Hurunui Long Term Community Plan - Hurunui District Council

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan - Hurunui District Council

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan

2009-2019


Cover: “Looking up at Upham”

(photograph by Joy van Lier of her grandson Luke Millar awestruck by the

statue of Charles Upham after visiting the Waipara Farmers Market at the

district council offices in Amberley)

Photo Competition - Acknowledgement of Entries

The Hurunui Long Term Community Plan is an important document that

captures the long-term visions that the community has for the District

(Community Outcomes), and what the Hurunui District Council and other

organizations and government departments will do to contribute towards

achieving these.

This document is as much about people and what is important to them, as


Accordingly, we ran a photo competition, calling for photographs from

the community that illustrate “the essence of the district”. The winning

photograph has been used on the front cover, the runner-up on the back

cover: “Scenes of the Hurunui District” (a collage by Gregory Fenwick)

Images on this page (from top right to bottom left) are:

“First Snow” (Hanmer Springs) - Ron Nelson

“Waipara Valley Farmers Market” (Amberley) - Jane Thompson

“Fielddays Hank” - Jan Weaver

“Gore Bay” - Roger Hornblow

“Relaxing at Motanau Beach” - Merle Hill

“Awesome tree in the Balcairn cemetery” - Trudy Maynard

Hurunui River from top of Hitchin Hills” - Kerry & Simon Maxwell

Images on the next page (from top left to bottom right) are:

“Lake Fishing” - Liz Smart

Hurunui Trek” - Mike Gilbert

“Amberley A&P Show 2008” - Joy van Lier

“Gore Bay” - Mike Gilbert

“Mt Cass” - Mel Paterson

“Swing Bridge” - Liz Smart

“Sky” - Jan Weaver

“The essence of young people from the District” (Cheviot) - Mel Paterson

(Mt Lyford) - Hamish Simpson

Some photographs from these entrants have also been used on the

chapter title pages of this plan. All other images used in this document

come from the Council’s photo stock.


Welcome to the Hurunui

District Council’s Long Term

Community Plan.

This plan explains what we are

planning to do over the next 10 years

(& beyond);

when and why we plan to do it;

how much it will cost; and

how we will pay for it.


Hurunui District Council

Contents

7 Introduction

8 Introduction from the Mayor & Chief Executive

10 How your rates are spent

11 About the Plan


17 Key Issues

23 Hurunui Wellness

25 Community Outcomes

26 Our Community Outcomes

27 Introduction

30 "A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play"

31 "A Healthy, Safe Place to Live"

33 “A Thriving Local Economy”

34 "Essential Infrastructure"

35 “Environmental Responsibility”

36 "Skills and Education for Work and Life"


37 Amberley

43 Amuri/ Hurunui

49 Cheviot

53 Glenmark

63 Council Activities

64 Introduction

65 Community Services and Facilities

67 Activity 1: Library

73 Activity 2: Township Facilities

78 Activity 3: Property

82 Activity 4: Public Toilets

85 Activity 5: Cemeteries

88 Activity 6: Reserves

92 Activity 7: Grants and Service Awards

95 Environment and Safety

97 Activity 1: Resource Management/Planning

101 Activity 2: Civil Defence

105 Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

108 Activity 4: Building Compliance

112 Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor Licensing

116 Activity 6: Animal Control

119 Growth and Development

121 Activity 1: Tourism

125 Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

128 Activity 3: Economic Development

132 Utility Services / Infrastructure

134 Activity 1: Roading Network

140 Activity 2: Waste Minimisation

146 Activity 3: Sewerage

150 Activity 4: Stormwater/Drainage

154 Activity 5: Water Supply

164 Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

170 Governance

57 Hanmer Springs

62 Sustainability

174 Hurunui Water Management

Strategy

177 Council Controlled Organisations

4


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

179 Financial Overview

180 Introduction

180 Forecasting Assumptions

184 Statement of Accounting Policy

192 Prospective Statement of Comprehensive Income

194 Prospective Statement of Changes in Equity

195 Prospective Statement of Financial Position

196 Prospective Statement of Cash Flows


198 Prospective Summary of Capital Expenditure

201 Policies

202 Mäori Contributions to Decision Making


210 Revenue and Financing Policy

227 Road Seal Extensions Policy

228 Statement Concerning Balancing of the Budget

229 Investment Policy

231 External Liability Management Policy

232 Treasury Risk Management Policy

236 Internal Financing Policy

237 Breakdown of Rates

238 Funding Impact Statement

243 Rating for 2009/10, 10/11, 11/12

247 Public/Private Partnership Policy

249 Policy for Rates Remissions on Mäori Freehold Land


Agricultural Land

250 Policy for Rates Remissions on Biodiversity

251 Rates Postponement Policy

251 Rates Penalties Policy

252 Policy of Reapportionment of Developer Outlays

253 Reserves Funding Policy

254 Developments Contributions Policy

5

269 District Representatives

270 Hurunui District Council Mayor and Deputy Mayor

270 Amberley Ward Councillors and Committee


Committee

272 Glenmark Ward Councillor

272 Hanmer Springs Ward Councillor, Community Board and

Thermal Reserve Management Committee

272 Cheviot Ward Councillors and Committee

273 Canterbury Regional Council

273 Canterbury District Health Board

273 Parliament

273 Ngäi Tahu

274 Management Team

275 Committee Structure


277 Appendices

278 Appendix 1:

Summary of the Solid Waste Management Plan

280 Appendix 2:

Summary of the Water and Sanitary Services

Assessment

283 Appendix 3:

Summary of the Draft Hurunui Community Road Safety


285 Appendix 4:

Levels of Service for Water and Sewer

288 Appendix 5:

Rates: Sample properties

294 Appendix 6:

Memorandum of Understanding between Te Rünanga o

Ngäi Tahu, Te Ngäi Tüähuriri

Rünanga, Te Rünanga o Kaiköura

and the Hurunui District Council

302 Appendix 7:

Audit Report

Page 5

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

6


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Introduction

8 From The Mayor and Chief

Executive

10 How your rates are spent

11 About the Plan


17 Key Issues

23 Hurunui Wellness

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Photo taken by Mel Paterson

7

Page 7

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Introduction From The Mayor and Chief Executive

Hello everyone, and welcome to Council’s Long Term Plan,

2009 – 2019. This introduction summarises some important

themes and points that will assist you in gaining an overall

understanding of the Plan and what it may mean to you,

and to our District.

The Plan itself is necessarily long in order to contain

information that is required as set out in the Local

Government Act 2002 and audited rigorously by Audit

New Zealand. You may be interested to know that the

auditing costs alone for this document are $66,937. All

we can do is assure you, as ratepayers and residents,


term plan diligently, to create what we believe is a robust

and comprehensive strategic framework for Hurunui for

the next ten years, notwithstanding the challenges and

uncertainties we all presently face.

The long term plan includes some new suggestions that


this plan in March and April 2009. We received almost

200 submissions. In the main, we received overwhelming

support for the plan. Of key consideration to Council, was


global economic downturn. We consider that we have

developed a plan which will take the Hurunui District

forward without overly burdening the ratepayer.

We have endeavoured to set this document out in a user

friendly way as much as possible. For example, you will see

a special section (page 17) titled “key issues”, representing

a summary of all the major issues which, in our opinion,

represent the more substantial items we asked for your

consideration and feedback on. We encourage you to use

this section to guide you to these major areas that deserve


appendix schedule (page 288) outlining the 2009/10

rates across a range of sample properties throughout the

District, so that you can easily see the impact of the budgets



and wards.

In developing this Plan from the outset, we have been

continuously guided by the same overriding fundamental

principles that we have emphasised since 2004:

- Focus on core services and infrastructure such as

roading, water supplies, solid waste, and waste water

and stormwater

-

- Continuous improvement in customer service delivery

This 2009 – 2019 Plan goes further, to include a fourth

strategic element, namely the pursuit of maximum

leverage and integration of the Hanmer Springs Thermal

Springs and Spa as a core business asset for the District

at large, clearly taking it far beyond being “just a tourism

facility” as such, or a “Hanmer Springs only” operation

disconnected from the rest of Hurunui. You will see

references to this new strategic element throughout this

Plan, particularly the way we have created the business

model to fund the Pools and Spa borrowings and debt


the Pools and Spa surpluses to continuously enhance our

network of reserves.



“wellness values” that shape our planned actions and

activities, and that will progressively become embedded

alongside our community outcomes and measures. The

Hurunui Wellness” concept, its origins and what it means

to this Plan, is outlined on page 23.

All of the foregoing has resulted in the following rates:

- The District wide general rate increase for 2009/2010

of 0.29 percent

- An average total rate increase (including all amenity

and targeted rates) for 2009/2010 of 4.2 percent

- The ten year cumulative increase is 18.9 percent for

the District wide general rate (1.9 percent per year on

average), and 28.75 percent for total rates including all

amenity and targeted rates (2.9 percent per year)


the projected rate movements, year by year, are shown

in the Funding Impact Statement on page 238. We must

emphasise that amenity and targeted rate increases vary

considerably across the District, according to the projects


water upgrades and debt repayment by scheme; there are

new medical centres to be built in Amuri and Cheviot;

new stormwater projects in Amberley Ward; and so on.


Management Strategy outlined on page 174. We have taken

a proactive stance in the development of an overarching,

comprehensive water management strategy for our

District. In doing so, we have tried to take a high level,

even handed and broad approach that we believe best

represents the balance of interests across our communities

and our District. This issue received 79 submissions,

mostly endorsing our strategy. Your supportive feedback

has reinforced our belief that we are on the right track and

that we must act now.

We have found the development of the Hurunui Long

Term Plan challenging, critically important, and rewarding

in terms of drawing together a comprehensive and very


we have been mindful of the present economic situation

nationally and globally, we have not allowed such

pessimism to dominate the longer term outlook. We have

also been caught by a possible mismatch in assumptions,


government (see page 181) predate the latest news

headlines, and may now appear excessive in light of more

recent data. Our response to these issues has been to focus

hard on our costs and rates particularly for 2009/10.

Notwithstanding these less than positive issues that we

are all wrestling with in our own lives, and our businesses,

8


we can highlight that Council is in a strong overall

position today, and throughout the long term plan period.

Currently, Council has no debt. Accumulated borrowings


Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa through to 2012,

plus other infrastructure development such as water

schemes), but all debt is anticipated to be repaid by 2017.


with strong cash surpluses particularly evident from 2012


District.

Finally a sincere thank you to all of these who took the



Garry Jackson

Mayor

Andrew Dalziel


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

9

Page 9

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

How your rates are spent

The council’s projected income and expenditure for 2009/2010

Operating Income for 2009/2010 year

$27,639,000

Other Income

18%

External Interest

0%

District Wide Rates

18%

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools &

Spa

25%

Targeted Rates

25%

Development Contributions

2%

NZTA Subsidies

12%

Operating Expenditure for 2009/2010 year

$25,727,000

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools &

Spa

21%

Other Operating Expendiure

9%

Governnance

2%

Community Services & Facilities

Growth & Development

11%

5%

Environment & Safety

7%

Drainage

0%

Sewer

3%

Water

12% Solid Waste

6%

Roading

24%

Capital Expenditure for the 2009/2010 year

$14,160,000

Other Capital Expenditure

3%

Community Services & Facilities

17%

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools &

Spa

31%

Drainage

9%

Roading

30%

Sewer

1%

Water

9%

10


About the Plan

Introduction

The Local Government Act 2002 requires all councils to

have a Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP).

The Hurunui Long Term Community Plan is our LTCCP.



actively involved in preparing plans for their townships


are the views of the many individuals who told us what

they consider to be important for the future of our district.

We have also begun working with various organizations


toward the visions and aspirations of Hurunui’s people.

This has been no small feat! Many people have put

considerable numbers of hours into the development of

this plan. The plan covers a 10 year period from 1 July

2009 to 30 June 2019.

Updating the Plan

This plan will be updated and revised every 3 years. The


Council does every 3 years.

In the years between each Hurunui Long Term Community

Plan review, we will prepare an Annual Plan which will

focus on the budgets of the particular year of publication.

This information will be taken from the Hurunui Long

Term Community Plan.

Guide to the Plan

The following is a brief guide about the information

contained in each section of the plan.

Introduction - This section gives information about our


about key issues facing the District (including the need for

sustainability) and the Council’s strategic direction for the

future (“Hurunui Wellness”).

Community Outcomes – The term ‘community outcomes’

is used to describe what people in our community want


only today’s people, but future generations. This section

describes the community outcomes and connects them

to the Council’s activities and to other organisations that

contribute towards the achievement of the community

outcomes.


about each ward and community rating area, including,

demographic data, key priorities and amenity rates.

– Gives useful information for each

Council activity such as water, roading, tourism etc,


major priorities or projects are planned for each activity.


information is summarised. It gives the 10 year capital


11

Page 11

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019


– Provides the key Council policies (including


making and planning.

– This section contains summaries of Council’s

Solid Waste Management Plan, the Water Services and

Sanitary Assessment, Road Safety Strategy and Council

structures.

Monitoring the Plan

A

Report. In this report, we will state how we have

performed against what we said we were going to do in

this plan and at what cost. We will also report on whether

there has been any progress toward the achievement of the

community outcomes.

Changing the Plan

If any si

Long Term Community Plan before it is formally revised

at each 3 year interval, the proposed changes will be


to have their say before Council decides whether or not to

make the proposed changes.

Our ‘ guides us in determining the

importance of an issue and the possible impact on the



is included in the Policy section.

The Plan does not include GST

When reading this document, please be aware that all of


Plan are GST exclusive except the

’ and the .

Inflation


basis to comply with accounting standards. Details of the


outlined on page 181.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Relationship between the Hurunui Long Term

Community Plan, and other documents

Annual

Report

Knowing what the

Council and other

organisations achieved

Community

Outcomes

Knowing what is important

for the future wellbeing of

our community

Annual

Plan

Knowing how it

is going to be

paid for

Hurunui

Long Term

Community Plan

Knowing what the Council

and other organisations are

doing to meet community

outcomes

The Hurunui Long Term Community Plan integrates


community outcomes, and in a way that promotes public

accountability and integrated decision making.

All planning that the Council undertakes is driven by the

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan, including asset

management plans and waste management plans as well

as linking to other non-mandatory strategies such as the

Hurunui Tourism Strategy and the Hurunui Community

Road Safety Strategy.

The Council’s reasons for being involved in activities


contributing to furthering community outcomes, and

promoting the District’s social, cultural, economic or

environmental wellbeing.

12


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Location

Land Use

Area

Climate

Population

Labour Force

The Hurunui District is in North Canterbury,

on the East Coast of the South Island,

New Zealand.

Predominantly rural

864,640 hectares (8,646,400,000 m²)

Ranging from unique coastal microclimates

to alpine climates

The estimated total population for the

Hurunui District as at 30 June 2007 is

10,800*, distributed between the various

Wards as shown in the chart at right:

Labour Force Hurunui District New Zealand

Unemployment Rate 2.2% 5.1%

Employment Participation 69% 63%

Main Occupations / Agriculture

Service &

Industries

& Forestry

Sales

13

Population by Ward / Community Rating area

Hanmer Springs,

930

Glenmark, 1140

Education

Education

15 years and over

Page 13

Hurunui, 1360

Cheviot, 1310

Amuri, 2000

Hurunui District

Amberley, 3700

New Zealand

35.6% 40%

36.1% 39.9%

No Formal Qual. 28.3% 25%



POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

16000

14000

Statistics NZ Population Projections for Hurunui District: high,

medium, and low growth (2006 base)

1400

1200

1000

Township Populations (Census Figures)

Number of People

12000

10000

8000

6000

4000

High Growth

Medium Growth

Low Growth

Population

800

600

400

200

0

1991

1996

2001

2006

2000

0

2006 2011 2016 2021 2026 2031

Amberley

Amberley Beach

Cheviot

Culverden

Gore Bay

Greta Valley

Hanmer Springs

Hawarden

Leithfield

Leithfield Beach

Rotherham

Waiau

Waikari

Waipara

Projected change in number and age distribution of people in the Hurunui District:-

Statistics New Zealand medium vairant (2006 base)

Ethinicty 2006: Hurunui District, Canterbury Region and New Zealand

(people may report more than one ethnicity, so percentages do not total 100%)

14000

90%

80%

12000

70%

Number of People

10000

8000

6000

4000

2000

0

2006 2011 2016 2021 2026 2031

65 Years and over

40-64 Years

15-39 Years

0-14 Years

Percentage

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

European

Mäori

Pacific Peoples

Asian

Middle Eastern/Latin American/African

Other Ethnicity (including "NewZealander")

Total NZ

Canterbury Region

Hurunui District

Hurunui District: Age and Place of Residence 5 years ago for new residents in 2006

People Born Overseas living in the Hurunui District (Census Data)

500

1400

450

1239

400

1200

Number of People

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0

12%

0-4 Years

5-9 Years

10-14 Years

15-19 Years

20-24 Years

25-29 Years

30-34 Years

35-39 Years

40-44 Years

45-49 Years

50-54 Years

55-59 Years

60-64 Years

65-69 Years

70-74 Years

75-79 Years

80-84 Years

85 Years And Over

Hurunui District, Canterbury Region, NZ: Age Distribution 2006

Overseas

Elsewhere in New Zealand

Number of People

1000

800

600

400

200

0

825

990

1996 2001 2006

Percentage of Areas (Meshblocks) in Hurunui District by Deprivation

Index Decile Scores (1="less deprived", 10="more deprived" in 2006)

(average for NZ as a whole = 10% for each score, 50% in each half)*

10%

8%

30%

25%

77% 23%

Percentage

6%

4%

2%

NZ

Canterbury Region

Hurunui District

Percentage of Meshblocks

20%

15%

10%

0%

0-4 Years

5-9 Years

10-14 Years

15-19 Years

20-24 Years

25-29 Years

30-34 Years

35-39 Years

40-44 Years

45-49 Years

50-54 Years

55-59 Years

60-64 Years

65-69 Years

70+ Years

5%

0%

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


14


Population

The population of the Hurunui District is predicted

to grow steadily over the next 20 years, although the

population of some towns in the District is dropping.

By far the greatest proportion of growth is occurring in

Amberley and Hanmer Springs (see graphs at top of

previous page). Census data reveals that the Hurunui

District has an aging population, with a steeper rise than

for the country as a whole predicted in the proportion of

people aged 65 and over (see graph). Ethnic diversity is

lower than that of New Zealand as a whole, but there has

been an marked increase in (mostly European) overseas

migrants (see graphs), especially in the 30-50 year old

age group (indicating that they have come to work in the

District).

Recreation, Visitor Attractions, Parks and Reserves

The Hurunui is one of the few places in New Zealand’s

South Island that in less than 2 hours travelling time, you

can drive from the Lewis Pass (the northern most point of

the Southern Alps) with its fresh mountain air, spectacular



Beach. Activities include mountain walks, skiing, thermal



beaches. The Waipara Valley is reknowned for some of



Hurunui has over 270 hectares of passive and recreation

reserves including the world famous Hanmer Springs


the former Queen Mary Hospital grounds in Hanmer


Motunau and Gore Bay. The main recreational lakes are

Lake Sumner, Lake Taylor and Lake Tennyson.

Main Industries

The Hurunui is continuing to experience growth and


District has been primarily agriculture based, and

agriculture continues to be the single largest contributor to

the Hurunui economy. However, recent times have seen an

expansion in both viticulture and tourism. The growth of

the District icon, Hanmer Springs as a tourist destination

and the establishment of associated infrastructure, is

unprecedented in the tourism sector New Zealand

wide. The majority of the District’s working population



employment industry category is “accommodation, cafes

and restaurants”, followed by “health and community

services”.

Agri/Viticulture

According to the 2007 Statistics New Zealand Agricultural

Production Census, the Hurunui District is home to 1,065

farms, 462 of which are sheep farms (total of 1,612,116

15

Page 15

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019



in the Hurunui District. The major horticultural activities

in the District are grape-growing (970 hectares), followed

by olives (87 hectares) and hazelnuts (25 hectares). There

is a small vegetable harvest in the Hurunui District (e.g.

asparagus), and we produced 9,679 tonnes of barley, 3,852


the year ended 30 June 2007.

Development and Growth


based around agriculture, viticulture and tourism. Both

domestic and international tourism have increased


wide array of recreational opportunities within Hurunui

from the coast to the mountains. The Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools & Spa, Mt Lyford Ski Field and Waipara

wine producing area are recognised as anchor destinations


investment in the District. Statistics New Zealand has

estimated the Hurunui population at 2026 to be 12,350 on

a medium growth projection. However because of a large

absentee population owning lifestyle and holiday homes,

the Council is planning for growth demands based upon

trends in subdivision developments, and, upon this basis,

indications are that growth will be much higher than what

is indicated by the Statistics New Zealand projections.

The majority of this growth is expected to occur in the

Amberley Ward and Hanmer Springs township (see

Development Contributions Policy, p254, for details).

Average Cost of Housing

The average cost of housing in our District has increased

dramatically over the past ten years, although it has


the median sale price for a house in the North Canterbury

region north of the Waimakariri River was $118,250.

By October 2008, this had risen to $292,500. The period

of time when our area experienced it's sharpest rise in

average house prices saw an increase of $54,000 between

September 2004 and September 2005. The District

experienced an increase in average house prices of 22%


average for the same period of 14%. (Real Estate Institute


Health

Indicators of health in the District include the Ministry of

Health’s “Deprivation Index”, which has been shown to

correlate with various health statistics (e.g. rates of cervical

cancer, mental health problems). This index assigns

deprivation scores (1 least deprived, to 10 most deprived)

to each meshblock in New Zealand. Meshblocks are


(containing a median of approximately 87 people in

2006). Scores are based on variables like income, home


crowding, transportation, and access to telecomunications.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

These scores are assigned as measures of relative (rather

than absolute) deprivation. Thus, 10% of meshblocks in

New Zealand as a whole will always score 10. Scores for

the Hurunui District indicate much lower than average

deprivation, with more than 75 % of meshblocks scoring

in the top half (see graph on page 14). Lower than average

levels of income and education in Amberley, and lower

than average home ownership in Hanmer Springs (due

to holiday and workers’ accommodation) contributed to

higher than expected scores for these areas (both 7) .

Rateable Value

Rates are levied on rateable properties based on their


may include the right to pass utilities over land, e.g.,

power lines and water pipes. Almost all lands are rateable.

Exceptions apply to certain Crown land and land mainly

used for educational and charitable purposes. At the date

of printing, total rateable value of the Hurunui District is

4.8 billion dollars.

Property Values by Ward






Amberley 987,953,800 2,094

Amuri 1,067,785,300 1,145

Cheviot 675,864,400 940

Glenmark 643,525,150 733

Hanmer Springs 727,486,500 1,576

Hurunui 580,945,100 797

Utilities 126,609,000 0


Growth Factor (1%) 48,101,693 73

*

*Note: The Council rates an additonal 1,500 properties in the Waimakariri District, who are on our Ashley Water Scheme

Services and Amenities

Major services and amenities in the district are available in the following locations.

Primary School

Area School

Council Medical Centre (blue = private)

Council provided Doctor’s Housing

Attached Locum Accomodation

Council Cemetery

Library

MT LYFORD

Hall

Pool

Libraries:


Pools:

Halls:


Medical Centres:

Cemeteries:


Schools:



16


Key Issues

Upcoming Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

AFFORDABILITY

In developing this long term plan, Council has been very


economic climate and the uncertainty of how long the

economic recession will continue, Council has made every


by taking a prudent approach to what is included in the

plan, and how it is funded. As a result, there will be a

0.29% increase in the District wide rate in 2009/10, which

is lower than the 3.26% increase signalled in the Council’s

previous long term plan.

A contributing factor to the low rate increase is Council’s

method to fund further developments of the Hanmer

Springs Thermal Pools and Spa complex (see pages

164 and 288 for further information). This will result

in Council receiving a new form of revenue which will

reduce the coming year’s general rate increase from 3.26%

as per the 2006-16 LTCCP to only 0.29%.

This trend continues throughout the plan, with Council


conservative approach to its operating expenditure.

“HURUNUI WELLNESS” THEME

Recent years have seen an upsurge in the awareness of

“wellness”. It is the concept of holistic integration and

balance across all aspects of our lifestyle, our communities,

our health and spirit in the fullest sense. The Hurunui

district already embodies the ideal of wellness - as one

Hurunui local once put it: “We live the lives the rest of

the world would love to live”. In order to build upon

strengths that we already possess to form an integrated

foundation for sustainable development, community

spirit, and tourism, the council has developed a vision

of “Hurunui Wellness” and incorporated this into many

aspects of this plan (see page 23 for details).

We received a lot of feedback about this concept, mainly in

support but also some challenges regarding the meaning

of ‘wellness’. This concept will be developed further over

the ensuing months.

COMPREHENSIVE HURUNUI WATER MANAGEMENT

STRATEGY

Our biggest issue for long-term planning concerns water,

and there is a recognised need to develop a comprehensive

water management strategy for the District. This strategy

will address issues surrounding storage, distribution,

quality, and conservation of water, and will draw in a

number of other projects and parties such as the Hurunui

Water Project, the Canterbury Strategic Water Study,

the Canterbury Mayoral Forum, and Environment

17

Canterbury.

This Long Term Plan represents the best opportunity for

Council to demonstrate a sense of leadership, by tabling

an overall direction for a comprehensive Hurunui Water

Management Strategy. At this stage, the strategy is

deliberately brief and high level. Further details will be

developed through working parties and other consultative

processes as implemented in future months. The initial

overview of the Hurunui Water Management Strategy

includes six key areas:

Water storage and distribution for production and

community development

Drinking water quality


Water use research

Environmental, social and recreational interests

Advocacy.

Broad notes on each of these six components are outlined

on page 174. The Strategy concludes with emphasis on

the need for all of us to strive to seek solutions that are

based on balance between various views and interest, so

that all sectors “win”. The drinking water quality issues

are covered in more detail in the Water Activity section on


costings for the upgrading of the Cheviot water supply to

meet the NZ drinking water standards ($579,000 has been

factored into the budget for 2010/11 year – although a


the government’s Drinking Water Assistance Programme).

This section also includes commentary on water quality

for other schemes in the District.

FLOODING, DRAINAGE & STORMWATER ISSUES


drainage and stormwater management systems in the





Impeded waterways and lagoons closed to the sea by sand

bar formation at the river mouths were major factors in

this. The report recommended that upstream diversions

be undertaken to protect Amberley Township, and, in

addition, for Amberley Beach, that outfall capacity be

increased by waterway capacity enhancement (cleaning,

widening, regrading).

The Council will be taking steps to address these issues

and similar issues (or potential issues) in other areas of

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

the District. Planned funding for upgrades of Amberley

stormwater systems have been increased following

consideration of submissions to $850,000 in the year

2009/10, these costs are to be covered by a uniform rating

charge of $53.69 for all ratepayers in the Amberley Ward.

(see page 150 for details for both Amberley and Hanmer

Springs stormwater plans).

MEDICAL SERVICES

Providing health services that are of a good quality,


in the District presents ongoing challenges. Finding


live in rural New Zealand is not a problem that Hurunui


GPs wanting to set up practice in a rural community and

stay for life (and work alone) has become unsustainable.

Important considerations for future planning include

having good medical facilities and a strong network of

medical practitioners and providers to support each other.



to provide medical facilities and to assist in facilitating

good outcomes. Council does meet with key providers

of medical services for the District, including the Primary

Health Organisations (PHO), Canterbury District Health

Board (CDHB), local practitioners, etc, and through these


services in the District are vulnerable. At some time in the

future, the Waikari Hospital is likely to come under review


ways of providing its services.

Both the Rotherham and the Cheviot Medical Centres have


cater for current and future demand. New medical centres

for both towns have been factored into this long term plan.

The Amberley Medical Centre is in a similar situation and

also planning on building new facilities, but whereas the

Council owns both the Rotherham and Cheviot Medical

Centres, the Amberley Medical Centre is privately owned.

The new medical centres in Rotherham and Cheviot will

require funding through local amenity rates. Provision

of $1 million has been allowed in 2009/10 to build a new

medical centre in Rotherham, and a further $1 million is

factored into the 2016/17 year to do the same in Cheviot.

AMBERLEY SWIMMING POOL

A major upgrade to the Amberley swimming pool, or

alternatively an all new pool, has been consistently


planning sessions, annual plan submissions and other

discussions. Council completed an in depth review of the

life-expectancy and replacement costs of the Amberley

Swimming Pool in September 2008, and concluded that

the present pool is good for another 10 more years.

Replacement costs of approximately $3m for a covered

and heated pool to be open most months of the year


following consideration of the submissions received. A

further consultation process will be undertaken before a

pool is built, which will enable options and proposals to

be shown. Details are shown on page 73.

HANMER SPRINGS THERMAL POOLS & SPA

The Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa complex

has undergone vast changes during the past 4 years

to modernise the facilities, to cater to increased visitor

demand, and to create the new Spa facility. These upgrades

and renovations went only as far as the current thermal

pools site would allow. Following the Government’s

decision to vest a substantial area of the Queen Mary site

in Council, and consistent with Council’s intention to use

such opportunity to expand the Thermal Pools and Spa to

include the adjoining area of approx 4,600 square metres,

Council is now planning a major expansion project for the

Thermal Pools complex.

The objectives of this project are to address present


competition from other water entertainment facilities, and

to continue the thermal pool’s award winning reputation as

New Zealand’s leader in water sensations and recreation.

This $7.5 million project has been incorporated into the

budgets for the next three years utilising a new business

model that maximises returns to the District at large.

The projects would be funded through the thermal pools

and spa borrowing directly from Council, with the interest


2.5% above the Council’s external borrowing rate; or the


providers. The additional interest derived from the


per $1 million of borrowings) provides a good return for

Council and contributes toward lower rates.

The risk to Council and ratepayers of borrowing money

to fund capital works for the Thermal Pools and Spa

is that, should it not be able to achieve the anticipated


to fund Reserves, toilets and cemeteries District library

operations) would be less than required (i.e. a negative

impact on the general rate) as the Pools prioritised debt

repayment ahead of surpluses to Council.

Such risk is considered low as the Thermal Pools and Spa

has performed consistently at budgeted levels, previous

assumptions of revenue growth arising from capital

improvements have been met, and the growth and revenue

projections backing up this 2010/2012 extension project

are very conservative. Council commissioned an expert

to undertake an independent review of the Pools and Spa

and the viability of the development plans. The resulting


Full details of the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and

Spa operation, this planned expansion project, growth

18


management model are set out on page 164.

QUEEN MARY HOSPITAL SITE

The Council has entered into an agreement with the

Crown for approximately 5.5 hectares of the former

Queen Mary Hospital site to be vested in the Council as

a historic reserve. In addition, an area of approximately

4,600 square metres will be vested as a recreation reserve

for use in conjunction with the Hanmer Springs Thermal

Reserve.

The Council will ensure the buildings and land are brought

up to a standard where they will not deteriorate, and

undertake the necessary planning for the buildings to be

developed and made available for appropriate commercial

and community use. Council plans to complete some

essential maintenance works to the buildings on the site


As part of the vesting proposal, the Government has

provided $1.5 million to fund the essential maintenance

and earthquake strengthening of the former Nurses block

on the site. Earthquake strengthening of the Nurses

Hostel is programmed for 2015/16. See page 88 for further

details.

TOURISM STRATEGY

A new tourism strategy has been developed, which is


The strategy incorporates the “Hurunui Wellness” vision

and uses revised marketing and product development



This will reduce the overhead and administration costs

(estimated at approximately $54,000), and increase

discretionary marketing spend to approximately $184,000.

The current targeted rate will be retained. The new


further information, see page 121.

AMBERLEY TOWNSHIP DEVELOPMENT


on the proposed plan changes to the Amberley Township

were publically released on 10 February 2009. The Hearing

Panel (consisting of John Milligan (Chair) of Christchurch,

a former barrister specialising in resource management, Cr

Michael Malthus - Deputy Mayor, Cr Judy Meikle - Chair


Coster - Amberley Ward elected representative) listened



before undertaking extensive deliberations to reach their



Proposed Plan Change 13.

The Hearing Panel has supported the principle that any


occur to the east of SH1. However, the Panel have not

19

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

provided for any additional residential zoned land

outside the current urban boundary at this time. The Panel

concluded that at the present time, allowing additional

residential zoning would not meet the sustainable

management requirements of the Resource Management


amount of urban land that is already available for

development and the costs to the community associated


been given for the proposed enlargement of the business

area, providing ample space for a new supermarket and

other retail facilities.

Council agreed with the Hearing Panel’s decision on

17 February 2009 and now will investigate work programmes

accordingly. Underlying this work programme

will be Council’s vision for Amberley’s growth and development

strategy which encompasses: a comprehensive

framework for sustainable growth and development

across residential, business, industrial and servicing activities;

a positive and vibrant direction which embraces

Amberley’s rich, traditional country values; Council having

a business friendly and service driven approach; and

township residents, businesses, developers, investors, etc


direction of the Amberley growth and development

strategy.


mediate with objectors of the Plan Change decision. This

is likely to occur around July or August 2009.

CANTERBURY MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT FUND

Council is required to pay an annual operating levy to the

Canterbury Museum, being Hurunui District’s share of

the Museum’s running costs. This is currently $48,198


based on the Museum’s long term forecasts.

Further, Canterbury Museum intends to proceed with a

redevelopment project. This has been signalled in their

previous Annual Plan and replaces the previously planned


Court judgement in 2006. The proposed redevelopment

is costed at $63.7M and is shown as occurring between

2011/12 and 2013/14. The levy imposed on Hurunui

District Council for the proposed capital development is

currently shown as:

2011/12 2012/13 2013/14

$44,523 $89,045 $44,523

Council has informed the Museum’s Trust Board that it did

not agree to the proposed capital contribution without more

information about the project and without consultation

with its community. However, the foregoing amounts


the respective years as shown above. Firm details about

the redevelopment project have yet to be provided by the

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Museum. Council’s view of the redevelopment project (it

was originally budgeted at approx $35 million in 2003, and

escalated to approx $48 million before being abandoned)

is that any redevelopment proposal must be designed

in such a way to minimise both the capital construction

cost and subsequent annual operating costs, i.e. “function

before design”.

INTERNAL FINANCING POLICY

The Council has formalised its Internal Financing Policy,

which is included on page 236 of this plan.

The Policy allows for communities to borrow internally from

Council to fund major capital projects. Key components of

the policy are the requirement for communities to allow for


for a transparent and consistent approach in charging

interest on debt that communities have accumulated.

DECISION NOT TO FULLY FUND DEPRECIATION

The Local Government Act requires Councils to balance

the budget and by doing so, Councils are required to

ensure that operating expenditure is met by operating

income. This requires Council to fund depreciation

through other income and, principally, rates. The funding

of depreciation does allow for additional funds to be

received which can accumulate to provide funding for the

ultimate replacement of those assets concerned.

In 1999, the Council widely consulted with its community

over this requirement and it concluded that the Council

will not cash fund depreciation on Water and Sewer assets,

Roading or Ward Amenity assets. In addition, it has been

resolved not to fund depreciation on the library building.

The implication of the Council not funding depreciation is

that no depreciation reserves are held for the replacement

of the asset. Any capital expenditure required has to be

funded through the use of internal loans or funding of the

capital cost through rates and other income. If internal

loans are used, there is the requirement on that community


but also a portion of the principal of the outstanding loan

on an annual basis. Both interest and principal repayments


community must bear and as a result, increases in the rate

requirement are inevitable. Council is comfortable with

increasing rates to meet the cost of interest and principal

because existing ratepayers have previously been relieved

of any rate increases that may have been required if the

Council resolved to fully fund the depreciation on those

assets.

ROAD SEAL EXTENSIONS POLICY


Community Outcome / Dimension of Wellness of “Essential

Infrastructure” by increasing the length of sealed roads


funding, and best value for money. The Policy provides

guidelines for prioritising and funding sections of road for

sealing, taking into account engineering considerations

and applications by residents (see page 227 for details).

$339,000 has been set aside for this purpose within the

scope of the current plan, and additional funds will be

made available at the Council’s discretion within the scope

of future plans.

RESERVES MANAGEMENT PLAN & FUNDING

POLICY

On 18 December 2008 Council adopted a District Reserves

Management Plan, which draws together individual

policies for reserves in the District as well as presenting

the commonalities between them in the form of a

“General Policy” section. The overall volume of policy

documentation is thus reduced, and a consistent approach

to the management of reserves across the District is

provided. A total of $1.5m is factored into the Plan for

future development for various reserves, comprising

$475,000 for projects on “District” reserves (funded from

Thermal Pools and Spa surpluses at a budgeted $50,000

per year 2009 -2019) and a further $1 million for “Amenity”

reserves (traditionally funded by amenity rates). A change

to our Reserves Funding Policy (see page 253) that allows

the Council discretion to fund (at least in part) capital

projects on such amenity reserves from the surpluses

received from the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

(see page 164). The full District Reserves Plan is available

on the Council’s website – www.hurunui.govt.nz

SOLID WASTE & RECYCLING


opted to retain the community involvement of Hurunui

Recycling in combination with services provided by Becon

Canterbury. This total cost is $1.7 million per annum for

Council to provide its waste and recycling services. An

estimated minimum of 60% of all dry waste deposited at


via a back loading and processing model using Becon’s

new Canterbury plant. Glass recycling will also resume


stations. A dual refuse and recycling collection undertaken

by Hanmer Refuse Services has been introduced in




are expected to increase in forward years at a greater rate

than presently due to increasing fuel prices, imposition of

waste levies, and other commercial factors.

From 2009/10, a commercial recycling collection will be

available for businesses located in townships. The rate

for this will be $230 per annum for businesses located

in townships using this service. Those businesses not

requiring a Council collection can opt out through an

annual declaration process, or can negotiate with Council

for a special (higher) rate to cater for additional volumes.

This approach is consistent with the domestic collection

rate, and eliminates the present inequities whereby some

businesses have no collection at all, whilst others are

20


eceiving a collection service at no cost (ie subsidised by

the domestic ratepayer).


for operating the Amberley Transfer station at its

present location expires in October 2009. Options are

being considered (taking into account present economic

conditions) to retain it on the existing site if work can be

done to meet all of the consent conditions. See page 140 for

more information about Council’s ‘Waste Minimisation’

activity.

DISTRICT PLAN REVIEW AND COUNCIL

ADVOCACY

The District Plan is due for a full review by 2013/14, and

Council has set aside $50,000 (in the 2009/10 year), $67,000

(2010/11) and $74,000 (2011/12) to undertake the extensive

work required. As part of the review process, Council

intends to review all sections of the plan with a focus on


will also be considering what impact climate change and

sea level rise may have on the current planning policies in

the plan. Additional resourcing is also required to respond

to outcomes associated with decisions and appeals on the


the Proposed Regional Policy Statement. Council also will

be responding to issues associated with the Hurunui River

Water Conservation Order and developing a management

strategy for the Waipara River to protect the values

people place on this resource. Whilst budgeted, no actual

expenditure on the District Plan reviews is likely to take

place until revisions to the Resource Management Act are


HANMER SPRINGS TOWNSHIP

DEVELOPMENT

Council will be working with the Hanmer Springs

Community Board to progress the outcomes of the work of

the Hanmer Strategy Group. This will include undertaking

a series of investigations relating to subdivision on

Woodbank Road and State Highway 7A, reviewing car

parking in Hanmer Springs and considering options

for integrated development of the former Queen Mary

Hospital site. Council will also be considering where and

how development in Hanmer Springs Township should

be managed to retain the alpine feel and character of the

town. Council’s District Plan sets out the standards and

conditions which apply to buildings in Hanmer Springs.

The District Plan is due to be reviewed and separate public

consultation will take place during the review process.

DEVELOPMENT CONTRIBUTIONS POLICY

The Council has reviewed its Development Contributions

Policy, and a number of changes have been made,



feedback, particularly from developers who viewed the

methodology used as to be a deterrent to development

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

of Amberley. As a result of the submissions, the policy

has been revised and predicts a higher level of growth in

Amberley and levies have been reapportioned to provide

a more ‘developer friendly’ policy.

Contributions collected between 2004 and 30 June 2008

towards a $2.2m share of the ‘purchase’ of the Queen

Mary Hospital site will be refunded when the site is vested

into Council; but contributions (towards a total of $1.2m)

will still be payable for upgrade purposes. Growth for

the District as a whole was lower than predicted by the

previous policy, so most contributions will increase due

to there being less expected developments over which to


adjustments and increases in capital costs (including new

capital items - e.g. for Amberley stormwater projects) also


to the capital costs of development projects, producing

increases in the level of contributions across the District

over the life of this plan of an average of 2.7% per annum.



longer be added to the face value of contributions, but will

be accounted for, if necessary, through collecting a greater



change has been made in the provision of a two year “grace

period” and waiving of new contributions in fairness to

developers who may have planned for a certain level of

contributions which might otherwise have been subject to

change at short notice. The full policy can be found in the

Policies section of this plan.

REAPPORTIONMENT OF DEVELOPER

OUTLAYS

There has been some concern expressed that developers

are “piggy-backing” on earlier developments in extending

infrastructure (water and roading) installed by those

developments without having to pay any proportion of

the initial cost of infrastructure installation. A new policy

addresses this issue, and is included in this plan (see page

252 for further details).

CONNECTIVITY (BROADBAND)

The Council sees itself as a facilitator, but not as a funder



that may be laid in the District and potential broadband

users in the District. Developers of major subdivisions

are advised by the Council to make provisions for “Fibre

to the Home”, and the Council seeks cooperation with

providers of broadband infrastructure when installing

underground services. Council engineers are available

for advice about dedicated corridors for broadband

infrastructure within road reserves. The Council also

looks to facilitate the provision of wireless broadband

infrastructure, e.g. in allowing the situation of wireless

masts on Council reserve land (to the extent that these


INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

values). Enterprise North Canterbury, an economic

development agency receiving community funding,


making a full application to the government’s Broadband


laid to connect schools in the Hurunui and Waimakariri

Districts. The EOI was accepted, but progress has been

frozen with the change of government. If an opportunity

reopens for a subsidy that will not require any substantial

funding from ratepayers, the Council will follow up this

EOI. Council has not set aside any budget provision for

the development of broadband in its long term plan.

BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY

A Biodiversity Strategy was adopted by the Council on

28 August 2008, and is supported by the employment


received from Government. The vision statement set out

in the strategy is as follows: “The unique natural values

of the Hurunui District are maintained and enhanced by

Council, landowners and other parties working together

in partnership, voluntarily and cooperatively, in a nonregulatory

framework”. A copy of the strategy is available

on the Council’s website – www.hurunui.govt.nz

HANMER SPRINGS REGIONAL FOREST PARK

There has been a keen response to the possibility of

establishing a Regional Forest Park in Hanmer Springs

centered around an existing forest track network which is

extensively used by the public for walking, running and


are the Dog Stream Reserve, Conical Hill Reserve, Larch

Reserve, various DOC Estates, Ngai Tahu / Matariki

Forestry, former Hanmer Recreation Reserve, and other

areas. Feedback is invited upon this proposal. The Council

intends to advocate on behalf of the District in relation to

this concept.

REGIONAL COASTAL PARK

The possibility has also been raised of the development

of a Regional Coastal Park incorporating surplus land


with Tiromoana Reserve and Covenant areas. The land in

question is currently under a 10 year lease, but Transwaste

has agreed not to negotiate with other parties for the sale


District Council and ECan their interest in the land. Your


this proposal.

SUSTAINABILITY

Recent local, national, and global trends and events

have highlighted the need for us to work towards more

sustainable means of economic, environmental, social

and cultural development. The need for sustainability


assumption of the present plan (more details on page 62).

NORTH CANTERBURY SPORT & RECREATION

TRUST

The plan includes a proposal from the North Canterbury

Sport and Recreation Trust to help fund a primary school

sport coaching programme for the 28 schools in the North

Canterbury area. This initiative is to commence in 2009


it up and running. Hurunui and Waimakariri Councils

have been asked to contribute from year 4 to enable


to continue. Hurunui has been asked to contribute

approximately $14,000 from 2012 onwards. Council

received public support through the Plan’s consultation

exercise to leave this in the plan, which Council has done.

22


Hurunui Wellness

A New Unifying Vision for the District

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

WHAT IS “WELLNESS”?

“Wellness” is a well established holistic concept of

integrated and balanced human existence comprising

several core dimensions and values. It is not a commonly

used term, nor is it just a medical or directly a simple health

concept. It is wider than that, and draws in our lifestyle,

our relationships with each other and the environment,

and our total sense of community. “Wellness” has a

commonality with the four wellbeings of the Local

Government Act, but extends much further as a totally

integrated and holistic approach.

A DEFINITION OF “HURUNUI WELLNESS”


Hurunui Wellness” is both a way of life and a planning

foundation, oriented towards optimal wellbeing in which

the body, mind and spirit are integrated by individuals

(be they residents or visitors), by communities, and by

the Hurunui District at large to live more fully within the

human and natural environments”.

Or, in everyday language “In Hurunui, we live the lives

the rest of the world would love to live”.

In this way, wellness as a planning foundation becomes a

“grass-roots up” approach. Wellness becomes the robust

framework for sustainable development, community

spirit, and tourism planning; completely integrated.

Further exploration of this concept is to be done before the


DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS

For practical purposes, Hurunui Wellness can be divided

into 9 strategic planning dimensions:





Landscape & Outlook

Individual and Community Lifestyle

Education and Skills Development

Heritage & Tradition

Infrastructure


Local Government Act 2002 as key factors to be considered

in council planning. The remaining 5 are drawn from

common theoretical approaches to wellness, adapted to

highlight areas that are of particular importance to the

Hurunui District.

23

Together these dimensions provide a framework for

planning which integrates the distinctive character of

our community with the legislative directives for local

councils and the opportunity for sustainable and nonintrusive

economic growth through enhancing each of the

9 dimensions.

We draw upon this framework throughout this plan - it

will serve as a test of the compatibility of our activities and

policies with the character and potential of the District.

Firstly, however, we need to demonstrate the compatibility

of this framework with the “community outcomes” -


Council surveys.

WELLNESS AND COMMUNITY OUTCOMES

The community outcomes are described in detail in the

following section. The dimensions of wellness can be seen

to encapsulate these community outcomes as follows:

Social Wellbeing – a healthy, safe place to live, with strong


Cultural Wellbeing – opportunities in arts, cultural and social


Economic Wellbeing – a thriving local economy with



Environmental Wellbeing – comprehensive and continuous

focus on all environmental responsibilities and sustainable


Landscape & Outlook – recognising, enjoying, and treasuring

Hurunui’s rich landscape values: alpine, coastal, rural,


Individual and Community Lifestyle – lifestyles balanced

across work and play, residents and visitors, with emphasis on


Education and Skills Development – enhancing skills and


Heritage and Tradition – treasuring and promoting our

traditional rural values and heritage that make Hurunui special


Infrastructure – Strong emphasis on service delivery across

all core infrastructure, including roading, water quality and

quantity for drinking and development, waste water, solid waste


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POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

24


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Community Outcomes

27 Introduction

30 "A Desirable Place to Live, Work

and Play"

31 "A Healthy, Safe Place to Live"

33 “A Thriving Local Economy”

34 "Essential Infrastructure"

35 “Environmental Responsibility”

36 "Skills and Education for Work

and Life"

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Photo taken by Gregory Fenwick

25

Page 25

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcomes

A DESIRABLE PLACE TO LIVE

To enhance the Hurunui District as a desirable place

to live, work and play, we need:

a strong sense of community that gives people a

sense of belonging and encourages them to take part

in local activities, to support essential volunteer

services, and to be involved in local consultation

and decision making


positive image encouraging people to live in and

visit the area



ensuring the preservation of local heritage and

rural uniqueness

A HEALTHY, SAFE PLACE TO LIVE

To enhance the health and safety of the Hurunui

District as a place to live, we need:



and ambulance


to meet the community’s needs


services particularly for the elderly and young

families


civil defence emergency situations

ESSENTIAL INFRASTRUCTURE

To enhance the essential infrastructure of the

Hurunui District, we need:


that provide good, clean household drinking

water and continuity of supply for agriculture,

horticulture and in the event of an emergency


maintained


the district and protects the physical environment

and health of the community


and residents, and also provide an environmental

and public health service

ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY

To enhance our environmental responsibility, we

need to maintain:


streams



working towards the target of zero waste


natural assets balanced with property owner’s

rights


A THRIVING LOCAL ECONOMY

To enhance our thriving local economy, the Hurunui

District needs to:

be a place where business development is encouraged

but in a way that preserves the community and the

environment


local services and employment opportunities for



telecommunication services including broadband

availability and adequate cellphone coverage

SKILLS AND EDUCATION FOR WORK

AND LIFE

To enhance our skills and education for work and

life, the Hurunui District needs to have:


preschools


opportunities available


all

26


Introduction

The term ‘community outcomes’ is used to describe what

people in our community want to happen now and in the


generations. Community outcomes are about improving

the wellness of our communities over time in a sustainable

manner. The term ‘wellness’ in this context is used to cover

the four ‘well-beings’ set out in the Local Government Act

2002 along with the additional “Dimensions of Wellness”

set out in the “Hurunui Wellness” vision (see p.23):

Social (wellbeing), Cultural (wellbeing), Economic

(wellbeing), Environmental (wellbeing); Landscape &

Outlook, Personal and Community Lifestyle, Education

and Skills Development, Heritage & Tradition,

Infrastructure.


the Hurunui District tie in well with these dimensions of

wellness, and will guide not only the Council’s planning,

but planning across all sectors of the community, including

government departments.

Identifying the Community Outcomes

The Council undertook a survey in early 2005 to identify

what our communities consider important for the future of

the Hurunui District. As a result, six high level outcomes


The survey was sent to every household in the Hurunui

and was advertised in the local ‘Hurunui News’. We

also sent a special survey to 138 key organisations and

community groups. 360 individuals and 22 community

groups took the time to return the survey. Results were


various outcomes. Participants were given the opportunity

to rate each outcome according to how important or

unimportant it was to them. This assisted with prioritising

the outcomes. We published the results and asked for




remain completely valid, and thus we have carried these

outcomes over into the current plan. They will be subject

to a statutory review in 2011, in time for the 2012-22 Long

Term Community Plan.

Achieving the Community Outcomes


Although the Council has a key role to play as a critical

provider of services and amenities, it is important to

understand that we are not solely responsible for achieving

the community outcomes. Everyone in the community

has a part to play, and a number of other organisations

and groups are of note in this regard. Also, rather than

having other Councils work in isolation from us, where



and government departments that we deal with. Our list

of contributing organisations and agencies is constantly

growing and evolving. If your organisation has a role to

play in contributing to the Community Outcomes and is

27

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

missing from the following list, then please let us know.


- Subsidises improvements to roading, and operates the

state highway system in a way that contributes to an

integrated, safe and sustainable land transport system.

Council’s relationship with the NZTA is very important.


which is advantageous to our District in terms of working

together to continue working on safety programmes.

Council regularly meet with them to discuss state highway

issues and seek solutions. We are both members of the



interaction at these meetings.

Federated Farmers of New Zealand

- Acts as a locally based, democratic organisation that

gives farmers a collective voice nationally and within

each province.

Federated Farmers has a strong presence in the Hurunui

District due to it’s predominate agricultural sector. Both

Council and Federated Farmers provide each other with

information that has a potential or actual impact on

each other and the people within our District. Through

this relationship, Council has taken on board many of

Federated Farmers suggestions that have impacted on

policy and planning decisions.


- Encourages New Zealanders to get moving, supports

elite athletes and gets out into local communities.

Council acts as an agent and disburses grants on behalf of

‘SPARC’ to encourage junior sporting teams to participate

in sporting activities by assisting with travel costs.

Creative New Zealand

- Encourages, promotes and supports the arts in New

Zealand.

Council acts as an agent and disburses grants on behalf

of the ‘Creative Communities New Zealand Fund’, to

encourage and assist our local community to participate

in arts and cultural projects.


- Provides social policy advice to Government, and

social services to people, including employment and

training opportunities and income support.

Council has a strong relationship with the MSD and this

has impacted on a number of areas. Through working

together, the current Hurunui Youth Programme has been

made possible through MSD funding. In 2008, the relief



Employment opportunities have been made possible for


Housing New Zealand Corporation

- Provides access to homes.

Council regularly meets with representatives from

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Housing New Zealand to keep in touch with the needs of

our community.

New Zealand Police

- Reduces crime and enhances safety.

Council invites the local police to meet with them

regularly to understand the issues in our communities and

how to address them. We are fortunate to have our Police


assists a close working relationship. Council’s liquor


this understanding and recommendations by the police.


- Prevents injuries, provides treatment and

rehabilitation.

Council regularly meets with ACC representatives to

come up with initiatives to reduce the number of accidents

in our locality. ACC representation is on our local Road


road safety. These have included operating electronic

speed readers to alert drivers that they are speeding, doing

safety checks on children’s car seats, running programmes

to educate drivers about dangerous driving conditions,

etc.

New Zealand Fire Service

-

responds to other emergencies.


who acts as the Rural Fire Chief and works directly with



constant risk particularly during the summer months.





St John

- Prevents and relieves sickness and injury, and acts to

enhance the health and wellbeing of people.

Council has civil defence responsibilities, and it is in this

capacity that Council’s relationship with St John is most

evident. St John is present at Council’s large scale civil

defence training or practice events, and at actual civil

defence events, and is aligned to our civil defence sector


contact with our local St Johns branch.


- PHO’ plan, coordinate and pay for health care in the

community.

Council and the PHO have been working together more

closely in recent times. This has mainly been through

discussions to look at how to mitigate some of the issues

unique to the rural sector regarding the provision of health

services


- Promotes, enhances and facilitates the health and

wellbeing of people.

As with the PHO, Council does meet with Canterbury

District Health Board representatives regarding health

issues in our area with the intention of ensuring our

community has suitable health services. Council’s


with the CDHB to prevent the spread of disease and seek

advice. Council and the CDHB has worked together for

years regarding the ex Queen Mary Hospital land. This

land is now soon to be vested in Council by the Crown.

Ministry of Health

- Ensures the health and disability system works for all

people.

Council’s relationship with the Ministry of Health is

mainly as an advocate and making submissions to the

Ministry’s proposals.


- Provides corporate services and facilitates policy

development for Te Rünanga O Ngäi Tahu and other

divisions within its organisation.

Council has an ongoing relationship with TRONT

particularly with regard to the Resource Management

Act and the Hurunui District Plan in respect to land and

water issues in our areas. Council has a memorandum

of understanding with TRONT that was signed by both

parties in the mid 2000’s.


- Encourages and drives economic development for

North Canterbury.

Council provides an annual grant to ENC and is an active

partner in terms of the programmes run by ENC. For

example, Council supports the new Youth Project which


projects include: the promotion and development of the

viticultural industry, and plans to improve the District’s

water quality and supply.

Ministry of Economic Development

- Leads the production and co-ordination of policy

advice related to economic, regional and industry

development.

Council’s relationship with the Ministry of Economic

Development is through our tourism activity and

Enterprise North Canterbury. The Ministry of Tourism

is a branch of the Ministry of Economic Development

which supports the Regional Tourism Organisations, one

of which is based within our Council. We are also one

of the contributing councils belonging to the ‘Canterbury

Economic Development Company’, which is a council


to apply for funding through the Ministry of Economic

Development. The Ministry supplies funding for major

regional initiatives that support regional economic

development. The Canterbury Economic Development

Company is able to make applications for this funding

on behalf of Hurunui initiatives. The Hurunui District

28


North Canterbury Food and Wine Trial and the Waipara

Valley Wine Region development initiative.


- Aims to achieve a sustainable environment and

communities.

This relationship is an important one and has an ongoing

impact on our communities with regard to rivers, lakes,



environment. In the main, through working together

collaboratively, issues such as resource consent conditions

are overcome. Council and ECan are both active members

of the Pegasus Bay Coastal Care Group, and the Waipara

River Working Group (formed for the protection of the

Waipara River).

North Canterbury Rural Support Trust

-



Council has an ongoing relationship with this group,

mainly around preparedness in the case of an emergency

or disaster. This came to the fore in July 2008 with the




Ministry of Culture and Heritage

- Provides advice to the Government on culture and


Council has a close relationship with the Ministry of

Culture and Heritage. During the past few years, this has

been largely regarding the acquisition of the ex Queen

Mary Hospital land and buildings. A successful outcome

has been achieved with the vesting of a substantial amount

of the land and buildings to Council (to take place around

July 2009).

Christchurch and Canterbury Tourism Marketing

- Markets the Canterbury region to promote tourism,

economic development and growth.

Our Tourism activity has a close relationship with this

organisation to promote the Hurunui District.

Ministry of Education

- Provides schools and educational opportunities to

children and adults.

Council’s relationship with the Ministry of Education is

mainly through our direct contact with our local schools

and in particular, our 3 area schools. Our Youth Programme


in doing so, our Youth Coordinator works with the local

teachers to ensure the programme is supported. Three of

our community libraries are located within our schools,

and so are many of our community facilities.


- Advises the Government on the environment and

29

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019


Council works with MoE to develop best practice guides

for statutory processes. Council makes submissions to

MoE on proposals impacting on the Hurunui District.


- Conserves New Zealand’s natural and historic

heritage.

Through DOC, Council has received funding to support

a biodiversity project for our District. Council and DOC

are integral partners regarding protecting assets for our

future. A recent venture is on the newly DOC acquired

St James reserve in the Hanmer Springs Ward. Council

and DOC are working together to ensure strategies are

consistent with both parties objectives such as ensuring

appropriate public access. Another ongoing project

concerns the protection of the Waipara River, of which

the Council and DOC are active members of the Waipara

River Working Group.

Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry

- Advances agriculture, horticulture and forestry.

Council’s involvement with the Ministry of Agriculture


policy proposals that impact on the Hurunui District.

MainPower

- Provides and maintains the electricity distribution

network throughout North Canterbury.

Council actively engages with MainPower to maximise

the work programme of both parties by minimising costs

and linking plans together. For example, Council aims to

coordinate road openings with MainPower programmes

as much as possible. Council receives an annual fund from

MainPower to reward and encourage people who, on a


Council distributes this by way of an award through the

‘MainPower Hurunui Natural Environment Fund’.

New Zealand Historic Places Trust

- Works toward the recognition, protection and

promotion of New Zealand’s historic and cultural

heritage.

Council has a long standing relationship with the New

Zealand Historic Places Trust, who provide important

information about classifying heritage buildings and

items of heritage value. Through working collaboratively,


hitching posts and stock troughs) according to the Trust’s

guidelines.

Measuring and Reporting our Progress

We are responsible for monitoring the achievement of the


will be measured at intervals of no less than 3 years. Each


that, over time, we can see how we are going and where


outcome is provided on the following pages.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcome 1:

"A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play"

To make progress in relation to this

outcome we need:

We will know we are

succeeding when

Progress will be measured using these key indicators

A strong sense of community that

gives people a sense of belonging and

encourages them to take part in local

activities, to support essential volunteer

services, and to be involved in local

consultation and decision making

People are involved

with their local

community

People actively

participate in public

decision making

1.1 Percentage of people in paid employment

1.2 Number of volunteers helping outside of the home

1.3 Degree people feel a sense of community with others

in the local neighbourhood

1.4 Perceptions of people about their quality of life

1.5 Voter turnout at local government elections

1.6 Number of people involved in Council meetings,



the past year

1.8 Degree of understanding of Council’s decision making


present a positive image encouraging

people to live in and visit the area

People feel the Hurunui


place to live

1.9 District population and growth rate


1.11 Perception of use of subdivisions, coastal environment,

Hanmer Basin and Hurunui lakes

Opportunities in leisure, art and cultural

activities


development but ensuring the

preservation of local heritage and rural

uniqueness

People participate in

these activities

Our heritage is

protected for future

generations

1.12 Participation in leisure, arts and cultural activities

1.13 Involvement in physical activities, including barriers

1.14 Number of Heritage sites and buildings

What the

Council is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Governance and Advocacy

Hanmer Springs Thermal

Pools and Spa

Library, Local Facilities

and Maintenance,

Property, Public

Toilets, Cemeteries

Grants & Service

Awards

Main wellbeing areas / dimensions

of wellness to which the outcome

contributes

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council advocates to other organisations and governs on the district's behalf. The



The thermal reserve is a special area to New Zealand and provides a place for relaxation

and recreational activities to members of the public.

Council provides community facilities and services for social and recreational use. It is


safe and healthy. Volunteers throughout the community are a critical component to the

continuation of many of these facilities and services (e.g. halls, parks and reserves,


good, but that everything works.

Social and Cultural Wellbeing, Individual & Community Lifestyle, Heritage &

Tradition.

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Regulator Facilitator Monitor

Hurunui District Council

Historic Places Trust

Creative NZ


Ministry of Culture &


Heritage

Federated Farmers of NZ

Sport & Recreation NZ

(SPARC)


30


Community Outcome 2:

"A Healthy, Safe Place to Live"


come we need:


available for all

Adequate emergency services including



available to meet the community’s needs


and social services particularly for the

elderly and young families

Management systems and resources

to deal with civil defence emergency

situations

What the

Council is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Civil Defence

Rural Fire Control

Building Inspections

Health Inspections

Liquor Licensing

Animal Control

Roading Network

Main wellbeing areas / dimensions of wellness

to which the outcome contributes

We will know we are

succeeding when

Statistics show that

availability and usage

of health services is increasing

People feel that health

services are accessible

Demand for emergency

services and the supply

of volunteers remain in

balance

Rates of crime and injury

decline

Suitable housing is


Social housing is

available and accessible

Civil Defence resources

and plans are in place

and up to date

How it Contributes to the Outcome

31

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Progress will be measured using these key

indicators

2.1 Number and percentage of people enrolled in PHO

2.2 Number of GPs per head of population

2.3 Hours spent in the Hurunui District by the District

Nursing service

2.4 Reasons why people did not go to the doctor when

they wanted to

2.5 People’s perception of accessibility of health services

2.6 Number of NZ Fire Service call-outs

2.7 Numbers of volunteers in essential services (in

comparison to numbers required)

2.8 Number of hospital admissions and deaths for

injuries

2.9 Number of workplace fatalities and injuries

2.10 Road crash fatalities and injuries by cause of crash


2.12 Perceptions of safety at home and in the neighbourhood

2.13 Home ownership statistics

2.14 Median dwelling sale prices

2.15 Size of waiting lists for Council and Government

housing

2.16 Number of people receiving Government accommodation

supplements

2.17 Status of Civil Defence resources and plans

Council has developed these to ensure capacity exists to protect the Hurunui District

and its people in times of crisis.

Council ensures that people are safeguarded from possible injury, illness, or loss

of amenity when using any building and ensures that buildings in the district are


administration and enforcement of the building code and the food hygiene, liquor

licensing and building regulations.

Council enforces obligations on owners of dogs or stock, designed to ensure that

animals do not injure, endanger, or cause distress to any person, animal, or protected

wildlife, and that they do not cause nuisance to people or property.

Council deals with the day-to-day operation, maintenance and improvements,

road reconstructions and upgrades, signs, street lighting, parking, cleaning, bridge

maintenance, and various road safety activities. These initiatives are supported

through policy development and forward planning, including linking in with

transport and land use planning and the Hurunui Community Road Safety Strategy,


Social and Cultural Wellbeing, Individual and Community Lifestyle

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

Regulator Facilitator Monitor


Hurunui-Kaikoura Primary Health

Organisation

Ministry of Social Development


Housing NZ

NZ Police



Accident Compensation Corporation

(ACC)

NZ Fire Services

St John





Canterbury District Health Board

NZ Transport Agency

Presbyterian Support




Ministry of Health



32


Community Outcome 3:

"A Thriving Local Economy"

To make progress in relation to this

outcome, we need to:

Be a place where business development

is encouraged but in a way that preserves

the community and the environment

Have new and diverse businesses

which will provide local services and


and retaining residents

Have equity of access to quality and


including broadband availability and

adequate cellphone coverage

What the

Councils is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Tourism

Visitor Centre

Economic

Development

Main wellbeing areas / dimensions

of wellness to which the outcome

contributes

We will know we are

succeeding when:

Labour force participation

rates increase

People’s standards of living

improve

The diversity, number, and

size of businesses in the

district increases

People have good access to

telecommunications

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Progress will be measured using these key

indicators

3.1 Percentage of people in full and part time

employment by industry and occupational

groupings

3.2 Percentage of people in labour force

3.3 Long term (6 months/1 year plus) unemployment

rates

3.4 Percentage of people registered unemployed

3.5 $ value of commercial and residential building

consents issued

3.6 Average weekly earnings and median annual

income


3.8 Percentage and average numbers of employees

3.9 Number of businesses*

3.10 Distribution of industry by type*

*(based on in Statistics New Zealand Business Frame)

3.11 Access to telecommunications services

3.12 Telecom and Vodafone mobile coverage areas

3.13 Access to, and satisfaction with, broadband



having a population to sustain more businesses, while also growing visitor numbers in

a sustainable manner.

Ensuring visitors to the area are encouraged to stay longer and use local services


important to the district's economy.

Council is actively involved in the Hurunui Tourism Board and the North Canterbury

Economic Development Board that promote the Hurunui and North Canterbury region

to bring people into our area to live, work and visit.

Economic Wellbeing, Infrastructure

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

INTRODUCTION

OUTCOMES

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

33

Page 33

Regulator Facilitator Monitor


Ministry of Economic

Development

Christchurch & Canterbury

Marketing


Enterprise North

Canterbury

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcome 4:

"Essential Infrastructure"

To make progress in relation to this

outcome, we need:

Water quality and quantity

management systems that provide

good, clean household drinking

water and continuity of supply for

agriculture, horticulture and in the

event of an emergency

A safe, quality roading network that is

well maintained

Sewerage systems that support the

development of the District and

protect the physical environment and

health of the community

Public toilets that meet the

expectations of visitors and residents,

and also provide an environmental

and public health service

We will know we are

succeeding when

Water quality and quantity

improves

People feel the District’s

roading network meets

their needs

Road roughness is less than

the national average

Our discharge consents for

wastewater comply with

ECan standards

People have a positive

perception of public toilets

in the District

Progress will be measured using these key

indicators

4.1 Quality of drinking water throughout the District

4.2 Rate of consumption versus supply of water

4.3 People’s perception of the quality and quantity of

water available

4.4 People’s perception of the safety and maintenance of

roads in the District

4.5 Road roughness in the District

4.6 Compliance of discharge consents for wastewater

4.7 People’s perception of the quality and quantity of

public toilets in the District

What the

Council is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Roading Network

Household Collection

Transfer Stations

Waste Minimisation

Sewerage

Drainage

Water Supply

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council routinely assesses which roads, bridges and footpaths need upgrading, sealing

and building in order to prevent accidents and link people, places and businesses through


Council provides a collection service of urban household refuse and disposal facilities.

These are services that are essential to our infrastructure and wellbeing, and that every

community expects.

Council provides appropriate treatment and disposal of waste water, while protecting


ensures discharged water is clean and that no contaminated pools form.


water permits are complied with, and the average consumption is maintained or reduced,



Main wellbeing areas / dimensions

of wellness to which the outcome

contributes

Environmental Wellbeing, Individual and Community Lifestyle, Infrastructure

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

NZ Transport Agency

Regulator Facilitator Monitor




34


Community Outcome 5:

"Environmental Responsibility"

To make progress in relation to this

outcome, we need:

We will know we are succeeding

when

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Progress will be measured using these key

indicators

INTRODUCTION

Beaches/ocean in a healthy condition

Clean and plentiful water in our rivers,

lakes and streams


actively working towards the target of

zero waste

Environmental safeguards and

protection for natural assets balanced

with property owner’s rights

Clean, healthy air quality

What the

Council is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Resource Management

Consents

Household Collection

Transfer Stations

Waste Minimisation

Main wellbeing areas / dimensions

of wellness to which the outcome

contributes

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Water quality is good


reduce


The District’s environment is

protected

Damage to our environment

reduces

There is a decrease in the

percentage of people who report

concern about environmental

issues in the District

How it Contributes to the Outcome

35

Page 35

5.1 Swimming water quality

5.2 No. of days that monitored rivers drop



and type of waste recycled

5.4 Dollars invested in Environmental Awards

5.5 Hectares protected under QEII covenants

5.6 Area of Native Vegetation

5.7 Spread of wilding trees

5.8 Number of nassella per hectare

5.9 Levels of possums, ferrets and rabbits

5.10 People’s perception of environmental issues


managed in the District

Council engages in continuous planning and the provision of strategic directions

through concept development planning and design standards. Managing our natural

resources as safely as possible ensures they are protected and remain sustainable for the

future. The District Plan provides standards that all development must comply with to

ensure a clean environment for people to live in.

The proper disposal of waste and managing how land will be used now and in the

future is essential so that we can protect and improve the environment we live in.

Council encourages waste minimisation and environmentally friendly practices to

manage refuse in a safe and sustainable manner.

Environmental Wellbeing, Landscape & Outlook, Individual and Community Lifestyle

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

Ministry of Environment

Department of

Conservation

Ministry of Agriculture &

Forestry

Te Runanga O Ngai Tahu

(TRONT)

Environment Canterbury

Main Power

Regulator Facilitator Monitor












POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcome 6:

"Skills and Education for Work and Life"

To make progress in relation to this

outcome, we need:

Quality education available at local

schools and preschools

Practical skills and work/trade-based

training opportunities available

A variety of options for learning to be

available to all

We will know we are

succeeding when

Participation rates in

education increase

People in the Hurunui

District leave school with


Rates of participation in

training increase

Library membership

increases

People feel education in

the Hurunui District is of

high quality

Progress will be measured using these key indicators

6.1 Percentage of school entrants who have participated

in early childhood education

6.2 Number of enrolments in Early Childhood

Education

6.3 Hurunui schools’ roll numbers

6.4 NQF results for local schools

6.5 Decile rating for local schools


6.7 Number of modern apprenticeships

6.8 Number of people undertaking industry training

6.9 Number of active members of district libraries

6.10 Perception of the quality of education available

within the District

What the

Council is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Libraries

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Supporting the educational needs of all residents by providing access to information

through resources and user education, while simultaneously providing access to our

cultural heritage resources and promoting an awareness of our community.

Main wellbeing areas / dimensions

of wellness to which the outcome

contributes

Social, Cultural and Economic Wellbeing, Education and Skills Development

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Regulator Facilitator Monitor

Hurunui District Council

Ministry of Education

36


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Amberley Ward Profile

38 Background and History

38 Recreation and Visitor Attractions


39 Ward Governance

39 Priority Community Outcomes

39 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

40 Key Planning assumptions

41 Key Projects

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Photo: Jane Thompson

37 37

Page 37

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council


Background and History


originally established as a result of the arrival of the

railway in 1876. The township continued to grow and

became an important farming service centre. Amberley


township in the Hurunui District with a water supply

scheme undertaken by a county council (1957).

3700 people. This is estimated by Statistics New

Zealand to have risen to approximately 3900 people

by 2009, and is projected to further increase to

approximately 5000 people by 2031.



in 1857 by John Leith as an important coach stop and to

provide services to the surrounding farming and milling


in North Canterbury and the only one to be powered by


only business centre at the time, between Kaiapoi and

Kaikoura.


Beach developed as residential suburbs between 1950

and 1990, and their current populations have grown

dramatically.

Recreation / Visitor Attractions

Located on State Highway 1, Amberley Township is a busy

rural service centre with an impressive range of cafes and

shops. The area is renowned for its impressive country


for visitors. There are very handy beach walks, rivers,

lakes and mountains to explore - including the Mt Grey

scenic walkways. Several parks and reserves can be found

in the township, and the local Amberley Domain is always

popular for sport and recreation events, agricultural

shows, and leisure activities. Amberley is ideal as a

country retreat with its nearby beach golf course and the

award winning wines and restaurants in the neighbouring

Waipara Valley Wine Region.


as the Kowai Walkway, a well maintained track from the



Present Profile

1400

1200

Township Populations (Census Figures)




The Amberley Ward is the largest community in the

Hurunui District. The ward makes up over one third

of the total district population, with a steady growth

in residents.


the Hurunui average. 29% of Amberley’s residents

are aged 65 years and over, compared to 25% for the

Hurunui District, 24% for the Canterbury Region, and

21% for New Zealand as a whole.

Amberley is about a 35 minutes drive from

Christchurch. The township’s close proximity


commuters a country lifestyle while still being able to

work in the City.

The State Highway 1 runs through the centre of the

Amberley Township. While this is a great strength for

development and growth, visibility and accessibility,

it simultaneously creates challenges for road safety,



Village experienced notable urban expansion and

development in recent years, including increased

lifestyle block development, however this has slowed

in line with the current national and international

economic climate.

Population

1000

800

600

400

200

1991

1996

2001

2006


The Amberley Ward also experienced substantial

growth and development in the Glasnevin area,

including large scale viticulture plantings, and


downturn, this rate of growth has now eased.

0

Amberley Amberley Beach Leithfield Leithfield Beach



and facilities.


The population of the Amberley Ward, based upon


In addition to the numerous shops and commercial

premises, the Ward has three primary schools, two

preschools, two playcentres, a medical centre, a swimming

38


pool, a community hall and two libraries (The Hurunui

Memorial Library in Amberley and a community library


a cemetery and several blocks of public toilets. The




located in Amberley.

Ward Governance

District Councillors are responsible for representing


monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Amberley Ward is currently represented by three

councillors: and.

In addition, the Amberley Ward also has an elected

which includes amongst its

varied responsibilities the overseeing of the Ward’s water

and sewerage schemes, and the

. The Amberley Ward also has the

the

and and the


Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Amberley Ward identify the following

three community outcomes as the most important:




Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges



The number one Amberley Concept Plan (ACP)



consultation process, the submissions on a proposed

District Plan Change to address these concerns were

considered in late 2008 by a hearings panel made

up of an independent hearings commissioner and

three Councillors. (The District Plan Change process

is regulated by the Resource Management Act.) The

Hearings Panel’s recommended decision on the Plan

Change was adopted by Council on 17 February 2009


Appeals have been lodged with the Environment

Court. Council has agreed to enter into mediation

with the appeallants and this should occur around


Change decision, refer to Council’s website: www.

hurunui.govt.nz.

The need to upgrade the Amberley Swimming Pool

was also highlighted during the ACP process, and

subsequent investigations have found that the pool


to replace the pool to the community’s desired

39







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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

standard are around $3 million, which is factored into

the 2013/14 budget. Extensive consultation will be


The Council has recently adopted a Walking and

Cycling Strategy, which aims to facilitate the desires

made by some members of the Community to improve

the Walking and Cycling linkages within the Hurunui

District. Of particular importance for the Amberley

Ward are the commuter routes from Amberley to

Amberley Beach (2010/11), Amberley to Waipara


The Amberley Ward beaches from Ashworths to “the

Rocks” are included in the Northern Pegasus Bay

Coastal Management Plan which has recently been

received by Council. This Plan contains a number

of recommendations, including a requirement that

all vehicles on Northern Pegasus Bay must obtain a

permit and obey all conditions of the permit including,

a speed limit for vehicles of 10km/h around people and

30km/h on the open beach, in addition any vehicle on

the beach must be operated below the high tide mark.

The Plan also recommends that a ranger is appointed

to ensure compliance with the permit system.


created havoc in the Amberley Ward in 2008. As a

result of the ensuing independent report, $850,000 of

recommended engineering works are now planned

in the Amberley area to minimise the risk of future



in both Dock Creek and Eastern Drain, and a cut-


Osborne and Courage Roads, and divert it around the

urban area. Two new drains are recommended across


to eliminate the present complicated drainage system,

and ensure the water discharging from Eastern Drain

and Dry Gully gets to the lagoons quicker.



drainage operations budget.

These works will be funded over the whole of the

Amberley Ward, rather than the separate rating system



from having good drainage systems in place.

The steady increase in Amberley Ward’s population,

particularly in the Amberley Township, will ultimately

create a need for expanded community facilities.

Further expansion and development of the Amberley

Domain, beyond that presently planned, may become

necessary. New subdivisions need to include the

provision of parks, reserves and walkways. Another

long term challenge to meeting population growth

and developers’ and residents’ expectations for the

Amberley Ward will be the possible demands to seal

existing gravel roads.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council







The presence of State Highway 1 will continue to

stimulate associated growth and development, whilst

at the same time placing responsibility on the council,

the community and NZ Transport Agency to manage



Amberley’s town centre has been a recent priority,

and several projects have been carried out in the last

few years. $750,000 is planned to be spent on Main

Street Development on Carters Road (SH1) between

Courage Road and Amberley Beach Road during

2009-12. Plans include paving, kerb and channel, trees

and landscaping.

Amberley Ward’s locality acts as a valuable ‘gateway’



tourism industry.

A new water well is being developed in Lawcocks

Road to address the increasing demand for potable


quantity and quality of the water in the bore and the


half of 2009.

The upgrading of the Amberley Sewerage treatment

plant has been placed on hold, follwing a challenge

to the designation in the District Plan and a hearing

into two discharge consents. The hearing has been

adjourned pending further information being

provided. Irrespective of the outcome, investigation



during periods of wet weather and high ground

saturation.

The new, nearby Pegasus Town development may

create both opportunities and challenges. Possible

adverse impacts on the Amberley Ward, include


and longer commuting times between Woodend and

Christchurch. Possible positive impacts include more

employment opportunities with less commuting time


the new township. The proposed new High School

would be the closest one to the Amberley Ward.

The Amberley Ward is an aging community with

29% of its population aged 65 years and over (Stats

. This results in a greater demand to

meet the requirements of this demographic, such as

pensioner housing, increased medical centre usage,

passive recreation facilities etc.

Key Planning Assumptions

The worldwide economic downturn is likely to have


Amberley Ward. However, the recent drop in petrol


cheaper than in urban areas closer to Christchurch and

the Amberley Ward is commutable. Amberley Township

is also popular to an increasing number of retirees. State

Highway 1 remains a major economic strength and safety

works carried out over the past two years have lessened

the pedestrian safety challenges for the community. The

outcome of the District Plan change will likely have an


40


Key Projects

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

For more information on the Sample Properties see Appendix 5 of this Document

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012+

Amberley town centre upgrade $250,000 $359,000

Amberley Pavillion $70,000 $10,000

Amberley Beach local reserve $6,000

$15,000 $11,000

$30,000

Pensioner Units heating and insulation $40,000 $51,000

New Amberley Beach toilets $50,000

Amberley Beach Road $1,323,000

Amberley Recycling Depot relocation (from 08/09) $1,900,000

School active warning signs $22,500 $15,000

Renew pipework $309,000

Construct additional reservoir $406,000

Electrical renewals $5,000

Stormwater/Drainage Works $970,000

$110,000

$8,000

Amberley Ward - Sample Properties




Amberley Township 270,000 Amberley 209 1 $1,256.09 $1,308.95 $52.86 4.21%

Amberley Township 550,000 Amberley 238 1 $1,583.44 $1,625.11 $41.67 2.63%

Amberley Beach Township 195,000 Ashley Rural 0.5 1 $1,328.85 $1,420.33 $91.49 6.88%

Amberley Rural 2,800,000 Ashley Rural 1 0 $3,129.76 $3,177.78 $48.02 1.53%

Leithfield Township 220,000 Ashley Rural 0.5 1 $1,262.41 $1,280.67 $18.27 1.45%

Leithfield Beach Township 205,000 Leithfield Beach 1 1 $1,189.10 $1,197.85 $8.75 0.74%

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

41

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

42


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Amuri-Hurunui Ward Profile

44 Background and History

44 Recreation and Visitor Attractions


46 Ward Governance

46 Priority Community Outcomes

46 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

46 Key Planning assumptions

47 Key Projects

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Photo Taken by Ron Nelson

43

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council


Background and History

Amuri































Hurunui

















New Beginnings

















Recreation / Visitor Attractions












































44


Present Profile


450

400

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0


Culverden Hawarden Rotherham Waiau Waikari Waipara

1991

1996

2001

2006

45







Page 45

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019






















































INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Ward Governance

District Councillors are responsible for representing


monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The newly combined Amuri-Hurunui Ward is currently

represented by three councillors: ,

and

.


the

the the

the

and

the

The Hurunui area has the ,

the ,

the , as well as the

.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Amuri Ward identify the following

community outcomes as the three most important:




Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges






The current Amuri Community Health Centre

facilities in Rotherham are woefully inadequate for

both current and future growth/demand. Following

community consultation on possible options, it was

agreed that a new, purpose-designed medical centre

will be built on a new site in Rotherham – with a one

million dollar capped budget being set aside in the

2009/10 year. As a result the amenity rate will increase

from $24 to $74 per household per year in what was

previously the Amuri Ward boundary.

A particular long term challenge for the Amuri Ward

will be overcoming the shortages of farm labour.

Small businesses are growing and increasing in Amuri

and it will be a challenge for new businesses coming


to meet the needs of today.

Another challenge, shared by many small rural towns

in New Zealand, is the viability and thus the retention

of local services and businesses. Economies of scale,


of technology all impact on the sustainability of small

businesses.

Increased fuel prices in recent years and the current

economic down turn may have a challenging impact

of Amuri Ward’s economic wellbeing.






Key long term opportunities include ongoing

prospects for tourist related activities and businesses,


Triangle.

There are opportunities for the wider Culverden


location for employees working in Hanmer Springs,


vineyard employees in Waipara.

Continuing development of Mt Lyford as a boutique

resort and ski area may create long term opportunities


growth.

The Hurunui Community Water Development Project


irrigate, and to enhance water management for, a


group. If the continuing investigations and proposals

progress as planned, major new opportunities for

primary production in the southern part of the ward

will be created.

Council has recently adopted a Walking and Cycling

Strategy, which aims to facilitate the desires made

by some members of the community to improve the

walking and cycling linkages within the Hurunui

District. Of particular importance for the Amuri-

Hurunui ward is the completion of the commuter link

between Waikari and Hawarden which is planned for


Key Planning Assumptions

The worldwide economic downturn is likely to have a


Hurunui Ward. Whilst it is anticipated that the Amuri-

Hurunui Ward will continue to grow at modest rates, the

potential exists for more substantial growth, as the area


for the workers of local vineyards, dairy farms and the

Hanmer Springs hospitality industry. It is also expected



‘undiscovered’ lakes area.

46


Key Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012+

INTRODUCTION

$22,000 $22,000 $22,000

Waikari Village Green wetlands development $12,000

$9,000 $10,000 $15,000

Rutherford reserve $13,000 $5,000 $3,000

$15,000 $5,000 $30,000

Rotherham hall $15,000

New Amuri Community Health Centre building $1,000,000

School active warning signs $15,000 $15,000

$18,000 $8,000 $11,000

Waiau Hall painting and roof: in 2014/15 $23,000

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

Amuri - Hurunui Ward - Sample Properties




Waiau Township 210,000 Waiau Town 147 1 $1,075.24 $1,166.79 $91.56 8.52%

Rotherham Township 305,000 No water n/a 1 $966.98 $1,065.42 $98.44 10.18%

Culverden Township 225,000 Culverden 322 1 $1,197.71 $1,294.29 $96.58 8.06%

Amuri Rural 2,600,000 Waiau Rural 8 1 $7,054.66 $7,681.44 $626.78 8.88%

Amuri Rural 6,218,000 Amuri Plains 7 4 $8,460.73 $8,837.51 $376.79 4.45%

Hawarden Township 145,000 Hawarden-Waikari 292 1 $1,199.44 $1,222.88 $23.44 1.95%

Waikari Township 190,000 Hawarden-Waikari 694 1 $1,565.57 $1,581.43 $15.85 1.01%

Hurunui Rural 3,500,000 Hurunui Rural 2 1 $4,592.84 $4,616.20 $23.36 0.51%

For more information on the Sample Properties see Appendix 5 of this Document

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

47

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

48


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Cheviot Ward Profile

50 Background and History

50 Recreation and Visitor Attractions


51 Ward Governance

51 Priority Community Outcomes

51 Long Term Opportunities and



52 Key Projects

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Photo taken by Mike Gilbert

49

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council


Background and History

Cheviot is well-known for its rural history, with its early

sheep stations. From the 1950s, the township of Cheviot


self-contained with various trades and businesses.


originally had a railway station, a sole-charge school and

some businesses. The famous Waiau River road/rail bridge

was here, before being abandoned and replaced with a

new road bridge. Prior to the opening of the old bridge in

the 1930s a ferry across the river carried goods north and

south.

In the 1950’s Spotswood had a hall (which is still used

regularly today) and a public library. Gore Bay was

a largely picnicking and holiday venue with some

permanent residents, and Conway Flat had its own school.



Station relocated to the main road as a cafe.

The Cheviot Rural Water Supply was put in place in 1971,

with further extensions in 1980. Cheviot District High

School transformed to an area school in 1976, and in

1978, the township’s old hospital was converted to a new

medical centre.

Recreation / Visitor Attractions


from hotels and motels to farm stays and home stays that

provide a traditional slice of kiwi life. In the township

there are several cafes, a museum and a golf course.

The Cheviot Hills Domain and Mansion Foundation was

the original site of the historical home of the founder of

Cheviot, William “Ready Money” Robinson. The front

steps of the mansion are still in place, and lead into the

cricket pavilion. The domain has a charming walkway and

superb picnic spots. St Anne’s Lagoon, about 2 km north of

Cheviot, is a popular nature reserve that used to provide






amazing walks and popular camping grounds and

the nearby Cathedral Gully, a spectacular weathered

clay canyon. The Hurunui and Waiau Rivers are easily


Conway Flat is yet another stunning site for surf casting.

The area’s spectacular coastline provides opportunities for

watching both whales and sea birds.

Present Profile








The Cheviot Ward had a population of 1311 as counted

in the 2006 Census, with 894 people in rural areas

and 417 people in urban areas. It has experienced a

slight decline (around 30 people) over the last two

census periods. Cheviot Ward’s residents make up

approximately 12% of Hurunui District’s population

as a whole.

State Highway 1 runs through the centre of the Cheviot

Township. This is a great strength for development and

growth, as it makes the township highly accessible,

as well as visible, while simultaneously increasing


A proposal for re-zoning in the District Plan would

allow houses to be built on the older titles on the

outskirts of the Cheviot township, providing for

current and future urban development.

Coastal property demand has created emerging


feeling. A private plan change proposal has been

received to re-zone the Buxton Valley catchment above

Gore Bay to help meet coastal property demand.

The importance of traditional farming is an ongoing

strength in the Cheviot economy. The Cheviot Ward

has a strong rural base with recent developments in

irrigation and viticulture.

With the recent closure of Parnassus School, the

Cheviot Ward is home to only one school now – the

Cheviot Area School in the Cheviot Township.

The Cheviot Medical Centre operates from an old

converted building that is less than ideal for the

50


provision of services and is unlikely to be adequate for

future demand. A new purposed-designed building

has been budgeted for completion in 2016/17.



A council service centre is also located there, and the

public library is based at the Cheviot Area School. A


Ward Governance

District Councillors are responsible for representing


monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Cheviot Ward is currently represented by one

councillor: .


and at

and

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Cheviot Ward identify the following

community outcomes as the three most important:




Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges



A growth strategy for the Cheviot township and

the coastal areas, predominantly Gore Bay and

Port Robinson area, was developed in 2007/08 with

extensive community input. This process has resulted

in proposals to re-zone parts of the Cheviot township

and to develop subdivision and design standards for

Gore Bay.

A new medical centre is included for the Cheviot

township in 2016/17. Extensive consultation will be


The drinking water quality in the Cheviot Ward is


used for drinking or food preparation. The main

source of water for the rural water scheme is a

well close to the Waiau River which shows signs of

bacterial contamination whenever the river runs dirty,


The Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Act 2007

requires the Cheviot scheme to comply with Drinking

Water Standards by 1st July, 2011. Funding to upgrade

the scheme to meet that standard has been provided


in rates or water charges unless government assistance

is received. A short term sloution to water quality

problems in the urban areas is being provided in the

form of a chlorination plant (MIDX) to serve Cheviot

51




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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

township and Gore Bay. This plant will operate before

1 July 2009 in accordance with instructions issued by


Council will continue to lobby Central Government

to make more funding available to rural areas such as

Cheviot to upgrade their water schemes, without total

reliance on rates.


services and amenities also present key long term

challenges and opportunities.

Changes in Cheviot Ward’s land use, such as rising

numbers of vineyards, lifestyle blocks (particularly at

Gore Bay and Port Robinson), irrigation, and tourism,

may result in considerable long term opportunities

and challenges.

Key Planning Assumptions

Population growth is projected to be restrained, mainly



area, as well as the lack of popularity as a retirement

area (as elderly residents tend towards areas with more

support services).

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Year Planned

Key Projects

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012+

Medical Centre $1,000,000

WATER SUPPLY:

Renew pipes $113,000

New treatment plant $579,000

Renew pipes, reservoirs $141,000

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

Cheviot Ward - Sample Properties




Cheviot Township 165,000 Cheviot 0.5 1 $1,286.13 $1,313.70 $27.57 2.14%

Cheviot Rural 2,500,000 Cheviot 2.5 2 $4,162.83 $4,256.01 $93.18 2.24%

For more information on the Sample Properties see Appendix 5 of this Document

52


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Glenmark Ward Profile

54 Background and History

54 Recreation and Visitor Attractions


55 Ward Governance

55 Priority Community Outcomes

55 Long Term Opportunities and



56 Key Projects

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Photo Taken by Mel Paterson

53

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council


Background and History

The area of Glenmark traditionally relied on a high

proportion of cash cropping to complement fat-lamb

production. The township of Waipara has its origins as

a railway town, at the junction of the main trunk line

and services heading west. Waipara led the way in rural

irrigation schemes by opening its No. 1 Rural Reticulated


scheme in New Zealand. By the turn of this century the


accommodating fourteen wineries.


late 1970s, complete with amenities, a primary school, a

church and a library service. Scargill owes its existence

to the Christchurch/Picton railway line, while Omihi

already housed some services including a primary school,

a Community Hall and a railway station in the 1950s. The


the past 50 years, with a third subdivision recently being

developed, complementing the many earlier “traditional


Recreation / Visitor Attractions

Waipara is one of New Zealand’s most rapidly expanding

wine areas, producing around 100,000 cases of award


tours, as well as personal excursions, the Waipara area

features wineries and various accommodation options.

The Glenmark Ward also features the Glenmark railway,

where one can recall the era of rural train travel with a

ride in vintage former NZR passenger carriages through

scenic Weka Pass on the 13-kilometre-long railway from

Waipara to Waikari, using vintage former NZR steam and

diesel locomotives.



wildlife watching and diving are just some of the great


peaceful, rural farming atmosphere still exists.



regenerating native bush and wetlands which form the

nucleus of the Transwaste Tiromoana Bush Restoration

plan. Transwaste are planning for Tiromoana Bush to be a

major national feature, with recreational, educational and


of New Zealanders and tourists.


Population


The Glenmark Ward population was 1143 people at

the time of the 2006 Census. 783 people lived in rural

areas and 360 in urban areas. The Glenmark Ward is

estimated to have experienced an increase of around

300 people in the past 5 years. Glenmark Ward’s

residents make up approximately 11% of Hurunui

District’s population as a whole.








growing premium quality grapes, the combination

of hot summer temperatures, well drained soil and

protection from the cool easterly wind makes for

award winning wines. It is the fastest growing wine

region in New Zealand with around 80 vineyards in the

Waipara Wine Valley covers more than 1,200 hectares

of plantings, including the extended Glasnevin area

of the Amberley Ward). The north facing moderately

sloping terrain provides an ideal sun trap for fruiting

vines, with Pinot Noirs and Rieslings being regional

specialities.

The township of Waipara is one apex of the Alpine


the Glenmark Ward.

A new, substantial multi-million dollar investment,

the Waipara Wine Village, has commenced

development on the SH1/SH7 intersection. The plans

include a golf-course and pro-shop, restaurants, bars,

corporate conference facilities, accommodation and

other features showcasing local Waipara wines and

products. This development is projected to increase



the area.


located within the Glenmark Ward. Council has an


operates in line with its consent conditions, and that

the interests and values of the Hurunui community are


planned 35 year life. A Community Trust, established



primarily focused on Waipara. Because Council has

no involvement in this Trust or its disbursements, this

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan does not take

into account any community projects or developments

funded by the Trust.

There are three primary schools in the Glenmark

Ward – Greta Valley, Omihi, and Waipara, and also

the Glenmark Playcentre. A community library is run

from the Greta Valley School.

Waipara Township is home to the ward’s New Zealand


forces operate from Motunau Beach and Scargill.

54


Ward Governance

District Councillors are responsible for representing


monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Glenmark Ward is currently represented by one

councillor: .


Ward. The Glenmark Ward has, however, the

, the

the and the

In addition, Omihi, Scargill and Motunau

Beach have their own

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Glenmark Ward identify the following

three community outcomes as the most important:




Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges




The Waipara growth strategy and concept plan, when

completed, will identify long term opportunities for

the Glenmark ward.

It is expected that the Waipara Wine Growers will

continue to pursue expanded opportunities for

marketing the region, following their initiatives with

Enterprise North Canterbury to establish centralised

funding and the appointment of a marketing director.

The State Highway 1, State Highway 7, and Mt Cass

Road intersection will represent a key challenge for

NZ Transport Authority and Council going forward,


volumes, ahead of the opening of the Waipara Wine

Village and also possible increases in Kate Valley


55







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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019


available from the Kate Valley Community Trust.

Key long term challenges include the lack of availability

of labour and housing to support Glenmark Ward’s

wine industry and tourism development.

Future challenges are also likely to involve pressure

on local infrastructure due to an increase in Glenmark

Ward’s industry and population.

The Council has adopted a Walking and Cycling

Strategy on 30 April 2009, which aims to facilitate the

desires made by some members of the community

to improve the walking and cycling linkages within

the Hurunui District. Of particular importance for

Glenmark Ward is the commuter route from Amberley

to Waipara (2011/12).

The Greening Waipara project provides environmental

opportunities by focusing on promoting nonregulatory

indigenous and exotic biodiversity

initiatives to achieve its goals relating to sustainable

agricultural practices. The project is sponsored by

Four Leaf Japan Co., Ltd and the Bio-Protection

Research Centre at Lincoln University.

There have been discussions regarding a reticulated

sewerage system in Waipara. There is a budget

provision of $25k in 2009/10 for the investigation and

planning work to commence. Public consultation will

be sought in 2010/11.

Key Planning Assumptions

The worldwide economic downturn will likely have a


and associated rural activities in the Glenmark Ward. It


next ten years on the level of growth and development

in the wine and tourism areas, resulting in the continued

demands and pressures on infrastructure in the Waipara

area.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012+

$15,000

School active warning signs $15,000

Greta Valley treatment renewals $24,000

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

Glenmark Ward - Sample Properties




Motunau Beach Township 410,000 Hurunui Rural 0.5 1 $1,401.28 $1,413.12 $11.85 0.85%

Waipara Township 225,000 Waipara 66 1 $870.20 $853.66 ($16.54) (1.90%)

Glenmark Rural 2,200,000 Hurunui Rural 7 2 $6,772.24 $6,785.87 $13.63 0.20%

For more information on the Sample Properties see Appendix 5 of this Document

56


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Hanmer Springs Ward Profile

58 Background and History

58 Recreation and Visitor Attractions


59 Ward Governance

59 Priority Community Outcomes

59 Long Term Opportunities and



61 Key Projects

Photo Taken by Ron Nelson

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

57

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Hanmer Springs Ward Profile

Background and History

In its very early days, Hanmer Springs was primarily a

farm servicing centre for the local area, but the presence of

the hot springs soon made the township a popular visitor

destination.

Hanmer Springs was the largest township in the district in

the early 1950s and in many ways, the most progressive.

Since that time there have been about as many holiday

homes in the township as there are permanent residences.

This popularity as a holiday destination continues today

and many tourism and hospitality focussed businesses


Hanmer Springs was the only township in the District at


have a preschool (1942), however it would take until 1972

until the sewerage scheme was completed.

Timber logging and milling of the surrounding forests

commenced in 1949. There have been subsequent changes

of ownership and operation of these surrounding forests

over the years, culminating in the recent closure of local

milling, and Ngai Tahu taking over ownership as part of


The well known Queen Mary Hospital site dates back

to the establishment of a Soldiers Hospital in 1916, for

the recuperation and rehabilitation of injured and war

weary soldiers returning from the WW1 front lines.

Medical services and additional buildings were added in

subsequent years. The surrounding park-like grounds and


recognized heritage site.

In recent history, the Queen Mary Hospital was a specialised

national facility for alcohol and drug rehabilitation,

eventually closing in 2003. Since the late 1990’s, the

Hurunui District Council, recognising the imminent

closure and the site’s national heritage and natural values,

began negotiating extensively with the CDHB and Ngäi

Tahu to acquire part of the site for a historic and recreation

reserve. In late 2008 discussions concluded, and the council

and the New Zealand Government reached an agreement

that has secured the future of a substantial six hectares of

the old Queen Mary Hospital site in public ownership for

present and future generations of New Zealanders. The

Crown will vest the land and protected buildings in the

council in 2009. See the Reserves section of this document

for more information about the Queen Mary site.

Most recently the Hanmer Springs township has been



due for completion in July 2009. Ongoing upgrades have

been applied to the reserves and walkways in the area.

Recreation / Visitor Attractions

Situated in a high country basin, the small, natural alpine

spa village of Hanmer Springs has been a favourite retreat

for generations of New Zealanders. The award winning

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa complex is a

major draw card, and the pristine alpine environment

with its forests, rivers and mountains enhance its appeal

as the ultimate year round destination.

There’s a substantial variety of accommodation available,

complimented by delightful restaurants, cafés, boutique



levels, with numerous walkways, golf, horse riding and

mountain biking options available. There are opportunities

for pure relaxation with massage & wellness treatments

or blood pumping, thrill seeking adventures such as jet


wheel driving.

The newly vested St James Station Conservation Area and

Queen Mary Hospital site will also provide both locals and

visitors with exciting new opportunities for recreational

activities.










growth in population in the last decade. The 2006


with 703 residents in an urban area; however, there are

more than 600 holiday homes in the Hanmer Springs

Township and this raises Hanmer Springs’ population

to around 2,700 during peak holiday times. In addition,

Hanmer Springs’ popularity as a tourist destination

means that the number of people in the area during

peak holiday times can be as high as 6,000.

Corresponding with this population and visitor

growth has been the extensive growth of Hanmer

Spring’s business sector, with many new businesses

having emerged within the past few years.

The hospitality industry is the single largest employer

in the Hanmer Springs Ward, employing around 30%

of the ward’s full time workers .

There are local town planning controls in place in the

Hanmer Springs Township to ensure that the look and

feel of this special alpine spa village are preserved for

future generations.

The town centre upgrade is scheduled to commence in

2009. This will complete the Hanmer Springs Growth

Strategy Plan.

Hanmer Springs has always promoted a general ‘health

and wellness’ theme. Historically, this was related

to the presence of the hot pools, with their relaxing

and rejuvenating purpose, as well as the Queen Mary

hospital which was prominent for recovering soldiers

from WWI and WWII. Today, the township still

maintains its theme of spiritual and physical wellness.

The Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa is an


Hurunui District Council, the complex hosts more

than 500,000 visitors per year. A total of $410,000 was

58


transferred from the Thermal Pools surplus to fund

district wide reserves.

The Hanmer Springs township has one primary

school, a child care centre and a playcentre. Council

also runs a service centre/library in the township.

In response to growth and demand, a purpose

designed medical centre was built in Hanmer Springs

in 2008.

Hanmer Springs has a combined emergency response

facility which houses Fire, Police, and Ambulance

services.

Ward Governance

District Councillors are responsible for representing


monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every three years by the voters of their ward.

The Hanmer Springs Ward is currently represented by

one councillor:

In addition, the Hanmer Springs Ward has the publicly

elected , chaired

by . Hanmer Springs also has its own

Business Association.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Hanmer Springs Ward identify

the following three community outcomes as the most

important:




Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges


A long term challenge for the Hanmer Springs Ward

is to maintain annual visitor growth. While tourism

marketing and promotion is continuing through both

Council and local endeavours, the reality appears

to be that tourism (internationally, nationally and

regionally) is facing new and substantial challenges

59







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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019


competition for the decreasing number of tourists.

The vesting of the 6 hectare reserve area on the Queen

Mary site represents a substantial opportunity for the

Hanmer Springs Ward and the district. Opportunities

for growth will be extended by the stimulus of

whatever private development takes place on the

balance of the site.

Council has not yet formed a long-term plan for the

buildings on the site, and in the current challenging

economic times, will proceed cautiously and prudently.


essential restoration and protection for the buildings,


and the opening up of access to appreciate them. A

plan will need to be prepared which focuses on the

sustainable and viable protection and use of the

historic site. There may be interest from parties keen

to become involved in investment and redevelopment

of the buildings.

Long term security of access to the forests that

surrounds Hanmer Springs will continue to be a

challenge. There is public support to establish a

Regional Forest Park in Hanmer Springs centred

around an existing forest track network which is

extensively used by the public for walking, running


proposal are the Dog Stream Reserve, Conical Hill

Reserve, Larch Reserve, various DOC Estates, Ngai

Tahu / Matariki Forestry, former Hanmer Recreation

Reserve, and other areas. In 2008 a memorandum

of understanding was signed with Matariki Forests,

who manage the forest, to allow public access to the

205 hectare Heritage Forest area (former Hanmer

Recreation Reserve). This forest is a notable feature

of Hanmer Springs with its autumn colour and is

enjoyed by visitors and locals. The Heritage Forest

Trust will maintain the recreational tracks on behalf

of the council.

Increasing tourism provides many opportunities but

also places pressures on core infrastructure resulting

in challenges for the ratepayers and council.

The opportunity exists for Hanmer Springs to develop

its own unique brand position in the market place,

as a focal centre of “health, wellness, recreation and

relaxation”, a place to get away to and “chill out”

from the pressures and demands of modern society.


Springs from other tourism destinations such as the

“adventure capital” of Queenstown.

A decision on private Plan Change 14 has been

recently released. If this becomes operative it will

create a Residential (River Edge) Zone between


which provides approximately 50 lots at 1,000 metres

squared.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council



Private Plan Change 16 seeks to rezone 7 hectares of

land in Hanmer Springs north of Woodbank Road


River. This Plan Change is still being processed by

Council.

In late 2008, the 78,196 hectare St James Station was

purchased by the Crown as part of the conservation

estate. An increase in visitor numbers to St James is

expected and this will support the ongoing economic


an additional boost to the Hanmer Springs tourism

destination area.

Key Planning Assumptions

The Hanmer Springs area is predicted to continue to grow

at above district and national average rates. Whilst there are

some important challenges facing tourism, it is assumed

that on balance the impact of the economic downturn on

international travel will make this destination even more

appealing to the Christchurch/Canterbury market, further

strengthening the already strong demand for holiday

homes.

Hanmer Springs is a popular location for retirees and

those able to work from home. It is predicted that as

telecommunications and technology advance over the

coming years, this market will further increase.

60


Key Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012+

INTRODUCTION

$82,000 $68,000 $87,000

Sealing Woodbank Road (1.15km) $170,000

Reserves $13,000 $5,000 $3,000

WATER SUPPLY:

Renew pipes $17,000

Renew pumps and hydrants $243,000 $256,000

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

Hanmer Springs Ward - Sample Properties




Hanmer Springs Township (Tourism) 440,000 Hanmer Springs 216 1 $1,929.79 $1,936.18 $6.38 0.33%

Hanmer Springs Township 510,000 Hanmer Springs 27 1 $1,587.19 $1,593.81 $6.62 0.42%

Hanmer Springs Rural 3,900,000 No water n/a 1 $4,391.67 $4,419.27 $27.60 0.63%

For more information on the Sample Properties see Appendix 5 of this Document

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Sustainability

INTRODUCTION

Sustainability is a key ideal of the Local Government

Act 2002. Section 14(1) of this act sets out the following

requirements:

(h) in taking a sustainable development approach, a local

authority should take into account—

(i) the social, economic, and cultural wellbeing

of people and communities; and

(ii) the need to maintain and enhance

the quality of the environment; and

(iii) the reasonably foreseeable needs of

future generations.

These factors are of relevance to most Council policies

and activities, and, where appropriate, we will explicitly

address the ideal of sustainability in relation to these.

They also tie in with some major climate change issues

that merit some discussion here. The Council is mindful

of trends in these areas, and will aim for compliance

with any central government initiatives, but the District

has long been subject to adverse weather events, and the


priority.

THIS PLAN AND OTHER COUNCIL INITIATIVES

Sustainability issues are discussed throughout the Groups

of Council Activities chapter of this plan, especially in

the introduction, where they are explicitly addressed


and sustainability” of Council activities. In the Policies

section of this plan, the topic of sustainability is raised in


wellness of the Community is taken into consideration in


also raised in the Revenue & Financing policy, in which

the sustainability of the means of funding each Council

service is considered.

“Environmental Responsibility” is one of the key


Hurunui District for the purposes of this plan, and the

Council will be monitoring this and working towards it

where appropriate. The Council will, for instance, look

to review its purchasing policies to bring these, wherever

it is reasonable to do so, into accord with the principles

of environmental sustainability. It has also incorporated

an “environmental wellbeing” dimension into the vision

of “Hurunui Wellness” that forms part of the framework

for this plan. Other initiatives include the Council’s

Biodiversity Strategy, which was adopted on 28 August

2008, the Regional Forest and Coastal Parks, and the

Walking and Cycling Strategy, which was adopted on 30

April 2009.

CLIMATE CHANGE



devastation, with widespread damage to roads, fences,




The Ministry for the Environment warns us to expect an

increase in the frequency of such extreme weather events,

and compounding factors such as rising sea levels, due

to “climate change” brought about by “human activity

increasing the natural level of greenhouse gases in the

atmosphere”.

This is a controversial topic, but whether or not the


whether or not such climate change is primarily due to


amongst the “experts”), it is clear that we need to be

prepared to respond to such events in order for farming

and other key activities in the District to be economically

and environmentally sustainable. In the recent incidents

volunteers and Enhanced Task Force Green workers have


the ideal for the future will be to improve drainage so that

the severity of future events is lessened. There will be

increased costs associated with this.

EMISSIONS TRADING / CARBON TAX

The Emissions Trading Scheme was a central government

driven initiative aimed at moving New Zealand towards



the recent change of government there has been some

discussion as to whether a “carbon tax” might be a more



compensation will be required from industries that

produce emissions. In the Hurunui District, forestry and





to monitoring and producing responses to these issues,

and should be able to provide reliable advice to farmers


62


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Council Activities

64 Introduction

65 Community Services and Facilities

Activity 1: Library

Activity 2: Local Facilities and Maintenance

Activity 3: Property

Activity 4: Public Toilets

Activity 5: Cemeteries

88 Activity 6: Reserves

Activity 7: Grants and Service Awards

95 Environment and Safety

97 Activity 1: Resource Management/Planning

101 Activity 2: Civil Defence

105 Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

108 Activity 4: Building Compliance

112 Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor Licensing

116 Activity 6: Animal Control

119 Growth and Development

121 Activity 1: Tourism

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

125 Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

128 Activity 3: Economic Development

Photo Taken by Joy van Lier

132 Utility Services / Infrastructure

134 Activity 1: Roading Network

140 Activity 2: Waste Minimisation

146 Activity 3: Sewerage

150 Activity 4: Stormwater/Drainage

154 Activity 5: Water Supply

63

164 Hanmer Springs Thermal

Pools and Spa

170 Governance

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Council Activities

Introduction

This section is about what the Council plans to do,

particularly over the next 3 years, and in some cases,

longer. ‘Activity’ is the term given to the services and

functions that Council is involved in, from public toilets,

to roads, to libraries, etc.

Council activities are grouped into six broad categories:

- Community Services and Facilities

- Growth & Development

- Environment and Safety

- Utility Services/Infrastructure

- Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

- Governance

The following pages go into detail about each category

and its associated activities. The format for each is similar

although some information is relevant for some activities

and not for others. For each activity, you will be able to


Council’s overall aim in relation to the activity

Background to the activity










How the activity will contribute towards the

achievement of community outcomes and

dimensions of wellness

What the current situation is in relation to the

activity

What Council’s future plans are in relation to the

activity

How the activity is funded

How the activity is maintained and operated


through the activity

Assumptions and risks that are associated with

the activity

How we measure or monitor our progress

Financial forecasts

Measuring and Reporting our Progress

We are responsible for monitoring the achievement of the


activities are linked to the community outcomes with

relevant performance measures so that we can measure

our progress towards achieving the desired outcomes.

Performance measures for each community outcome are

detailed in the Community Outcome section.

For each council activity, you are able read about our

performance measures linked with that activity in this

section. We will describe our key service objectives and

also what we are doing toward delivering that service,

and what exactly we will measure. These will be

reported against in Council’s Annual Report, published in

November each year.

Plan Review/Public Consultation

The outlined approach in relation to each of our Council

activities will be updated on a continuous basis as

circumstances change. It will also be comprehensively

reviewed at intervals of not less than three years via a

special consultative procedure, primarily to coincide with

the review of the long term plan. The next planned review

will be in 2012.

64


Community Services and Facilities

Overview

Community Services and Facilities deals with seven

separate activities that Council undertakes in order to

maintain and improve our community’s wellbeing and to

strive towards achieving our community outcomes:








Activity 1: Library

Activity 2: Township Facilities

Activity 3: Property

Activity 4: Public Toilets

Activity 5: Cemeteries

Activity 6: Reserves

Activity 7: Grants and Service Awards

Why is the Council Involved?

The Council is involved in Community Services and

Facilities in order to provide for the social and cultural

wellbeing of its people.

All of the activities within the ‘Community Services and

Facilities’ group are to do with ensuring our communities

have the type of facilities and services reasonably expected

to be provided by the Council. For some, there is a statutory

requirement for the Council to be involved, for example:

cemeteries and reserves.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Community Services and Facilities category

of activities primarily contributes to the community

outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play”. It is

important for people to have a strong sense of community

and a sense of belonging, and to have opportunities

to participate in leisure, art and cultural activities. The

Council ensures essential services are provided to meet

community expectations and to promote the ideal of

District and community wellness. The activities in the

Community Services and Facilities category contribute to


cultural wellbeing, infrastructure, heritage and tradition,

education and skills development.

Emergency Management

The Council is developing a business continuity plan

to detail the procedures that are to be followed in an

emergency. This is to enable essential services to continue

to function to the fullest possible extent, even though

this may be at a reduced level, during major breakdowns


emergency, most local facilities and services are not

considered as essential services.

Further Information


relating to the Community Services and Facilities group of

activities for the next 10 year period.

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

The remainder of this section gives more information

about the seven separate community services and facilities

activities undertaken by Council.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10

2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19

$000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's

Community Services & Facilities Summary

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 1,580 1,515 1,558 1,651 1,765 1,966 2,196 2,196 2,192 2,216 2,236

Development Contributions 271 185 332 310 317 295 273 280 274 281 287

Other Income 605 2,075 600 619 634 1,757 668 688 705 725 743

Internal Interest Received 0 50 97 102 111 121 131 142 101 110 114

Council Overheads 0 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52

Total Operating Revenue 2,456 3,877 2,640 2,734 2,879 4,191 3,320 3,358 3,325 3,383 3,431

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 2,201 2,430 2,356 2,454 2,564 2,613 2,630 2,678 2,749 2,812 2,906

Internal Interest Paid 0 178 272 281 270 254 386 349 309 342 305

Council Overheads 588 596 612 635 653 661 684 695 712 747 748

Depreciation 369 327 330 333 335 338 341 344 347 350 353

Total Operating Expenditure 3,158 3,530 3,570 3,703 3,822 3,866 4,040 4,066 4,117 4,251 4,313

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (702) 347 (930) (969) (943) 325 (721) (708) (793) (868) (882)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Library 60 60 61 63 64 66 67 69 71 73 74

Township Facilities 2,131 1,658 548 277 253 3,609 235 210 1,165 246 1,353

Property (348) 0 51 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Public Toilets 17 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Cemeteries 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Parks & Reserves 3,400 586 188 72 73 75 77 1,242 81 83 85

Grants & Services Awards 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 5,261 2,355 851 414 393 3,752 382 1,523 1,319 404 1,515

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 702 0 930 969 943 0 721 708 793 868 882

Capital Expenditure 5,261 2,355 851 414 393 3,752 382 1,523 1,319 404 1,515

Transfer to Special Funds 312 1,590 197 191 201 198 178 175 94 96 98

Repayment of Internal Loans 269 422 543 552 605 1,909 927 981 1,018 990 1,009

Transfer to General Council Reserves 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6,568 4,367 2,522 2,126 2,142 5,859 2,207 3,387 3,223 2,358 3,503

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 0 347 0 0 0 325 0 0 0 0 0

Transfer from Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve 1,155 1,516 1,521 1,561 1,597 1,630 1,671 1,708 1,748 1,797 1,830

Non Cash Expenses 149 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 159

General Council Reserves 3,133 112 114 65 66 68 69 71 73 75 76

Transfer from Special Funds 0 586 188 72 73 75 77 1,242 81 83 85

Internal Loans 2,131 1,658 548 277 253 3,609 235 210 1,165 246 1,353

6,568 4,367 2,522 2,126 2,142 5,859 2,207 3,387 3,223 2,358 3,503

66


Activity 1: Library

Our Aim




Background

Council recognises the role that a library has within

its community and aims to provide a service which

encourages a joy of reading, the pursuit of knowledge

and information, and also presents opportunities to get

involved in a variety of activities. Not only are libraries

an important educational and recreational resource for

the district, a public library system ensures that there is

equitable opportunity for people to access the information

that they want and need. The library service is available

throughout the district through our website and network

of libraries. The libraries are well stocked with a wide

range of resources in a variety of formats for people to



access and use any of the library materials.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Library activity contributes to the

Community Outcomes “A Desirable Place to Live, Work

and Play”, and “Skills and Education for Work and Life”

(see levels of service and performance measures table).

The relevant dimensions of wellness are: Social and

Cultural wellbeing, Individual and Community Lifestyle,

Education and Skills Development, and Heritage

and Tradition. Libraries provide physical community

resources and support educational needs through access

to information and education programmes. Libraries

promote cultural heritage by collecting and preserving

resources, and provide for leisure and cultural interests.

Current Situation

Council’s library system was established in 1993 and

consists of eight libraries with four of these sharing

premises with school libraries. The Hurunui Memorial

Library, based in Amberley, is the administrative centre


at Hanmer Springs, Amuri, Cheviot and Hawarden. In

addition, there are 3 community libraries at Greta Valley,


Two of the libraries are combined Council service centres.

These are the Hanmer Springs Library/Service Centre and

the Amuri Library/ Service Centre.

Volunteers are active at all libraries and support the library

service with many hours of their time. The “Friends of

the Hurunui District Libraries” was formed in 2002 to

support the library service and along with other groups

of volunteers who contribute to the delivery of library

services across the District.

In mid 2008 the library introduced free internet access

for customers via the Aotearoa People’s Network (APN).

This is a national government funded initiative aimed at

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

increasing New Zealanders access to digital information

and technology. For the Hurunui libraries, this involved


including wireless access at some sites. This internet

access is high speed and reliable and delivered through 17

computers throughout the District.

All items held by the district’s libraries are listed on the

online library catalogue (the OPAC). There are a number

of online databases available which provide access to a

large number of electronic resources such as magazines,

newspapers and reference materials. As well as online

databases the library collection includes talking books,

videos and DVDs, music, large print books, magazines

and newspapers, jigsaws, a broad range of books and upto-date

reference material. Through the interlibrary loans

service the Library can access to resources held in other

New Zealand libraries on behalf of customers.

The library will continue to support community education

by providing display and meeting spaces and also through

the use of the library’s Community Notice Board. We have

entered a reciprocal borrowing agreement with the Selwyn

and Waimate Districts which will give our borrowers

access to their libraries. By presenting their Hurunui

Library card, customers are able to join these libraries and

enjoy the same borrowing privileges as residents of the

Selwyn or Waimate Districts.

In 2008, Council was successful in its funding application to

develop a Youth Programme within the Hurunui District.

Subsequently, approximately $80,000 was pledged and a

part time Youth Coordinator was appointed to develop

and run a programme with youth aged between 12 and

18. The programme has been developing and a number

of initiatives and activities have been organised with

the support and assistance of the youth concerned and

the local Area schools. Whereas the youth programme

is not a library activity as such, there are linkages with

the District’s libraries with regard to accessing resources

such as computers and technology, and the libraries are

distributed in a number of locations within the District.

The Youth Programme has been a new area for Council

and its success will depend on support from local

communities, parents and schools for the programme to

develop and continue and future funding.

Plans for the Future

Library services do not remain static and endeavouring

to meet the needs and expectations of our community

is a key driver for future services. All library items will

continue to be updated as appropriate to meet the needs

of the district. We aim to keep up with what is happening

in the national and international library environment for

innovations and improvements that can be adapted and

applied to our district. One of our challenges is to keep

up with technology and improvements while at the same

time, be mindful of the cost to the ratepayer and assessing

the value of any new service or product. Technology is an

area that continues to develop at a fast pace and customers

are generally receptive to these types of enhancements.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council


predict what will be available in the near future, let alone

the life of this plan.

Within the Hurunui Libraries, and based on what we know

now, we plan to make several technology enhancements.

A new look library webpage will present a number of

enhanced features, including the Internet Gateway. This is

an organized and evaluated collection of internet sites and


and news boards will all be available in electronic formats.

There will also be the opportunity for customer interaction

with the site through online forums. Customers will be


email. Given the decreased cost and increased reliability

of technology the installation of library catalogue

computers into the volunteer libraries will be investigated.

The Library website will be redesigned to make it easier

to access resources online from home or work. We will

also investigate how alternative forms of service delivery,

such as remote access or a speedy delivery service can be

improved.

New forms of technology may impact on how some

library resources are delivered. For example, we expect

that there will be increased customer choice in talking

books through being able to download these to customer

i-pods and other devices. This will be a cheaper option

than purchasing expensive talking book CDs.

We have instigated a programme to co-ordinate our local

history resources. Initial meetings with local heritage

and archive societies have elicited a positive response to

working together to increase access to resources and the

library will play a leading role in this. Once it is up and

running, it is expected that this will be a long term project

that will gain momentum once people see the value in

it. The intention is to make information and resources

available on the web that currently is only available at the

physical place they are stored. This will enable people to

access heritage data and items easily through the internet.

National funding through the APN has been sought to

make a start on this project which we consider to be an

important contribution toward preserving our heritage.

A review of our library hours is undertaken from time to

time to check whether we are open to the public at the best

times for most people. The Hanmer Springs community

has requested that their library/service centre hours are

extended to include Monday opening whereas at present,

it is open from Tuesday to Saturday. This will commence

from July 2009.




shared New Zealand wide library management system


public library environment. This new system will provide

enhanced interactive features for customers beyond what


one we are using now. We also hope to gain agreement

from other libraries within the Canterbury region (in

addition to Selwyn and Waimate) to enable our customers

to use other libraries with a Hurunui library card and visa

versa.

Funding

User charges apply for some library services to cover

actual operational costs. The balance is split 75% District

Uniform Annual Charge and 25% District Rate on Capital

Value known as the Library rates.


Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa toward the cost

of running the library. When this is done, the amount of

the contribution is subtracted from the District Library

Rate. Council intends to fully fund the library rate from

the Thermal Pools and Spa and has factored this into the

life of this plan. This decision is dependent on there being


and Spa.

The Amberley Memorial Library is funded via the District

Uniform Annual Charge, and a separately rated Amberley

Ward rate of $16 per property per annum over 20 years.

This local rate was agreed to by the Amberley Ward


expensive library building option rather than accept a

lower cost, plainer building. Development Contributions

also contribute toward the portion of the cost of the

Amberley Library that was incurred due to growth.

Maintenance and Operating


this area. All stock purchased with Council funding is

owned by Council, whereas items donated or locally

fundraised may either be vested in the Council or owned

as local assets depending on the preference of the donor.

Council owns the library buildings in Amberley, Hanmer


building, but the other libraries are situated in schools,

and therefore owned by the Ministry of Education.) Most


to the library management system are owned by Council



Hurunui College and Amuri Area School. Internet access

for library users is provided at Amberley, Hanmer Springs,

Amuri, Cheviot, and Hawarden through the Aotearoa

People’s Network and maintained by them.



the library activity.

Assumptions and Risks

A number of assumptions have been made concerning the

Hurunui District Libraries. Council intends to continue

to provide a library service for the Hurunui community

from the current locations, and in the same buildings. It

68


is expected that membership and usage will continue at

the current per capita rate. There had been an increase in

membership and usage in 2006 when the new Hurunui


peak lasting a few months, this stabilised. It is also

expected that public interest in online services will increase

as high speed broadband becomes more widely available

within the Hurunui District. The library service has been

based on the premise that the community expects the cost

of providing the service does not exceed the previous


reductions where possible without decreasing the level of

service.

The library is presented with a number of risks. Future

education reviews and restructuring could determine

the availability of schools to host public library services.

Should any of the schools which currently host a public

library service close, alternative means of supply could

be required which may result in a cost which has not

been allowed for. As the population changes and new

people enter the district from other countries or cities,


could put pressure on resourcing. Any withdrawal or

reduction in national government support and funding

of the Aotearoa Peoples’ Network and related digital


up the funding without increasing the overall library

budget. Communication networks in the rural areas may

not always be able to support the technology needs of the

library. The smaller volunteer run community libraries are


run and operate these libraries. Without this commitment,

any of these libraries are in danger of closing.

Major Projects

There are no plans to build any libraries during the life of

this plan or to undertake any major upgrades to existing

libraries.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

69

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Library Goals and Performance Measures

Community Outcomes

(& Dimensions of

Wellness) to which

this Activity Contrib

utes

“A Desirable Place to

Live Work and Play”

(Social and Cultural

Wellbeing, Individual &

Community Lifestyle)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

“Opportunities in leisure,

art and cultural activities”

The Council provides

libraries for social and

recreation use. It is

important that these are

affordable and relevant

to the community, as

well as accessible, safe

and healthy. Volunteers

throughout the community

are critical to the

continuation of library

services.

“Skills & Education

for Work and Life”

(Education & Skills

Development)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section)

“A variety of options for

learning to be available

to all”

The Council’s libraries

support the educational

needs of all residents

by providing access

to information through

resources and user

education.

Goals

The library is

accessible to

most people

within the

District

Customers


with the library

service

Library technology

is

available in

our libraries

to support a

relevant service

for our

communities

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Review the library

opening

hours on a regular

basis to check

that they meet

the needs of the

local communities

Undertake an

annual residents

satisfaction survey

Ensure the library

collection

meets the needs

of the community

Join with other

NZ libraries

to purchase a

new NZ based

Library Manage-


programme to

replace the current

outdated

programme

Performance

Measures

The Hanmer

Springs Library/Service

Centre hours

are extended to

include Monday

opening

Review the


opening hours

At least 90%

of residents


with the library

service

A minimum of

85% of customers

have used

their library

card at least

biannually

Audio (talking)

books – investigate

options

for customers

to download

talking books to

MP3 players or

other technology

System installed

(dependent

on affordability

and

availability)

Current Situation

07/08

This is a new performance

measure (current

hours are Tue-Fri 12noon

- 4.30pm, Sat 10.30am-

2pm).

This is a new performance

measure.

09/10 10/11 11/12 12++

97%

The total membership is

currently 7018 (6053 community

and 965 school) or

60% of the total District

population. Of the community

members, 84% of

library customers have

used their library card for

borrowing in the last two

years.

This is a new performance

measure.

This is a new performance

measure.

Enhanced interactive

online measure.

This is a new performance

features for customers









70


“A Desirable Place to

Live Work and Play”

(Social and Cultural

Wellbeing, Individual &

Community Lifestyle,

Heritage & Tradition)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

Ensuring the preservation

of local heritage and rural

uniqueness

Providing access to our

cultural heritage resources

and promoting an aware

ness of our community.

“A Desirable Place to

Live Work and Play”

(Social and Cultural

Wellbeing, Individual &

Community Lifestyle)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

A strong sense of com

munity that gives people

a sense of belonging and

encourages them to take

part in local activities, to

support essential volun

teer services, and to be

involved in local consulta

tion and decision making

Reciprocal

borrowing

privileges

with other

libraries

To have access

to local

history

resources

within the

Hurunui District

Volunteers

continue be

involved in

the Hurunui

District libraries

Implement a

redesign and layout

of the library

website and related

links

Work with other

libraries in the

Canterbury region

to enable

reciprocal borrower

rights to

their libraries for

Hurunui library

customers.

Collaborate with

organisations

and groups

involved in collecting

and storing

local history

items

Volunteers are

encouraged and

provided with

training

New website

layout implemented

Online forms

available for

customers

Hurunui library

card holders

can borrow

from other

Canterbury libraries

Local history

items are digitised

and available

to all (subject

to external

funding).

No less than

one training/

information

session is held

each year

Volunteers

numbers remain

constant

in each of the 8

libraries in the

district

71

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

This is a new performance

measure.

This is a new performance

measure.

This is a new performance

measure.

This is a new performance

measure.

A Digital services training


to volunteers at Amberley

and Greta Valley. The

other libraries requested

their volunteers be trained

on an individual basis according

to need and this is

an ongoing process.

The number of volunteers

has remained steady

throughout the District’s

library network. The

volunteers’ numbers currently

total 176, which is

four more than the end of










INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Library

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 114,924 29,775 29,775 29,775

Development Contributions 38,200 22,816 43,374 40,698

Other Income 49,200 49,200 50,528 51,808

Total Operating Revenue 202,324 101,791 123,677 122,281

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 424,163 471,186 483,956 496,291

Internal Interest Paid 0 21,500 19,246 15,338

Council Overheads 157,352 160,219 164,833 172,014

Depreciation 103,668 103,861 106,665 109,366

Total Operating Expenditure 685,183 756,767 774,701 793,009

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (482,859) (654,976) (651,023) (670,728)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Library 59,500 59,500 61,107 62,654

Total Capital Expenditure 59,500 59,500 61,107 62,654

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 482,859 654,976 651,023 670,728

Capital Expenditure 59,500 59,500 61,107 62,654

Transfer to Special Funds 81,921 31,091 53,903 55,135

624,280 745,566 766,032 788,516

FUNDED BY

Non Cash Expenses 38,668 38,668 39,712 40,717

Transfer from the Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve 526,112 647,398 665,214 685,145

General Council Reserves 59,500 59,500 61,107 62,654

624,280 745,566 766,032 788,516

72


Activity 2: Township Facilities

Our Aim

T


Background

The Council activity Local Facilities and Maintenance

involves the provision and preservation of the district’s

medical centres, halls, swimming pools and township

facilities (footpaths, garden plots, grass verges etc).

Council is involved in this activity to ensure that local

amenities (facilities that service a Ward) are maintained to

standards appropriate and acceptable to the community.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Local Facilities and Maintenance activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “A Desirable

Place to Live, Work and Play”, promoting wellness in

terms of Social wellbeing, Landscape & Outlook, and

Individual and Community lifestyle. It is important


the community, as well as accessible, safe and healthy.

Volunteers throughout the community are a critical

component to the continuation of many of these facilities

and services.

Current Situation

Medical Centres - Council owns four medical centres which

are located in Cheviot, Hanmer Springs, Rotherham and

Waikari. Council also provides medical practitioners’

residences in Cheviot, Rotherham and Hanmer Springs.

The Hanmer Springs medical centre is the newest and was

built in 2008.

Halls – There are 14 Council owned halls throughout the

District that are largely used to hold meetings, events,

indoor sports and social functions. Many of these buildings

are War Memorial halls or historic buildings.

Swimming Pools – Council’s most well known pool complex is

the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa. This complex

is not included in this section and has a chapter of its own

under the same name. This section refers to the Council

owned swimming pools that are located in Amberley and

Rotherham. Both pools only operate during the summer


operates as a public swimming pool. It is covered, but

not heated, and so is reliant upon the sun to warm the

water. The Rotherham swimming pool is not covered or

heated and is managed by the local swimming club and

school, who determine who uses the pool. In this case,

amenity rates on the Amuri Community Rating Area are

used to fund the maintenance of the Rotherham pool, but


Township Maintenance - Township maintenance covers areas

such as street cleaning, grass mowing, street rubbish bin

clearance, and the maintenance of footpaths and garden

areas. The Wards pay an amenity rate that funds much

of the maintenance within that ward. Managing the

73

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

township maintenance this way has worked out well as

localised rating enables people to have a say on where

their rates are spent.


be more active regarding planning for the future. Concept

township planning has been undertaken in Amberley,

Hanmer Springs and the Amuri Ward’s townships over

the past few years. This has resulted in improved facilities,

(for example: the new medical centre and main street

improvements in Hanmer Springs and extensive plans

ahead for the Amberley township).

Plans for the Future

Council plans to continue to maintain the existing local

facilities to a suitable standard depending on their use.

The demand for local facilities and maintenance plans is

assessed by taking into account residential, tourism and


and submissions. The Waipara community is looking to

develop a future design strategy for their township, which

is undergoing changes due to the wine industry growth

in the area. Some of the main projects or improvements

which are planned to occur during the next few years are

summarized in the Ward Section of this plan.

Medical Centres – A strategic needs assessment of the Amuri

Community Health Centre has found that the current

medical centre is less than ideal for the provision of services

and is predicted to be woefully inadequate for future

growth/demand. A similar situation is also occurring in

Cheviot, where it is expected that the current facility will

not cope with the demand being placed on it. Provision

of $1 million has been allowed in 2009/10 to build a new

medical centre in Rotherham, and a further $1 million is

factored into the 2016/17 year to do the same in Cheviot.

Halls – The Amberley Pavilion has undergone major

renovations and it is planned to continue the upgrade over


the kitchen and toilets and building a permanent stage.

Swimming Pools – The Amberley swimming pool is reaching

the end of its useful life and it is estimated that it will

last for another 10 years or so. This pool has been the

subject of much discussion with a growing community

desire to have a recreational swimming pool facility that

is heated, covered and can operate all year round. It has


range of people and would be used by people throughout


a report on the state of the existing pool, the Council has

decided to maintain the existing facility for 5 more years

and then replace it with a new covered and heated pool.

$3 million has been budgeted in year 5 of the plan, with

funding to be split equally 3 ways ; Amberley Amenities

Rate, Council general rate and fundraising.

Township Maintenance – Various township upgrades are planned

to occur over the next few years. Further detail is outlined

in the Ward Plans earlier in this document. In addition to

these plans, a long term goal is for every town or area to

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

have at least one short term duration and one long term


will be incorporated in the development process where

appropriate.

Funding

Medical Centres – Council funds up to $150,000 for the

provision of medical buildings, which in turn is funded

from the general rate. The balance is funded from the

amenity rate for what ever community is served by the

medical building.

The operational charge of medical centres is intended to be

covered 100% by user charges with any shortfall funded

by the Uniform Annual Charge within the relevant Ward.

Capital expenditure is loan funded by a Uniform Annual

Charge within the relevant ward. If Council decides that

the district should contribute, then the amount of the

contribution is subtracted from the loan. If any of the

capital expenditure caters for future growth, then that

portion of the expenditure that is related to growth will be

funded via Development Contributions.

Halls – A rental charge the market will stand, with the

shortfall met from a Uniform Annual Charge on the Ward.

If any of the Capital Expenditure caters for future growth,

then that portion of the expenditure that relates to growth

will be funded via Development Contributions.

Swimming Pools – The cost of operating and maintaining

swimming pools is a charge to the local ward amenity

rates. Although swimming pool fees are charged to

users, the total revenue generated only contributes a small

amount toward the total cost of the pools outgoing costs.

A new Amberley swimming pool for year 5 of this plan is

to be funded in 3 equal ways ; Amberley Amenities Rate,

Council general rate and fundraising.

Township Maintenance – Township maintenance is funded 100%

by a local Uniform Annual Charge on the Ward.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to retain ownership of the properties

and facilities as outlined in this section. The local Ward


done in their particular Ward through the use of amenity

rating. For physical works, Council employs some

gardeners and cleaners (mostly part time), however most

work in this activity area is done by contractors. Many

of the District’s halls are managed by the local Reserve


pool is funded by user charges and from the Amberley


a pool supervisor during the summer months when

the weather is warm enough to run the pool. This will

continue as this pool continues to remain functional and

until the new pool is built.



activity.

Assumptions and Risks

It is assumed that the current facilities as described in this

section will continue to be needed by the local communities.

It is also assumed that the communities expect the Council

to maintain the facilities and amenities at the lowest cost

possible. As the population in the District changes, there

are possible issues for rate payers when having to fund

facilities to match residents’ and visitors’ expectations.

Given the rural nature of the district, and consequential

small population, the costs can pose challenges.

74


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Major Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Amberley

Upgrade town entre $250,000 $359,000

Amberley pavilion $70,000

Amberley Beach

Local reserve $6,000


Footpaths, capital works $15,000 $10,000 $11,000


Community Centre reclad & paint $30,000

Cheviot

Footpath and kerb & channelling upgrades $15,000 $15,000 $16,000

Gore Bay

Install a new streetlight in the township $3,000

Waikari & Hawarden

Upgrade footpaths and kerb and channelling in Waikari $22,000 $22,000 $22,000

Hanmer Springs

Footpaths, kerb & channelling, and streetlights $82,000 $68,000 $87,000

Reserves $52,000 $23,000 $23,000

Culverden

Footpaths $9,000 $10,000 $15,000

Rutherford reserve $13,000 $5,000 $3,000

Rotherham

Footpaths & town centre $15,000 $5,000 $30,000

Rotherham Hall $15,000

New Amuri Community Health Centre Building $1,000,000

Waiau

Footpaths, plantings, street lighting $18,000 $8,000 $11,000

Waiau Hall painting and roof: $23,000 in 2014/15

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Township Facilities Goals and Performance Measures

Community Outcomes

(& Dimensions of

Wellness) to which this

Activity Contributes

Goals

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Performance

Measures

Current

Situation


10


11

Year


12

12 +

“A Desirable Place to Live,

Work and Play” (Social

and Cultural Wellbeing,

Individual and Community

Lifestyle, Heritage &

Tradition)

Provideand

maintain

buildingsto

support

activitiesand

recreational

needsforlocal

communities

Provide

medical

buildingsto

attract

primaryhealth

professionals

inruralareas

Eachrural

medicalpractice

hasapracticing

general

practitioner

General

practitioners

were

establishedin

eachofthe

ruralmedical

centresinthe

District


Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

Upgradehalls

inresponseto

community

needs

Upgradethe

Amberley

DomainPavilion

Thisisanew

measure



“Attractive well designed

villages that present a

positive image, encouraging

people to live in and visit the

area”

“Opportunities in leisure, art,

and cultural activities”

Undertakean

annual

residents

satisfaction

survey

Residents

surveyed

Thisisanew

measure

considerthe

standardofhalls

tobe

satisfactory:

- 85%

- 90%

Council provides community

facilities and services for

social and recreational use,

while ensuring that they are

affordable and relevant to the

community. Effective

township maintenance

ensures towns and villages

not only look good, but that

everything works.

Maintainthe

townshipsto

ensurethey

appearneat

andtidy

Buildanew

swimming

poolin

Amberley

Employstaff

and

contractorsto

undertake

cleaning,

gardeningand

maintenance

work

Thenew

Amberley

swimmingpool

isoperational

Contracts

monitoring

recordsconfirm

workdoneas

percontract

specifications

Thisisanew

measure

Township

amenitieswere

maintainedby

contractorsand

their

performance

wasmonitored

byCouncil

officersfro

compliance

with

specifications



Undertakean

annual

residents

satisfaction

survey

Residents

surveyed

considerthe

standardof

footpathstobe

satisfactory:

65%of

residents

surveyedwere

satisfiedwith

thestandardof

footpathsinthe

district

- 85%

- 90%

76


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Township Facilities

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 1,310,828 1,354,804 1,394,909 1,439,407

Development Contributions 2,417 117,307 203,539 189,158

Other Income 180,470 191,986 206,885 215,588

Internal Interest Received 0 35,895 39,141 45,866

Total Operating Revenue 1,493,715 1,699,992 1,844,473 1,890,020

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 1,075,767 977,106 899,521 917,078

Internal Interest Paid 0 156,093 252,508 265,493

Council Overheads 148,592 145,274 149,355 155,553

Depreciation 110,237 110,237 110,237 110,237

Total Operating Expenditure 1,334,596 1,388,710 1,411,622 1,448,361

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 159,119 311,282 432,852 441,659

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Amberley Ward 485,000 376,000 369,720 46,126

Amuri Ward 76,925 70,500 34,148 64,657

Cheviot Ward 38,500 18,000 15,405 15,915

Glenmark Ward 13,000 0 0 0

Hanmer Springs Ward 1,512,750 155,750 100,441 120,884

Hurunui Ward 5,000 22,000 22,594 23,342

Self Funded Amenities 0 0 0 0

Medical Centres 0 1,016,000 6,162 6,318

Total Capital Expenditure 2,131,175 1,658,250 548,469 277,242

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 2,131,175 1,658,250 548,469 277,242

Repayment of Internal Loans 269,356 421,519 543,089 551,896

2,400,531 2,079,769 1,091,558 829,138

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 159,119 311,282 432,852 441,659

Non Cash Expenses 110,237 110,237 110,237 110,237

Internal Loans 2,131,175 1,658,250 548,469 277,242

2,400,531 2,079,769 1,091,558 829,138

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

77

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 3: Property

Our Aim

T


Background

The Council owns a variety of properties throughout the


people in the Hurunui District. The Council has over time

acquired a portfolio of properties so that it can provide

a range of the services and facilities our people consider

important to have in their communities. The ‘property’

activity includes Council owned sites and buildings, such

as pensioner housing, car parking areas, and Council

buildings.

The Council holds a small range of commercial properties


well as having a long-term contribution to the communities’

goals.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

Council’s Property activity contributes to the Community

Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play”,

promoting wellness in terms of Social, Economic, &

Cultural wellbeing, and Individual and Community


relevant to the community, as well as accessible, safe and

healthy.

Current Situation

The Council owns a small number of commercial premises

that are generally leased to small businesses. We receive

revenue through the rental of these premises. As of June

2009, Council owns 34 housing units for the elderly – 12

in Amberley, 13 in Cheviot, 4 in Hanmer Springs and 5

in Waikari. Council also owns 3 residential houses – 1 in


Other properties owned by Council are used for Council

services. These include 5 depots used for water and

sewerage functions, 4 buildings used for Council service


transfer stations

Plans for the Future

Land may need to be acquired to relocate the Amberley

Transfer Station (recycling depot) in 2009/10 because of the

expiry of the current resource consent. This is explained in

more detail in the Waste Management section. Although


the transfer station relocation, any disposal of surplus

property initiated by lessees will be actioned in accordance

with Council policy.

Pensioner housing is currently only provided by the

Council in Amberley, Cheviot, Hanmer Springs and

Waikari. This may inadvertently have social and cultural

impacts upon the age demographics in local communities

as the elderly population becomes concentrated in certain

areas only. This may result in higher demands on some

local services and facilities. With the aging of the District’s

population, the provision of the same relative amounts of

pensioner housing is unlikely to be sustainable. Demand

for pensioner housing in the District as a whole is already

fast outstripping supply, and this may result in some older

people leaving the District, with negative consequences

for the social and cultural wellbeing of the District, its

community lifestyle, and its heritage and tradition

In the past two years, Council has undertaken to improve


district. With the exception of the 3 new units to be built

in Amberley in 2009, and another 3 in Amberley built

in 1991, most of the pensioner units were built between

1960 and 1975. Insulation and heating options were not


years, the remaining units will have work done to improve

the warmth of these homes.

The Hurunui District has an aging population that is

expected to increase for the next several years. This is

expected to place additional demand for low cost housing

options for aging and retired people. However the Council

believes the expected demand is best met by the private


authorities as was the case in 2008. The 3 new pensioner

units (due for completion by June 2009) in Amberley were


Community Trust.

Funding

Pensioner and residential housing are funded by rents set


for providing the housing. Any shortfall is made up from

the district rate on capital value. Capital expenditure is

funded through either loans or cash reserves.

Rentals for pensioner housing and other rented Council

properties are reviewed annually to ensure they meet

the rising cost of maintenance and repairs, but that they

also remain within an acceptable costing structure for the


other Council properties are based on commercial rents

which are periodically reviewed by registered valuations.

Maintenance and Operating

A property review is undertaken every several years to

assess the state of the property portfolio and to enable

a suitable maintenance programme to be put in place.

Generally, all properties are maintained to a level that

keeps them functional. Maintenance and upkeep is

undertaken by contractors approved by Council.


Pensioner housing is only available in Amberley, Cheviot,

Hanmer Springs and Waikari. This may inadvertently have

social and cultural impacts upon the age demographics in

the local communities as the elderly population becomes

concentrated in certain areas only. This may result in

higher demands on some local services and facilities.

78


At this stage, the land for the relocation of the Amberley


to meet the town planning regulations. Because of the

nature of the activity, there are negative environmental


taken to mitigate them, including choosing the actual site

location. See the ‘Waste Minimisation’ section for further

information.


hazardous areas, particularly to pedestrians. This is best

demonstrated in Hanmer Springs and Amberley, which


certain times of the day or year. The impact is lessened

through location and design of car parking to reduce the

risk of accidents and injury.

Assumptions and Risks

Council intends to continue to own, control and manage

its properties within the district. Although we have an

aging population in the district, Council has no plans to

increase pensioner housing at this stage.

Major Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Pensioner Units to receive warmth and insulation improvements $40,000 $51,000

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

79

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Property Goals and Performance Measures

Year

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to which

this Activity

Contributes

Goals

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Performance

Measures


10


11


12

12 +

“A Desirable Place to

Live, Work and Play”

(Social, Cultural and

Economic Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

Maintain

Councilowned

propertiesso

thattheyare

safeandfitfor

purpose

Engage

suitably

qualified

professionals

orcontractors

toundertake

workneeded

toreviewand

maintain

buildings

Undertakea

propertyreview

onCouncil

owned

propertiesto

establisha

maintenance

programme

Scheduled

maintenance

workofCouncil

buildingswas

completedto

specification



The Council provides

community facilities and

services for social and

recreational use. It is

important that these are

affordable and relevant to

the community, as well as

accessible, safe and

healthy.

Improved

heatingand

insulationin

olderPensioner

Units

Thisisanew

performance

measure



“A healthy, safe place

to live” (Social, Cultural

and Economic

Wellbeing)

Councilowned

premiseshavea

95%occupancy

rate

100%

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community outcomes

section):

Purchaseland

forfuture

development

Establish

wherelandis

neededand

purchase

Purchaseland

torelocatethe

Amberley

TransferStation

Thisisanew

performance

measure


accordingly

“Good quality, affordable

accommodation available

to meet the community’s

needs”

Toensurethat

allCouncil

owned

propertynot

Regularly

reviewleases

andproperty

portfolios

Allbuildings

notrequiredby

Councilorthe

publicare

Allsurplus

councillandis

leasedout.No

buildingsare


requiredfor

leasedout

vacant,except

Councilor

within6

foroneofthe

publicuseis

monthsofbeing

officespacesin

leasedout

vacant

theEx

Chambers

buildingin

Culverden,

whichis

currentlybeing

usedbythe

Councilfor

storagepurposes

80


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Property

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 24,457 36,607 35,634 35,778

Other Income 271,000 234,000 240,318 246,402

Council Overheads 0 51,938 51,938 51,938

Total Operating Revenue 295,457 322,545 327,890 334,118

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 103,596 195,097 199,331 204,402

Council Overheads 40,653 42,060 43,171 44,329

Depreciation 127,208 85,388 85,388 85,388

Total Operating Expenditure 271,457 322,545 327,890 334,118

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 24,000 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Pensioner Housing 0 0 51,350 0

Residential Housing 0 0 0 0

Other Property (348,250) 0 0 0

Depots 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure (348,250) 0 51,350 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure (348,250) 0 51,350 0

Transfer to General Council Reserves 24,000 0 0 0

(324,250) 0 51,350 0

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 24,000 0 0 0

General Council Reserves (348,250) 0 51,350 0

(324,250) 0 51,350 0

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

81

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APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 4: Public Toilets

Our Aim



Background

The Council provides public toilets in most townships

for visitors and residents to use. Council also meets its

statutory duties under the Health Act 1956, which urges

local authorities to promote and conserve the public

health within their district, by providing ‘sanitary works’

including ‘sanitary conveniences’ for the use of the public.

Therefore, consistent signage is used to highlight the

locations of the toilets so that they can be found easily.

Whereas we try to build toilets in the most obvious of

places so that they are very convenient, some of our

existing toilets may not be in the most suitable location.


required toilets to be discretely positioned, whereas


easily accessible, well-lit facility. Gradually, as toilets are

replaced, alternative locations will be considered. All new

toilets are sited where they are highly visible to maximise

safety for the users and to reduce the risk of vandalism.

Adequate car parking is also considered and needs to be

available nearby.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Public Toilets activity contributes to

the Community Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live,

Work and Play”, promoting wellness in terms of Social

wellbeing, and Individual and Community Lifestyle.

Council provides these facilities for the wellbeing and

convenience of its residents and visitors. It is important

that these facilities are accessible, safe and healthy.

Current Situation

Throughout the Hurunui district, there are 14 toilet blocks

located on reserves (which are funded from amenity

accounts), 16 district public toilets sited either on reserves

or Council freehold property (funded from the general

rate) and two privately owned toilets, which Council

contributes to the maintenance of. All of the district toilets

have been built or renovated within the last 10 years so are

in a very good condition. The last one built at Hawarden,

won the “Keep NZ Beautiful Best Loo” award in 2008.

Council policy is that, in towns where public toilets are

warranted, one toilet shall be funded by the general rate.

Any additional toilets are charged to the respective ward

except when the demand for a public toilet exceeds one

and the need is driven by visitors to the area rather than

locals. For example, this is the case in Hanmer Springs to

meet the needs of visitors and tourists to the township.

Plans for the Future

New toilets will be built at Amberley Beach in 2009/10

which had been scheduled for the 2008/09 year. Funding

will be carried over. There are no other plans to install any

more district public toilets within the period of this plan as

the number of toilets available, and their general location

is expected to service the District for more than 10 years.

We expect a well designed public toilet to last for at least

50 years.

Baby change facilities will be installed in the district

reserve toilets at a rate of two per year from 2009/10.

Funding

District toilets are funded by 100% District Uniform

Annual Charge. The cost of Ward toilets is included in

township maintenance expenditure, which is funded via a

100% Uniform Annual Charge on the local ward. Council

has considered other funding methods such as seeking

sponsorship or selling advertising space on or in the toilets,

but has been unable to secure anything at this stage.


Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa operation the

amount of the contribution is subtracted from the district

rate. If any of the Capital Expenditure caters for future

growth, then that portion of the expenditure that relates

to growth will be funded via Development Contributions.

Maintenance and Operating

The maintenance of these facilities, including cleaning and

replenishing of supplies, is contracted out under Council’s

approval. No major renovations or alterations are expected

within the life of this plan.



associated anti-social behaviour, there are potential


try to minimise these impacts by building new toilets in

highly visible areas that are easily accessible and well lit.


tend to drive as close as they can. Therefore, consideration

is given to car parking facilities to minimise congestion

and hazards.



and other associated anti-social behaviour. The Council’s


behaviour by building all new public toilets in areas that

are highly visible, well lit and accessible. The provision

of public toilets under these conditions is likely to be

sustainable for the foreseeable future.

Assumptions and Risks

Council intends to continue to own, control and manage

public toilets throughout the district. It is assumed that no

82


Major Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

New Amberley Beach toilets $50,000

Public Toilets: Goals and Performance Measures

Community Outcomes (&

Dimensions of Wellness) to

which this Activity Contributes

“Essential Infrastructure”

(Infrastructure, Environmental

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of this outcome (as

set out in the Community Outcomes

section):

“Public toilets that meet the

expectations of visitors and residents

and also provide an environmental

and public health service”

“A Desirable Place to Live, Work

and Play” (Social and Cultural

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of this outcome (as

set out in the Community Outcomes

section):

The Council provides community

facilities for public use. It is

important that they are accessible,

safe and healthy.

Goals

Tohave

well

maintained

public

toilets

locatedin

eachofthe

main

townships

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Employ

staffand

contractors

tomaintain

andclean

thedistricts

public

toilets

Investigate

complaints

aboutthe

standardof

thetoilets

Undertake

anannual

residents

satisfaction

survey

Performance

Measures

Contracts

monitoring

records

confirmwork

doneasper

contract

specifications

All

complaints

arefollowed

upwithin48

hours

Current

Situation

Routine

monitoringby

Councilstaff

ensuredwork

wascarried

outtomeet

contract

specifications

Thisisanew

performance

measure


10


11

Year


12

12 +



Residents 82%

whohave

usedthe

publictoilets

85%

90%

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

83

Page 83

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Public Toilets

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Other Income 0 0 0 0

Total Operating Revenue 0 0 0 0

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 245,639 245,500 252,159 258,594

Council Overheads 28,226 28,626 29,514 30,063

Depreciation 27,425 27,425 27,425 27,425

Total Operating Expenditure 301,290 301,551 309,098 316,082

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (301,290) (301,551) (309,098) (316,082)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Public Toilets 16,500 50,000 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 16,500 50,000 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 301,290 301,551 309,098 316,082

Capital Expenditure 16,500 50,000 0 0

317,790 351,551 309,098 316,082

FUNDED BY

Transfer from Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve 301,290 301,551 309,098 316,082

General Council Reserves 16,500 50,000 0 0

317,790 351,551 309,098 316,082

84


Activity 5: Cemeteries

Our Aim



Background

Cemeteries are an area of responsibility that Councils

are charged with establishing and maintaining under

the Burial and Cremation Act 1964. Council also sets and

charges fees for the use of these cemeteries. This is to


access to cemetery plots when they are required, and

in an appropriate location to them. Burial services and

cemeteries are an integral part of our culture, and within

the Hurunui, this is no exception, particularly to those who


expect that cemeteries are kept in a tidy condition. Our


district’s cemeteries, while protecting any constructions

such as monuments and vegetation from destruction or

damage.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

Council’s Cemeteries activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work

and Play”, as Council provides these facilities for the

peace-of-mind and convenience of its residents. It is


safe and well maintained. They promote wellness for the

District in terms of its Cultural wellbeing, and Heritage

and Tradition.

Current Situation

There are 10 cemetery reserves throughout our district.

These are located at Balcairn, Cheviot, Culverden,

Glenmark, Hanmer Springs, Horsley Down, Jed,

Rotherham, Waiau, and Waikari. With the exception of

Cheviot, each of the cemeteries has more than enough

vacant plots to last for at least the next 10 years. Provision

has been made in the plan to extend the Cheviot cemetery

into adjoining land owned by the Council. In total, there

are approximately 3,000 vacant plots currently available

spread throughout the district. Of the 9 cemeteries, Balcairn

Cemetery is used the most frequently with approximately

22 plots sold on average each year. In contrast, our least

frequently used cemetery is Rotherham, with an average

of 2 plots sold each year.

Whereas Council owns the cemetery reserves, we do


grounds. Instead, the services of sextons, gardeners and

trades people are contracted by Council. Cemetery plots


or to be buried in the cemeteries – they are not only for

Hurunui district residents.

Plans for the Future

Most of the district’s cemeteries have many years

remaining before they will run out of space. It is predicted

85

Page 85

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

that the demand for plots within the district’s cemeteries

will increase gradually over the next 50 years, due to

the increasing age of the population within the district.

Funeral Directors have indicated that there is generally an

increasing trend away from cemetery burials as people are

moving towards cremation services. However, this has

not impacted on the sales of plots within the Hurunui.

Long-term development and landscaping plans

are in place or being developed, which include the

construction of berms and placement of new plantings.

The construction of berms (concrete strips that the head

stones and memorial plaques are laid on) will continue in

the Balcairn, Glenmark, Waikari, Horsley Down, Hanmer

Springs and Waiau cemeteries to cater for new interments.

Berms make it easier to do general maintenance, such as

grass mowing and help make the cemeteries look tidier.

Otherwise, general maintenance and gardening will

continue to be the main plan for the future with regard to


Funding

Maintenance is funded from the district rate on the Capital

Value. Interment costs are paid through user charges.


Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa operation the

amount of the contribution is subtracted from the District

Rate.

Maintenance and Operating

General maintenance and upkeep such as grass mowing,

weed spraying, rubbish removal, fencing, grave topping,

digging and landscaping, is undertaken by contractors

approved by Council. Generally, all cemeteries within

the district are well maintained. All cemeteries have areas

marked for future grave and cremation sites for Anglican,

Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, and non-denominational

residents, and these will continue to be developed in

accordance with demand in each area.


Our cemeteries are situated in mainly rural areas and do


Assumptions and Risks

Plans for cemeteries in the Hurunui are based on the

assumption that our current 9 cemeteries will continue to

meet the needs of our growing and aging population for

many years to come. There is always a risk that a natural

disaster could severely damage any of the cemeteries, such


date, and in this event, alternative sites (or site) may need


INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Year Planned

Major Projects

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Berm construction at various cemeteries $5,000 $5,000 $5,000

Cemeteries: Goals and Performance Measures

Year

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this

Activity

Contributes

Goals

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Performance

Measures



10


11


12

12 +

“A Desirable

Place to Live,

Work and Play”

(Cultural

Wellbeing,

Landscape &

Outlook,

Infrastructure)


























Relevant aspects of

this outcome (as set

out in the

Community

Outcomes section):

The Council

provides community

facilities and

services for social

and recreational

use. Effective

township

maintenance

ensures towns and

villages not only

look good, but that

everything works.










































-

-

-



















86


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Cemeteries

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Other Income 50,000 50,000 51,350 52,650

Total Operating Revenue 50,000 50,000 51,350 52,650

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 94,712 116,511 119,657 122,686

Council Overheads 40,211 41,585 42,713 43,875

Depreciation 0 200 200 200

Total Operating Expenditure 134,923 158,296 162,570 166,761

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (84,923) (108,296) (111,220) (114,111)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Cemeteries 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

Total Capital Expenditure 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 84,923 108,296 111,220 114,111

Capital Expenditure 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

86,923 110,296 113,220 116,111

FUNDED BY

Transfer from Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve 84,923 108,296 111,220 114,111

General Council Reserves 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

86,923 110,296 113,220 116,111

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

87

Page 87

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 6: Reserves

Our Aim




Background

The Reserves activity provides for the preservation and in

some cases the extension of the district’s parks and reserves.

The district’s reserves are highly regarded by Council



which are delegated responsibilities to ensure reserves are

maintained and useful for people to enjoy. Council also

has a statutory requirement under the Reserves Act 1977

to manage its reserve network in accordance with each


Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Reserve activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work

and Play”, as Council provides public spaces for social and

recreational use. It is important that these are accessible

and useful to the community, as well as safe. Volunteers

throughout the community are a critical component to the

continuation and upkeep of the reserves. This activity

contributes to wellness across the following dimensions:

Social, Cultural and Environmental wellbeing, Landscape

& Outlook, Individual and Community Lifestyle, and

Heritage and Tradition.

Current Situation

There are currently 160 parks, reserves and recreation

areas in our district. This includes the Hanmer Springs

Thermal Reserve, now known as the ‘Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools and Spa’. This section does not discuss the


right. Please refer to the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools

and Spa section of this plan. The reserves discussed in

this section cover the 9 parks (picnic areas/playgrounds),

6 camping grounds and 146 developed and undeveloped

reserves and plantation areas in the district. The reserve

portfolio will soon also include approximately 6.0 hectares

of the former Queen Mary Hospital Site in Hanmer Springs

which had been owned by the Canterbury District Health

Board.



play in maintaining and preserving the reserves. Their

membership includes volunteers as well as elected

members of Council. A number of reserves are also

managed on behalf of local communities via the Council


groups is sincerely appreciated by Council.

Plans for the Future

In late 2008 Council adopted a comprehensive District




The Plan sets out the future plans for each of the District’s

reserves. The total accumulated cost of these projects

over 2009 to 2019 is $475,000, and this Long Term Plan

includes a provision of $50,000 per year to cover these

plans, funded from the annual surplus from the Hanmer


projects and plans are contained in the District Reserves

Management Plan, available on the Council website.


reserves, the District Reserve Management Plan also


“amenity” reserves for the period from 2009 to 2019. Under

previous policy, such projects had to be funded by local

amenity rates and could not be funded from the Hanmer

Springs Thermal Pools and Spa surplus. In pursuit of the

overall objective of Reserves development throughout

Hurunui, and the associated theme of “wellness”,

Council has changed the Reserves Funding Policy (see the

Policy section of this Plan), to allow spending at Council

discretion of excess surpluses from the Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools and Spa on amenity reserves development.

There is precedent for this approach, namely Council’s one



Council’s funding actions for amenity reserves, following

this policy change, will depend on actual surplus levels

achieved from the Thermal Pools and Spa in future years;

and other factors considered by Council at the time.



Crown in October 2008 for the vesting of approximately

6 hectares of the ex Queen Mary Hospital land and three


of this land (approx 5.5 hectares) and all three buildings

(Chisholm Ward, Soldiers Hospital and Nurses Hostel)

will be vested as a “historic reserve” under the Reserves

Act 1977. A small portion of land, approx 4,600m,

will be vested as “recreation reserve” for use as part of

expansionary development at the adjoining Hanmer

Springs Thermal Pools and Spa. It is expected that the



For the purposes of this plan, Council’s strategic approach

to the Queen Mary land is as follows:

Whilst Council is extremely positive about the values and

opportunities that Queen Mary represents, it is equally

mindful that the property must be prudently managed


liabilities for the District.

Accordingly Council has consistently emphasised to the

Crown and others that it sees commercial development,

and commercial partners, as the keys to long term

planning.

88


Once vesting takes place, Council will commence the

development of a Reserves Management Plan for the

Historic Reserve. This Plan is a requirement under the

Reserves Act 1977, and will incorporate appropriate

consultation and submission processes to draw in the


interests and views. Timing will be approximately late

2009 through late 2010.

In advance of this Reserves Management Plan development,


Thermal Pools and Spa have indicated a preliminary,

high level associated development for the Chisholm Ward

facility. Council is prepared to consider such a concept on

the basis of its potential return to the District at large (and


a proposal be forthcoming). Should this proceed further,

it would be subject to a special consultative procedure.

Assuming vesting is achieved by December 2009, Council

has budgeted $794,000 over 10 years from 2009/10 for

essential refurbishment and security for the Chisholm

and Soldiers buildings and surrounding areas, funded

from development contributions at hand (see further note

below). Council refers to this as its “mothballing strategy”,

ahead of any subsequent commercial development which

would trigger full restoration / refurbishment / earthquake


Similar “mothballing” work on the Nurses Hostel is

budgeted at $1.77 million from 2009/10, funded in this

instance from the Crown’s grant for this facility. The

balance of the Crown’s grant will be spent on earthquake

strengthening on the Nurses Hostel building no later than

2015/16 as per the agreement with the Crown.

Development contributions for Queen Mary have been




and/or development”. Only those contributions collected




Funding

Capital works on reserves are funded either from

money collected from revenues raised within the reserve

network, rate income, or from surpluses generated by the

Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve. If any of the Capital

Expenditure caters for future growth, then that portion

of the expenditure that relates to growth will be funded

from future users via Development Contributions. In the

case of the ex Queen Mary Hospital site, any development

work carried out on the buildings and site will be funded

through a combination of development contributions,

government funding, private sector/commercial funding,

and funding from Council reserves.

89

Maintenance and Operating

Page 89

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Council acts as an administering body for a large number

of parks and reserves within the Hurunui District. The

parks and reserves are either owned by Council or vested

in Council to administer and maintain. Those that are

vested are owned by the Crown. Council has a reserve

management structure comprising of a number of Reserve



development. Lawn mowing and heavy maintenance is

largely undertaken by contractors; however, Council has

employed gardeners to do some maintenance work in

some of the reserves.



this activity.

Assumptions and Risks

It is assumed that the district’s communities will continue

to support the preservation of the district’s reserves and


We will work over the next three year period to develop

a plan to manage and develop that part of the former

Queen Mary hospital site that will be vested in Council as

a reserve in 2009. The cornerstone of this planning will be


the three heritage buildings on the site.

The biggest risk to the reserves is natural weather and


severe damage in some of the reserves and dramatically

altered the landscape of some of them. This plan does not

include additional funding to restore reserves in the event

they are severely damaged in future.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Major Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Ex Queen Mary Hospital reserve – historic building improvements $586,000 $468,000 $72,000

Ex Queen Mary Hospital reserve grounds maintenance $55,000 $56,000 $58,000

Capital projects in reserves in accordance with the Reserve

Management Plan

$50,000 $50,000 $50,000

Build a new footbridge in the Brooke Dawson Reserve, Hanmer Springs $20,000

Parks & Reserves

Operating Statement

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

OPERATING REVENUE

Development Contributions 230,000 44,999 85,575 80,326

Other Income 30,000 1,530,000 30,810 31,590

Internal Interest Received 0 13,962 57,762 55,744

Total Operating Revenue 260,000 1,588,961 174,147 167,660

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 118,694 330,060 303,408 308,557

Council Overheads 154,193 158,262 162,694 168,722

Total Operating Expenditure 272,887 488,322 466,102 477,279

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (12,887) 1,100,639 (291,955) (309,620)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

District Reserves 3,400,000 585,640 188,187 71,646

Total Capital Expenditure 3,400,000 585,640 188,187 71,646

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 12,887 0 291,955 309,620

Capital Expenditure 3,400,000 585,640 188,187 71,646

Transfer to Special Funds 230,000 1,558,961 143,337 136,070

3,642,887 2,144,601 623,479 517,335

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 0 1,100,639 0 0

Transfer from Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve 242,887 458,322 435,292 445,689

General Council Reserves 3,400,000 0 0 0

Transfer from Special Funds 0 585,640 188,187 71,646

3,642,887 2,144,601 623,479 517,335

90


Reserves Goals and Performance Measures

Community Outcomes (&

Dimensions of Wellness) to

which this Activity

Contributes

“A Desirable Place to Live,

Work and Play” (Social and

Cultural Wellbeing,

Landscape and Outlook)

Relevant aspects of this outcome

(as set out in the Community

Outcomes section):

“Attractive, well designed villages

that present a positive image,

encouraging people to live in and

visit the area”

“Effective planning for future

development, but ensuring the

preservation of local heritage and

rural uniqueness”

The Council Provides community

facilities and services for social

and recreational use. It is

important that they remain

affordable and relevant to the

community.

Goals

Tocarefor

parksand

reservesfor

residentsand

visitorsto

enjoy

Tohaveplans

inplacefor

the

development

ofnewand

existing

reserves

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Working

toward

achievingthe

actionsset

outinthe

Reserves

Management

Plan

Involvelocal

communities

andreserve

committees

inthe

planningand

developingof

theirreserves

Undertakean

annual

residents

satisfaction

survey

Developa

strategyfor

the

management

and

development

oftheex

QueenMary

reservein

Hanmer

Springs

Reserve

91

Performance

Measures

Projectsare

undertaken

annuallyin

accordancewith

thePlan

Contestable

fundingisspent

eachyearon

reserve

improvements

Thestandardof

parksand

reservesis

consideredtobe

satisfactory:

Page 91

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Current

Situation


10


11


12

12

+

Thisisa

new

performance

measure


- 85% parksand

- 90% reservesin


Amanagement

planisinplace

Thisisa

new

performance

measure

80%of

residents

surveyed

were

satisfied

withthe

standardof

Thisisa

new

performance

measure

Year



INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 7: Grants & Service Awards

Our Aim

T



Background

Council is required by legislation to disperse grants. It

facilitates the distribution of funds from the Sports and

Recreation New Zealand (SPARC) and Creative New

Zealand. Local residents are represented in the distribution


a variety of achievement based award schemes available to

people in the district to recognise and reward excellence in

environmental initiatives, secondary school achievements

and voluntary service within the district.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Grants and Service Awards activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “A Desirable

Place to Live, Work and Play”, by acknowledging,

rewarding and encouraging people’s contribution to their

communities, and personal achievements. It promotes

wellness in terms of Social, Cultural and Environmental

wellbeing, and Individual and Community Lifestyle.

Current Situation

Council has four Service Awards, which are all presented

on an annual basis. They are:

1. Community Service Awards for those who have given

extended periods of exceptional volunteer service

2. Secondary School Achievers Awards for promising



3. MainPower Hurunui Natural Environment Fund

to encourage and assist with voluntary work that


4. Hurunui Heritage Fund to encourage and assist with

voluntary work that protects, enhances, explains or


In addition, Council acts as an agent and disburses grants

on behalf of two government funded initiatives. These are

the ‘Creative Communities Scheme’, which is to increase

participation in the arts at the local level and increase the

range and diversity of arts available to communities; and

‘SPARC’ to encourage junior sporting teams to participate

in sporting activities by assisting with travel costs.

Council is required to pay a contribution toward the

Canterbury Museum. This is a legislative requirement

and Council takes this commitment seriously to ensure the

contribution is at the minimum level and value for money.

The Mayor is a member of the Canterbury Museum Trust

and advocates on behalf of the Hurunui District.

Plans for the Future

Council plans to continue its role with the grant and

awards structure as described as above. Recently, Council

received a proposal from the North Canterbury Sport

and Recreation Trust to help fund a primary school sport

coaching programme for the 28 schools in the North

Canterbury area. This initiative is to commence in 2009


it up and running. Hurunui and Waimakariri Councils

have been asked to contribute from year 4 to enable the


continue. Hurunui’s share is approximately $14,000 from

2012 onwards, but will depend on how the Waimakariri


The Council is required to pay the Canterbury Museum

a levy each year to contribute to its running costs. This is

currently $48,198 per annum and increases at a rate of 5%

per annum. Canterbury Museum intends to proceed with

a redevelopment project that has been signalled in their

previous Annual Plans. The redevelopment is costed at

$63.7M and is shown as occurring between 2010/11 and

2013/14. The levy which will be imposed on our Council

for the proposed capital development, in addition to the

operational levy Council pays is currently shown as:

Funding


$44,523 $89,045 $44,523

100% Uniform Annual General Charge.

Maintenance and Operating

Council acts as an agent in administering and distributing

grants on behalf of two government funded initiatives –

SPARC and Creative Communities New Zealand. Both

organisations provide assistance to Council in managing


be distributed to community sporting groups and arts


awards internally.



the grants and awards activity.

Assumptions and Risks

It is assumed that Council will continue to support the

current programmes. Should government funding or

externally sourced funding cease to become available,

Council will need to reconsider its position regarding the


grows, there could be an increased community expectation

that more grants and service awards be provided and this

has not been factored into this plan.

92


Canterbury Museum

Major Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Contribution $48,000 $51,000 $53,000

Capital levy on major development $45,000

Grants and Service Awards: Goals and Performance Measures

Community Outcomes

(& Dimensions of

Wellness) to which this

Activity Contributes

“A Desirable Place to Live,

Work and Play” (Social and

Cultural Wellbeing,

Individual & Community

Lifestyle, Education and

Skills Development)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

“A strong sense of community

that gives people a sense of

belonging and encourages

them to take part in local

activities, to support essential

volunteer services”

Through recognition of

individuals and community

members the council seeks to

develop and encourage

community members’

contributions to the District.

Goals

Toreward

andrecognise

outstanding

contribution

and

initiatives

from

individuals

and

community

members

How we will achieve

our Goals

Advertiseand

promotethe

availabilityofgrants

andawards

Advertiseand

promotethe

availabilityoffunding

onbehalfofSportand

RecreationNew

Zealand(SPARC)and

CreativeNewZealand

93

Page 93

Performance

Measures

Grantsare

awardedin

all

categories:

Secondary

Education

School

Achievers


Community

Service

Mainpower

Hurunui

Natural

Environmen

tFund

Hurunui

Heritage

Fund

Allfunding

isawarded

toapplicants

Current

Situation

All

awards

were

advertised

andgrants

disbursed


10


11

Year


12

12

+



POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Grants & Service Awards

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 129,975 94,193 97,837 145,914

Other Income 24,500 20,000 20,540 21,060

Total Operating Revenue 154,475 114,193 118,377 166,974

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 138,500 94,617 98,280 146,540

Council Overheads 19,079 19,576 20,097 20,433

Total Operating Expenditure 157,579 114,193 118,377 166,974

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (3,104) 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Grants & Services Awards 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 3,104 0 0 0

3,104 0 0 0

FUNDED BY

General Council Reserves 3,104 0 0 0

3,104 0 0 0

94


Environment and Safety

Overview

Environment and Safety covers six separate activities that

Council undertakes in order to maintain our community’s

wellbeing and strive towards achieving our community

outcomes. This section provides more details about the

seven separate environment and safety activities that

Council undertakes as listed below:













Why is the Council Involved?

The Council is involved in environmental and safety

services in order to provide for the wellbeing of our people.

In relation to Resource Management Policy and Consents,

the Resource Management Act requires the Council to


water, via its District Plan.

The Council has a statutory requirement to be involved in

all of the other activities in this section of the Plan. Council


a desirable place to live and work and visit through

following through on the communities concerns and

desires and using policy and advocacy to further enhance

the District. The statutory requirements for each activity

listed in this section are described below:

- Civil Defence - the Civil Defence and Emergency

Management Act 2002

- Rural Fire Service - the Forest and Rural Fire Act 1979

and the Fire Service Act 1975

- Building consents - the Building Act 2004

-

Act 1981

- Liquor licensing - the Sale of Liquor Act 1989

- Animal control - the Dog Control Act 1996, the Dog

Control Amendment Act 2003, and the Impounding

Act 1955

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

Council’s Environment and Safety category of activities

contributes to the community outcome “Environmental

Responsibility”, as managing our natural and physical

resources as safely as possible is essential so that we

can protect and improve the environment we live in. In

addition, Council’s Environment and Safety category

of activities contributes to the community outcome “A

Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, as adequate emergency

and regulatory services are vital in providing for our

95

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

communities’ health and wellness, and to ensure that

our people are well protected. This group of activities

promotes the ideal of District and community wellness


social, cultural, and environmental wellbeing, landscape

and outlook, individual and community lifestyle, heritage

and tradition.

Emergency Management

The Council is developing a business continuity plan

to detail the procedures that are to be followed in an

emergency. This is to enable essential services to continue

to function to the fullest possible extent, even though

this may be at a reduced level, during major breakdowns


activities does contain the Civil Defence activity which is

activated in a disaster or emergency situation concerning

the welfare of people and protection of properties in our

District.

Further Information


to the environmental and safety group of activities for the

next 10 year period.

The remainder of this section gives more information

about the six separate environmental and safety activities

undertaken by Council.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Environment & Safety Summary

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10

2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19

$000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 1,127 1,158 1,209 1,229 1,207 1,277 1,272 1,251 1,325 1,352 1,401

Other Income 1,250 1,232 1,236 1,282 1,334 1,343 1,382 1,470 1,475 1,528 1,560

Internal Interest Received 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Operating Revenue 2,376 2,392 2,446 2,511 2,541 2,620 2,653 2,720 2,800 2,881 2,961

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 1,649 1,683 1,738 1,755 1,785 1,818 1,851 1,871 1,952 1,968 2,055

Internal Interest Paid 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 2 2 3 4

Council Overheads 633 665 683 704 721 734 757 773 792 822 831

Depreciation 0 80 83 85 87 89 91 93 96 98 100

Total Operating Expenditure 2,282 2,428 2,504 2,544 2,594 2,645 2,702 2,740 2,842 2,891 2,991

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 94 (37) (57) (32) (53) (25) (48) (19) (41) (10) (30)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Resource Management & Planning 0 0 26 0 32 28 0 0 66 0 0

Civil Defence 48 12 17 44 0 0 28 0 0 31 0

Rural Fire 14 23 36 63 54 0 0 70 72 73 75

Building Compliance 0 32 0 34 0 35 0 37 0 39 0

Public Health & Liquor Licencing 0 0 0 0 27 0 0 0 30 0 0

Animal Control 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 62 67 79 141 113 63 28 107 167 143 75

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 0 37 57 32 53 26 48 19 41 10 30

Capital Expenditure 62 67 79 141 113 63 28 107 167 143 75

Transfer to General Council Reserves 119 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 4

Repayment of Internal Loans 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2

183 103 136 173 167 91 76 126 212 158 111

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 94 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 76 115 136 146 150 127 115 96 182 127 79

Internal Loans 14 (12) 1 27 17 (38) (39) 30 31 31 32

183 103 136 173 167 91 76 126 212 158 111

96


Activity 1: Resource Management /Planning

Our Aim



Background

Council has statutory functions under the Resource

Management Act which relates to the use of land, air, and

water. The purpose of this Act is to promote the sustainable

management of natural and physical resources.

The Council is required to have a District Plan in place.

The plan sets out objectives, policies and methods which

identify the resource management issues confronted

within the district and how they will be managed. The

Council also has an important role to play in reviewing

plans prepared by other agencies and central government

bodies and advocating changes or support for these where

appropriate.

In addition to the statutory requirements placed on local

authorities, the Council aims to have good processes,

policies and plans in place to ensure that the Hurunui

District is a great place to live and retains its special

qualities, yet at the same time is able to develop for the

future in a sustainable manner.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Resource Management and Planning activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “Environmental

Responsibility”, through providing strategic and forward

planning of the district’s natural and physical resources.

Providing direction through concept development

planning and performance standards means our natural

and physical resources are protected and remain

sustainable into the future. The District Plan provides

standards that all development must comply with to

ensure a clean and safe environment exists for people to

live in. This activity promotes wellness along the lines

of Cultural and Environmental wellbeing, Landscape &

Outlook, Heritage and Tradition.

Current Situation

The Council’s District Plan became operative in August


for our district, and the Council’s objectives, policies and

methods for addressing each of those issues.

In order to achieve the objectives and policies set out in

the District Plan, the Council sets rules and standards

which developments must meet. The Council processes a

number of resource consent applications from applicants

who want to engage in activities that don’t comply

with the land use provisions of the plan or who want to

subdivide their property. Two thirds of resource consents

processed relate to subdivision consents. About 95% of

resource consent applications are granted by the Council


application been received. The remaining 5% of consents


97

Page 97

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019



the standard requirements of the District Plan.

This Council activity is also involved with developing

Bylaws and reviewing a wide range of Council policy

initiatives and responsibilities set by other government

legislation. For example, policy responses relating to the

Gambling Act 2003. The Council also responds to other

agency plans prepared under the Resource Management

Act to protect the interests of the Hurunui community.


Regional Policy Statement, the Natural Resources

Regional Plan and a proposed Conservation Order over

the Hurunui River.

Plans for the Future

The Council is constantly monitoring the state of the district

environment. In 2013, the District Plan will be reviewed

in its entirety. We intend to initiate this process over the

next 4 years by reviewing all sections of the District Plan.

The purpose of this review will be to consider the ongoing


within the current District Plan and the measures and

standards used to manage these.


lifestyle developments in the district and traditional and


consider how these might be best managed into the future.

The issues will be fully canvassed and consulted on with


current District Plan.

The Council will place a greater emphasis on biodiversity

over the life of this plan. Biodiversity is a term relating to

the number and variety of indigenous organisms found


creatures of the Hurunui are important to our district,

and are features treasured by many in our community.

Our vision is to work together with our communities and

private landowners to increase awareness of the value of

the District’s indigenous biodiversity while respecting

private property rights.

In 2008 the Council developed a non regulatory

Biodiversity Strategy. Over the next two years, Council

will partner with the sponsors of the Greening Waipara

project to promote the initiatives contained in the Council

Strategy. The focus of the strategy will be the ultimate


in the District Plan.


reviewed in 2012 -13. We hope that by then, we can show

a proven track record of partnership and co-operation


biodiversity gains, so that there will be no need to include

listings of SNAs in the next District Plan. The Council has

also been involved in the development of a joint strategy

titled the Northern Pegasus Bay Coastal Management

Plan 2008. The Council intends to work with the partners

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

to this strategy to consider funding options to implement


The change of Government at the end of 2008 has

sparked a review of the Resource Management Act. The

Government has signalled that they intend to make a


Council as a result of these changes, however the extent is

not yet known.

Funding

The Resource Management Act policy work is funded via

50% district rate on capital value (known as the ‘planning

rate’), and 50% District Uniform Annual General Charge.

The resource consent processing work on the other hand

is funded via 100% user charges. The Council may waive

consent fees as provided for in the Resource Management

Act and its remission policy on consent fees.

Maintenance and Operating

The Council manages the Resource Management/Planning



engage consultants for specialty areas or when demand



The main intention of this Council activity is to mitigate




Assumptions and Risks

The Resource Management Act and the District Plan are

the main drivers of actions in this activity. It is assumed

that there will continue to be changes to the District Plan

before it is required to be reviewed in 2013. This ability

is important to enable Council to respond to the district’s

environmental issues and changing demographics. The

Council will continue to act in an advocacy role on other

agency plans and actions where these may impact on the

future prosperity of the District.

Major Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Biodiversity Government Grant for the Biodiversty Strategy. $32,000

Review of the District Plan and Resource Management advocacy $50,000 $67,000 $74,000

Resource Management Goals and Performance Measures

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this Activity

Contributes

“Environmental

Responsibility”

(Environmental

Wellbeing, Social

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of

this outcome (as set

out in the Community

Outcomes section):

The Council engages

in continuous

planning and the

provision of strategic

directions through

concept development

planning and design

standards. Managing

our natural resources

as safely as possible

ensures they are

Goals

Have a

current

District

Plan in

place

Manage a

biodiversit

y strategy

for the

District

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Undertake a

review of the

District Plan

annually to

consider

appropriatenes

s of current

management

and policy

Undertake

initiatives

identified in the

biodiversity

strategy.

Performance

Measures

3sectionsofthe

District Plan are

reviewed per

annum

An inventory of

potential

biodiversity

projects is

Written resources

areavailablefor

landowners,

organizations and

voluntary groups

on biodiversity

98

Current Situation 09-

10

This is a new performance

measure

The Biodiversity Strategy

was adopted on 28 August

2008 after delays due to

amendments suggested by

the Council


10-

11

Year

11-

12



12

+


protected and remain

sustainable for the

future.

Manage

application

sfor

services

and town

planning

effectively

Complete an

urban zoning

review for

Cheviot

Township and

its surrounds

To decide on all

resource

consent

applications

within

statutory

timeframes

Monitor terms

of consents

issued to those

operating land

use consents to

ensure they

comply

Process Project

Information

Memorandum’

s (PIM’s) in a

timely manner

The plan change

process is complete

All resource

consent

applications are

decided within the

statutory

timeframes

To be within the

top 10% of all

territorial

authorities in the

Resource

Management Act

Biennial Survey of

Local Authorities

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

This is a new performance

measure

Of 254 resource consents

received for the 2007/2008

period 29 were processed

outside the 20 day statutory

timeframe.

This is a new performance

measure



Land use consents Due to staffing shortages,

are checked for less than 5% were checked

compliance with in the 2007/2008 financial

the terms of the year

consent*:

40%

50%

60%

70%

All PIM’s have

planning checks

completed within 8

working days of a

complete

application being

received

This is a new performance

measure



*Excluding set back and Hanmer Springs design standard consents that have been given effect to. Once monitoring levels

have increased and we have a better idea of actual compliance levels, we will took to change the targets for this measure to

address these compliance levels.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

99

Page 99

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Minimise

therateof

environme

ntal

damage

between

the

Waipara

Rocks and

Ashworths

Beach

Work with

ECan to

implement the

Northern

Pegasus Bay

Coastal

Management

Plan.

Rangers are in

place to safeguard

the beach areas

Council adopted the

Northern Pegasus Bay

Coastal Non Statutory Plan

on 25 September 2008.

Councilisworkingwith

Environment Canterbury,

DoC and the Waimakariri

District Council and other

stakeholder groups to

implement the Plan. This

Plan seeks to appoint a

ranger to patrol the entire




Educational

material is

available

All break-ins to

areas fenced off

from vehicles are

repaired within 3

days.

length of Pegasus Bay and

enforce the vehicle access

conditions. Under the Plan

the ranger is required to

pay particular attention to

Ashworths Beach in the

inter-dune ponds on

weekends and evenings



Provide

Review the

This is a new performance


initiatives to

effectiveness of the

measure

restrict vehicle

Northern Pegasus

access to these

Bay Coastal

beach areas

Management Plan

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Resource Management & Planning

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 677,297 641,281 674,914 696,834

Other Income 462,750 454,750 434,164 445,156

Total Operating Revenue 1,140,047 1,096,031 1,109,078 1,141,989

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 718,422 767,472 771,203 793,240

Council Overheads 303,341 318,209 327,246 337,851

Depreciation 0 10,350 10,629 10,899

Total Operating Expenditure 1,021,763 1,096,031 1,109,078 1,141,989

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 118,284 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Subdivision Inspections 0 0 25,675 0

RMA Consents & Compliance 0 0 0 0

RMA Implementation 0 0 0 0

RMA Policy Development 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 0 25,675 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 0 0 25,675 0

Transfer to General Council Reserves 118,284 0 0 0

118,284 0 25,675 0

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 118,284 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 0 0 25,675 0

118,284 0 25,675 0

100


Activity 2: Civil Defence

Our Aim



Background

Council has a statutory requirement under the Civil

Defence and Emergency Management Act 2002 to lead

and manage civil defence emergency management

within its territorial area. Another requirement is for

Council to belong to a regional Civil Defence Emergency

Management Group and through that forum, work

collaboratively with other authorities and agencies in order


defence emergencies. Our Council takes this responsibility

seriously and as a lead organisation within the Hurunui

District, has put resources in place so as to minimise the

impact of any disaster or emergency on the community

as much as possible. This includes educating the public


an initial disaster phase.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Civil Defence Emergency Management

(CDEM) activity contributes to the Community Outcome

“A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, as Council ensures capacity

exists to protect the Hurunui District and its people in

times of emergencies. This promotes wellness in terms

of Social wellbeing, and Individual and Community

Lifestyle.

Current Situation

In the Hurunui District, there are currently seven Sector

Posts (Cheviot, Culverden, Hawarden, Waiau, Mt

Lyford, Hanmer Springs and Amberley), and a District


from diverse backgrounds are involved in these centres.

Volunteers are generally local people who receive training

so they know what to do should a disaster or emergency

situation arise.

To strengthen our ability to manage in a disaster, key

relationships have been established with our neighbouring

District Councils (Waimakariri and Kaikoura), and

those within the greater Canterbury Region, as well as

the Ministry of Civil Defence Emergency Management

(MCDEM), critical emergency service partners and support

agencies from both Government and non-Government

organisations (such as Red Cross, St Johns Ambulance,

Ministry of Social Development).

Plans for the Future


within the Hurunui District and tested our civil defence



Therefore, Council intends to increase its capacity to deal


the time arrives, and subject to voluntary community

101 Page 101

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

participation, we will seek to establish additional Sector


Omihi area, Gore Bay, Conway Flat, Rotherham, and

Waikari.

The Hurunui District has 106 kilometres of coastline. With

heightened public awareness about the risk of tsunamis

worldwide, the feasibility of installing a local warning

system will be investigated. Internationally and nationally,

as yet there is no clear consensus on what system would

best suit Hurunui. The “Canterbury Civil Defence

Emergency Management Group” has been looking at this

issue. A system that is consistently applied throughout


systems in each district. At this stage, no budget has been

allocated, but should a recommended system come to


Council will continue to maintain an organisational

structure of suitably trained and competent personnel,

including volunteers, to manage civil defence emergencies.

Recruitment drives for civil defence volunteers are

essential to maintain the numbers of personnel needed in

a civil defence emergency. Training is delivered locally


regionally through the Canterbury CDEM Group for both


Funding


account the small central government contribution via an

annual grant.

Maintenance and Operating

Council will continue to manage and operate its civil

defence emergency management functions from its




the civil defence activity.

Assumptions and Risks

Planning and preparing for an emergency situation that

may not happen requires making assumptions. Civil

defence emergency management planning is based on the

assumption that a serious disaster will occur, such as an

earthquake. The Hurunui District contains several fault


part of the Hurunui District is coastal, and therefore at risk



planning and preparation is crucial, therefore Council has

taken its role in civil defence emergency management very

seriously.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Major Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Wiring sector posts to be compatible with portable electric generators $12,000 $12,000 $13,000

Emergency sewage for Emergency Operation Centre (EOC) $5,000 $5,000

Civil Defence Goals and Performance Measures

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this

Activity

Contributes

“A Healthy, Safe

Place to Live”

(Social and

Cultural

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects

of this outcome

(as set out in the

Community

Outcomes

section):

“Adequate

emergency

services”

“Management

systems and

resources to deal

with civil defence

emergency

situations”

Goals

Tobe

preparedfor

emergency

situations

whichhave

widespread

implications

forthe

District

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Haverelevant

andcurrent

plansand

standard

operating

procedures

(SOPs)inplace

Performance

Measures

Plansand

SOPsare

reviewed

annually.


Council’s“CDEMLocal

Arrangements”weresignedon

31October2007andratifiedby

theCanterburyCDEM(Civil

DefenceEmergency

Management)Groupin

February2008.Theplan

incorporatesarrangementsfor

AdverseEventswhichis

consistentwiththeCanterbury

Council’sPandemicBusiness

ContinuityPlan(20July2007)

remainsextant

AgeneralBCPisstillbeing

developedinstages.Thisisin

progressinvolvingManagement

andTeamLeaders,facilitatedby

theEmergencyServices

Manager


10

Year


11


12

12

+


EOC(EmergencyOperations

Centre)SOP’sandSectorPost

Handbooksareoperational

102


The Council has

developed Civil

Defence and Rural

Fire Control to

ensure capacity

exists to protect

the Hurunui district

and its people in

times of crisis.

Ensurethere

aresufficient

civildefence

sectorposts

throughoutthe

district

Educatethe

publichowto

prepare

themselvesfor

acivildefence

typeemergency

Trainstaffand

volunteersto

meettheir

CDEM

responsibilities

Newsector

poststobe

established:

Leithfield&

Waipara

Motunau

Beach&

ScargillOmihi

GoreBay&

ConwayFlat

Rotherham&

Waikari

Atleastone

public

promotionis

undertaken

annually

Stafftraining

isdeliveredat

leasttwiceper

yeartoEOC

staff

SectorPost

(volunteer)

staff

participatein

training

annually:

103 Page 103

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Thisisanewperformance

measure

Thisisanewmeasure

Thisisanewmeasure

70%ofAmberleyOfficestaff

plusAmberleyLibrarystaff

haveattendedstaffCDEM

trainingthisyear

- 40%

- 50%

- 60%

- 75%

TheEOC

participatesin

theCanterbury

regional

Exercise

Pandora

annually

70%attendedexercisePandora

inSeptember






INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Civil Defence

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 117,511 149,647 170,907 176,268

Other Income 17,300 2,300 2,362 2,422

Total Operating Revenue 134,811 151,947 173,269 178,690

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 90,213 91,910 111,645 115,306

Council Overheads 43,598 45,547 46,743 48,126

Depreciation 0 14,490 14,881 15,258

Total Operating Expenditure 133,811 151,947 173,269 178,690

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 1,000 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Civil Defence 48,400 12,000 17,459 44,226

Total Capital Expenditure 48,400 12,000 17,459 44,226

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 48,400 12,000 17,459 44,226

Transfer to General Council Reserves 1,000 0 0 0

49,400 12,000 17,459 44,226

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 1,000 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 48,400 12,000 17,459 44,226

49,400 12,000 17,459 44,226

104


Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

Our Aim



Background

North Canterbury is prone to drought conditions during




on the Districts residents could be catastrophic in a major



district under the Forest and Rural Fires Act 1977 and the

Fire Service Act 1975 in order to save life and property


Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Rural Fire Control activity contributes to

the Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”,

by ensuring there is capacity to protect people, property


in terms of Social and Environmental wellbeing, and

Individual and Community Lifestyle.

Current Situation

Council maintains a District Fire Plan which prescribes





Rural Fire Force parties based in Waikari, Waiau, Conway

Flat, Motunau Beach and Greta Valley. Collectively





provides tankers to the NZ Fire Service brigades located

in Amberley, Waipara and Cheviot. Council is responsible

for providing the public with information and warnings




Plans for the Future


will continue to ensure that all Volunteer Rural Fire Force




in national research projects will educate the District on

passive measures to help reduce the incidence of wild


Volunteers are crucial to this activity and recruitment

drives must be ongoing to sustain required numbers for

each Volunteer Rural Fire Force established in our district.

Numbers of volunteers have been dwindling over the past

years which is of real concern. Full training is provided to

105 Page 105

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

volunteers to ensure they are able to carry out their duties

safely.

Council will continue to promote, encourage and carry out





reducing hazards which may trigger unwanted vegetation


Funding



The Rural Fire Authority contributes toward the cost

of equipment with a subsidy. The remaining costs are

apportioned 80% to ratepayers in the applicable rural


Value.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to manage and operate all of

its emergency management functions from its Amberley








Assumptions and Risks

The Hurunui District can be subject to extreme drought

conditions during the summer months and it is then that




our rural community is the constant need to recruit, train


A major risk is the issue of health and safety. Obviously,


volunteers are fully trained to prevent injury or loss of

life to themselves and others. Fire plans and appropriate

resources are critical to mitigate these risks.

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Major Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

$15,000

$36,000 $63,000

Rural Fire Goals and Performance Measures

Year

Community Outcomes

(& Dimensions of

Wellness) to which

this Activity

Contributes

Goals

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Performance

Measures

Current Situation 09-

10

10-

11

11-

12

12 +

“A Healthy, Safe Place

to Live” (Social and

Environmental

Wellbeing, Landscape

and Outlook)

To respond to

rural fires in

time to prevent

loss of life and

property

Train, equip

and prepare

volunteer

rural fire

force teams to

Train volunteer

rural fire force

teams:

- 50% of each

team per annum

78% of the District’s

Volunteer Rural Fire

Force has achieved

the absolute

minimum training


extinguish

requirement. A

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in the

Community Outcomes

section):

fires and save

life and

property

from fire risk

Motunau Fire Depot

program remains in

place to account for

the remaining 22%

This is a new


is renovated

performance measure

“Adequate emergency

services”

Heli bucket

purchased for

This is a new

performance measure


Hawarden Waikari

team

The Council’s Rural Fire

activities ensure capacity

exists to protect the

Hurunui District and its

people in times of crisis.

New pump for

Hawarden Waikari

team

Replacement fire

This is a new

performance measure

This is a new




tankers purchased

performance measure

Recruit

Each rural fire team

A Volunteer Rural


volunteers

will be at least 80%

Fire Force crew

for Council

full strength (i.e.

should contain at

Volunteer

enough members

least five people and

Rural Fire

for an

should be able to

Force teams

uncompromised

provide back-ups for

level of response).

protracted

operations. Currently

each Volunteer Rural

Fire Force comprises

not less than 8

members

Educate the

public of fire

risks and

mitigation

strategies

Provide up to

date

information

to the public

through

media,

website and

fire signage

The number of fires

in the district

decreases annually

by:

This is a new

performance measure

- 5%

- 10%

- 20%

106


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Rural Fire

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 216,000 218,666 211,937 199,768

Other Income 43,278 43,278 44,447 56,102

Total Operating Revenue 259,278 261,944 256,384 255,870

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 213,035 181,978 174,311 171,879

Council Overheads 43,960 45,591 46,770 47,794

Depreciation 0 34,375 35,303 36,197

Total Operating Expenditure 256,995 261,944 256,384 255,870

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 2,283 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Rural Fire 13,500 22,500 35,945 63,180

Total Capital Expenditure 13,500 22,500 35,945 63,180

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 13,500 22,500 35,945 63,180

Repayment of Internal Loans 2,283 0 0 0

15,783 22,500 35,945 63,180

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 2,283 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 0 34,375 35,303 36,197

Internal Loans 13,500 (11,875) 642 26,983

15,783 22,500 35,945 63,180

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

107 Page 107

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 4: Building Compliance

Our Aim



Background

Council has a statutory requirement to enforce the

building code and regulations under the Building Act

2004 and, as such, must provide services relating to the

processing of consents. This includes building inspections

and associated compliance work. A key driver for Council

is to ensure that the processes associated with these are


encourage building activity in the Hurunui District by

focusing on customer service and joint problem solving.

Council is ultimately required to ensure that buildings


they are intended for.

The Council also has obligations to ensure all private

swimming pools are fenced in a manner that complies

with the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

Council’s Building Compliance activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, by

ensuring that people are safeguarded from possible injury

or loss of amenity when using any building and loss of

young lives in respect of fencing of swimming pools.

This promotes wellness in terms of Social wellbeing, and

Individual and Community Lifestyle.

Current Situation

Buildings and building sites are inspected at several stages

of their development. Council issues between 550 and 650

building consents annually, including private buildings,

public buildings, and businesses. Recently, the number

of building consent applications have reduced which is

consistent with other local authorities within New Zealand

given the economic recession at the time of writing this

plan.

In addition to building inspections, the District’s private

swimming pools are inspected to ensure ongoing

compliance with the ‘Fencing of Swimming Pools Act’

requirements. New Zealand has a history of accidental

drownings and the Fencing Act is a national initiative to

drive down the rate of drownings. Unfortunately, the

Hurunui District has also had its share of tragedy, and

hence, Council considers the requirement to ensure that

private swimming pools are safe and that owners have

taken practicable steps to prevent accidental drownings

taking place in their pools to be important.

Plans for the Future



to the public. The Building Act 2004 requires that all

Councils become Building Consent Authorities (BCA)

or that it contracts a BCA to carry out the work on its

behalf. Hurunui became the third accredited BCA in the

country in September 2007. Accreditation has ongoing



assurance systems are being used and maintained. The

Council systems are externally audited every two years to

ensure minimum standards are being met on an ongoing

basis.

Regarding the inspection of private swimming pools

under the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act, it is planned

to continue to ensure that all private swimming pools

are inspected once in every 3 years given the level of


previous pool audits.


in recent times and was one of the fastest growing areas

in New Zealand. Resourcing this activity is important to

accommodate demand and to comply with timeliness

standards around the processing of consents. Given the

current economic downturn and the slowing down of

building work and subsequent building applications,

Council will monitor this situation to make sure it is


still complying with the building regulations. That will

include reducing internal costs as necessary to match the

demand for this service.

Funding

Building consents are funded by charging applicants 100%

user charges. Building administration other than consents

processing (including some advice) is funded 100% on the

District Rate on Capital Value. Swimming pool inspections

are funded via swimming pool owner user charges.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to perform the Building



contractors being employed when demand exceeds our inhouse

capabilities. It is expected that the use of external

contractors will diminish during the next year or two

depending on how long the recession continues for, and to

what extent it reaches.




what impacts that building has on people and existing

infrastructure. Standards set out in the District Plan, and


Assumptions and Risks

The Hurunui District is continuing to grow although the

rate of growth is expected in the short term to slow given

the current world recession. The rate of growth impacts

on the number of building inspections undertaken and

108


esourcing in this area will be monitored to match the

level of work required to be processed. Labour shortages



Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

Major Projects

Year Planned

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12

Swimming pool audits process (3 yearly) $22,000 $22,500 $23,000

IANZ Building Consent Authority Accreditation $22,500

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

109 Page 109

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Building Compliance Goals and Performance Measures

Year

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this Activity

Contributes

Goals

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Performance

Measures

Current Situation 09-

10

10-

11

11-

12

12 +

“A Healthy, Safe

Place to Live”

(Social and Cultural

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of

this outcome (as set

out in the Community

Outcomes section):

Ensure

buildings and

swimming

pools are safe

for the public

and fit for

purpose

Process and

decide on

building consent

applications

within statutory

timeframes

Make sure that

all public

buildings have a

current Building

Warrant of

Fitness

100% of all

building consent

applications are

decided within

20 working days

No less than

30% of all

registered public

buildings with a

compliance

schedule are

inspected each

year

524 building

consents have

been processed

with 116 consents

exceeding the

statutory time


30%

The Council ensures

that people are

safeguarded from

possible injury, illness

or loss of amenity

when using and

building and ensures

that buildings in the

district are and remain

safe, stay sanitary,

and provide means of

escape from fire

through administration

and enforcement of

the building code.

Make sure that

all registered

private

swimming pools

comply with the

Fencing of

Swimming Pools

Act

No less than a

third of all

registered

private

swimming pools

are inspected

each year

The percentage

of audited

swimming pools

that are noncompliant

upon

first inspection

decreasesby5%

each year

34%

29% were noncompliant


upon

first inspection

Council will

maintain its

Building

Consent

Authority

accreditation

All Council

building

inspections staff

are trained to

building

accreditation

standards

Biannual

International

Accreditation

New Zealand

audit reports are

favourable.

Staff are

appropriately

trained, and

attended industry

training

This is a new

performance

measure



110


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Building Compliance

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 13,653 13,068 13,264 14,817

Other Income 513,600 513,600 527,467 540,821

Total Operating Revenue 527,253 526,668 540,731 555,638

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 382,195 360,969 393,309 380,100

Council Overheads 157,558 165,849 170,197 175,749

Depreciation 0 15,850 16,251 16,637

Total Operating Expenditure 539,753 542,668 579,757 572,486

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (12,500) (16,000) (39,026) (16,848)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Building Services Consents 0 32,000 0 33,696

Building Services Administration 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 32,000 0 33,696

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 12,500 16,000 39,026 16,848

Capital Expenditure 0 32,000 0 33,696

12,500 48,000 39,026 50,544

FUNDED BY

General Council Reserves 12,500 48,000 39,026 50,544

12,500 48,000 39,026 50,544

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

111 Page 111

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor Licensing

Our Aim


Background

Council has statutory obligations related to the Health Act


Hygiene Regulations 1974 to provide health inspections.

It is also required under the Sale of Liquor Act 1989 to

undertake responsibilities as the District Licensing Agency

for the district. Council manages food safety by identifying

and controlling food safety risk factors in food premises,

as well as ascertains and removes, by regular inspections,


injurious to health. Liquor licensing is important as it

contributes to the control and reduction of liquor abuse.

This area is an important activity for Council to manage as

it contributes directly to the welfare of the public.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Health Inspections and Liquor Licensing

activity contributes to the Community Outcome “A

Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, by safeguarding people

from possible illness through the administration and

enforcement of the food hygiene and liquor licensing

regulations. The administration of liquor licensing

laws has an impact on the social and cultural aspects of

life in the Hurunui District. More and more it is being

acknowledged by social services and the police, that

alcohol abuse and overuse has a negative impact on our


various parties to overcome those impacts. This Council

activity promotes wellness in terms of Social wellbeing,

and Individual and Community Lifestyle.

Current Situation

There are close to 150 registered premises in the

district, which are inspected annually, including food,


(i.e. slink skin operators and septic tank cleaners). Permits

to operate are also issued to food stands at shows and

events around the district, and inspections are carried out

to ensure that these are operating at appropriate health

standards.

All of the water schemes in the district are monitored to

test compliance with the Drinking Water NZ Standards.

Testing is done within an approved Telarc laboratory. The

district’s public swimming pools are also inspected to

ensure health standards are being met.


required and reported on. These are the common parasitic

and bacteria infections such as campylobacter, salmonella,

giardia and cryptosporidium. Inspections are also carried


year regarding nuisance activities or activities that may

be injurious to health. These include noise, smoke, dust,


disposal.

Over that past couple of years, Council has dealt with

approximately 50 applications (new and renewals) for


for special licences and 70 applications for renewal of


association with issuing of licenses to ensure premises

meet the requirements of the Sale and Liquor Act and the

terms of the license issued. The Council also works closely

with the police and Crown Public Health where operators

of licences are known to be remiss.

Plans for the Future

Growth in the district will continue to see an increase in


Likewise with health inspections as food premises and

bars develop in the area. Council will continue to perform

its statutory responsibilities in this area; therefore, the

future will be mainly business as usual.

Funding

The cost of actual health inspections is set to be recovered

100% from user charges. Any shortfall is met 50% from the

District Rate on Capital Value and 50% District Uniform

Annual General Charge. The maximum fees for liquor

licences are payable as set out in the Liquor Licensing Act.

Any shortfall is met 50% from the District Rate and 50%

from District Uniform Annual General Charge.

Maintenance and Operating


advice on its health and liquor functions, including food

and water testing, inspecting premises, and investigating

health issues and the processing of all associated actions.

Up until 2008, Council had employed contractors to

manage this service on behalf of the Council. The service


service aspects and encourage a greater level of compliance

from licensed premises.




therefore it is important that Council follows up any

complaints involving food premises promptly to prevent

further spread of the disease. Similarly with water, as

infection and illness can spread quickly via drinking water

in particular. Council has a key role to help eliminate the


through its regulatory function. Council is able to help


outlets (such as restaurants and retailers) and limiting

the number of hours alcohol is for sale. A big challenge



outlets to sell alcohol at all hours), and ensuring the

communities and members of the public are not subjected


112


Assumptions and Risks

Long term projections for the district indicated that

there will continue to be growth, and therefore increased

demand for inspections and licensing.

Major Projects

There are no plans to undertake any major projects in this

area.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

113 Page 113

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Public Health and Liquor Licensing Goals and Performance Measures

Year

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this

Activity

Contributes

Goals

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Performance

Measures

Current

Situation


10


11


12

12 +

“A Healthy, Safe

Place to Live”

(Social and

Cultural Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of

this outcome (as set

out in the Community

Outcomes section):

The Council ensures

that buildings in the

district are and

remain safe and stay

sanitary through

administration and

enforcement of the

building code and

the food hygiene and

liquor licensing

regulations.

Encourage

complianceso

thatallfood,

liquorandother

licensedpremises

complywiththe

relevant

legislation

Undertake

inspectionson

licensedpremises

PromotetheNew

ZealandFood

Safety

Alllicensed

premisesare

inspectedat

leastannually

Investigate

complaints

aboutpoorfood

handlingand

unsanitary

conditionsin

anyfood

premisewithin

3workingdays

Numberof

eligiblefood

premisesthat

Allfood&

liquorpremises

wereinspected

overthecourse

oftheyear

Allcomplaints

wereassessed

andinspected

within10

workingdaysof

receipt(old

target20days)

Thisisanew

performance

measure



Authority’s

areinvolvedin

Voluntary

theVIPper

Implementation

annum:

Programme(VIP)

toalllicensed

foodpremises

duringthe

annualinspection

- 5

- 10

- 15

- 20

Workwithother

Regularliaison

Quarterly

Thisisanew


partnerson

meetingsareheld

meetingsare

performance

liquortoreduce

between

held

measure

thenegative

representativesof

impactofalcohol

theDistrict

abuse

Licensing

Agency,Police

andCommunity

andPublic

Health(CPH)

114


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Public Health & Liquor Licencing

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 72,560 100,523 102,413 104,680

Other Income 91,500 96,500 99,106 101,615

Total Operating Revenue 164,060 197,023 201,518 206,294

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 116,600 140,886 143,868 147,511

Council Overheads 47,460 50,737 52,104 53,098

Depreciation 0 5,400 5,546 5,686

Total Operating Expenditure 164,060 197,023 201,518 206,294

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 0 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Health Inspection 0 0 0 0

Liquor Licencing 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

FUNDED BY

General Council Reserves 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

115 Page 115

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 6: Animal Control

Our Aim

To


Background

Council has a statutory requirement to be involved in

animal control under the Dog Control Act 1996, the Dog

Control Amendment Act 2003, and the Impounding

Act 1955. The Council also has responsibilities under

the Animal Welfare Act 1999. This activity ensures that

dogs and stock are kept under control at all times for the

safety and wellbeing of people and animals. Council has a

responsibility toward ensuring that all dogs in the district


their welfare. Council undertakes some public education

and publicity to encourage owners of dogs and animals to

take personal responsibility for their animals.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Animal Control activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, as

the Council ensures that dogs and other animals do not

injure, endanger, or cause distress to any person or to

any other animals or protected wildlife. This promotes

wellness through enhancing the Social wellbeing of the

District and protecting its Individual and Community

Lifestyle.

Current Situation

The Hurunui District has approximately 5,000 registered

dogs (with around 2,000 owners). Annually, Council

receives around 380 complaints regarding dogs which

require follow up investigation. The majority of these are

‘general nuisance’ complaints, mostly involving barking

and wandering. Around 35-40 dogs are impounded each

year. Nearly a quarter of these are put down mainly for

a variety of reasons including owners not claiming their

animals, dangerous and uncontrollable behaviour, and

stray animals. Council manages an animal pound at

Balcairn.

Around 170 callouts are received each year concerning

stock, with the majority of the complaints regarding

wandering. Fortunately, very few incidents in the district


are impounded annually and most are reclaimed by their

owners.

Major changes took place recently, to the way in which

dog registration information is collected due to legislative

requirements. Council is responsible for supplying

information to the National Dog Database which came

into being in July 2006. From that date, Councils are

responsible for ensuring that new dogs and dogs that have

been impounded for the second time within 12 months

are micro-chipped. This practice has resulted in easier


ensuring quicker recovery of impounded or lost dogs. 12

months ago, Council initiated a review of the dog control

policy and the dog control bylaw. These are now up to

date, relevant and in force.

Plans for the Future

There are no major plans for the future other than

‘business as usual’. Council is currently investigating

using infringement notices as an enforcement tool.

Funding

The cost of Council’s involvement in dealing with stock

incidents is recovered 100% from exacerbators (those who

have caused the problem). The balance of remaining costs

is to be met from the District Rate on Capital Value. The

dog registration process and costs associated with dealing

with complaints, including the keeping of records, is

funded by all dog owners via the dog registration fee.

Maintenance and Operating


and contracted services. The contractor investigates

complaints, collects animals and impounds dogs and stock

when necessary at any time of the day or night depending


such as dog registration and the collection of fees.


Unruly dogs and animals pose dangerous risk to people

and stock. There have been several cases of extreme dog


raised people’s awareness of the potentially dangerous

nature of dogs in particular and as a result, there is less


caused a demand for a higher level of service from Council

to respond quickly to complaints and to take measures to

ensure compliance.

Assumptions and Risks

Council is assuming business as usual within this activity

area.

Major Projects

There are no plans to undertake any major projects in this

area.

116


Animal Control Goals and Performance Measures

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to which

this Activity

Contributes

“A Healthy, Safe

Place to Live” (Social

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of this

outcome (as set out in

the Community

Outcomes section):

The Council enforces

obligations on owners of

dogs or stock, designed

to ensure that animals

do not injure, endanger,

or cause distress to any

person, animal, or

protected wildlife, and

that they do not cause

nuisance to people or

property.

Goals

Ensurethat

dogsand

otheranimals

donotcausea

nuisanceor

hazard

Encourage

voluntarydog

registration

andincrease

owner

responsibility

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Investigate

andrespond

toall

complaintsof

dangerous

animal

behaviouror

wandering

animalsand

stock

Administer

dog

registrations

andtake

compliance

actionwhere

necessary

Performance

Measures

Thereisno

significant

increaseinthe

overall

numberof

complaintsor

inany

particular

categoryof

dogcontrol

complaints.

Alldogsthe

Councilhasa

recordofare

registeredin

accordance

withtheDog

ControlAct

1996


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Therewere596dog

controlandstock

complaints.Of

thosematters

relatingtodog

control152callouts

relatedtolostdogs,

90calloutsrelated

towanderingdogs,

84calloutsrelated

tobarkingdogs,52

calloutsrelatedto

dogsmenacing,

bitingorexhibiting

dangerous

behaviour.13call

outsrelatedto

welfare,28callouts

wererelatedto

registrationenquires

andtherewere17

miscellaneous

callouts.


10


11

Year


12

12+


Asat30/6/08(i.e.at

theendofthe

financialyear)5,127

dogswere

registered.Asat

thattimeallknown

dogswereregistered

withtheexception

of2dogswhose

ownershavesince

lefttheDistrict.


INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Thenumber

ofdogs

impounded

decreases

Currentdatanot

available.Thisisa

newperformance

measure.

annuallyby.

- 5%

- 10%

- 20%

117 Page 117

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Animal Control

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 29,562 34,390 35,319 36,213

Other Income 121,300 121,300 128,683 136,153

Internal Interest Received 0 2,384 1,449 636

Total Operating Revenue 150,862 158,074 165,450 173,002

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 129,005 139,641 143,411 147,042

Council Overheads 36,943 39,210 40,098 41,177

Total Operating Expenditure 165,948 178,851 183,509 188,219

Operating Surplus (Deficit) (15,086) (20,777) (18,059) (15,217)

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Ranging & Impounding 0 0 0 0

Animal Control 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Operating Deficit 15,086 20,777 18,059 15,217

Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

Transfer to General Council Reserves 0 0 0 0

15,086 20,777 18,059 15,217

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 0 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 15,086 20,777 18,059 15,217

15,086 20,777 18,059 15,217

118


Growth and Development

Overview

Growth and Development deals with three separate

activities that the Council undertakes in order to improve

our community’s economic wellbeing and strive towards

achieving our community outcomes. These activities are:




Activity 1: Tourism

Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

Activity 3: Economic Development

Why is the Council Involved?

The Council is involved in promoting the district through

tourism and destination marketing as it recognises that


and is important for the future growth of the district.


brings new job opportunities for residents, encourages


the breadth and depth of the economy. Rural community

services and facilities are frequently under threat through

depopulation; however, focusing on sustainable growth


The Council recognises the uniqueness of the district and


and business opportunities.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

Council’s Growth and Development category of activities

contributes to the community outcome “A thriving local

economy”, promoting wellness in terms of Economic

wellbeing. An increase in local economy means an

improvement in people’s opportunities, access to quality

services, living standards, and hence, general wellbeing.

Emergency Management

The Council is developing a business continuity plan

to detail the procedures that are to be followed in an

emergency. This is to enable essential services to continue

to function to the fullest possible extent, even though

this may be at a reduced level, during major breakdown


Growth and Development category are not considered

an essential service in time of an extreme emergency or

situation.

Further Information


to the growth and development group of activities for the

next 10 year period. The remainder of this section gives

more information about the three separate growth and

development activities undertaken by Council.

119 Page 119

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Growth & Development Summary

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10

2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19

$000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's $000's

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 289 361 370 379 386 394 404 412 421 432 440

Other Income 954 974 1,000 1,026 1,051 1,076 1,104 1,133 1,161 1,189 1,219

Total Operating Revenue 1,243 1,335 1,370 1,405 1,437 1,470 1,508 1,545 1,582 1,622 1,659

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 1,126 1,233 1,265 1,296 1,326 1,357 1,390 1,426 1,460 1,494 1,531

Council Overheads 82 64 66 69 70 71 75 75 77 81 81

Depreciation 35 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

Total Operating Expenditure 1,243 1,335 1,370 1,405 1,437 1,470 1,508 1,545 1,582 1,622 1,659

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Tourism 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Visitor Information Centre 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Economic Development 0 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 0 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Transfer to General Council Reserves 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 0 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

120


Activity 1: Tourism

Our Aim






Background

Council has operated a small dedicated tourism unit

for almost ten years, with a core structure of a specialist

tourism General Manager (and Tourism Marketing


Council, originally known as the Hurunui Tourism Board,


developed the tourism unit to encourage economic

growth through promoting the district and local tourism


over the period have been a move away from general rate


venture income (2005) and the adoption of the Alpine


Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s tourism activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A thriving local economy”,

promoting wellness primarily in terms of Economic




population to sustain more businesses, while also growing


Current Situation


organisation which promotes the Hurunui District and the


has been to increase visitor expenditure and length of

stay, by growing visitor numbers and targeting high value



those countries that make up our key international



the direction for the future and maximising the return on


Many, if not most, Councils around New Zealand have



across two broad areas: “destination marketing” and

“destination management” and our Council is no


Destination marketing: Marketing and promotional

activity, such as international and domestic advertising,


tourism unit has primarily been focussed on international

marketing, including working with other regional tourism

121 Page 121

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019



Destination management: Development of District

tourism products and services including capacity and


planning and coordination, business mentoring, provision


tracks, providing input for managing visitor impacts and


product development is the successful North Canterbury

Food and Wine Trail, in association with Enterprise North


The Council is faced with a number of issues, challenges,


The issues and challenges include:

- A need to increase the level of spend on the domestic

market

- A need to increase the level of discretionary marketing



by overheads and administrative support (including



-

duplication that exists between the separate operations




and Spa, and the i-site have their own Council funded


The opportunities include:

- Use “Hurunui Wellness” as a new community based

philosphy for marketing and development strategy to


described more fully in the Wellness Section toward


- Leverage further the product development capabilities


-


and Spa to drive Hurunui’s tourism marketing (whilst

still maintaining separate identities, “pools” versus


Plans for the Future

Taking all of the above into account, a new ‘Hurunui


points of this strategy are listed below:

- Use the “Hurunui Wellness” vision as a new

community based philosphy for marketing and

development strategy to position Hurunui as a District


-

INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

(“Hurunui Tourism Governance Board”) with

appointees chosen for their skills and insights relative

to the overall Hurunui Wellness concept, as well as

Hurunui knowledge and representation.

- The new tourism strategy will have a dedicated focus

on product development and support (i.e. Destination

Management only) as aligned to the values and

principles of Hurunui Wellness.

- Formalise the roles, responsibilities and resources of

Enterprise North Canterbury with regard to regional

development and business capability, reporting

through the Tourism Board.

- Create a dedicated destination marketing and

promotional unit by restructuring / realigning

resources and capabilities already in place in the

form of the Marketing Manager, Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools and Spa, the Hurunui i-Site, and the

existing advertising agency arrangements servicing

the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa. (The

Hurunui Tourism Governance Board” would oversee

the expenditure of targeted tourism rate funds in

promotion of the Hurunui District).

- Retain the existing targeted rate.

The implementation of this proposal will address all the


Council to capture the opportunities available. The net


- Greatly increased focus on Hurunui Wellness as a


business, activities, services and communities totally

aligned with the Wellness strategy.

- Overheads and administration costs (estimated at

approximately $54,000 are removed from this activity

area), with a resultant increase in discretionary

marketing spend to approximately $184,000.

With the appointment of the new governance board, the

strategy will continue to be developed in 2009/10.

Funding

Tourism destination marketing and destination

management will be funded 100%, less contributions

from businesses (including the Hanmer Springs Thermal

Reserve), from all rateable properties that Council


Maintenance and Operating

The APT is governed by a Board comprising of both

Hurunui District Councillors and independent members


positions include a full time General Manager and a

Marketing Assistant. The new strategy will restructure the

way destination marketing and destination management

(tourism development) are carried out by the Tourism

Board. The Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa, and

Enterprise North Canterbury respectively, will be more

closely aligned to these activities.




result in an increase in waste, air and noise pollution,



tourism industry to the economic wellbeing of the District,

and with proper planning the growth in tourism should

be sustainable for the foreseeable future.


Growth has occurred within the district in recent years

however the economic downturn has begun to have

an impact on tourism. It is assumed that the trend will

plateau for a relatively short time and then continue to

grow, however, not necessarily at the same high rate.

External factors, such as a natural or man-made disaster,

or pandemic could have a major impact on tourism should

such an event occur. Because of the unknown nature of

a disaster occurring, this has not been factored into the

budget.


There are no plans to undertake any major capital projects

in this area.

122


Tourism Goals and Performance Measures

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this

Activity

Contributes

“A Thriving Local



Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of

this outcome (as set

out in the

Community

Outcomes section):

Council ensures that

new businesses are

attracted that invest

in the district and

generate

employment

opportunities.

Attracting new

families to the

district means

having a population

to sustain more

businesses, while

also growing visitor

numbers in a

sustainable manner.

Goals

Togrow

visitor

numbersto

theHurunui

District

Toincrease

thenumber

ofovernight

visitorsto

theHurunui

District

How we will

achieve our

Goals

Carryout

destination

marketingand

destination

managementto

promoteand

attractvisitors

totheDistrict.

Establishand

maintain

relationships

withtourism

operatorsand

clients.

Assessneeds

andplanfor

futuredemands

Performance

Measures

Current

Situation

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

09-

10

10-

11

11-

12

12+

Numberofvisitors 322,339

tothedistrictwho

stayovernightwill

bemaintainedator

growabove:

320,000

325,000

330,000+

(thesefiguresare

setasdesired

outcomesbut

consideration

shouldbegivento

thecurrentglobal

recession)

Thegrowthinthe

numberof

overnightgueststo

theHurunui

Districtatleast

matchesthe

averageforNZ

(FortheYear

EndingSeptember

2008,theNZrate

ofgrowthwas

0.4%comparedto

1.1%inthe

Hurunui)

Percentage

growthinthe

Hurunui

commercial

guestnights

hasincreased

4.4%,compared

withtheoverall

nationalfigure

of0.0%forthe

yearending

December2008

Year


INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

123 Page 123

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

Tourism

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates 271,000 285,000 292,695 300,105

Other Income 123,950 94,000 96,538 98,982

Total Operating Revenue 394,950 379,000 389,233 399,087

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 352,882 369,000 378,963 388,557

Council Overheads 41,516 10,000 10,270 10,530

Total Operating Expenditure 394,398 379,000 389,233 399,087

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 552 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Tourism 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

Transfer to General Council Reserves 552 0 0 0

552 0 0 0

FUNDED BY

Operating Surplus 552 0 0 0

General Council Reserves 0 0 0 0

552 0 0 0

124


Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

Our Aim

To promo




Background

Council is involved in tourism and promoting the district

as it recognises that visitors to our district contributes to

economic growth and is important for the future growth


in the Hurunui district and therefore the task of promoting


Many visitors arrive in the district with the expectation

that visitor information will be readily available as is the


coordination role in promoting the district, so that the

district can take advantage of the economic growth that


Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness


contributes to the Community Outcome “A thriving local

economy”, promoting wellness in terms of Economic

wellbeing through encouraging visitors to the area to stay


Current Situation

The district’s main visitor centre is in Hanmer Springs and is


The Council’s Service Centres based in Amberley, Cheviot

and Amuri provide some limited visitor information and




Hanmer Springs is the district’s most well known visitor

destination and has the biggest demand for a visitor


centre are to provide an international level of service and


as only 2 years ago, the visitor centre was a cost to the rate

payer as is the norm with other Councils throughout New



Our Hanmer Springs i-site is a member of the New Zealand


recognised provider of reliable New Zealand information,




Visitors to our Hanmer Springs facility can access a range

of information and are able to make direct bookings for

accommodation, travel (air, road, rail and ferry), tours,



entertainment, maps and guide books, itinerary planning


125 Page 125

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

The range of merchandise for sale has increased during







Plans for the Future






and retail space which will allow us to generate more

income with the view to turning the losses presently


i-site has been built with the future in mind and there are


the service and strive to provide an excellent information


Funding


Maintenance and Operating






visitors to the District, and to keep them in the area for




numbers of visitors, particularly to the Hanmer Springs

area are the additional resources expected to mitigate




Assumptions and Risks

A key assumption made is that the visitor centre will


that is not achieved, the centre may be reliant on Council


to take into account an expected slowing of the tourism


Major Projects



INTRODUCTION

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Visitor Information Centre Goals and Performance Measures

Community

Outcomes (&

Dimensions of

Wellness) to

which this Activity

Contributes

“A Thriving Local

Economy”

(Economic

Wellbeing)

Relevant aspects of

this outcome (as set

out in the Community

Outcomes section):

Ensuring visitors to the

area are encouraged

to stay longer and use

local services and

hospitality while

ensuring that the

Information Centre

breaks even financially

is important to the

District’s economy.

Goals














How we will

achieve our

Goals























Performance

Measures





Current

Situation

07/08




09-

10

10-

11

Year

11-

12

12+

-

-

-








-

-

-







-

-

-

-

126


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2009 - 2019

Annual Plan Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

2008/09 2009/2010 2010/11 2011/12

INTRODUCTION

Visitor Information Centre

Operating Statement

OPERATING REVENUE

Rates (31,803) (21,192) (21,595) (20,732)

Other Income 830,000 875,000 898,625 921,375

Total Operating Revenue 798,197 853,808 877,030 900,643

OPERATING EXPENDITURE

Direct Expenditure 722,921 767,921 788,655 808,621

Council Overheads 40,576 51,187 52,738 55,483

Depreciation 34,700 34,700 35,637 36,539

Total Operating Expenditure 798,197 853,808 877,030 900,643

Operating Surplus (Deficit) 0 0 0 0

Capital Statement

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Visitor Information Centre 0 0 0 0

Total Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

FUNDS REQUIRED

Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

FUNDED BY

General Council Reserves 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW COUNCIL ACTIVITIES WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

127 Page 127

APPENDICES DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 3: Economic Development

Our Aim





Background

Council combined with the Waimakariri District Council in

2002 to form the North Canterbury Economic Development

Trust. The Trust developed and manages “Enterprise

North Canterbury”. Enterprise North Canterbury

(ENC) is an economic and business development

agency that seeks to improve the region’s investment

and business enabling environment so enhancing the

regions competitiveness, retaining and increasing jobs,

improving incomes, enhancing economic wellbeing and

thus improve the quality of life of residents. It’s vision is

to foster an exceptional North Canterbury by encouraging

the development of exceptional businesses, experiences,


Board also plays an important role in Hurunui’s economic

development which is detailed in the section named

‘Tourism’.

Community Outcomes & Dimensions of Wellness

The Council’s Economic Development activity contributes

to the Community Outcome “A thriving local economy”,

promoting wellness in terms of Economic wellbeing


grow, and by encouraging people into our area to live,

work and visit.

Current Situation

Over the past several years, there has been a dramatic

change in our district’s business landscape. Multiple

businesses have been established in Waipara Valley and

Hanmer Springs, which has been more than twice the

national average. Up until very recently, businesses had

been experiencing noticeable labour growth with a strong

increase in the number of jobs available since 2002. There

has been some decline from late 2008 on account of the

economic downturn, and it is unknown at this stage, what

long term impact there may be.


and an increase of annual sales. The global downturn

creates an environment of uncertainty for local businesses.

Enterprise North Canterbury works in conjunction with

our district’s employers by providing access to information

and assistance to establish, develop, train and strengthen

local businesses.

Plans for the Future

This section should be read in conjunction with the Tourism

activity section as there are some parallels in terms of the

outcomes Council wants to achieve. The reorganisation of

how Council will deliver its tourism activity will include

Enterprise North Canterbury, particularly with regard to

product development and support, and promoting the

Hurunui Wellness strategy.

ENC’s ‘Strategic Plan 2004-2009’ sets future goals to

assist economic development in the North Canterbury

region. In February 2008 ENC developed (in collaboration

with the region’s businesses, education providers, local

councils and central government) a North Canterbury

Labour Market Strategy. ENC have been awarded funding

from the Ministry of Social Development to implement

this Strategy over the coming two years. ENC plans to

undertake a review of regional development programmes,

participate in planning and policy development initiatives,


local businesses, identify skill shortages and implement


ENC plans to promote remote learning and business

management, undertake research to identify and protect

population growth drivers, and train, sponsor and

celebrate new business entrepreneurs.

ENC is working with schools to promote youth employmnet

in the District. The Council has signed up to the Mayors

Taskforce for Jobs, which works collaboratively with other

Councils to promote employment opportunities. One of

their goals is that all young people under the age of 25

should be engaged in appropriate education, training,

work, or other options, which will lead to long-term

economic independence and wellbeing.

ENC also aims to develop a regional competitive advantage

around the integrity of land use (grass-fed food and


management, sustainability of water-use, collaborative

small-holding management, and the development of


aims to develop a regional competitive advantage around

visitor industry experiences including encouraging the

development of exceptional places to visit, sustainability in

tourism businesses, initiating new events, and promoting

local pride and experience awareness, of the region’s

recreation and lifestyle opportunities.

Council plans to install signage at the entry points of

the district boundary, and to eventually have consistent

signage throughout the district to signal each township.

Provision has been made in the long term budget at $15,000

in the 2009/10 year, and the same for the following year.

Funding

Council provides Enterprise North Canterbury with an

annual grant of $50,000. This is 100% funded through the

general rate.

Maintenance and Operating

The activity Economic Development is in part, the

cumulative impact of a number of activities (other

activities include Hurunui Tourism, Visitor Information

Centre, Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa),

although this section focuses on the service provided by

Enterprise North Canterbury. Council contracts out this

128


each year. Besides the grant, there are no other costs or

capital expenditures involved.


Increased business activities places pressure on existing

infrastructure, such as water and sewerage and may