;

placing orders; and specifying furniture,

fabric, and finishes, especially on custom

goods. It is recommended that students take

this course with Interior Design Studio I:

Fundamental Principles/NDES1-CE9155.

SUMMER INTENSIVE

Interior Design

NDES1-CE9138/$1,495

W Sec. 1: Mon.–Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., July 11–22 (10 sessions).

Sonya Sinha, owner and creative principal, Sinha Designs.

Study the basic elements of interior design and learn how to conceive, draft, and present

your ideas professionally. In this intensive, students are introduced to key design

principles and the importance of design in the utilization of interior spaces. Explore

the impact of both functional and aesthetic approaches to interiors. Students are also

introduced to basic drafting skills and presentation techniques. In an applied project,

students have the opportunity to experiment through the use of the traditional elements

of space and furniture planning; lighting; and selection of colors, materials, textures,

and finishes. Develop an understanding of the design process and the ability to think

through design problems. This intensive covers color theory and psychology of color;

design process and ideation through implementation; programming, conceptualization,

and schematic analysis; human factors in design; architectural materials and finishes in

interior design; and requirements of residential and commercial interiors.

For details on all our Summer Intensive programs, visit scps.nyu.edu/summer

or call (212) 998-7200.

Model Construction for Interior Design

NDES1-CE9157/$645

W Sec. 1: Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., June 4–25

(4 sessions). Lee Stout, president,

Lee Stout, Inc.

Acquire the tools for studying and presenting

design concepts in three-dimensional

form, and learn the methods and materials

of model construction. Begin to build models

of your own design, focusing on architectural

modeling materials, techniques,

shortcuts, and methods of construction.

All aspects of model building are covered.

Students create an interior model for client

presentation. It is recommended that students

take this course simultaneously with Interior

Design Studio II: Applied Design/

NDES1-CE9156.

Sourcing for Interior Design

NDES1-CE9149/$645

M Sec. 1: Fri. Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., July 15–23

(4 sessions). Ana Luchangco, associate senior

interior designer, Fogarty Finger Architecture +

Interiors.

Learn about diverse products and services

available to the interior designer and their

use in decorating home and office spaces.

Through lectures, field trips, guest speakers,

and coursework, explore the latest

trends in home fashion. Get inside information

on working with trade and retail

sources. Distinctions between residential

and commercial products are explained, as

are trade pricing structures, discounts, insider

tips, and market shows. Sites of previous

trips have included New York City

design trade centers such as the D and D

Building and the Gift Building. Antique

shops, auction houses, custom upholstery

workshops, and artist studios are also visited.

Interior Design Studio II: Applied Design

NDES1-CE9156/$645

W Sec. 1: Wed. 6–9.45 p.m., July 13–Aug. 17

(6 sessions).

This second-level course deals with our

relation to space, form, and environment.

Emphasis is on spatial problem-solving; how

human factors influence design; and applying

design principles to projects of varying

scale, materials, and structures. Develop and

expand your ability to tackle the challenges

of more complex design issues by analyzing

and considering professional design problems.

Strengthen drafting and rendering

skills. Work toward developing a final design

project by examining storage solutions and

product display systems. Study the application

of color, materials, and finishes for commercial

design projects. Prerequisite: Interior

Design Studio I: Fundamental Principles/

NDES1-CE9155. It is recommended that

students take this course simultaneously with

Model Construction for Interior Design/NDES1-

CE9157 and Sourcing for Interior Design/

NDES1-CE9149.

Presentation Techniques

for Interior Designers

NDES1-CE9009/$625

W Sec. 1: Sat. Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Aug. 6–14

(4 sessions). Ellen Schimmel Berns

Communicate your concepts with confidence

and panache. A successful designer must

be sensitive to the client’s needs and maintain

a rapport based on trust. The ability to

put together a dynamic, innovative presentation

that showcases your ideas in a compelling

and visually cogent way can be the

difference between landing and losing the

job. Work through the process of transforming

your ideas and drawings into polished

presentation materials. Learn the importance

of details as subtle as which colored

pencils or markers and paper stock to choose.

Enhance your skills with in-class practice

and attention to preparation. Prerequisites:

Interior Design Studio I/NDES1-CE9155,

Basic Drafting/NDES1-CE9143, and

Model Construction/NDES1-CE9157 or

equivalent experience. May be taken with

Interior Design Studio II/NDES1-CE9156.

See online course description for supply list.

CERTIFICATE IN

INTERIOR DESIGN

If you have a flair for interior design,

this program imparts the fundamentals

and provides hands-on training in the

discipline of designing interiors. Learn

all aspects of project design—space planning,

fabric selection, drawings, furniture

specification, accessories, design presentation,

and setting up jobs within time

and budget constraints.

Upon completion of the program,

students possess:

• The ability to solve design problems

and an understanding of the needs for

different projects—from corporate to

residential.

• An understanding of design fundamentals,

including light and color theory.

• Practice with mechanical drawing and

drafting.

• Knowledge of space planning and furniture

layouts.

• Familiarity with materials and finishes.

• Understanding of human factors that

impact design for interiors, such as

scale, materials, and structures.

• Ability to execute professional presentation

skills (sketching and drafting).

• Knowledge of business practices.

To earn the certificate, an average grade

of B or higher is required, indicating

successful completion of the eight

required courses.

REQUIRED COURSES

Basic Drafting for Interior Design/

NDES1-CE9143 (page 5)

Interior Design Studio I: Fundamental

Principles/NDES1-CE9155 (this page)

Lighting for Interior Designers/

NDES1-CE9152 (this page)

Interior Design Industry/

NDES1-CE9142 (this page)

Model Construction for Interior

Design/NDES1-CE9157 (this page)

Sourcing for Interior Design/

NDES1-CE9149 (this page)

Presentation Techniques for Interior

Designers/NDES1-CE9009 (this page)

Interior Design Studio II: Applied

Design/NDES1-CE9156 (this page)

See page 7 for certificate requirements and benefits.

M Meets at NYU Midtown Center, 11 W. 42nd St.

N Meets at Norman Thomas Center, 111 E. 33rd St.

V Meets at Manhattan Village Academy, 43 W. 22nd St.

W Meets at the Woolworth Building, 15 Barclay St.

H Consult an advisor before registering.

6

WEB: SCPS.NYU.EDU

E-MAIL: SCPSINFO@NYU.EDU


GENERAL INFORMATION

Professional Certificate

Programs: Requirements

and Benefits

NYU-SCPS professional certificate programs

provide knowledge and essential

skills in specific fields and are taught by

highly qualified faculty with in-depth experience

in their subject areas. Professional

certificates are comprised of courses that do

not carry credit and are not state-reviewed.

To receive an official certificate, students

must declare their candidacy before the start

of the fourth certificate course for which

they enroll. Certificate candidacy entitles

students to important new benefits detailed

on this page. To apply for certificate

candidacy, use the Application for Certificate

Candidacy at scps.nyu.edu/certificate.

There is a nonrefundable one-time $100

application fee.

Students are welcome to take as many

individual courses from a certificate program

as they wish but will not receive an

official certificate or be eligible for the

benefits detailed below unless they apply

for candidacy. Undeclared students may

request a transcript showing course completion

and grades, but that transcript will

not indicate certificate completion.

Certificate Candidate Benefits

• NYU student photo ID, which confers

the following privileges while students

are enrolled in course(s) applicable to

the certificate:

° Access to NYU Libraries.

° NYU Computer Store educational

discount pricing.

° Access to the Kimmel Center for

University Life.

• Invitations to NYU-SCPS events.

• Access to services through the NYU

Home website. For more information,

visit scps.nyu.edu/certificate.

• Invitations to career workshops and

related resources.

• Upon completion of certificate program,

$100 discount voucher toward an NYU-

SCPS course (valid for one year).

Certificate Requirements

• Certificate declaration is required before

the start of the fourth applicable course.

A one-time $100, nonrefundable application

fee is required.

• Students have up to four years to complete

a certificate from initial date of

registration.

• An official certificate is available upon

completion of all courses if an overall

B average or above is maintained and

candidacy has been declared. Students

must request their certificate online at

scps.nyu.edu/certificate.

• Certificate candidacy may be revoked if

academic performance is not maintained.

• The NYU-SCPS transcript of declared candidates

will identify certificate completion.

• Substitution classes require approval of

the academic department.

• Certificate candidacy may be revoked if

student conduct policies are not adhered to.

• There is a one-time $5 fee for the NYU

student photo ID card. The card is active

for the entire semester in which a registered

student is enrolled in an approved

certificate course and is deactivated

when the student is not enrolled in an

applicable course.

• Students must satisfy the certificate program

requirements listed in the Bulletin

published for the term in which they

register for the first course toward the

certificate.

• Program administrators may authorize in

writing substitutions of specified courses

in individual situations (maximum of one

substitution for a four-course certificate;

two substitutions for a certificate requiring

five or more courses).

• Regular class attendance is required in

order for a course to be applied toward

a certificate program.

• Students may complete more than one

certificate in a given term but, for administrative

purposes, each certificate will be

issued and dated in separate terms.

• Courses taken at NYU-SCPS may be

applied to fulfilling the requirements of

only one certificate program. No transfer

work or waiver of the total number of

courses required is permitted.

• The name printed on the certificate will

match the name on the student’s NYU

transcript.

• Certificates offered through the

International Institute for Learning

(IIL) and the Dalton Education certificate

program in financial planning do

not require declaration.

• Approval for exception to any of the above

requirements must be obtained in advance

in writing from the program office.

Certificates are highlighted throughout

this Bulletin in their respective subject areas,

where the specific requirements and course

sequences are outlined.

A comprehensive alphabetical listing of

all certificate programs can be found in the

Bulletin Index.

Note: Departments may es tablish more

stringent requirements for their programs.

Check individual listings for details.

ID Cards

NYU-SCPS students enrolled in degree

or diploma programs and declared professional

certificate candidates are issued

NYU photo ID cards. Students enrolled in

courses, seminars, and conferences, or with

undeclared status in a certificate program,

are issued a Building Access Pass that

provides access to classroom buildings.

Replacements for lost NYU photo ID

cards can be obtained at the NYU Card

Center, 383 Lafayette St. One piece of

photo ID is required to get a replacement

card. The fees for replacements are $15 for

the first replacement; $50 for the second;

and $75 for the third.

Information Services

The NYU-SCPS information line,

(212) 998-7200, is open Mon.–Thurs.,

9 a.m.–7 p.m.; Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. We

are available to answer inquiries about the

School and its programs. If you would like

to be added to our mailing list for future

Bulletins, call (212) 998-7200 and leave

your name and address with a staff member

or our 24-hour automated attendant.

You may also obtain schoolwide general

information or request a Bulletin on our

website at scps.nyu.edu, or by e-mailing your

name and address to scpsinfo@nyu.edu.

Noncredit Changes,

Withdrawals, and Refunds

Additions (added courses) to your nondegree

program may be made by telephone,

fax, mail, online, or in person.

Program changes (drop/adds) may be

made via the Web, in person, or by fax.

Withdrawals. Students who wish to

withdraw from, or for any reason find it

impossible to complete, a noncredit course

should officially withdraw. Requests to

withdraw (drops only) from noncredit

courses can be made online anytime at

scps.nyu.edu/drop; up until one day before

the course start date via ALBERT, the

NYU student information services website;

by mail, Office of Noncredit Student

Services, NYU School of Continuing

and Profess ional Studies, P.O. Box 1206,

Stuyvesant Station, New York, NY 10009-

9988; by fax, (212) 995-3060; or in person,

145 Fourth Avenue (between 13th and

14th Streets), Room 214.

Merely ceasing to attend a class does

not constitute official withdrawal, nor

does notification to the instructor.

Cancellation of payment does not constitute

withdrawal, nor does it reduce indebtedness to

the University; in this case, a penalty of $25

for late payment and $10 for stop-payment

(subject to change without notice) must

be charged. Students of any other NYU

school must withdraw from NYU-SCPS

courses through NYU-SCPS.

Refund Policy. Refunds are computed

based on the date and time the written or

electronic notice of withdrawal is received

by the Office of Noncredit Student Services.

In addition, refunds for noncredit courses

and seminars are based on the number of

class sessions for the course that have met

between the time of registration and withdrawal.

Course withdrawal does not necessarily

entitle a student to a refund—nor to

a cancellation of tuition still due.

The refund schedule is as follows:

For noncredit courses (containing

the designation “CE”) and seminars

(containing the designation “CS”):

1. Student withdraws prior to the first

session—100 percent refund.

2. Student withdraws after one or two

sessions of a course with six or more

sessions—75 percent refund. No refund

thereafter.

3. Student withdraws after one or two

sessions of a four- to five-session

course—60 percent refund. No refund

thereafter.

4. Student withdraws after more than

two sessions of a four-session course—

no refund.

5. Student has attended any session

of a one- to three-session course—

no refund.

For seminars that contain the designation

“CS” and conferences (prefix

“SCPS”): Procedures and policies for

refunds vary by department.

For online courses: Refunds for online

courses are calculated differently from

on-site courses. Students are eligible for

a 100 percent tuition refund if they withdraw

from the course before the official

start date. Students are eligible for a 60

percent tuition refund if they withdraw

from the course before having logged into

the course four times or within the first

two weeks of the course. After the fourth

login, or the second week, students are not

eligible to receive any tuition refund for

courses taken through NYU-SCPS.

Noncredit Registration Fees

For noncredit courses that contain the

designation “CE” or “CS,” the registration

fee is either $10 or $20, depending on the

total cost of the course or courses for which

you apply. If the total of your tuition is $99

or less, your registration fee is $10. If the

total of your tuition is $100 or more, the

fee is $20. The maximum $20 registration

fee is pay able only once each semester, no

matter how many times you add courses.

Regis tration fees are nonrefundable.

Note: This fee schedule does not apply to

programs requiring Credit Registration.


R E G I S T R A T I O N F O R M

Registration, Summer Term, 2011. MAIL TO: SCPS Noncredit Student Services, New York University, PO Box 1206, Stuyvesant Station,

New York, NY 10009-9988. FAX: (212) 995-3060. Mail and fax registrations are accepted throughout the semester for late-starting courses;

mail registrations must be postmarked two weeks before the course start date. REGISTER EARLY FOR BEST COURSE SELECTION.

PRIORITY CODE

B20

PRINT NAME (LAST) (FIRST) (MIDDLE INITIAL)

MR.

MS.

HOME ADDRESS (STREET)_________________________________________________________________

APT. NO.

CITY_________________________________________________ STATE___________________ ZIP

E-MAIL

HOME TELEPHONE ( )______________________________ WORK TELEPHONE ( )

Note: You must provide an e-mail address and/or telephone number so that SCPS can notify you regarding room location or class changes.

Please check this box if you do not want your e-mail address or telephone number to be used for marketing purposes.

NYU STUDENT ID NO. BIRTH DATE FIRST ATTENDANCE AT NYU-SCPS?

YES NO

N

IF NO, DATE LAST ATTENDED

HIGHEST EDUCATIONAL LEVEL (CHECK ONE)

HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDED COLLEGE FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE GRADUATE GRADUATE STUDIES

COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP U.S. OTHER (PLEASE SPECIFY)

DO YOU PLAN TO PURSUE A PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE? YES NO FOR NEW CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS AND BENEFITS, VISIT SCPS.NYU.EDU/CERTIFICATE.

WHAT CERTIFICATE ARE YOU PLANNING TO PURSUE?

COURSE/SEMINAR SECTION

NUMBER NUMBER

TITLE OF COURSE/SEMINAR (ABBREVIATE) TUITION AND FEES DAYS HOURS

I ENCLOSE CHECK OR MONEY ORDER FOR TOTAL SHOWN I HEREBY AUTHORIZE USE OF MY CREDIT CARD

SIGNATURE

NO.

NONREFUNDABLE REGISTRATION FEE (see below to calculate)*

Discover ® CARD MASTERCARD ® VISA ® AMERICAN EXPRESS ® EXPIRES

MONTH

YEAR

TUITION + REGISTRATION FEE=TOTAL

*Registration fees: $10 on $99 total tuition, $20 on totals of $100 and above (regardless of number of courses for which you are registering).

Please answer these optional questions about your place of business if you wish to be kept informed of corporate and free events.

YOUR NAME

DAYTIME TELEPHONE NUMBER ( )

YOUR TITLE

FAX NUMBER ( )__________________________________ E-MAIL

YOUR DIVISION OR DEPARTMENT

TYPE OF BUSINESS________________________________________________________

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

COMPANY NAME

COMPANY ADDRESS

CITY___________________________________________________________ STATE ______________ ZIP

DOES YOUR COMPANY OFFER TUITION REIMBURSEMENT?

FULL PARTIAL CHECK ANY RESTRICTIONS THAT APPLY:

MUST BE JOB-RELATED CREDIT ONLY OTHER

USE THIS FORM TO REGISTER.

REGISTER EARLY FOR THE BEST SELECTION OF COURSES:

WEB

You can register for courses online at scps.nyu.edu. Online registration requires payment by credit card. Consult the

inside front cover of this Bulletin for complete information.

MAIL OR FAX

1 Use the Registration Form to register for noncredit courses with course numbers that contain the designation

“CE” and for seminars that contain the designation “CS.” Do not use this form to register for credit courses

(courses that contain the designation “DC” or “GC”), conferences (prefix “SCPS”), or courses in the American

Language Institute (ESL courses).

2 Find the course(s) you want to register for and note:

• Course title

• Course number and section

• Days and hours of the course • Course fee

Transfer this information to the registration form.

3 Type or write clearly and make sure you copy your credit card information accurately.

Mistakes can delay your registration.

4 Be sure to include your phone number and e-mail address so that we may contact you if there are any questions.

5 Place the registration form in the postage-paid envelope provided or fax the form to (212) 995-3060.

TELEPHONE

1 For your convenience and to have a written record for yourself, fill out the course information section of

the registration form before you call.

2 Have your credit card handy.

3 Note the code in the upper right corner of the registration form; the registration operator will ask you for it.

4 Call (212) 998-7150 if you know the course you would like to take. If you have questions about course

curriculum, a certificate, or your registration, please call (212) 998-7200.

HERE ARE ANSWERS TO SOME

COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

WHAT INFORMATION DO I NEED TO REGISTER BY PHONE?

• Course title, course number, and course section.

• Your mailing address, e-mail address, and telephone number.

• Your credit card (Visa ® , MasterCard ® , American Express ® , or Discover ® card).

WHAT ABOUT LATE FEES?

There are no late fees for noncredit courses. But remember to register early for best course selection and availability.

HOW DO I DROP OR ADD COURSES?

You may drop a course by mail or in person (145 Fourth Avenue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10003); online anytime at

scps.nyu.edu/drop; and up until one day before the course start date via ALBERT, the NYU student information services

website (instructions for accessing ALBERT are sent upon registration); or by fax (212-995-3060). Please consult our

refund policy in the Registration section of this Bulletin for drops made after the start of class. You may add a course

by fax, online, or in person.

MAY I USE A COMPANY VOUCHER TO PAY FOR MY CLASS?

Yes, as long as your company does not qualify payment based upon completion of coursework with a passing

grade. We accept purchase orders, vouchers, and letters of authorization as payment for tuition in credit and

noncredit courses. Please send the voucher with your registration.

WHERE CAN I LEARN ABOUT NEW PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE DECLARATION REQUIREMENTS?

Our professional certificate programs include new requirements and benefits. Students intending

to pursue a certificate must declare their candidacy. For details, visit scps.nyu.edu/certificate.

CAN I CONTACT NYU WITH QUESTIONS BEFORE I REGISTER?

Yes. If you need more information or have questions about a course or certificate, we are available via e-mail

at scpsinfo@nyu.edu, or by phone (see the General Information section of the Bulletin for contact information).

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