Long Term Community Plan 2006-2016 - Hurunui District Council

hurunui.govt.nz

Long Term Community Plan 2006-2016 - Hurunui District Council

Hurunui

Long Term

Community

Plan

20 06 - 2016


Cover: “My Community, My Hurunui, My Future”

Acknowledgement

The Hurunui Community Plan is an important document that captures

the long-term visions that the community has for the district (Community

Outcomes), and what the Hurunui District Council and other organizations

and Government Departments will do to contribute towards achieving these.

This document is as much about people and what is important to them, as it is

about the more traditional focus of budgets and financial reporting.

To this extent it was decided that this edition’s cover should represent the way

our young people see their local communities and/or would like to see their

local communities in the future.

The schools in the district were asked to contribute pupil’s artwork to create a

collage of these images which would illustrate the diversity (and yet oneness)

of the communities that make-up the Hurunui district.

The results, as we are sure you will agree are simply stunning! The Hurunui

is renowned for its talented artists, and when you see the fantastic artwork

from our district’s kids then you know we will continue this hold this well

deserved reputation for many years yet!

Thank you also to the schools who participated - with quite short notice

it must be added! And of course thank you so much to the children who

submied their beautiful work - it was a really hard decision selecting

ones for the cover, but you will notice that we have included more

artwork from these talented youngsters throughout the document.

Front Cover Artists:

Kirshla Jensen age 12

Rachel Basher age 9

Hanna Coughlan age 10

Michaela Robins age 7

Jamie Michelle age 9

Jessy Crosby age 11

Inside Cover Artists:

Brooke Daniels age 9

Tayla Gray age 12

Olive Price age 12

Grace Lile age 9

Denver Adams age 9

Sam Bradbury age 8


District Council Offices

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Main Office

Hurunui District Council

66 Carters Road

P O Box 13

Amberley

Telephone (03) 314 8816

Facsimile (03) 314 9181

Email: info@hurunui.govt.nz

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Service Centre

Service Centre/Libraries

Auditor

Banker

Cheviot Service Centre

39 Hall Street

Cheviot

Telephone (03) 319 8862

Facsimile (03) 319 8861

Cheviot Toll Free to Amberley 319 8812

Amuri Service Centre/Library

School Road

Culverden

Telephone (03) 315 8946

Facsimile (03) 315 8946

Culverden Toll Free to Amberley 315 8400

Hanmer Springs Service Centre/Library

49 Amuri Avenue

Hanmer Springs

Telephone (03) 315 7912

Facsimile (03) 315 7914

Hanmer Springs Toll Free to Amberley 315 8400

Audit New Zealand, Christchurch

On behalf of the Controller and Auditor General

WestpacTrust

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WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Contents

5 Introduction

1 District Council Offices

6 Message from the Mayor & Chief Executive

9 About the Plan

11 Hurunui District Profile - today

17 District Representatives

18 Hurunui District Council Mayor and Deputy Mayor

18 Amberley Ward Councillors and Committee

19 Amuri Ward Councillors and Committee

19 Cheviot Ward Councillors and Committee

20 Glenmark Ward Councillor

20 Hanmer Springs Ward Councillor, Community Board

and Thermal Reserve Management Committee

20 Hurunui Ward Councillors and Committee

21 Canterbury Regional Council

21 Canterbury District Health Board

21 Parliament

21 Ngai Tahu

23 Community Outcomes

24 Future Hurunui - Our Community Outcomes

25 Introduction

27 "A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play"

28 "A Healthy, Safe Place to Live"

30 “A Thriving Local Economy”

31 "Essential Infrastructure"

32 “Environmental Responsibility”

33 "Skills and Education for Work and Life"

35 Ward Profiles

35 Amberley

39 Amuri

45 Cheviot

49 Glenmark

53 Hanmer Springs

57 Hurunui

61 Groups of Council Activities

62 Introduction

62 Measuring and Reporting Progress

62 Significant Negative Effects

65 Community Services and Facilities

67 Activity 1: Library

72 Activity 2: Local Facilities and Maintenance

78 Activity 3: Property

81 Activity 4: Public Toilets

83 Activity 5: Cemeteries

86 Activity 6: Grants and Service Awards

89 Growth and Development

91 Activity 1: Tourism

94 Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

97 Activity 3: Economic Development

100 Environment and Safety

102 Activity 1: Resource Management/Planning

107 Activity 2: Civil Defence

110 Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

113 Activity 4: Building Compliance

116 Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor Licensing

119 Activity 6: Animal Control

122 Utility Services / Infrastructure

124 Activity 1: Roading Network

130 Activity 2: Solid Waste Household Collection

133 Activity 3: Transfer Stations

136 Activity 4: Sewerage

141 Activity 5: Stormwater/Drainage

144 Activity 6: Water Supply

153 Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

158 Governance

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161 Financial Overview

162 Introduction

163 Statement of Accounting Policy

168 Forecast Income Statement

169 Balance Sheet

170 Forecast Statement of Movement in Equity

171 Statement of Cash Flow

173 Reconciliation

174 Summary of Capital Expenditure

175 Activity Summary

176 Council Funding Statements

177 Commercial Activities

179 Policies

180 Introduction

181 Mäori Contributions to Decision Making

182 Significance Policy

189 Revenue and Financing Policy

211 Funding of Depreciation Policy

212 Liability Management Policy

214 Investment Policy

220 Funding Impact Statement (2006 - 2007)

227 Public/Private Partnership Policy

230 Rates Relief Policy on Mäori Freehold Land

231 Rates Remissions

232 Rates Penalties Policy

233 Rates Postponement Policy

234 Developments Contributions Policy

238 Reserves

246 Network Infrastructure

256 Community Infrastructure

260 Development Levy Summary

262 Framework for Recovering Financial and

Development Contributions

Page 3

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

263 Appendices

264 Appendix 1:

Summary of the Solid Waste Management Plan

266 Appendix 2:

Summary of the Water and Sanitary Services

Assessment

269 Appendix 3:

Summary of the Hurunui Community Road Safety

Strategy 2006-2011

271 Appendix 4:

Governance Structure

274 Appendix 5:

Audit Report

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Introduction

6 From The Mayor and Chief Executive

9 How to make a submission

10 About the Plan

12 Hurunui District Profile – Today

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

17 Representatives of our District

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Artwork: Callum Bradbury age 10

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

From The Mayor and Chief Executive

Welcome to the 2006 - 16 Hurunui Long

Term Community Plan.

Opportunities and Key Issues

In developing this long term, ten year plan, Council and

staff have endeavoured to identify the key issues and

opportunities ahead, and to establish appropriate longer

term strategies and action plans to address them.

Throughout this Hurunui Long Term Community Plan,

we have been guided by four overall principal objectives:

• prudent and responsible financial planning,

including intense scrutiny of all operating costs

and capital expenses;

• emphasis on core infrastructure and essential

services;

• maximum leverage of the returns available to

the District as a whole from the Hanmer Springs

Thermal Reserve;

• appropriate planning for “balanced growth”, in

the realisation that growth itself is an important

element in achieving long term affordability for

services and infrastructure, by expanding the

support base of ratepayers.

The following notes provide relevant details of the

strategic approach taken on a number of particular issues

and opportunities.The subjects are listed in random

sequence; in our view they are all of equal importance.

Economic Development

Council is commied to sustainable economic

development and business growth throughout the

District. The funding grant from Council to its economic

development agency, Enterprise North Canterbury, will

be increased from $32,500 to $50,000 per year from 2007,

to support increased services in the areas of business

skills training and support for new ventures, and existing

operators.

drinking water quality upgrades in Cheviot and Hanmer

Springs.

The Amberley urban zoning review remains a key

priority, and Council will work with interested and

affected parties to implement the commercial and

industrial zoning recommendations in 2006, as the

foundation for ongoing development throughout the

ten year planning period. Similar reviews of Hanmer

Springs, Cheviot, Waipara and other areas will follow in

the 2006-2008 period.

Environmental Planning

Environmental planning in the 2006-2016 period

represents a substantial increase over previously

projected levels of expenditure. In conjunction with

Council’s already announced direction to pursue a non

regulatory approach for environmental protection of

biodiversity, $64,000 of funding obtained from Central

Government will be dedicated to biodiversity activities

in 2006-2008.

Increased funding for coastal care and restricted vehicle

access programmes has been provided throughout the

Plan, commencing 2006/2007. Funding has also been

provided for coastal and other studies affecting areas at

Amberley Beach and between Motunau and the Conway.

Tourism

The business structure of Council’s Tourism operation

follows the funding model implemented as part

of the 2005/2006 Annual Plan, with the majority of

funding sourced from a targeted rate, supplemented

by a marketing contribution from the Hanmer Springs

Thermal Reserve. Whilst possible revisions and

refinements to this approach have been considered,

no practical options have been identified, apart from

increased efforts that will be applied to aract voluntary

contributions from operators who are not presently

categorised to pay the target rate, in return for their

inclusion in the specific services and products provided

by Hurunui Tourism.

We will take a closer interest in the investigations and

proposals of the Hurunui Irrigation and Water group,

regarding further development of the primary sector of

the District, to achieve increased economic benefits from

under-utilised natural resources.

A total of $13.85 million over 10 years from 2006/07

has been identified for development , expansion of

the District’s 13 water schemes, water supply directly

benefiting primary production and urban expansion, and

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Retention of the targeted rate funded model, together

with the impetus of a newly appointed Tourism Board,

provides the foundation in this Plan for the development

of a far stronger marketing strategy going forward,

focused on a new, higher impact and clearly recognisable

brand, “The Alpine Pacific Touring Triangle”.

Council’s other main tourism component is the Hurunui

Information Centre, in Hanmer Springs. A major

$400,000 facility upgrade and expansion is planned


in 2006, concurrent with other developments in the

Thermal Reserve. The resultant increase in retail sales

revenue takes the Information Centre from being a

traditional “cost” to the general rate, to being a generator

of surplus funds. Whilst some consideration has been

given to using these surpluses to increase the marketing

activities of “Alpine Pacific Tourism”, the Plan presently

incorporates these surpluses as general revenue to offset

rates.

Former Queen Mary Hospital Site

The Hurunui Community Plan makes provision of $3.4

million in 2006/2007 for the purchase of a selected part of

the Queen Mary Hospital site. This provision is identical

to that presently identified in the 2005/2006 Annual Plan,

targeting the northern most 4.8 hectare area, including

the high heritage Chisholm and Soldiers Block buildings.

Assuming such acquisition, Council’s intentions under

this Plan are to open up the grounds for public access,

appreciation and recreation, as well as the realignment

of some land adjoining the Thermal Reserve, necessary

to support ongoing development and expansion of the

pools.

For the purposes of this Plan, no activities in, or income

from, the Chisholm and Soldiers Block buildings, is

assumed. General maintenance costs have been provided

for, but no more.

Council will continue to actively pursue all possible

avenues for Central Government funding support, either

towards the site purchase, or maintenance, or upgrade

and refurbishment of the buildings, or some combination

of all of these expenses.

Roading

Roading is an area of major strategic emphasis, and

importance, in this Plan. Total roading expenditure,

including all maintenance, new sealing, bridge upgrades,

staff and overhead costs, is $62.9 million for the 2006-2016

period.

Provision is made to increase staff resources in roading

from 3 to potentially up to 5 engineers (full time), in

turn allowing Council to deliver the highest possible

standards of maintenance, and supervision of contract

performance. These increases follow a detailed consultant

review of engineering services, focussed on present and

future service levels and operations performance.

The Plan provides for a major replacement or upgrade

programme for approximately 36 of the District’s 260

bridges. Total replacement expenditure on bridges is

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

$3.59 million over the next 10 years.

The extent to which Council should plan for new first

time sealing of existing gravel roads has been the

subject of much discussion including possible methods

of funding other than the general rate. The Plan as

presented provides $500,000 for such new sealing, for

Georges Road, Glasnevin in 2006 and a further $339,000

for a presently unidentified road in 2010-2012. Whilst

Council is aware of possible further demand for sealing,

such development has not been included pending public

feedback.

Water Quality and Supply

Water quality issues continue to be an area of Council

priority. Of the total water scheme expenditures planned

2006/07 through 2007/08 ($9.6 million), approximately

$1.82 million is to be spent on actions that will have a

positive impact on drinking water quality. The major

schemes that will benefit are Cheviot, Waipara and

Hanmer Springs.

Council will continue to advocate actively and

persuasively to influence the National Drinking Water

legislation, and even more importantly, the availability of

suitable implementation funding for rural districts such

as the Hurunui.

We are planning to spend a total of approximately

$2.81 million for the further development and supply

expansion of the District’s water schemes to meet

anticipated demand. A further $1.65 million is earmarked

for sewerage and waste water scheme development.

In order to do this, provision has been made to increase

total water staff resources from 3 engineers, potentially

up to 6, effective from 2006/2007, in line with the same

consultancy referred to above.

Solid Waste

The solid waste plans and budgets included in this

2006-16 Plan have, by necessity, been based largely on

the present activities and expenditures. Whilst the new

Waste Minimisation and Management Board structure

was established in late 2005, its operation and longer term

planning cannot be realised until the new Waste Manager

position is filled (expected in early 2006), and the whole

entity of the new waste operation becomes functional.

The resultant financial projections therefore commence

from the 2005/06 base of $1.021 million (total cost to

ratepayers for waste collection, transfer stations, disposal

to landfill and recycling support), increasing to $1.234

million in 2006/07, and further increases of approximately

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

$81,000 from 2007 to 2009.

Whilst not reflected in the Plan, Council has every

expectation that the Board, and the new Waste Manager,

will take the necessary actions and initiatives to reduce

Hurunui’s waste to landfill over time, and progressively

the net total cost to ratepayers.

Road Safety Strategy

With its extensive network of 1,703 kilometres of state

highways and district roads, road safety is obviously an

issue close to the hearts of all Hurunui residents.

For the first time, a summary of the Hurunui Road

Safety Strategy is included as an appendix to this Long

Term Plan. This strategy was developed by the Hurunui

Road Safety Commiee, comprising Council, NZ Police,

Transit, Land Transport, Road Transport Association,

Environment Canterbury, ACC and a number of

other stakeholders. Public feedback on the strategy is

welcomed.

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

Prior to the development of this Plan, Council consulted

and approved in very late 2005 the first of a new three

stage development plan for the Hanmer Springs Thermal

Reserve, with the construction of a new international

standard spa and private pools complex in 2006 for

$2.85m.

Acknowledging the increasing level of competition of

pools and water entertainment centres in Christchurch,

together with the need to continue to push for visitor and

revenue growth in Hanmer Springs. Council is planning

a further two stages of capital development in 2006/07

and 2007/08, totalling $5.1m.

Aer taking all capital loan repayments and debt

servicing into account, net cash surpluses from the

Thermal Reserve are expected to average $836,000 per

year 2006/07 through to 2010/2011, and increasing to

$2.25 million per year through to 2015/16.

From these surpluses, Council projects to use $9.975

million over the 10 year period of the Plan to fund

district wide reserves, thereby representing a significant

ongoing offset to general rate levels for the benefit of all

ratepayers.

planning, policy and regulatory requirements for the

Environmental and Community Policy areas.

Council have accepted the need for these expansions

in service coverage and resource requirements. Some

partial offsets in other less critical expense areas have

been identified, and will continue to be pursued. In

line with the increased staffing levels, Council has now

accepted the necessity of expansion of the Amberley

office. A maximum provision for this project of $380,000

has been set, aer consideration of several other options

including using portable offices, utilising other existing

buildings, and renting alternative accommodation.

Conclusion

As indicated in the opening comments of this

introduction, Council’s approach to this Plan has been

one of prudence and conservative planning. The key

result of this strategy is a restrained level of general rate

increases: the total general rate in 2006/07 is $4.6 million,

a 5% increase over 2005/06.

These projections have been achieved due to careful

leverage of the contributions to the District reserves

available from the Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve

and Spa operation and its planned expansion programs,

the interest income derived from Council’s financial

reserves especially in the early years of the Plan, and

from the rigorous approach taken to manage all costs and

expenses wherever possible.

Concurrently capital expenditures on the key

infrastructure activities of roading, water, sewerage and

waste are planned to increase in real terms, with average

per annum levels of $ 6.37 million in the next three years

2006/07 through 2008/09.

But we believe that this Hurunui Long term Community

Plan is much more than a set of financial budgets. We

have endeavoured to adopt a serious and strategic view

of the opportunities and challenges facing the Hurunui,

and all its constituent communities, over the next ten

years, and to develop and provide for the plans to meet

them, and to achieve the community outcomes and goals

that we have as a District.

Kind regards

Council Staff Resources and Facilities

In addition to recruiting additional road and water

engineering staff as above, present staffing levels will

be increased by 2.75 full time employees to cover

Garry Jackson

Mayor

Paddy Clifford

Chief Executive Officer

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About the Plan

Introduction

The Local Government Act 2002 requires all councils to

have a Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP).

The Hurunui Long Term Community Plan is our LTCCP.

This plan is the combined effort of Council and the District’s

community. Many of Council’s sub commiees were

actively involved in preparing plans for their townships

and wards and their efforts are reflected in this plan. So

are the views of the many individuals who told us what

they consider to be important for the future of our district.

We have also begun working with various organizations

to help ensure that collectively our efforts are contributing

toward the visions and aspirations of Hurunui’s people.

This has been no small feat! Many people have put

considerable numbers of hours into the development of

this plan. The plan covers a 10 year period from 1 July

2006 to 30 June 2016.

Council’s vision statement sums up our philosophy behind

the Plan:

“Sustainable growth and prosperity in accord with

Hurunui’s traditional rural and natural values”

Updating the Plan

The plan will be updated and revised every 3 years. The

plan is one of the main ways you can influence what the

Council does and every 3 years you’ll have a chance to

share your views on the plan.

In the years between each Hurunui Long Term Community

Plan review, we will prepare an Annual Plan which will

focus on the budgets of the particular year of publication.

This information will be taken from the Hurunui Long

Term Community Plan.

Guide to the Plan

The following is a brief guide about the information

contained in each section of the plan.

Introduction - This section gives information about our

district and an introduction to the plan. You will find out

about Council’s strategic direction for the future.

Community Outcomes – This is where the community

outcomes are described. It connects the outcomes with

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

how they link with what the Council does.

Ward Profiles – Here you will find key information about

each ward including, demographic data, key priorities

and amenity rates.

Council Activities – Gives useful information for each

Council activity such as water, roading, tourism etc,

including financial information. Here you will find what

major priorities or projects are planned for each activity.

Financial Information – This section is where financial

information is summarised. It gives the 10 year capital

expenditure programme and forecast financial statements

as well as financial statements required by law.

Policies – Provides key Council policies (including

financial policies and principles) to assist with decision

making and planning.

Appendices – This section contains summaries of Council’s

Solid Waste Management Plan, the Water Services and

Sanitary Assessment, Road Safety Strategy and Council

structures.

Monitoring the Plan

At the end of each financial year, we must complete an

Annual Report. In this report, we will state how we have

performed against what we said we were going to do in

our plan and at what cost. We will also report on whether

there has been any progress toward the achievement of the

community outcomes.

Changing the Plan

If any significant changes need to be made to the Hurunui

Long Term Community Plan before it is formally revised at

each 3 year interval, the proposed changes will be publicly

notified to give anyone affected an opportunity to have

their say before Council decides whether or not to make

the proposed changes.

Our ‘Significance Policy’ guides us in determining the

importance of an issue and the possible impact on the

community. When an issue is deemed significant, we will

consider how best to consult you. The significance policy

is included in the Policy section.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Influencing the Hurunui Community Plan

We welcome your thoughts and input into the plan. That

is the reason it goes out to the public in a dra form before

it is finalised. There are other ways to be involved in the

Hurunui community, and to influence the Council and

community planning processes. You can aend Council

meetings, or stand for election as the Mayor, Councillor,

Community Board member or Commiee member. You

are also able to contact the Council or your local Councillor

at any time during the year to offer suggestions about

things that impact on your community and environment.

Road Safety Strategy.

Annual

Report

Knowing what the

Council and other

organisations achieved

Community

Outcomes

Knowing what is important

for the future wellbeing of

our community

It is important to understand the value of the contribution

that you can make. This plan demonstrates Council’s

contribution to help make the Hurunui District a beer

place for us all to live, work and play in. The best results

will happen when the Council and the community work

together. That is why having your say is so important.

The Plan does not include GST

When reading this document, please be aware that all of

the figures quoted in the Hurunui Long Term Community

Plan are GST exclusive except the ‘Statement of Rating

Policy’ and the ‘Development Contributions Policy’.

Inflation

The plan has been developed on an inflation adjusted

basis to comply with accounting standards. Details of the

inflation assumptions 2006 - 16 that have been used are

outlined on page 167

Annual

Plan

Knowing how it

is going to be

paid for

Hurunui

Long Term

Community Plan

Knowing what the Council

and other organisations are

doing to meet community

outcomes

Council’s reasons for being involved in activities are set

out in the document and are justified in terms of furthering

community outcomes or promoting the district’s social,

cultural, economic or environmental wellbeing.

Relationship between the Hurunui Long Term Community

Plan, and other documents

The Hurunui Long Term Community Plan integrates

strategies, policies and activities in the context of identified

community outcomes, and in a way that promotes public

accountability and integrated decision making.

All planning that Council undertakes is driven by the

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan, including asset

management plans and waste management plans as well

as linking to other non-mandatory strategies such as the

Hurunui Tourism Strategy and the Hurunui Community

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Hurunui District Profile – Today

*Note: Unless otherwise specified, statistics quoted in this section are from the NZ Census 2001

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

INTRODUCTION

Location The Hurunui District is in North

Canterbury, East Coast of South Island,

New Zealand

Use

Area

Climate

Population

Predominantly rural

864,640 hectares

Temperature - ranging from unique

coastal micro-climates to Alpine climates

The total population estimate for the

Hurunui District as at 30 June 2005 is

10,850, made up of the following Ward

proportions:

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Hanmer Springs

1,110

Glenmark

1,180

Cheviot

1,270

Hurunui

1,410

Amuri

1,920

Amberley

3,940

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Ethnicity

Ethnicity Hurunui District New Zealand

European 97.1% 80.1%

Other

Asian

New Zealand

Hurunui

Maori 5.4% 14.7%

Pacific People 0.4% 6.5%

Asian 0.5% 6.6%

Source: NZ Census 2001

Ethnicity

Pacific People

Mäori

European

0 20 40 60 80 100

Percentage

Education

Education

Hurunui District

New Zealand

15 years and over

School Qualification 41% 40%

Tertiary -

New Zealand

Hurunui

Tertiary Qualification 28% 32.2%

No Formal Qual. 31% 28%

Source: NZ Census 2001

Education

School -

None -

0 10 20 30 40 50

Percentage

0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Labour Force

Labour Force Hurunui District New Zealand

Unemployment Rate 3.8% 3.4%

Employment Rate 68% 62%

Main Occupations /

Industries

Agriculture

Fishing

Service

Sales

Labour Force

Not in Labour

Force

Unemployed

Employed

New Zealand

Hurunui

Source: NZ Census 2001

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70

Percentage

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Age Structure

Recreation

The 2001 Census data reveals that the

median age of people in the Hurunui

District is 39, compared with 34 for all

of New Zealand. 13% of people in the

Hurunui District are aged 65 and over,

compared with 12% for all of New

Zealand.

The Hurunui district has an aging

population, and it is predicted to have a

steeper rise in the proportion of people

aged 65 and over compared to the country

as a whole, with 25% predicted to be in

this age group by 2021, compared to 17%

nationwide.

The Hurunui is one of the few places in

New Zealand’s South Island that in less

than 2 hours travelling time, you have

driven from the Lewis Pass (the northern

most point of the Southern Alps) with its

fresh mountain air, spectacular scenery

and lush beech forests, to be siing by the

coast watching the waves from the Pacific

Ocean crash onto the Beach.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Main Industries The Hurunui is continuing to experience

growth and diversification in terms

of industry. Historically the district

was primarily agriculture based, and

agriculture continues to be the single

largest contributor to the Hurunui

economy. However recent times have

seen an expansion in both viticulture

and tourism. The introduction of the ‘big

player’, Montana Wines into the local wine

industry has seen plantings in the area

double. The growth of the district icon,

Hanmer Springs as a tourist destination

and the establishment of associated

infrastructure, is unprecedented in

the tourism sector New Zealand wide.

The majority (41%) of the district’s

working population are employed in the

“agriculture, forestry or fishing” industry

(category defined by Statistics NZ). The

second largest employment industry

category is “manufacturing” (9%) and

“health and community services” and

“Hospitality and retail” each employ 7%

of the district’s working population.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Visitor

Attractions

Parks and

Reserves

Activities include from mountain walks,

skiing, thermal bathing, river sports

and recreation, surfing, fishing and

spectacular walks amidst salt stone cliffs

on our secluded beaches. The Waipara

Valley is reknowned for some of New

Zealand’s award winning wines, and this

area offers the opportunity to discover

many fine vineyards.

The Hurunui has over 274 hectares of

passive and recreation reserves including

the world famous Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools and Spa.

Main Beaches are at Leithfeild, Amberley,

Motunau and Gore Bay.

Main recreational waters are the hurunui

and Waiau Rivers and Lake Sumner, Lake

Taylor and Lake Tennyson.

13

Agri/Viticulture The Hurunui District is home to around

1,000 farms making up 594,801 hectares in

area (as at June 2002). Over half of those

farms (510) are sheep farms with around

1,643,785 sheep, and about one eighth

are beef cale farms (130), with around

117,623 beef cale. There are over 40,000

dairy cale and deer in the Hurunui

District. Most fruit trees and vines grown

are wine grapes (381 hectares), followed

by olives (109 hectares), and some apples

(34 hectares). There is lile vegetable

harvested in the Hurunui District, the

majority of which is asparagus (23

hectares), while we produce 11,475 tonnes

of barley, 3075 tonnes of wheat, and 1,219

tonnes of oats annually (during the year

ended June 2002).

Page 13

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Services and Amenities

MT LYFORD

Medical Centre

Development The Hurunui district has a highly

and Growth diversified economy based around

agriculture, viticulture and tourism.

Both domestic and international tourism

have increased significantly over the

past decade in recognition of the wide

array of recreational opportunities within

Hurunui from the coast to the mountains.

The Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve,

Mt Lyford Ski field and Waipara wine

producing area are recognised as anchor

destinations that have been a catalyst

for significant business investment in

the District. New Zealand Statistics has

estimated the Hurunui population at

2026 to be 12,700 on a medium growth

projection. However because of a large

absentee population, owning lifestyle and

holiday homes, the Council is planning

for growth demands associated with a

population of approximately 17,700. The

majority of this growth is expected to

occur in the Amberley Ward and Hanmer

Springs township.

Average Cost

of Housing

Health

The average cost of housing in our district

has increased dramatically over the past

ten years. In 1995, the median sale price

for a house in the North Canterbury region

north of the Waimakariri River totalled

$85,500. By 2005, the average price of a

house had risen to $256,500. Our district

experienced an increase in average house

prices of 22% from 2004 to 2005, a figure

that is well ahead of the national average

for the same period totalling 14%.

This was also the period of time when

our area experienced it's sharpest rise in

average house prices, with an increase

of $54,000 between September 2004 and

September 2005. Source: Real Estate Institute

of NZ Inc. (Reinz)

In general, the health of the people of

Hurunui is not different overall to the

health status reported for all Canterbury

people in the “Demographics Health

Sevices Health Staus” report released in

November 2004 by th Canterbury District

Health Board.

14

Page 14


Rateable Value Rates are levied on rateable properties

based on their rateable value. Basically all

lands are rateable. The definition of land

is very broad and may include the right

to pass utilities over land, e.g., power

lines and water pipes. Exceptions apply to

certain Crown land and land mainly used

for educational and charitable purposes.

At the date of printing, total rateable value

of the Hurunui District is $3,280,960,250.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Property Values by Ward

Ward

District Capital Value

($)

Number of Rateable Properties liable for UAC’s

(Uniform Annual Charge)

Urban Rural Total

Urban Capital Value

($)

Rural Capital

Value($)

Amberley 655,347,200 1,170.5 789.0 1,964.5 234,394,700 420,952,500

Amuri 706,566,950 427.0 694.5 1,126.5 44,461,750 662,105,200

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Cheviot 466,215,250 352.0 575.5 927.5 57,810,200 408,405,050

Glenmark 453,597,650 258.0 442.0 712.0 49,842,200 403,755,450

Hanmer Springs 508,293,500 1,315.0 188.5 1,503.5 362,644,500 145,649,000

Hurunui 395,458,700 250.0 528.5 778.5 26,613,500 368,845,200

Utilities 95,481,000

Total 3,280,960,250 3,772.5 3,240.0 7,012.5 775,766,850 2,409,712,400

Rural Fire (Value on which the rural fire rate is based) 1,160,983,800 2,119,976,450

15

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APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

16

Page 16


Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Representatives of our District

18 Hurunui District Council Mayor and Deputy Mayor

18 Amberley Ward Councillors and Committee

19 Amuri Ward Councillors and Committee

19 Cheviot Ward Councillors and Committee

20 Glenmark Ward Councillor

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

20 Hanmer Springs Ward Councillor, Community Board

and Thermal Reserve Management Committee

20 Hurunui Ward Councillors and Committee

21 Canterbury Regional Council

21 Canterbury District Health Board

21 Parliament

21 Ngai Tahu

17

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Artwork: Michaela Robins age 7

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Representatives of our District

Hurunui District Council:

Garry Jackson

Mayor

Ph: (03) 314 7242

Fax: (03) 314 7242

Mobile: 0274 855 335

Email: mayor@hurunui.govt.nz

Judy Meikle

Deputy Mayor

Ph: (03) 315 6198

Fax: (03) 315 6198

Email: c.j.meikle@xtra.co.nz

Amberley Ward:

Russell Black

Amberley Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 314 5888

Fax: (03) 314 5800

Mobile: 021 314 987

Email: black.estate@paradise.net.nz

Andrew Smart

Amberley Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 314 8742

Fax: (03) 314 9092

Mobile: 021 355 890

Judith McKendry

Amberley Ward Committee Chairman

Ph: 03 314 8308

Amberley Ward Committee Members

Peter Carmichael

Julie Coster

Peter McLelland

Jessie Garland

Ian Fawce

Kevin Brookfield

John Hibbard

Kevin Roche

Roger Chambers

18

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Amuri Ward

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Wendy Doody

Amuri Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 315 8372

Fax: (03) 315 8972

Email: ian.wendy@xtra.co.nz

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Judy Meikle

Amuri Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 315 6198

Fax: (03) 315 6198

Email: c.j.meikle@xtra.co.nz

Brian Beaven

Amuri Ward Committee Chairman

Ph: (03) 315 6346

Amuri Ward Committee Members

David Cro

Pat Hoban

Geoff Topp

John Belton

Graham Clark

Rose Lawson

Max Rhodes

Mary Mackintosh

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Cheviot Ward

Jamie McFadden

Cheviot Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 319 8152

Fax: (03) 319 8153

Vince Daly

Cheviot Ward Councillor

Ph: 03 319 8773

Fax: 03 319 8773

Email: vjdaly@hotmail.com

Richard Maxwell

Cheviot Ward Committee Chairman

Ph: 03 319 8820

19

Cheviot Ward Committee Members

Max Winskill

Rob Fitzgibbon

Simon Harris

Page 19

Carol Maxwell

Keith Shipston

John Sorensen

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Glenmark Ward

Kerry Prenter

Glenmark Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 314 3838

Fax: (03) 314 3838

Email: homefield@orcon.net.nz

Hanmer Springs Ward

Michael Malthus

Hanmer Springs Ward Councillor

Ph: (03) 315 7757

Fax: (03) 315 7746

Email: m.j.malthus@xtra.co.nz

Alice Stielow

Hanmer Springs Community Board Chairman

Ph: 021 317 001

PH/Fax: (03) 315 7219

Email: herbert.stielow@xtra.co.nz

Tim Herrick

Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Management

Committee Chairman

Ph: 03 351-7713

Hanmer Springs Community Board Members

Roger Keey

Andrew Cameron

Hugh Burry

Will Lawson

Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Management Committee

Graham Heenan

Alice Stielow

Cr Michael Malthus Cr Wendy Doody

Mayor Garry Jackson

Manager Financial Services: Grant Elliot

Hurunui Ward

Hurunui Ward

Winton Dalley

Hurunui Ward Councillor

Ph: 03 314 4230

Fax: 03 314 4276

Email: w.j.dalley@xtra.co.nz

Gary Miller

Hurunui Ward Committee Chairman

Ph: 03 314 4355

Hurunui Ward Committee Members

May Hassell

Colin Twose

Pat Manning

Tom Stewart

Brian Holland

Bevan Jensen

Richard Sutherland

20

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Canterbury Regional Council:

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Ross Little

North Canterbury Constituency

Ph: (03) 314 75841

Fax: (03) 314 5846

Email: ross.lile@ecan.govt.nz

Robert Johnson

Deputy Chairman

North Canterbury Constituency

Ph: (03) 312 4166

Fax: (03) 312 3085

Email: robert.johnston@ecan.govt.nz

Canterbury District Health Board:

Jo Kane

Board Member

Ph: (03) 312 7863

Fax: (03) 312 7863

Email: jokane@cweb.co.nz

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Parliament

Ngai Tahu

Colin King

Kaikoura Electorate MP

National Party

Ph: (04) 470 6965

(03) 577 6930

Email: colin.king@xtra.co.nz

Te Runanga O Ngai Tahu

Ph: (03) 366 4344

Fax: (03) 365 4424

Email: info@ngaitahu.iwi.nz

Ngai Tuahuriri

TRONT Representative:

Te Maire Tau

Ph: (03) 313 5543

Email: tuahuriri@xtra.co.nz

21

Takahanga Marae

home base for

Te Runanga o Kaikoura

Page 21

Te Runanga O Kaikoura

Contact: Raewyn Solomon

Fax: (03) 319 6523

Email: takahanga.marae@clear.net.nz

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

22

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Community Outcomes

24 Future Hurunui - Community Outcomes

25 Introduction

27 "A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play"

28 "A Healthy, Safe Place to Live"

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

30 “A Thriving Local Economy”

31 "Essential Infrastructure"

32 “Environmental Responsibility”

33 "Skills and Education for Work and Life"

23

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Artwork: Ashlee Olsen age 9

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Future

Hurunui District Council

Hurunui

C OMMUNITY OUTCOMES

A DESIRABLE P LACE TO LIVE,

WORK AND PLAY

To enhance our desirable place to live, work and play,

the Hurunui needs to have:

· strong sense of community that gives people a sense

of belonging and encourages them to take part in local

activities, to support essential volunteer services, and to

be involved in local consultation and decision making

· attractive, well designed villages that present a positive

image encouraging people to live in and visit the area

· opportunities in leisure, art and cultural activities

· effective planning for future development but ensuring

the preservation of local heritage and rural uniqueness

A HEALTHY, SAFE PLACE TO LIVE

To enhance our healthy, safe place to live, the Hurunui

needs to have:

· good, affordable health care services available for all

· adequate emergency services including fi re, police and

ambulance

· good quality, affordable accommodation available to

meet the community’s needs

· affordable and accessible community and social services

particularly for the elderly and young families

· management systems and resources to deal with civil

defence emergency situations

E SSENTIAL INFRASTRUCTURE

To enhance our essential infrastructure, the Hurunui

needs to have:

· water quality and quantity management systems that

provide good, clean household drinking water and

continuity of supply for agriculture,

horticulture and in the event of an emergency

· a safe, quality roading network that is well maintained

· sewerage systems that support the development of

the district and protects the physical environment and

health of the community

· public toilets that meet the expectations of visitors

and residents, and also provide an environmental and

public health service

E NVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY

To enhance our environmental responsibility, the

Hurunui needs to have:

· clean and plentiful water in our rivers, lakes and

streams

· beaches/ocean in a healthy condition

· an effective recycling service and to be actively

working towards the target of zero waste

· environmental safeguards and protection for natural

assets balanced with property owner’s rights

· clean, healthy air quality

A THRIVING LOCAL ECONOMY

To enhance our thriving local economy, the Hurunui

needs to:

· be a place where business development is encouraged

but in a way that preserves the community and the

environment

· have new and diverse businesses which will provide local

services and employment opportunities for attracting

and retaining residents

· have equity of access to quality and affordable

telecommunication services including broadband

availability and adequate cellphone coverage

S KILLS AND EDUCATION FOR

WORK AND LIFE

To enhance our skills and education for work and

life, the Hurunui needs to have:

· quality education available at local schools and

preschools

· practical skills and work/trade-based training

opportunities available

· a variety of options for learning to be available to all

24

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Introduction

The term ‘community outcomes’ is used to describe what

people in our community want to happen now and in

the future for the benefit of not only today’s people, but

future generations. Community outcomes are about

improving the well-being of our communities over time in

a sustainable manner. The term ‘community well-being’ is

used to cover the following areas:

• Economic Well-being

• Social Well-being

• Cultural Well-being

• Environmental Well-being

Community outcomes are developed to enable both the

community and the Council to deliberately work towards

achieving positive results to benefit the community and

help ensure a beer future. The purpose of focusing on

economic, social, cultural and environmental well-being is

to achieve overall community well-being.

The community outcomes identified by the Hurunui

district will guide not only Council’s planning, but also

influence planning across all sectors of the community

including government departments.

Identifying the Community Outcomes

Council undertook a process to identify what our

communities consider important for the future of the

Hurunui District. As a result, six high level outcomes were

identified. These are shown on the previous page.

To identify what people consider vital in terms of

economic, social, cultural and environmental well-being,

we undertook a survey in early 2005.

The survey was sent to every household in the Hurunui and

was advertised in the local ‘Hurunui News’. We also sent

a special survey to 138 key organisations and community

groups. 360 individuals and 22 community groups took

the time to return the survey. Results were then analysed

by Council staff. We also used other information to check

that we were interpreting the survey data correctly.

The survey focused on various different outcomes.

Participants were given the opportunity to rate each

outcome according to how important or unimportant they

were to them. This assisted with prioritising the outcomes.

We published the results and asked for your feedback,

aer which, we were satisfied that we had reflected what

is important to our communities.

25

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Achieving the Community Outcomes

Although we have a key role to play, it is important to

understand that Councils are not solely responsible for

achieving the community outcomes. Everyone in the

community has a part to play, however, we are a critical

provider of services and amenities and have a responsibility

towards the well-being of our district. Therefore we have

a role towards the achievement of community outcomes,

with more involvement in some than in others.

Contributing Organisations

Other organisations and groups also have a part to play

towards achieving the outcomes. Many organisations have

already indicated that they want to work with us. Rather

than each Council working in isolation to achieve similar

results, where possible we collaborate and coordinate

efforts with our neighbouring Councils as we are oen

dealing with the same organisations and government

departments.

Our list of contributing organisations and agencies is

constantly growing and evolving. If your organisation has

a role to play in contributing to the Community Outcomes,

and is missing from the following list, then please contact

our Amberley office.

Hurunui-Kaikoura Primary Health Organisation (HK PHO)

PHOs plan, coordinate and pay for health care in the

community.

New Zealand Historic Places Trust

Works toward the recognition, protection and promotion

of New Zealand’s historic and cultural heritage.

Creative New Zealand

Encourages, promotes and supports the arts in New

Zealand.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Provides advice to the Government on culture and heritage

maers.

Federated Farmers of New Zealand

Acts as a locally based, democratic organisation that gives

farmers a collective voice nationally and within each

province.

Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC)

Encourages New Zealanders to get moving, supports elite

athletes and gets out into local communities.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Ministry of Social Development

Provides social policy advice to Government, and social

services to people, including employment and training

opportunities and income support.

Housing New Zealand

Provides access to homes.

New Zealand Police

Reduces crime and enhance safety.

Accident Compensation Corporations (ACC)

Prevents injuries, provides treatment and rehabilitation.

New Zealand Fire Services

Reduces incidences and consequences of fire and responds

to other emergencies.

St John

Prevents and relieves sickness and injury, and acts to

enhance the health and well-being of people.

Canterbury District Health Board

Promotes, enhances and facilitates the health and wellbeing

of people.

Land Transport New Zealand

Contributes to a safe, responsive and sustainable land

transport system.

Presbyterian Support

Makes positive and lasting differences in the lives of

people in need.

Ministry of Health

Ensures the health and disability system works for all

people.

Ministry of Economic Development

Leads the production and co-ordination of policy advice

related to economic, regional and industry development.

Transit

Operates the state highway system in a way that

contributes to an integrated, safe and sustainable land

transport system.

Ministry of Environment

Advises the Government on the environment and

international maers that affect the environment.

Department of Conservation

Conserves New Zealand’s natural and historic heritage.

Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry

Advances agriculture, horticulture and forestry.

Te Runaga O Ngai Tahu (TRONT)

Provides corporate services and facilitate policy

development for Te Runganga O Ngai Tahu and to all

other divisions within the organisation.

Environment Canterbury

Aims to achieve a sustainable environment and

communities.

Main Power

Provides and maintains the electricity distribution network

throughout North Canterbury, Kaikoura and Wigram

areas.

Ministry of Education

Provides schools and educational opportunities to children

and adults.

Measuring and Reporting our Progress

We are responsible for monitoring the achievement of the

community outcomes and to report the findings. These

will be measured at no less than every 3 years. Each of our

community outcomes has performance measures so that

over time, we can see how we are going, and where more

effort is needed.

Christchurch and Canterbury Marketing

Markets the Canterbury region to promote tourism,

economic development and growth.

Enterprise North Canterbury

Encourages and drives economic development for North

Canterbury.

Our Community Outcomes

Following are detailed descriptions of our six community

outcomes, how we will achieve our objectives, who helps

us reach our goals and how we measure our progress

towards the desired outcomes.

26

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Community Outcome 1:

"A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play"

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

To enhance this outcome, we need to

have

• Strong sense of community that

gives people a sense of belonging

and encourages them to take part in

local activities, to support essential

volunteer services, and to be involved

in local consultation and decision

making

• Aractive, well designed villages that

present a positive image encouraging

people to live in and visit the area

•Oopportunities in leisure, art and

cultural activities

• Effective planning for future

development but ensuring the

preservation of local heritage and

rural uniqueness

We will know we are

succeeding when

• People are involved with

their local community

• People actively participate

in public decision making

• People feel the Hurunui

District is an aractive

place to live

• Our future heritage is

protected for future

generations

Progress will be measured using these key indicators

• Percentage of people involved in work outside

home

• Number of volunteers involved in essential

services

• Degree people feel a sense of community with

others in the local neighbourhood

• Participation in leisure, arts and cultural activities

• Perception of how people feel about their own

quality of life

• Voter turnout at local government elections

• Number of people involved in Council meetings,

commiees and submissions to Council

• Level of confidence in Council's decision making

in the past year

• Degree of understanding of Council's decision

making

District population and growth rate

• Perception of aractiveness of townships and

villages

• Perception of use of subdivisions, coastal

environment, Hanmer Basin and Hurunui lakes

• Number of Heritage sites and buildings

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

What the Council

is doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Governance and Advocacy

Hanmer Springs Thermal

Pools and Spa

Library

Local Facilities and

Maintenance

Property

Public Toilets

Cemeteries

Grants & Service Awards

Main well-being areas to which the outcome

contributes

Organisations

and groups that

contribute towards

achieving this

outcome

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council advocates to other organisations and governs on the district's behalf. The

Council structure encourages community involvement through its Ward Commiees

and sub commiees.

The thermal reserve is a special area to New Zealand and provides a place for relaxation

and recreational activities to members of the public.

Council provides community facilities and services for social and recreational use. It is

important that these are affordable and relevant to the community, as well as accessible,

safe and healthy. Volunteers throughout the community are a critical component to the

continuation of many of these facilities and services (e.g. halls, parks and reserves,

library etc). Effective township maintenance ensures towns and villages not only look

good, but that everything works.

Social and Cultural Well-being

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

27

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Regulator Facilitator Monitor

Hurunui District Council √ √ √ √ √ √

NZ Historic Places Trust √ √ √

Creative NZ


Ministry for Culture &



Heritage

Federated Farmers of NZ √ √ √

Sport & Recreation NZ

(SPARC)



APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcome 2:

"A Healthy, Safe Place to Live"

To enhance this outcome, we need to have We will know we are

succeeding when

• good, affordable health care services

available for all

• adequate emergency services including

fire, police and ambulance

• good quality, affordable

accommodation available to meet the

community’s needs

• affordable and accessible community

and social services particularly for the

elderly and young families

• management systems and resources

to deal with civil defence emergency

situations

• People feel the Hurunui

District is a healthy

place to live

• Suitable housing is

available and affordable

• Rates of crime and

injury decline

• Social Services are

available and accessible

Progress will be measured using these key indicators

• Number and percentage of people enrolled in PHOs

• GPs per head of population

• Reasons for why people did not go to the doctor when

they wanted to

• Involvement in physical activities, including barriers

• Median dwelling sale prices

• Size of waiting lists for Council and Government

housing

• Civil defence resources and plans

• Rate of hospitalisation and unintentional deaths for

injuries (accidents)

• Rate of deaths for intentional injuries

• Number of workplace fatalities and injuries

• Road crash fatalities and injuries by cause of crash

• Total crime offences

– Number and rate of recorded burglary offence

– Number of successful clearances

– Number and rate of recorded violent offences

– Number and rate of recorded sexual offences

– Number and rate of recorded total car offences

– Number and rate of recorded drug offences

– Number of youth apprehensions by age group (0-13

years, 14-16 years)

• Perceptions of sense of freedom from crime (safe or

unsafe) locations

• People's perception of accessibility of health and social

services

• Number of people receiving Governement

accommodation supplements

What the Council

is doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Civil Defence

Rural Fire Control

Building Inspections

Health Inspections

Liquor Licensing

Animal Control

Roading Network

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council has developed these to ensure capacity exists to protect the Hurunui district and

its people in times of crisis.

Council ensures that people are safeguarded from possible injury, illness, or loss of

amenity when using any building and ensures that buildings in the district are and

remain safe, stay sanitary, and provide means of escape from fire through administration

and enforcement of the building code and the food hygiene, liquor licensing and building

regulations.

Council enforces obligations on owners of dogs or stock, designed to ensure that animals

do not injure, endanger, or cause distress to any person, animal, or protected wildlife,

and that they do not cause nuisance to people or property.

Council deals with the day-to-day operation, maintenance and improvements,

road reconstructions and upgrades, signs, street lighting, parking, cleaning, bridge

maintenance, and various road safety activities. These initiatives are supported through

policy development and forward planning, including linking in with transport and land

use planning and the Hurunui Community Road Safety Strategy, as well as representation

on the Hurunui Community Road Safety Commiee .

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Main well-being areas to which the outcome

contributes

Organisations

and groups that

contribute towards

achieving this

outcome

Social and Cultural Well-being

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

Regulator Facilitator Monitor

√ √ √ √ √ √

Hurunui-Kaikoura Primary Health

Organisation √ √ √ √

Ministry of Social Development

Housing NZ

NZ Police

√ √ √ √

√ √ √

√ √ √ √ √

Accident Compensation Corporation

(ACC) √ √ √ √ √ √

NZ Fire Services



DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

St John

Canterbury District Health Board

Land Transport NZ

Presbyterian Support

Ministry of Health



√ √ √ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

29



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APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcome 3:

"A Thriving Local Economy"

To enhance this outcome, we need to:

• Be a place where business development

is encouraged but in a way that

preserves the community and the

environment

• Have new and diverse businesses

which will provide local services

and employment opportunities for

aracting and retaining residents

• Have equity of access to quality and

affordable telecommunication services

including broadband availability and

adequate cellphone coverage

We will know we are

succeeding when:

• Labour force participation

rates increase

• The Hurunui District has a

strong, healthy economy

• People's standards of living

improve

Progress will be measured using these key

indicators

• Percentage of people in full and part time

employment by industry and occupational

groupings

• Percentage of people in labour force

Long term (6 months/1 year plus) unemployment

rates

• Percentage of people registered unemployed

• Percentage and average numbers of employees

• Number of GST registered businesses

• Distribution of industry by type

• $ value of commercial and residential building

consents issued

• Average weekly earnings

• Total number of means tested benefits

• Coverage of telecom services (including

broadband)

What the

Councils is

doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Tourism

Visitor Centre

Economic

Development

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council ensures that new businesses are aracted that invest in the district and

generate employment opportunities. Aracting new families to the district means

having a population to sustain more businesses, while also growing visitor numbers in

a sustainable manner.

Ensuring visitors to the area are encouraged to stay longer and use local services and

hospitality while securing the Information Centre breaks even financially, excluding

Council's contribution, is important to the district's economy.

Council is actively involved in the Hurunui Tourism Board and the North Canterbury

Economic Development Board that promote the Hurunui and North Canterbury region

to bring people into our area to live, work and visit.

Main well-being areas to which the

outcome contributes

Economic Well-being

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

Ministry of Economic

Development

Christchurch & Canterbury

Marketing

Enterprise North

Canterbury

Regulator Facilitator Monitor

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √


√ √ √ √ √

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Community Outcome 4:

"Essential Infrastructure"

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

To enhance this outcome, we need to

have

• Water quality and quantity

management systems that provide

good, clean household drinking

water and continuity of supply for

agriculture, horticulture and in the

event of an emergency

We will know we are

succeeding when

• People feel the district's

infrastructure meets their

needs

• Water quality and

quantity improves

Progress will be measured using these key indicators

• Quality of drinking water throughout district

• Rate of consumption versus supply of water

• Discharge consents for wastewater

• Roads’ safety and maintenance

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

• A safe, quality roading network that

is well maintained

• People's perception of the quality and quantity of

amenities in townships

• Sewerage systems that support the

development of the district and

protects the physical environment

and health of the community

• Public toilets that meet the

expectations of visitors and

residents, and also provide an

environmental and public health

service

What the Council

is doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Roading Network

Household Collection

Transfer Stations

Waste Minimisation

Main well-being areas to which the

outcome contributes

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Sewerage

Drainage

Water Supply

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council routinely assesses which roads, bridges and footpaths need upgrading, sealing

and building in order to prevent accidents and link people, places and businesses through

an effective roading system, while representing best value for money.

Council provides a collection service of urban household refuse and disposal facilities.

These are services that are essential to our infrastructure and wellbeing, and that every

community expects.

Council provides appropriate treatment and disposal of waste water, while protecting

properties and public safety from flooding and erosion effects of stormwater. It also

ensures discharged water is clean and that no contaminated pools form.

Council ensures that all reticulated systems operate efficiently, that the conditions of all

water permits are complied with, and the average consumption is maintained or reduced,

while providing cost-effective public supplies and adequately located pressured

connections for fire fighting.

Environmental Well-being

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

Transit

31

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Regulator Facilitator Monitor

√ √ √ √ √ √



WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Community Outcome 5:

"Environmental Responsibility"

To enhance this outcome, we need to

have

• Clean and plentiful water in our rivers,

lakes and streams

• Beaches/ocean in a healthy condition

• An effective recycling service and to be

actively working towards the target of

zero waste

• Environmental safeguards and

protection for natural assets balanced

with property owner’s rights

• Clean, healthy air quality

We will know we are succeeding

when

• The district's environment is

protected

• Damage to our environment

reduces

• Waste to landfills reduces

Progress will be measured using these key

indicators

• State of air quality in the Hurunui

• River water and coastal quality

• Changes in protected vegetation

• Length of funded waterway fencing and

riparian planting

• Known new fencing of vegetation area

• Number of wilding trees

• Number of nassella

• Number of possums, pigs, ferrets and rabbits

• Levels and type of waste to landfills

What the Council

is doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Resource Management

Consents

Household Collection

Transfer Stations

Waste Minimisation

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Council engages in continuous planning and the provision of strategic directions

through concept development planning and design standards. Managing our natural

resources as safely as possible ensures they are protected and remain sustainable for the

future. The District Plan provides standards that all development must comply with to

ensure a clean environment for people to live in.

The proper disposal of waste and managing how land will be used now and in the

future is essential so that we can protect and improve the environment we live in.

Council encourages waste minimisation and environmentally friendly practices to

manage refuse in a safe and sustainable manner.

Main well-being areas to which the

outcome contributes

Environmental Well-being

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

Hurunui District Council

Ministry of Environment

Department of

Conservation

Ministry of Agriculture &

Forestry

Te Runanga O Ngai Tahu

(TRONT)

Environment Canterbury

Regulator Facilitator Monitor

√ √ √ √ √ √

√ √ √ √ √ √

√ √ √

√ √ √

√ √ √




√ √ √

Main Power



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Community Outcome 6:

"Skills and Education for Work and Life"

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

To enhance this outcome, we need to

have

• Quality education available at local

schools and preschools

• Practical skills and work/trade-based

training opportunities available

• A variety of options for learning to be

available to all

We will know we are

succeeding when

• Participation rates

in education and/or

training increase

• People in the Hurunui

District leave school

with qualifications

• People feel education in

the Hurunui District is

of high quality

Progress will be measured using these key indicators

• Percentage of school entrants who have participated in

early childhood education

Hurunui schools' roll numbers

• Number of modern apprenticeships by location of

apprenticeship

• Number of people undertaking industry training

• NCEA results for local schools

• Decile rating

• Percentage of school leavers with no qualification

• Number of people actively enrolled at libraries

throughout the district

• Percentage of early childhood available unused hours

• Perception of the quality of education available within

the district

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

What the Council

is doing towards

achieving the

outcome

Council Activity

Libraries

Main well-being areas to which the

outcome contributes

Organisations

and groups

that contribute

towards

achieving this

outcome

How it Contributes to the Outcome

Supporting the educational needs of all residents by providing access to information

through resources and user education, while simultaneously providing access to our

cultural heritage resources and promoting an awareness of our community.

Economic Well-being

Organisation Advocate Funder Service

Provider

33

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Regulator Facilitator Monitor

Hurunui District Council √ √

Ministry of Education √ √ √ √ √ √

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

34

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Amberley Ward Profile

36 Background and History

36 Present Profile

36 Ward Governance

37 Recreation and Visitor Attractions

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

37 Priority Community Outcomes

37 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

37 Key Planning assumptions

38 Key Projects

35

Page 35

Artwork: Callum Bradbury age 10

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Amberley Ward Profile

AMBERLEY WARD

Background and History

Amberley was originally established as a result of the

arrival of the railway in 1876 and the township continued

to grow ever since, soon becoming an important farming

centre. Amberley has grown significantly since the 1950s,

with the centralisation of council services, as well as being

the first township in the Hurunui District with a water

supply scheme undertaken by a county council in 1957.

Amberley’s neighbouring town, Leithfield, flourished

in the 1870s, being, at the time, the only business centre

between Kaiapoi and Kaikoura. The beach selements of

Amberley Beach and Leithfield Beach have also developed

as residential suburbs between 1950 and 1990, both of

whose population grew dramatically.

Present Profile

Population

Rural

Urban

2001

Census

Total

Estimate

June 05

Population 1,416 1,977 3,393 3,940

• The Amberley Ward is also experiencing substantial

growth and development in the Glasnevin area,

including large scale viticulture plantings, and

subdivision activity.

• The Amberley Concept Plan is currently in process.

The Concept Plan includes far reaching planning on

many fronts, including urban and commercial zoning,

social and recreation activities, street scaping and

branding. The Plan was developed by the community

through several public meetings and consultation

processes.

• The Amberley Ward offers a wide range of services

and facilities. The Ward is home to 3 primary schools,

a medical centre, a swimming pool, a community

hall, two libraries (Amberley District Library, and

Leithfield), as well as a cemetery.

Amberley Ward

• The Amberley Ward is the largest community in the

Hurunui District. The ward makes up over one third

of the total district population (36%) with a steady

growth in residents.

• Amberley’s population profile is somewhat older

that the Hurunui average. Almost 30% of Amberley’s

residents are aged 65 years and over, compared to 13%

for the Hurunui District and 12% for New Zealand as

a whole belonging to this age group (Statistics NZ,

Census 2001).

• Amberley is about a 30 minutes drive from Christchurch.

The township’s close proximity presents an advantage

for residential growth, offering commuters a country

lifestyle while working in the City.

• The State Highway 1 runs through the centre of the

Amberley Township. While this is a great strength for

development and growth, visibility and accessibility, it

simultaneously creates challenges for amenity values

including road safety, noise and heavy transport

effects.

• Both, the Amberley Township and its neighbouring

town, Leithfield, have seen notable urban expansion

and development in recent years, including increasing

lifestyle block development.

Ward Governance

District Councilors are responsible for representing

the interest of their ward, seing Council policies and

monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Amberley Ward is currently represented by two

councilors: Russell Black and Andrew Smart.

In addition, the Amberley Ward also has an elected

Amberley Ward Commiee which includes amongst its

varied responsibilities the overseeing of the Ward’s water

and sewerage schemes, and the Amberley Recreation

Reserve Subcommiee. The Amberley Ward also has the

Amberley District Residents Association, the Leithfield

and Leithfield Beach Residents Groups, Amberley Beach

Residents Association, and the Amberley/Leithfield

Promotions Association.

36

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Recreation / Visitor Attractions

The Amberley Township has a range of cafes, cras,

coastline, and nearby beaches, rivers, mountains and lakes.

Amberley is renowned for its impressive country gardens,

as well as its Beach Golf Course. Great bushwalks are

found nearby at Mount Grey and Lake Janet. Amberley is

also the home to the Amberley Domain, which is generally

used for sport, recreation, events, agricultural shows,

and leisure activities. Close by and founded in 1857, the

Leithfield Township is one of the oldest in the Hurunui

District. Leithfield’s historic hotel, the Old Leithfield, is the

meeting point for the Kowai Walk, a well maintained track

that heads towards the coastal selement of Leithfield

Beach. The Pegasus Bay winery in the Glasnevin area

features a restaurant awarded “NZ’s best casual dining”

in 2005.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Amberley Ward identify the following

three community outcomes as the most important:

1. Clean water and air

2. Water systems (water, storm water, sewerage)

3. Accessible health and social services

Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges

• Urban and commercial zoning in the Amberley

township area is presently undergoing extensive

review, following the Concept Plan process. It is

expected that this process will set the stage for ongoing

residential and commercial development.

• State Highway 1, and the projected continuing

increases in traffic volumes, will continue to stimulate

associated growth and development, whilst at the

same time placing responsibility on Council, the

community and Transit NZ to manage the associated

effects of such traffic. Road safety, especially in regards

to State Highway 1 traffic through Amberley’s town

centre is a key concern for Council.

• Amberley Ward’s locality acts as a great ‘gateway’ to

the Alpine Pacific Triangle. New Zealand’s tourism is

continuously on the rise. The major “icon” aractions

of the Alpine Pacific Triangle, such as the Waipara Wine

region, Hanmer Springs Alpine Village, Kaikoura, and

other areas and activities on route, offer opportunities

for further growth and profitable gains from the

Tourism Industry, and for Amberley and surrounding

areas in particular.

• One of the longer term challenges for the Amberley

Ward will be the possible demands to seal existing

37

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

gravel roads, to meet population growth, and

developers’ and residents’ expectations.

• An increase in Amberley Ward’s population,

particularly in the Amberley Township, also creates

a need for expanded community facilities. A new

swimming pool, for example, has been identified in

the Concept Plan process (although as this is still at a

concept stage it has not been allowed for in this plan).

Further expansion and development of the Amberley

Domain, beyond that presently planned, may be

necessary.

• An increase in population will also result in increasing

demand on potable water supply and quality.

• Amberley will see a more concentrated focus on road

safety strategies, due to its rising population and

growth in traffic.

• The new Pegasus Town development may create

possible adverse impacts on the Amberley Ward,

including posing a competition for growth, and

additional traffic volumes and longer commuting

times between Woodend and Christchurch.

• The Amberley Ward is an aging community with 21% of

its population aged 60 years and over (Stats NZ Census

2001). This results in retired sector requirements, such

as pensioner housing, demand on the medical centre,

etc.

Key Planning Assumptions

It is anticipated that the Amberley Ward will continue

to grow and develop at rates above the District average.

It is expected that this growth and development will

be widespread throughout the Ward, and that from a

residential viewpoint, it will incorporate all age groups,

from younger, single workers in the wine and tourism

industry, to families living in urban or “lifestyle” areas, to

an increasing number of retirees. State Highway 1 will be

both a major strength, and a challenge for the community.

The Amberley Concept Plan will be the major planning

initiative guiding development, at least in the next three

years.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Amberley Concept Plan

Projects arising from this process include:

• Re-zoning / Town-Planning Project

• Upgrade and beautify town centre $64,550

$51,000

$265,500

2009/10 $272,500

2010/11 $167,500

• Amberley Pavilion upgrade

• Town entrances - planting and signage

Transfer Station/Recycling Centre Relocation

• Public consultation

• Relocation of the Recycling Centre / Transfer Station

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+













Roading

AMBERLEY WARD

• $500,000 for road sealing in Georges Road (providing that

Land Transport New Zealand funding is secured)

Sewerage

• $240,000 for pond upgrade

• $490,000 to upgrade the oxidation ponds, including

irrigation extensions, power to site, aerators and screen

(assuming a 50% subsidy from Central Government)

• Progressive replacement of AC (asbestos cement) pipe with

PVC pipe: $88,000

$270,000







2012/13 $270,000


Water

Amberley Town

• $125,000 to replace AC pipes

• $492,000 for a new deep bore including well, pipeline to

reservoir and treatment



• $340,000 to replace AC pipe over three years




• $90,000 to construct an additional reservoir


Leithfield Beach

• $11,000 for new firefighting pump


• $112,000 for a new bore


• $240,000 to upgrade the Leithfield Outfall Drain


Amberley Beach

• Funding for an investigation into the Amberley Beach erosion

risk assessment and selement options

• $36,000 for Amberley Beach Renourishment



Public Toilets

Amberley Beach

• $52,000 to include caravan waste disposal services


Leithfield Village

• $50,000 for new toilets at Coulbeck Reserve


For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

38

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Amuri Ward Profile

40 Background and History

40 Present Profile

40 Ward Governance

41 Recreation and Visitor Attractions

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

41 Priority Community Outcomes

41 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

41 Key Planning assumptions

42 Key Projects

39

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Artwork: Aora Brons age 8

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Amuri Ward Profile

AMURI WARD

Background and History

The township of Waiau was the first of the three main

selements established in the area we today call the

Amuri Ward. It originated in the 1860s, and, due to the

ferry, the bridging of Waiau River, the opening of the road

to Kaikoura and the completion of the railway line, soon

became an important farm servicing and transport centre.

The development of Rotherham as a township followed in

1877, as it was laid out in order to aract labourers to the

district. Culverden was the last to be established and only

so due to the arrival of the railway in 1886, consequently

becoming the rail and coach, as well as the farming centre

for Amuri.

A secondary school department was established in

Culverden in 1960, making it the third high school in the

district, and the changed its status from a district high

school to an area school in 1977. The ‘Amuri Community

Health Centre’ opened in Rotherham in 1982.

Over the years, the Amuri has been an area of traditional

large scale farming, characterised in many cases by

continuous family ownership across several generations.

Up until 1986, the small, privately-owned alpine resort of

Mt Lyford was a high country station. When farming was

becoming difficult due to high snow risk in winter, the area

was given an alternative opportunity. The Mt Lyford alpine

village soon included roading, water supply, underground

power and phone service. The commercial ski field and

access way were developed to compliment the subdivision

below, and the entire area opened up following the

upgrading and sealing of the inland Kaikoura road. 1993

saw the extension of the ski field into the Terako Basin.

and to and from Hanmer Springs and Kaikoura.

• Farming developments in recent years include an

extensive number of conversions, from traditional

sheep farming to intensive and irrigated dairy

farming.

• Just 26km north of Waiau, Mt Lyford resort and ski

area offer various facilities and services, such as

accommodation, a Café, ski and snowboard hire,

alpine coaching, a wild ride terrain park and more.

• The Amuri Ward is home to three schools – an area

school in Culverden, and a primary school in each,

Waiau and Rotherham.

• A medical centre in Rotherham meets the majority of

the ward’s residents’ medical needs.

Amuri Ward

MT LYFORD

Present Profile

Population

Ward Governance

Rural

Urban

2001

Census

Total

Estimate

June 05

District Councilors are responsible for representing

the interest of their ward, seing Council policies and

monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

Population 1,140 675 1,815 1,920

• The Amuri Ward population has seen modest growth

in the past 5 years and makes up approximately 18%

of Hurunui District’s population as a whole.

• The Amuri Ward is centrally located in the Alpine

Pacific Triangle and acts as an essential access way to

the Hanmer Springs Alpine Village when travelling to

and from Hanmer Springs and Amberley / Waipara,

The Amuri Ward is currently represented by two

councilors: Wendy Doody JP (also Chair Works & Services)

and Judy Meikle JP (also Deputy Mayor).

Council commiees in the Amuri Ward are the Amuri Ward

Commiee, the Amuri Plains Rural Water Commiee,

the Balmoral Water Commiee, the Waiau Rural Water

Commiee, the Waiau Township Water Commiee,

Culverden Township Water Commieeand the Waiau

Reserve Commiee.

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Recreation / Visitor Attractions

The townships of Waiau and Rotherham are the epitome

of the small New Zealand rural town and great places

to visit, relax and enjoy the farmstay accommodations

widely available. Waiau is only a short drive from Mt

Lyford, Hanmer Springs or Culverden and offers some of

the best access to the Waiau River, where trout and salmon

are abundantly found. South of Rotherham, the delightful

country town of Culverden offers various farmstays, bed

and breakfasts and gardens to enjoy, making it a great

place to stay for those visitors seeking a rural New Zealand

experience.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Amuri Ward identify the following

community outcomes as the three most important:

1. Clean water and air

2. A healthy community

3. Accessible health and social services

Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges

• A particular long term challenges for the Amuri Ward

is the ward’s present shortage of farm labour, as well

as suitable, affordable housing.

• Another challenge, shared by much of rural small

town NZ, is the retention of many service businesses

in small townships, when local viability becomes

threatened by potential efficiencies of centralisation

and greater use of technology.

• Increasing fuel prices may have a challenging impact

of Amuri Ward’s economic wellbeing.

• Key long term opportunities include ongoing

prospects for tourist related activities and businesses,

maximising the associations with the Alpine Pacific

Triangle.

• There are opportunities for the Amuri area to become

an increasingly aractive residential location for

employees working in Hanmer Springs.

• Continuing development of Mt Lyford as a boutique

resort and ski area may create long term opportunities

benefiting the Amuri Ward’s economic development

and growth.

41

Key Planning Assumptions

Page 41

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Whilst it is anticipated that the Amuri Ward will continue

to grow at modest rates, the potential exists for more

substantial growth, as the Amuri is seen as an increasingly

aractive accommodation area for the workers of local

vineyards, dairy farms and the Hanmer Springs hospitality

industry. It is also expected that the Amuri will capitalise

on the benefits of tourist traffic. Through all of these

factors, it is projected that the townships of Culverden,

Rotherham and Waiau will continue to strengthen their

unique local community values and aractions.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Town Amenities

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+

Amuri Village Signage

• $15,500 signage in Culverden, Rotherham and Waiau



Culverden

• New footpaths on Moutainview Road, Montrose Street and

Lyndon Street over the next three years.




• Kerb and channelling at street corners to improve drainage

problems.




• Main Street beautification

• $8,100 to complete the stone wall






• $30,000 proposed for Rutherford Reserve ring-road


Rotherham

• Extend the footpath on Wilkin Street.

• Street lights in George Street.



• $27,000 for the Village Green in 2009/10


AMURI WARD

Waiau

• New footpaths in Leslie Street and Cheviot Street.

• Kerb and channelling in Hawkeswood Street.

• $10,000 for the Village Green






Waiau Fire Tanker

• A replacement rural fire tanker for Waiau


• Garaging for the rural fire tanker


Waiau Cemetery

• It is proposed to extend the Waiau Cemetery to ensure that

there will be adequate plots available to meet future demand.


Mt Lyford

• Land stability project and investigations


Amuri Community Medical Centre

• $145,000 to upgrade facilities √

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Key Projects

Water

Culverden

• $9,000 pipe extension

• $540,000 to progressively replace AC (asbestos cement) pipes

with PVC pipe over three years from 2013/14

Waiau Town

• $156,000 to replace AC pipe over two years from 2013/14

• $28,000 to replace reservoir roof in 2009/10

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+





INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Amuri Plains

• $32,000 to replace “under-spec” pipe

Waiau Rural

• Progressive replacement of AC pipelines:

$34,000

$25,000

$16,000

in 2009/10 $25,000

thereaer $18,000

Amuri Concept Plan

For Culverden, Rotherham and Waiau

• Zoning project

It is anticipated that various ‘yet-to-be-identified’ projects will fall out of

this process.

Rotherham Swimming Pool

• Maintenance upgrade

$16,000 over ten years

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

43




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√ √ √

√ √ √ √

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

CHEVIOT WARD

44

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Cheviot Ward Profile

46 Background and History

46 Present Profile

46 Ward Governance

47 Recreation and Visitor Attractions

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

47 Priority Community Outcomes

47 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

47 Key Planning assumptions

48 Key Projects

45

Page 45

Artwork: Kate Hunter age 12

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Cheviot Ward Profile

Background and History

In the 1950s, the Cheviot Township was a relatively seled,

stable community that was largely self-contained with

various trades and businesses. Cheviot is well-known for

its rural history, with its early sheep stations.

Cheviot Ward’s other townships were also well established

in the 1950s; Parnassus had a railway station, a sole-charge

school and some businesses, while Spotswood had a public

library. Gore Bay was a largely picnicking and holiday

venue with some permanent residents, while Conway Flat

was home to its own school.

The Cheviot Rural Water Supply was put in place in 1971,

with further extensions in 1980. Cheviot District High

School transformed to an area school in 1976, and in

1978, the township’s old hospital was converted to a new

medical centre.

to boil all drinking water. Funding a water scheme

to the level that would meet the official Drinking

Water Standard would mean a significant increase in

rates or water charges. Late in 2003, the Government

announced that it planned to review the provision of

subsidies for drinking-water supply. However, until the

Health (Drinking-Water) Amendment Bill and hence

final decisions have been passed, lile can currently

be done towards the improvement of Cheviot area’s

water.

• The Cheviot Ward is home to two schools – an area

school in the Cheviot Township, and a primary school

in Parnassus.

• The medical centre in the Cheviot Township meets the

majority of Cheviot Ward’s residents’ medical needs.

CHEVIOT WARD

Present Profile

Population

Rural

Urban

2001

Census

Total

Estimate

June 05

Cheviot Ward

Population 954 387 1,341 1,270

• The Cheviot Ward population is estimated to have

experienced a slight decline of around 70 people in

the past 5 years. Cheviot Ward’s residents make up

approximately 12% of Hurunui District’s population

as a whole.

• The State Highway 1 runs through the centre of

the Cheviot Township. This is a great strength

for development and growth, as it makes the

township highly accessible, as well as visible, while

simultaneously increasing tourism through traffic and

heavy transport.

• There is a present shortage of suitable sections to meet

urban development demand in Cheviot.

• Coastal property demand has created emerging conflict

between development interests and local feeling.

• Ongoing strength and importance of traditional

farming in the Cheviot economy mark the Cheviot

Ward. Cheviot Ward has a strong rural base with

recent developments in irrigation and viticulture.

• The water quality in the Cheviot Ward is poor, with

residents being reminded that they need to continue

Ward Governance

District Councillors are responsible for representing

the interest of their ward, seing Council policies and

monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Cheviot Ward is currently represented by two

councillors: Vincent Daly and Jamie McFadden (also Chair

Environmental Services).

The Cheviot Council commiees are the Cheviot Ward

Commiee, and Reserve Commiees at Spotswood,

Cheviot, Domme and Port Robinson.

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Recreation / Visitor Attractions

A variety of quality accommodation, from farm stays

and home stays to Hotels and Motels offers a slice of

Kiwi life in the Cheviot region. The township of Cheviot

offers great cafes, museum and golf course, while the

Cheviot Hills Domain and St Anne’s Lagoon have superb

picnic spots all year around. Gore Bay is nature’s treasure

trove, offering great surfing, amazing walks and popular

camping grounds. The Hurunui and Waiau Rivers are

easily accessible for salmon, trout and white bait fishing,

while Conway Flat is yet another stunning site for surf

casting. The area’s spectacular coastline provides for

watching whales and sea birds.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Cheviot Ward identify the following

community outcomes as the three most important:

1. Clean water and air

2. Sustainable land use

3. Water systems (water, stormwater, sewerage)

Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges

• There is a need for concept planning and growth

strategy for the Cheviot Township and the coastal

areas, predominantly Gore Bay and Port Robinson

area, with particular focus on coastal development

and urban planning.

• Cheviot area’s drinking water quality, and the

affordability of major upgrades, remain an ongoing

key long term challenge and focus.

• Key long term challenges include the impact of tourism

and tourist traffic on local services and amenities.

• Changes in Cheviot Ward’s land use, such as rising

numbers of vineyards, lifestyle blocks (particularly at

Gore Bay and Port Robinson), irrigation, and tourism,

may result in key long term opportunities and

challenges.

Key Planning Assumptions

We expect that there will be an increase in the number of

tourists travelling through the area, thereby providing

ongoing opportunities for growth and development

of associated activities. The local economy will also

benefit from ongoing farm investment and new business

developments such as viticulture. However, population

growth is projected to be restrained, mainly due to raising

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

fuel costs (excessive distances for workers commuting

outside the local area), as well as the lack of popularity as

a retirement area (as elderly residents tend towards areas

with more support services).

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Town Amenities

Cheviot

• Resurface footpaths in Hall Street, Cadman Street and

Seddon Street.

• Install two new street lights.

• Kerb and channelling replacement in Seddon Street.

Gore Bay

• Install a new streetlight in the township

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+





District Planning Project

• “growth strategy” to be developed for Cheviot


Civil Defence Satellite Phone

• New satellite phone for the Conway area √

CHEVIOT WARD

New Fire Appliance

• A new fire appliance for the Cheviot Rural Fire area

Coastal Impact Report

• Identify issues and options regarding the coastal selements

from the Conway to Motunau Beach



Sewerage

• Replacement of AC (asbestos cement) pipe with PVC pipe

from 2013:

$200,000 in 2013/14


$210,000 in 2014/15


$220,000 in 2015/16


Water

• $24,500 for new pumps


• $245,000 to install a new treatment plant for the main intake

(dependant on 50% subsidy from Central Government - total

cost $490,000)


• $65,000 to construct additional reservoirs for Cheviot Town

and Gore Bay


• $20,500 for a second well for the Parnassus scheme


• Progressive replacement of pipelines

$46,000


$31,000


$32,000


thereaer $35,000


For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

48

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Glenmark Ward Profile

50 Background and History

50 Present Profile

50 Ward Governance

51 Recreation and Visitor Attractions

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

51 Priority Community Outcomes

51 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

51 Key Planning assumptions

52 Key Projects

49

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Artwork: Holly Greenslade age 10

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Glenmark Ward Profile

GLENMARK WARD

Background and History

The area of Glenmark traditionally relied on a high

proportion of cash cropping to complement fat-lamb

production. The township of Waipara has its origins as

a railway town, at the junction of the main trunk line

and services heading west. Waipara led the way in rural

irrigation schemes by opening its No. 1 Rural Reticulated

Water Supply Scheme in 1986 - the first water harvesting

scheme in New Zealand. By 1999, the area had become

a significant wine production region, accommodating

fourteen wineries.

The smaller township of Greta Valley was created in the

late 1970s, complete with amenities, a primary school, a

church and a library service. Scargill owes its existence

to the Christchurch/Picton railway line, while Omihi

already housed some services including a primary school,

a Community Hall and a railway station in the 1950s. The

beach selement of Motunau Beach has expanded over

the past 50 years, with a third subdivision recently being

developed, complementing the many earlier “traditional

Kiwi baches” that characterise this selement.

Present Profile

Population

Rural

Urban

2001

Census

Total

Estimate

June 05

Pacific Triangle and acts as an important focal point of

the Glenmark Ward.

• A new, substantial $20 million investment, the Waipara

Wine Village, is due to open in 2007 on the SH1/SH7

intersection. The plans include restaurants, bars, large

scale corporate conference facilities, accommodation

and other features showcasing local Waipara wines

and products. This development is projected to

increase the international and domestic profile of the

area, and to aract further growth, development and

tourism to the area.

• The Canterbury regional landfill at Kate Valley is

located within the Glenmark Ward. Council has an

ongoing commitment to ensuring that this landfill

operates in line with its consent conditions, and that

the interests and values of the Hurunui community are

effectively represented and protected throughout the

planned 35 year life. A Community Trust, established

and funded by the landfill company, will provide

financial benefits to the neighbouring community,

primarily focused on Waipara. Because Council has

no involvement in this Trust or its disbursements, this

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan does not take

into account any community projects or developments

funded by the Trust.

• Glenmark There Ward are three primary schools in the Glenmark Ward

– Greta Valley, Omihi, and Waipara.

Population 840 291 1,131 1,180

• The Glenmark Ward population is estimated to have

experienced an increase of around 50 people in the

past 5 years. Glenmark Ward’s residents make up

approximately 11% of Hurunui District’s population

as a whole.

• The Waipara Valley offers ideal conditions for

growing premium quality grapes, the combination

of hot summer temperatures, well drained soil and

protection from the cool easterly wind makes for

award winning wines. It is the fastest growing wine

region in New Zealand with around 79 vineyards in

the Waipara valley covering more than 800 hectares

of plantings, including the extended Glasnevin area

of the Amberley Ward). The north facing moderately

sloping terrain provides an ideal sun trap for fruiting

vines, with pinot noirs and rieslings being regional

specialities.

• The township of Waipara is one apex of the Alpine

Ward Governance

District Councilors are responsible for representing

the interest of their ward, seing Council policies and

monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Glenmark Ward is currently represented by one

councilor: Kerry Prenter.

50

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There is currently no ward commiee representing the

Glenmark Ward. The Glenmark Ward has, however, the

Glenmark Reserve Commiee, the Waipara Residents

Association, the Waipara Wine Growers and the Waipara

Valley Promotions. In addition, Omihi, Scargill and

Motunau Beach have their own residents groups.

Recreation / Visitor Attractions

Waipara is one of New Zealand’s most rapidly expanding

wine areas, producing around 100,000 cases of award

winning wines in an average year. Offering daily wine tours,

as well as personal excursions, the Waipara area features

wineries and various superb accommodation operators..

The Glenmark Ward also features the Glenmark railway,

where one can recall the era of rural train travel with a

ride in vintage former NZR passenger carriages through

scenic Weka Pass on the 13-kilometre-long railway from

Waipara to Waikari, using vintage former NZR steam and

diesel locomotives.

The small selements of Greta Valley and Motunau are

both great places to retreat and enjoy the quiet country

ambience. Sea fishing, marine wildlife watching and diving

are just some of the great adventures on offer, while the

nearby township of Scargill depicts a wonderful farming

atmosphere.

The regional landfill at Kate Valley is located within the

Glenmark Ward. The landfill has areas of regenerating

native bush and wetlands which form the nucleus of the

Transwaste Tiromoana Bush Restoration plan. Transwaste

are planning for Tiromoana Bush to be a major national

feature, with recreational, educational and scientific

opportunities for present and future generations of New

Zealanders and tourists.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Glenmark Ward identify the following

three community outcomes as the most important:

1. Clean water and air

2. Community participation in decision making

3. Sustainable land use

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges

• The Waipara growth strategy and concept plan, when

completed, will identify long term opportunities for

the Glenmark Ward.

• Brand development and marketing of the Alpine

Pacific Triangle will result in ongoing substantial

opportunities relating to tourism in the Ward, both

those centred on the Waipara Wine region, and on

wider activities in the local area.

• Concurrently, it is expected that the Waipara

Wine Growers themselves will pursue expanded

opportunities for marketing the region, following

their initiatives with Enterprise North Canterbury to

establish centralised funding and the appointment of

a marketing director.

• The State Highway 1, State Highway 7, and Mt Cass

Road intersection will represent a key challenge for

Transit NZ and Council going forward, given present

concerns regarding safety and traffic volumes, ahead

of the opening of the Waipara Wine Village and

also expected increases in Kate Valley landfill truck

movements.

• Opportunities will be afforded by the funds available

from the Kate Valley Community Trust

• Key long term challenges may include the availability

of labour and housing to support Glenmark Ward’s

wine industry and tourism development.

• Future challenges are also likely to involve pressure

on local infrastructure due to an increase in Glenmark

Ward’s industry and population.

Key Planning Assumptions

Whilst farming and associated rural activities in the

Glenmark Ward are unlikely to change to any large degree

in the next ten years, the level of growth and development

in the wine and tourism areas is likely to be substantial,

resulting in associated demands and pressures on

infrastructure in the Waipara area.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Concept Planning

Waipara

• Develop a strategy with regards to the future design and

direction of Waipara.

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+


It is anticipated that various ‘yet-to-be-identified’ projects will fall

out of this process.

Town Amenities

• Complete the pedestrian networks in Glenmark Ward's three

townships:

Waipara

Greta Valley

Motunau Beach




Sewerage

Greta Valley

• Replace the wave band on pond at a cost of $27,000.


GLENMARK WARD

Water

Waipara

• $135,000 (local share) to install filtration an UV sterilization

treatment to intake (assuming a 50% subsidy from Central

Government).


• $81,000 to drill a second well.

• $20,000 to replace remaining galvanized pipe



• $42,000 to install a new reservoir in McKenzies Road


Hurunui

• $200,000 per annum to replace old lines.





• $21,000 to install security covers on reservoirs





• $15 - $30,000 every year for replacement of pumps, pressure

cylinders etc.





Scargill

• $17,000 contribution to upgrade Squash Club building √

For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

INTRODUCTION

Hanmer Springs Ward Profile

54 Background and History

54 Present Profile

55 Ward Governance

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

55 Recreation and Visitor Attractions

55 Priority Community Outcomes

55 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

55 Key Planning assumptions

56 Key Projects

53

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Artwork: Saffia Beluchi age 8

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Hanmer Springs Ward Profile

HANMER SPRINGS

WARD

Background and History

In its very early days, Hanmer Springs was primarily a

farm servicing centre for the local area, but the presence

of the hot springs made the township a popular visitor

destination. The Queen Mary Hospital opened in 1916,

owning and controlling the hot pools. As a result, Hanmer

Springs was the only township in the District at the end of

the 1940s to have water supply.

Hanmer Springs housed the first pre-school in the Hurunui

District which opened in 1942. Timber logging and

milling, servicing the surrounding forests, commenced in

1949. There have been subsequent changes of ownership

and operation of these surrounding forests over the years,

culmination in the recent closure of local milling, and Ngai

Tahu taking over ownership as part of New Zealand’s

treaty selements legislation.

By the 1950s, there were about as many holiday homes in

the township as there were permanent residences, along

with various tourist accommodations. Hanmer Springs

was the largest township in the district in the early 1950s

and in many ways, the most progressive. A sewerage

scheme was completed in 1972.

In its most recent years the Queen Mary Hospital was a

specialised facility for alcohol and drug rehabilitation,

eventually closing in 2003. Site owners, the Canterbury

District Health Board are presently in the process of

disposing of the site, and are working with Ngai Tahu

as part of the treaty selements requirements. These

developments have created extensive public interest, and

there is a very strong public call for the site to be retailed

in public ownership, recognising its national heritage and

natural values. The Hurunui District Council is presently

negotiating to secure a key 4.8ha part of the site as a public

reserve.

Present Profile

Population

the number of people during peak premium holiday

times can be as high as 6000.

• Hanmer Springs has experienced extensive growth in

its business sector, with many new businesses having

emerged within the past few years.

• The hospitality industry is the single largest employer

in the Hanmer Springs Ward, employing around 30%

of the ward’s full time workers (Stats NZ 2001 Census).

It is likely that this proportion had grown even further

in recent years.

• There are local town planning controls in place in

the Hanmer Springs Township. An updated growth

strategy plan is presently scheduled for completion in

early 2006.

• Historically, Hanmer Springs has always engulfed a

general ‘health and wellness’ theme. This was due to

the presence of the hotpools, with their relaxing and

rejuvenating purpose. In addition, Hanmer Springs’

hospital was prominent for recovering soldiers from

war. Today, the township still maintains its theme of

spiritual and physical wellness.

• The Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa is an

award winning tourist araction. Owned by the

Hurunui District Council, the complex entertains more

than 500,000 visitors per year. In 2004/05 the Thermal

Reserve had an increase in visitor numbers of 5% and

a surplus of $1.45m was achieved. A total of $410,000

was transferred from the Thermal Pools surplus for

the funding of district wide reserves.

• The Hurunui District Council is currently in

negotiation over the purchase of part of Queen Mary

land and buildings in order to provide for the future

prosperity of the Hanmer Springs Township.

• The Hanmer Springs Township is home to one primary

school.

• The medical centre located in the Hanmer Springs

Township provides most of the ward’s residents with

their medical assistance.

Rural

Urban

2001

Census

Total

Estimate

June 05

Population 186 660 846 1,110

• The Hanmer Springs Ward has experienced significant

growth in population in previous years. In June 2005,

the estimate population was 1110 residents; however,

there are around 630 holiday homes in the Hanmer

Springs Township, accounting for up to 1575 extra

people, which raises Hanmer Springs’ population to

2685 during peak holiday times. In addition, due to

Hanmer Springs’ popularity as a tourist destination,

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Ward Governance

District Councilors are responsible for representing

the interest of their ward, seing Council policies and

monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Hanmer Springs Ward is currently represented by one

councilor: Michael Malthus.

In addition, the Hanmer Springs Ward has the publicly

elected Hanmer Springs Community Board, chaired by

Alice Stielow.

Recreation / Visitor Attractions

Situated in a high country basin, the small Alpine Village

of Hanmer Springs is one of New Zealand's favourite

retreats, featuring the outdoor thermal pool complex, the

‘Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa’. Hanmer Springs

offers something for all tastes, from numerous short walks,

golf, horse riding and dining, to thrill seeking adventures

such as jet boating, white water raing, bungee jumping,

mountain biking and four-wheel driving.

The forest that surrounds the Hanmer Springs Township,

owned by Ngai Tahu, features numerous great walkways,

a ski field and mountain bike tracks.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Hanmer Springs Ward identify

the following three community outcomes as the most

important:

1. Beer quality of life for residents

2. Accessible health and social services

3. Clean water and air

Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges

• A long term challenge for the Hanmer Springs Ward

is to maintain annual visitor growth at the levels

seen in the recent years. While tourism marketing

and promotion will continue through both Council

and local endeavours, the reality appears to be that

tourism (nationally and regionally) is facing new

and substantial challenges resulting in lower growth,

internationally and domestically.

• Whilst the funding of the Queen Mary site purchase

and development is a key long term challenge for the

Hurunui District, the access and availability of this site

represents a substantial opportunity for the Hanmer

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Springs Ward. These opportunities for growth will

be extended by the stimulus of whatever private

development takes place on the balance of the site.

Long term security of access to the Heritage Forest

that surrounds the Hanmer Springs Township will

continue to be a challenge.

• A new medical centre is planned for the Hanmer

Springs Township.

• Increasing tourism pressures on core infrastructure

is a key long term challenge for the Hanmer Springs

Ward.

• The opportunity exists for Hanmer Springs to develop

its own unique brand position in the market place,

as a focal centre of “health, wellness, recreation and

relaxation”, a place to get away to and “chill out”

from the pressures and demands of modern society.

Such positioning would clearly differentiate Hanmer

Springs from other tourism destinations such as the

“adventure capital” of Queenstown.

Key Planning Assumptions

The Hanmer Springs area is predicted to continue to grow

at above District and national average rates. Whilst there

are some important challenges facing tourism as above, it

is assumed that on balance the impact of increased fuel

costs will make this destination even more appealing to the

Christchurch/Canterbury market, further strengthening

the already strong demand for holiday homes.

Hanmer Springs is a popular location for retirees and those

able to work from home and it is predicted that with the

advances in telecommunications and technology over the

coming years, that this market will further increase.

Other assumptions impacting on planning and budgeting

include the acquisition of the former Queen Mary Hospital

land and also the construction of a new medical centre.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Town Amenities

• $10,000 for promotional signage

• $20,000 contribution to netball courts upgrade

• Construct an information layby and welcome sign at the

township's entrance

• $390,000 for new hall facilities

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+





• $950,000 redevelopment of Hanmer Springs' commercial

centre



• New public toilet is planned for Chisholm Park



HANMER SPRINGS

WARD

Amuri Ave Oak Reserve

• Upgrade the reserve over three years. Improvements to

include grass resurfacing, daffodil plantings, and new refuse

bins.

Sewerage

• $302,000 to replace pipeline through Queen Mary Hospital

Reserve

• Upgrade ponds (including screens, aeration, flow buffers),

assuming a 40% subsidy from SWSS

$220,000

$325,000

• $134,000 to install main in Hanmer Springs Road

Water

• $84,000 pipe replacement

• $30,000 for additional reservoir

√ √ √







• $240,000 to install a new treatment plant (assuming a 35%

subsidy from TDSS)



• $170,000 to construct an additional reservoir


• $31,000 to reclad Conical Hill reservoir


Queen Mary Hospital

• $3.4m to purchase some of the ex Queen Mary Hospital land

• $55,000 per annum for grounds maintenance and security

services for ex Queen Mary Hospital land and buildings


√ √ √ √

Medical Centre

• $600,000 to construct a new medical centre building


For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

56

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

INTRODUCTION

Hurunui Ward Profile

58 Background and History

58 Present Profile

58 Ward Governance

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

58 Recreation and Visitor Attractions

58 Priority Community Outcomes

58 Long Term Opportunities and

Challenges

59 Key Planning assumptions

60 Key Projects

57

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Artwork: James Stewart age 10

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Hurunui Ward Profile

HURUNUI WARD

Background and History

In the 1950s, the township of Waikari was well established,

accommodating county offices, an extensive council works

yard and several businesses. The smaller township of

Hawarden began as a roads board coage and a store on

route taken by thousands of gold seekers who made their

way over the old Weka Pass Road in the 1860s. Hawarden

was also the service centre for a large farming area.

Establishments later included several businesses, a post

office, a Community Hall and a church. Water supplies

and sewerage works for Waikari and Hawarden completed

in 1966. Harwarden opened a school in 1927, later adding

the secondary department in 1930, which became the first

high school of the Hurunui District. A medical centre was

later opened in Waikari in 1971.

Present Profile

Population

Rural

Urban

2001

Census

Total

Estimate

June 05

Population 882 477 1,359 1,410

• The Hurunui Ward has experienced modest growth

in the last 5 years. Hurunui Ward’s residents make up

around 13% of Hurunui District’s total population.

• The Hurunui Ward is dominated by traditional

farming.

• The Hurunui Ward is home to two schools – one

primary school in Waikari and the ‘Hurunui College’,

which was the first area school in the Hurunui District,

located in Hawarden.

• Waikari houses a medical centre, which meets most

Hurunui Ward’s residents’ medical needs.

Ward Governance

District Councilors are responsible for representing

the interest of their ward, seing Council policies and

monitoring the Council’s performance. They are elected

every 3 years by the voters of their ward.

The Hurunui Ward is currently represented by one

councilor: Winton Dalley.

The Hurunui Ward has the Hurunui Ward Commiee,

the Hurunui Recreation (Racecourse) Reserve Commiee,

the Waikari Reserve and Hall Commiee, as well as the

Hawarden Recreation Reserve and Hall Commiee.

Recreation / Visitor Attractions

Waikari, first seled at the turn of the century, is renowned

for its Mäori cave art and provides access to the Mäori

rock drawings in the Weka Pass Reserve. Waikari and

Hawarden are the gateway to Lake Sumner Forest Park

that offers excellent fishing and hunting grounds. In

general, the natural outdoors paradise of the Hurunui

Ward features some of New Zealand’s most spectacular

mountain ranges, hillside, lakes and the headwaters of

the Hurunui River, while offering several accommodation

options for visitors. The Hurunui Ward is also home to the

iconic Hurunui Hotel.

Priority Community Outcomes

People living in the Hurunui Ward identify the following

three community outcomes as the most important:

1. Clean water and air

2. Personal safety (from violence, the etc)

3. Quality (pre-school/primary/secondary) education

Key Long Term Opportunities and Challenges

• Key long term opportunities within the Hurunui Ward

include the Hurunui Water Project.

58

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• Pressures on the small townships within the Hurunui

Ward, and the ongoing viability of some of the business

services remain a long term challenge for the Hurunui

Ward.

• Key long term challenges for the Hurunui Ward

include addressing ways to more effectively harness

the growth and traffic of the Alpine Pacific Triangle

to beer benefit the Hurunui Ward and the activities

located on and off the main highway route.

• The growth and development in the Waipara area (see


Glenmark Ward profile), and other developments in

dairy farming in the Amuri and tourism growth in

Hanmer Springs are all creating a possible impetus

for residential and urban development in Waikari

and Hawarden, thereby providing longer term

opportunities for the Hurunui Ward.

• The Hurunui Community Water Development Project

has identified a potentially viable opportunity to

irrigate, and to enhance water management for, a

significant area of the Hurunui catchment identified

by the working group. If the continuing investigations

and proposals progress as planned, major new

opportunities for primary production in the ward will

be created.

Key Planning Assumptions

We expect that this area will continue to grow at current

rates. The relatively ‘undiscovered’ lake area is becoming

increasingly popular and the ward is also beginning

to prove itself as an aractive accommodation area for

workers in the local vineyards, dairy farms and Hanmer

Springs hospitality industry. Council will follow closely

the progress of the working group on the Hurunui Water

Development Project, and assist where possible.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES

COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

59

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APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Key Projects

Town Amenities

• Continue upgrade of footpaths, and kerb and channelling

facilities in Waikari and Hawarden.

• Review / plan for Princes St

Where to find further

information

Year Planned

06/07 07/08 08/09 2009+

√ √ √ √


Hawarden Public Toilets

• Replace public toilets.


Satellite Phone

• New Civil Defence satellite phone for Hawarden.


Sewerage

Hawarden

• $225,000 to upgrade ponds if subsidy available.

• $95,000 to install aerators on pond.



HURUNUI WARD

Waikari

• $8,000for new sewerage pump and switchboard

Water

Hawarden - Waikari

• $7,000 for new pump

• $20,000 to replace main along Princes Street.




• $5,000 per annum to replace other pipes.





• $760,000 to provide for replacement of AC (asbestos cement)

pipe in 2013/14


• $130,000 for replacement of meters and valves in 2013/14


Hurunui

• $13,000 for new storage tanks


• $200,000 per annum to replace old lines.





• $21,000 to install security covers on reservoirs



• $15 - $30,000 every year for replacement of pumps, pressure

cylinders etc.





For more information on these projects please refer to the Activity Section of this document

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Council Activities

62 Introduction

62 Measuring and Reporting Progress

62 Significant Negative Effects

65 Community Services and Facilities

67 Activity 1: Library

72 Activity 2: Local Facilities and Maintenance

78 Activity 3: Property

81 Activity 4: Public Toilets

83 Activity 5: Cemeteries

86 Activity 6: Grants and Service Awards

89 Growth and Development

91 Activity 1: Tourism

94 Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

97 Activity 3: Economic Development

100 Environment and Safety

102 Activity 1: Resource Management/Planning

107 Activity 2: Civil Defence

110 Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

113 Activity 4: Building Compliance

116 Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor Licensing

119 Activity 6: Animal Control

122 Utility Services / Infrastructure

124 Activity 1: Roading Network

130 Activity 2: Solid Waste Household Collection

133 Activity 3: Transfer Stations

136 Activity 4: Sewerage

141 Activity 5: Stormwater/Drainage

144 Activity 6: Water Supply

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Artwork: Eloise Adorian age 9

153 Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools

and Spa

158 Governance

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Council Activities

Introduction

This section is about what the Council intends to do,

particularly over the next 3 years, and in some cases,

longer. ‘Activity’ is the term given to the services and

functions that Council is involved in, from public toilets,

to roads, to libraries.

Council activities are grouped into six broad categories:

Community Services and Facilities

• Growth & Development

• Environment and Safety

• Utility Services/Infrastructure

• Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

• Governance

The following pages go into detail about each category

and its associated activities. The format for each is similar

although some information is relevant for some activities

and not for others. For each activity, you will be able to

find out:










Background to the activity

How the activity will contribute towards the

achievement of community outcomes

What the current situation is in relation to the

activity

What Council’s future plans are in relation to the

activity

How the activity is funded

How the activity is maintained and operated

Assumptions and risks that are associated with

the activity

How we measure or monitor our progress

Financial forecasts

Measuring and Reporting our Progress

We are responsible for monitoring the achievement of the

community outcomes and reporting the findings. Council

activities are linked to the community outcomes with

relevant performance measures so that we can measure

our progress towards achieving the desired outcomes.

Performance measures for each community outcome are

detailed in the Community Outcome section.

For each council activity, you are able read about our

performance measures linked with that activity in this

section. The ‘strategic goal’ is the long term vision Council

strives to achieve. Our ‘target’ depicts the exact, quantifiable

result we are working towards achieving over a period of

time. We also show ‘what we do towards achieving the

target’, as well as the ‘information source to monitor our

progress’ towards achieving the target, and ultimately, our

strategic goal.

Significant Negative Effects

In considering whether any negative effects that an

activity may have are significant, the council takes into

consideration the likely impacts and consequences for:

– the current and future social, economic,

environmental, or cultural well-being of the

district

– anyone who is lkely to be particularly affected or

interested

– its capacity to perform its role and the financial

and other costs of doing so

Activities that have been assessed as potentially having

significant negative effects on the social, economic,

environmental, or cultural well-being of the local

community are outlined below:

Property

Pensioner housing is currently only available in Amberley,

Cheviot, Hanmer Springs and Waikari. This may

inadvertantly have social and cultural impacts on the age

demographics in both in local communities as the elderly

population becomes concentrated in certain areas only.

This may result in higher demands on some local services

and facilities.

Public Toilets

Potential economic, environmental and social effects are

possible from this activity, as public toilets can aract

vandalism and other associated anti-social behaviour.

Councils main efforts in minimizing these impacts is to

deter such behaviour by building all new public toilets in

areas that are highly visible, lit and accessible.

Economic Development

Environmental effects are to be expected from an increase

in population; these may include an increase in waste, air

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and noise pollution, traffic, and pressure on water and

sewerage schemes.

Negative effects on cultural and social well-being are also

anticipated as a result of an increasing population and

number of new businesses as this is potentially threatening

to the district’s rural identity and hence, isolating longterm

residents.

Economic negative effects include the anticipated increase

in the cost of housing and competition for long-standing

local businesses.

Planning for growth and development requires decisions

that may adversely affect the well-being of some in the

community in order to secure long term community wellbeing

and sustainable development.

However, in assessing the negative effects, the economic

value of a sustainable population and vibrant business

culture and what this adds to the district needs also to be

considered.

Tourism

Environmental well-being is likely to be affected by an

increase in tourism and hence, people to the district, as

this results in an increase in waste, air and noise pollution,

traffic, and pressure on water and sewerage schemes.

Assessment of the significance of these negative effects

takes into considerastion that there is a corresponding

value from the tourism industry to the economic wellbeing

of the district.

Visitor Information Centre

The Visitor Information Centre aims to assist and aract

visitor to the district, and to keep them in the area for

longer. An increase in tourism results in the negative

environmental impacts described above.

Another negative effect from the impacts of increasing

numbers of visitors, particularly to the Hanmer Springs

area are the additional resources expected to mitigate any

negative impacts.

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa

This activity aracts significant numbers of tourists into

the township. An increase in tourism and hence, people

to the area, results in an increase in waste, air and noise

pollution, traffic, and pressure on water and sewerage

schemes as identified previously.

The increasing population and number of houses and

businesses being developed in Hanmer Springs, has

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

created an increase in the cost of housing and competition

to local businesses, and thus impacted on the current

and future cultural, social and economic well-being of

the local community from the threat to rural identity and

disadvantage to long term residents who moved into the

area before the growth.

Roading

Hurunui’s land transport network provides people a high

degree of mobility. The economic and social benefits have

some environmental costs. High volumes of traffic affect

residential amenity. The most common effects are noise,

lighting and air quality. Dust from unsealed roads causes

a nuisance on neighbouring properties and impacts on

road safety due to decreased visibility.

Motor vehicles emissions effect air quality and have the

potential to diminish the water quality of adjacent streams

from the vehicle discharge run off from the roads.

Sewerage

Environmental, economic, cultural and social well-being

may all be affected by this activity.

The disposal of treated effluent to land and waterways

carries physical and health risks, although these are

minimised by ensuring that the reticulation and disposal

systems comply with the appropriate resource consents.

All facilities are based around pond treatment, which

means any overflow of failure at these locations will

involve release of treated or partially treated material.

The lack of reticulated sewerage systems is affecting the

economic wellbeing of some local communities, however

the cost of installing such a system may have an even

bigger negative effect.

Stormwater / Drainage

There is a potential for negative impact on the environment

and cultural well-being generated by this activity, but this

is minimised by ensuring the disposal of water is done

in a manner than minimises contaminants and eases

peak flows. Drainage systems may not always cope with

changes in volumes of rainfall with subsequent negative

effects of flooding on roads and properties. This may cause

additional social problems in living quality, public health

and access to and safety of transport systems. However,

such problems are mitigated by provision of stormwater

systems to cope with flooding.

Drain clearances can have short-term adverse effects on

biodiversity, ecosystems and water quality.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Water Supply

There is potential for negative effects on the environmental

and cultural well-being of the community if there is

excessive abstraction of water. Abstraction is managed to

minimize the chance of outages or disruption to supply.

There are also potential negative public health effects in

providing water in some areas that does not meet current

drinking water guidelines for biological contaminants.

Council currently issues public “boil water” notices for

on-demand networks at times when positive samples are

detected.

Plan Review/Public Consultation

The outlined approach in relation to each of our Council

activities will be updated on a continuous basis as

circumstances change. It will also be comprehensively

reviewed at intervals of not less than three years via a

special consultative procedure, primarily to coincide with

the review of the long term plan. The next known review

will be in 2009.

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Community Services and Facilities

Overview

Community Services and Facilities deals with six separate

activities that Council undertakes in order to improve our

community’s well-being and strive towards achieving our

community outcomes:

• Activity 1: Library

• Activity 2: Local Facilities and Maintenance

• Activity 3: Property

• Activity 4: Public Toilets

• Activity 5: Cemeteries

• Activity 6: Grants and Service Awards

Why is Council Involved?

Council is involved in Community Services and Facilities

in order to provide for the social and cultural well-being

of its people.

All of the activities within the ‘Community Services and

Facilities’ group are to do with ensuring our communities

have the type of facilities and services reasonably expected

to be provided by Council. For some, there is a statutory

requirement for Council to be involved, for example:

cemeteries and parks and reserves.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Community Services and Facilities category of

activities primarily contributes to the community outcome

“A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play”. It is important

for people to have a strong sense of community and a sense

of belonging, and to have opportunities to participate in

leisure, art and cultural activities. Council ensures essential

services are provided to meet community expectations.

Emergency Management

Council is developing a business continuity plan to detail

the procedures that are to be followed in an emergency.

This is to enable essential services to continue to function

to the fullest possible extent, even though this may be at

a reduced level, during major breakdown or during and

aer any civil emergency.

In an extreme emergency, most local facilities and services

are not considered an essential service.

Further Information

The following page provides financial information

relating to the Community Services and Facilities group of

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

activities for the next 10 year period.

The remainder of this section gives more information

about the six separate community services and facilities

activities undertaken by Council.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 10 Years

Community Services and Facilities

COMMUNITY SERVICES

AND FACILITIES

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - - - - - - - - -

Targeted Rates 947,503 1,019,245 1,088,583 1,175,043 1,268,739 1,362,092 1,440,135 1,501,582 1,564,759 1,578,927 1,621,639

Development Impact Fees 188,928 257,622 257,622 257,622 257,622 257,622 257,622 257,622 257,622 173,922 148,922

User Fees 440,942 440,235 448,197 457,208 465,598 473,697 480,405 487,682 491,887 500,392 503,224

Interest Received - - - - - - - - - - -

Subsidies & Grants 22,625 15,500 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

Other Income - - - - - - - - - - -

Total Activity Income 1,599,998 1,732,602 1,799,402 1,894,874 1,996,960 2,098,411 2,183,162 2,251,886 2,319,268 2,258,241 2,278,785

Expenditure

Operational Costs 2,437,219 2,438,222 2,454,256 2,555,566 2,643,609 2,730,908 2,832,308 2,860,141 2,903,135 2,931,081 2,961,694

Interest - - - - - - - - - - -

Depreciation 106,856 279,241 329,301 339,292 343,520 347,597 351,523 355,147 358,318 361,338 364,207

Operating Costs 2,544,075 2,717,463 2,783,557 2,894,858 2,987,129 3,078,505 3,183,831 3,215,288 3,261,453 3,292,419 3,325,901

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (944,077) (984,861) (984,155) (999,984) (990,170) (980,093) (1,000,668) (963,401) (942,185) (1,034,178) (1,047,116)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 5,053,683 5,499,875 634,451 1,152,898 877,566 554,787 344,519 313,473 334,654 402,601 408,411

- Renewals - - - - - - - - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - - - - - - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 5,053,683 5,499,875 634,451 1,152,898 877,566 554,787 344,519 313,473 334,654 402,601 408,411

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - - - - - - - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded 58,000 84,000 86,604 89,208 91,560 93,828 96,012 98,028 99,792 101,472 103,068

Funding Required 5,939,760 6,400,736 1,532,002 2,063,674 1,776,176 1,441,053 1,249,176 1,178,846 1,177,047 1,335,306 1,352,458

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 774,274 700,112 740,294 804,810 791,249 779,650 711,106 642,687 673,263 587,957 515,074

Loans (Net) - - - - - - - - - - -

HSTR Surplus 620,000 660,000 760,000 760,000 810,000 860,000 960,000 1,060,000 1,060,000 1,160,000 1,257,817

Reserves 4,545,486 5,040,624 31,708 498,864 174,926 (198,597) (421,931) (523,841) (556,215) (412,651) (420,432)

Total Funding 5,939,760 6,400,736 1,532,002 2,063,674 1,776,176 1,441,053 1,249,176 1,178,846 1,177,047 1,335,306 1,352,458

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Activity 1: Library

Background

Council is involved in providing a public library service as

a public good. Public libraries have a fundamental role in

the development and maintenance of a democratic society

and have an impact on the culture, education, economy

and development of its communities. Libraries do this by

collecting, organising, preserving and providing access

to resources in a range of formats. Library staff help

and support people to effectively access and use library

materials.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Library activity contributes to the Community

Outcomes “A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play”, and

“Skills and Education for Work and Life”. Libraries provide

physical community resources, support educational needs

through access to information, and education programmes.

Libraries promote cultural heritage by collecting and

preserving resources, and provide for leisure and cultural

interests.

Current Situation

Council’s library system was established in 1993 and consists

of eight libraries with five of these sharing premises with

school libraries. The new and improved District Library

(the Hurunui Memorial Library) is based in Amberley

and is the administrative centre for the district. Branch

libraries with paid staff are based at Hanmer Springs,

Amuri, Cheviot and Hawarden. Volunteer community

libraries are at Greta Valley, Waiau and Leithfield.

Volunteers are active at all libraries and support the library

service with many hours of their time. The “Friends of the

Hurunui District Libraries” was formed in 2002 to support

the service and has raised a substantial amount to purchase

library resources.

All items held by the district’s libraries are listed on the

online library catalogue (the OPAC). There are a number

of online databases available both in the library and on

the website which provide access to a large number of

electronic resources such as magazines, newspapers and

reference materials. As well as online databases the library

collection includes talking books, videos and DVDs, music,

large print books, magazines and newspapers, jigsaws, a

broad range of books and an up-to-date reference material.

An interlibrary loans service allows access to resources

held in other New Zealand libraries.

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Plans for the Future

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Since the opening of the new Hurunui Memorial Library

in Amberley, there has been substantial growth in

membership and usage. Services are expanding to meet

these needs, including children’s programmes, adult

literacy training, and continuing education programmes.

The number of online resources will be increased to meet

the demands of people wishing to access the library online

from home or work. A new ‘gateway’ to our internet will

enhance search options and sort data into an accessible

and usable manner.

The Hurunui libraries plan to be one of the major drivers

in the co-ordination of our local history resources, working

with other established organisations in the community to

list contents, digitise resources and provide online access.

This will enable people to identify and locate heritage data

and items with more ease.

Increasingly, protecting valuable heritage items concerning

the Hurunui is of concern. National funding will be

made available to digitise local collections of photos and

documents for electronic access and the library will play a

leading role in this. This will be an important contribution

toward preserving our heritage.

Access to the library web page and its online resources is

expected to grow with an accompanying increase in visitors

to the physical libraries. The library will also investigate

some alternative forms of service delivery, such as remote

access or a speedy delivery service.

In the technology field, there are expected to be substantial

changes. A self issue machine will be installed at the

Hurunui Memorial Library in 2006. External funding

will be applied for to supply audiovisual aids, such as

big screens, computer banks, ‘smart’ whiteboards, digital

projectors, and more. A new look webpage will present a

number of new resources, including the Internet Gateway.

This is an organized and evaluated collection of internet

sites including all NZ sites. Further online databases will

be added as part of the library collection. Newsleers, latest

acquisitions, event and news boards will all be available in

electronic formats.

The support that the library can offer to the community

in education field is a major new focus. The library

will continue to explore ways of sharing resources and

working with schools in the district. As well as commiing

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

LIBRARY

to holiday programmes for children, the library will offer

story times, adult and community education classes,

cultural opportunities, displays, and literacy aids. One of

the very important roles for the public libraries is to teach

customers how to navigate, assess, and select form the huge

amount of information available in today’s ‘knowledge’

world and the Hurunui Libraries will be offering training

in this.

The emphasis on staffing skills is expected to continue to

grow alongside a need to supply increasingly complex,

widespread, and changing customer needs. Training and

supporting staff will be pivotal to the ability to supply an

efficient and resourceful library service. The changing face

of volunteering in the rural areas that has been decreasing

numbers may have some impact on the ability to supply

such a wide geographical coverage of libraries in the

future.

Funding

Operational

User charges apply for some internet and library

services to cover actual costs. The balance is split 75%

District Uniform Annual Charge and 25% District Rate

on Capital Value known as the Library rates.

If the Council decides to apply surplus from the Hanmer

Springs Thermal Reserve Operation the amount of the

contribution is subtracted from the District Rate.

Capital Expenditure

Significant Capital Expenditure on land and building

will be funded from Council Reserves, loans and if any

of this Capital Expenditure caters for future growth,

then that portion of the expenditure that relates to

growth will be funded from future units of demand via

Development Contributions and loans.

The Council recognises that the residents and ratepayers

of the local ward may prefer an enhanced building but

this would cost more than the Council is willing to

contribute. If there was sufficient support from the local

ward then this will be funded by a loan and financed by

that ward concerned.

Maintenance and Operating

Council manages its library service through the District

Librarian and library staff, with support from volunteers.

Of the 8 libraries, 3 are managed by volunteers. All

libraries have local commiees which raise funds and have

input into library policies through the Hurunui Advisory

Commiee.

Another commiee, the Library Commiee, is a

subcommiee of Council and consists of 3 Councilors and

a representative of each of the Board of Trustees of the

Area Schools. This commiee meets four times a year and

oversees the running of the library service.

The Council owns the following:

– Stock – all stock purchased with Council funding

is owned by Council. Items donated or locally

fundraised may either be vested in the Council or

owned as local assets.

– Buildings – Council owns the library buildings at

Amberley, Hanmer Springs and Waiau. Leithfield

Library Inc owns its own building and the other

libraries are situated in schools.

– Technology – All soware, hardware and operating

systems are owned by Council and the library soware

is shared with Hurunui College and Amuri Areas

School. Internet access is provided by the Council in

Cheviot , Hawarden, Hanmer Springs, Amberley and

Amuri.

Assumptions and Risks

The Hurunui District Libraries are important for the social

and cultural wellbeing of the residents of the Hurunui

District, and therefore, Council will continue to have a role

in providing this service.

It is envisaged that usage will continue to increase, and

that the level of service will also continue to increase as

the ability to visit the library 24/7 through online access

grows.

Future education reviews and restructuring could

determine the availability of schools to host public library

services and alternative means of supply could be required

which may impact on Council’s library service.

Communication networks in the rural areas may not

always be able to support the technology needs of the

library.

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Performance Measures 2006-2016

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Library Goal: To provide a service that will support and encourage the residents of the

Target

To increase usage of the

library

community to meet and extend their educational, recreational, cultural and

information needs

Customers are satisfied with

the library service

What will we do towards

achieving the target

How will we know we have

met our target

Promote and encourage use of Borrowing books, CDs, magazines

etc increases as follows:

services by assessing customer

needs,providing a variety of 5%

library resources, keeping the 3%

library website current and interesting

2%

Library website visits increase

as follows:

10%

5%

5%

Undertake an annual residents

satisfaction survey

At least 80% of residents

are satisfied with the library

service

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +







√ √ √ √

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Library membership is active Have libraries in local communities

and resources available on

line

Members of the library have

used their library card at least

bi annually

To introduce new services Assess customer needs and Childrens programmes are

and programmes to the library

develop appropriate programmes run in each school holiday

including various educational and period

special interest programmes

At least one adult programme

will be held annually

Increase the range of adult

literacy material by:

50%

10%

5%

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√ √ √ √












APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Target

What will we do towards achieving How will we know we have

the target

met our target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To extend the range of audio

visual aids in the library

Apply for external funding for Purchase a plasma TV for the

the purchase of electronic items to Hurunui Memorial Library

enhance the resources currently

available

Purchase additional

computers to form a

computer bank in the

Hurunui Memorial Library




Purchase further high tech

electronic gear ('smart whiteboard',

digital projectors etc)


To have access to local history Collaborate with organisations

resources within the Hurunui and groups involved in collecting

District

and storing local history items

Volunteers continue be Volunteers are encouraged and

involved in the Hurunui provided with training

District libraries

Access to local history items

held throughout the Hurunui

District are digitised and

available to all (subject to

external funding)

√ √

No less than one training/information

session is held each

√ √ √ √

year

LIBRARY

Volunteers numbers remain

constant in each of the 8

libraries in the district

√ √ √ √

Improving Services 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Major Projects 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Replacement and

Introduce an internet

gateway to manage and sort

internet data for ease of use

$3,000 $3,100 $3,200

update of stock in

libraries (collection

items)

$58,000 $57,736 $59,472

New online subscription to

publications such as Briania

Encyclopedia

$2,000 $2,050 $2,100

Adult literacy material

and children's holiday

programmes

$2,000 $2,050 $2,100

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates 27,000 27,000 27,000 27,000

Development Impact Fees 40,000 38,200 38,200 38,200

User Fees 40,385 42,700 44,024 45,347

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 107,385 107,900 109,224 110,547

Expenditure

Operational Costs 601,040 508,296 527,778 540,050

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - 150,500 155,681 160,362

Operating Costs 601,040 658,796 683,459 700,412

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (493,655) (550,896) (574,235) (589,864)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 166,000 70,500 57,736 59,472

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 166,000 70,500 57,736 59,472

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded 58,000 84,000 86,604 89,208

Funding Required 601,655 537,396 545,367 560,128

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 560,163 475,025 509,151 567,620

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - 43,680 (1,764)

Reserves 41,492 62,371 (7,464) (5,728)

Total Funding 601,655 537,396 545,367 560,128

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DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 2: Local Facilities and Maintenance

LOCAL FACILITIES

AND MAINTENANCE

Background

The Council activity Local Facilities and Maintenance

involves the provision and preservation of the district’s

medical centres, halls, parks and reserves, swimming

pools and township facilities (footpaths, garden plots,

grass verges etc).

Council is involved in this activity to ensure that local

amenities (facilities that service a Ward) are maintained to

standards appropriate and acceptable to the community,

In the case of parks and reserves, Council has a statutory

requirement under the Reserves Act 1977 to do so.

Council buys land for community facilities in advance of

urban development when it can be purchased at a lower

cost. This ensures that where possible, Council can provide

amenities to meet community needs.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Local Facilities and Maintenance activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “A Desirable Place

to Live, Work and Play”, as Council provides these facilities

and services for social and recreational use. It is important

that these are affordable and relevant to the community, as

well as accessible, safe and healthy. Volunteers throughout

the community are a critical component to the continuation

of many of these facilities and services.

Current Situation

Medical Centres - There are currently three Council owned

medical centres in the Hurunui District which are located

in Cheviot, Rotherham and Waikari. Council also provides

medical practitioners’ residences in Cheviot, Rotherham

and Hanmer Springs.

Halls - Council owns and maintains 14 buildings that are

largely used to hold meetings, events, indoor sports and

social functions. Many of these buildings are War Memorial

halls or historic buildings.

Parks and Reserves - There are currently 160 parks, reserves

and recreation areas in our district, comprising of the

Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve, 9 parks, picnic areas or

playgrounds, 6 camping grounds, and 146 developed and

undeveloped reserves and plantation areas. The Council is

in the process of negotiating to increase its reserve network

by trying to secure 4.8 hectares of the former Queen Mary

Hospital Site in Hanmer Springs.

Swimming Pools - The two Council owned swimming pools

in the district, other than Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools

and Spa, are located in Amberley and Rotherham. The

Amberley pool is covered and the Rotherham pool is

uncovered but neither is heated. They are both available

to the public during the summer months only. Only the

Amberley pool is staffed. The Rotherham pool is managed

by the local swimming club and school who determine

who uses the pool. The swimming club and the school,

are primary users of the Rotherham pool.

Township Maintenance - Township maintenance covers areas

such as street cleaning, grass mowing, street rubbish bin

clearance, and the maintenance of footpaths and garden

areas. Each of our wards pays an amenity rate that funds

in part the maintenance and operation for works and

services within that ward. Localised rating enables people

to have a say on where their rates are spent.

Plans for the Future

Council’s primary goal is to maintain existing local

facilities to a suitable standard depending on their use.

The demand for local facilities and maintenance plans is

assessed by analysing various data including residential

and business growth paerns, visitor information, facility

usage paerns, surveys and submissions. Growth in the

Hurunui district, and increasing numbers of tourists

visiting the area indicates that demand for good facilities,

including parks and reserves is likely to increase in future

years.

There has been a recent trend for townships to be more

active regarding planning for the future. Concept

township planning has been undertaken in Amberley and

Hanmer Springs. Amuri ward’s townships are currently

undergoing their concept planning, and Cheviot is to

commence urban zoning planning in 2007. Waipara

is looking to develop a future design strategy for their

township, which is undergoing changes due to the wine

industry growth in the area.

Projects that will be carried out to manage the impact

of growth are set out in the Development Contributions

Policy (page 234).

Known township plans are summarized in the Ward

Section of this plan. Long term planning is necessary so

that Council can make provisions for the purchase and

development land for future use. Known plans for the

future include:

Medical Centres – A new medical centre is being developed

in Hanmer Springs to meet the changing needs of the local

community. There are no other plans for medical centres

in the District other than maintaining them.

Halls – The Amberley Pavilion will undergo an upgrade in

the years from 2007 to 2008. Also, the Hanmer Springs

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community hall is to be refurbished in 2006/07.

Parks and Reserves – A major expenditure planned during the

life of this Plan is for the purchase of some of the former

Queen Mary Hospital land. The area of land proposed to be

purchased has two nationally important heritage buildings

standing on it. The purchase of this land will enable future

development of the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and

Spa. Importantly, however, this land which is regarded as

special and unique due to its beautiful botanical gardens,

and its history and former use as a soldiers’ and later, a

rehabilitation hospital, will be retained for public use.

Negotiations over the land have been a lengthy and a

complex process between Council, Ngai Tahu and the

District Health Board.

Should Council purchase the land and the historic buildings

sited on the Queen Mary land, Council will seek funding

from external sources to make the buildings usable. In the

meantime, Council will be responsible for the security of

any historic buildings it purchases.

Future plans regarding the Hanmer Springs Thermal

Reserve is provided in more detail in the activity section

called, ‘Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa’.

Swimming Pools – The Amberley swimming pool has been

the subject of much discussion with regard to upgrading

and heating it to extend the swimming season and aract

a wider range of people. Whereas a decision has not yet

been reached, the Amberley Ward is still considering

options and costs to improve this facility. In the meantime,

both pools will continue to be maintained.

Township Maintenance – Various township upgrades are

planned to occur over the next few years. Further detail is

outlined in the Ward Plans earlier in this document.

Funding

Medical Centres –Council funds up to $150,000 for the

provision of medical buildings, which in turn is funded

from the district rate. The balance is funded from the

amenity rate for what ever community is served by the

medical building.

The operational charge of medical centres is paid by

100% user charges with any shortfall funded by the

Uniform Annual Charge within the relevant ward.

Capital expenditure is loan funded by a Uniform Annual

Charge within the relevant ward. If Council decides that

the district should contribute, then the amount of the

contribution is subtracted from the loan. If any of the

capital expenditure caters for future growth, then that

portion of the expenditure that related to growth will be

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

funded from future units of demand via Development

Contributions and loans.

Halls – A rental charge the market will stand, with the

shortfall met from a Uniform Annual Charge on the ward.

If any of the Capital Expenditure caters for future growth,

then that portion of the expenditure that relates to growth

will be funded from future lots or units of demand via

Development Contributions.

Parks and Reserves – Capital works on reserves are funded

either from money collected from revenues raised

within the reserve network, rate income or development

contributions received principally from subdivision. In

the case of the proposed purchase of the ex Queen Mary

Hospital land, this will not be a direct cost via rating, as

the purchase will be funded from reserves and repaid

from income generated from the Hanmer Springs Thermal

Pools and Spa. The development of the land, for recreation

purposes will be funded via development contributions.

Any work carried out on the buildings for improvements

associated for reuse in the meantime will be sourced from

external funding providers including central government.

Maintenance on reserves is generally funded from rate

money. Depending on a reserve’s categorization (as a

District Reserve, or a District/Amenity Reserve, or an

Amenity Reserve), this will either be amenity rate funded

or district rate funded. Further information is explained

in the Finance and Revenue Policy included within this

document.

Swimming Pools – The cost of operating and maintenance of

swimming pools is a charge to the local ward amenity

rates. Although swimming pool fees are charged to

users, the total revenue generated only contributes a small

amount toward the total cost of the pools outgoing costs.

Township Maintenance – Township maintenance is funded by a

100% local Uniform Annual Charge on the ward.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to retain ownership of the properties and

facilities as outlined in this section. Although the District

employs some part-time gardeners and cleaners, most

work in this activity area is conducted by contractors.

Council acts as an administering body for a large number

of parks and reserves within the Hurunui District. The

parks and reserves are either owned by Council or vested

in Council to administer and maintain. Those that are

vested are owned by the Crown. Council has a reserve

management structure comprising of a number of Reserve

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Commiees. Delegation of power has been given to

these commiees for the day to day maintenance and

development. Many halls are also managed by the Reserve

Commiees or Hall Commiees.

Performance Measures

Assumptions and Risks

• Expected continued growth in the district poses

issues for rate payers when having to fund facilities to

match residents’ and visitors’ expectations. Given the

rural nature of the district, and consequential small

population, the costs can pose challenges.

• It is expected that the purchase of part of the former

Queen Mary Hospital land will eventuate, if this was

not to proceed it would limit expansion opportunities

at the Thermal Reserve Pools and Spa.

Local Facilities and Maintenance Goal: To ensure that local communities have suitable

amenities and that townships are well maintained

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

LOCAL FACILITIES

AND MAINTENANCE

To ensure that parks and Employ contractors to maintain

reserves are well maintained and garden parks and reserves

for the enjoyment of residents

and visitors

Undertake an annual residents

satisfaction survey

To encourage recruitment and Provide medical buildings in the

retention of primary health rural areas of Cheviot, Hanmer

professionals in rural areas Springs and Rotherham

Contracts monitoring records

confirm work done as per

contract specifications

80% of residents surveyed

consider the standard of

parks and reserves to be

satisfactory

Each rural practice has a

practicing professional

A new medical centre is built

in Hanmer Springs





√ √ √

√ √ √

√ √ √

To maintain public halls and

be responsive to community

requests for upgrades

Employ contractors to clean and

maintain the buildings

Contracts monitoring records

confirm work done as per

contract specifications





Upgrade halls in response to

community needs

Upgrade the Amberley

Domain Pavilion



To ensure that township

amenities are maintained to

an appropriate standard

Employ contractors to maintain

amenities

Contracts monitoring records

confirm work done as per

contract specifications





Undertake an annual residents

satisfaction survey

% of residents surveyed

consider the standard of

township amenities to be

satisfactory:

= 60% in 2006/07

= 65% in 2007/08

= 70% in 2008/09+




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Major Projects 2006 -2009

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Amberley:

- upgrade town centre

- upgrade Amberley Pavilion

- general township amenity

works - footpaths, kerb &

chanel etc.

- reserves

Cheviot:

- resurface footpaths in Hall

St, Cadman St and Seddon St

and install 2 new street lights

- kerb and channelling

replacement in Seddon St

- continue new footpaths,

including kerb and channel

in Seddon and Montgomery

- continue new footpath in

Cadman St and Hall St, and

new footpaths and kerb and

channelling in Seddon St

Gore Bay:

- install a new streetlight in

the township

Glenmark:

- complete footpaths in

Waipara, Greta Valley and

Motunau Beach

- Scargill Squash Club

Hanmer Springs:

- purchase of some of the ex

Queen Mary Hospital land

- grounds maintenance and

building security services

- complete construction of

hall refurbishment

- commence redevelopment

of the commercial centre

- upgrade reserves

- construct a new medical

centre facility

- general township amenity

work, footpaths, kerb &

chanel etc

- contribution towards

netball courts upgrade

- promotional signage

$55,850

$20,000

$7,000

$2,500

$5,200

$17,000

$3.4m

$55,000

$399,000

$25,000

$600,000

$67,000

$10,000

$10,000

$64,550 $250,000

$219,303

$10,310 $6,638

$29,332

$31,356

$6,000 $5,625

$55,000 $55,000

$250,000 $250,000

$10,000 $10,000

$87,347 $73,190

75

Waikari & Hawarden:

- upgrade footpaths and kerb

and channelling

Culverden:

- town signage

- new footpath for school

corner Bridge to Lyndon St

-kerb and channelling for

Montrose/St Leonards St

intersection

- Main St beautification

- construct Rutherford

Reserve Ring Rd

- general township amenity

works - footpaths, kerb &

chanel etc.

Rotherham:

- street lighting in George St

- kerb and channelling at

pool frontage

- new footpath in Heaton St

- upgrade medical centre

- Rotherham Swimming Pool

upgrade - $16,000 over ten

years

Waiau:

- new footpaths continued in

Leslie St and Cheviot St

- kerb and channelling in

Hawkeswood St

- new footpaths in Leslie St

and Montrose St

- reserves

Page 75

$16,200 $15,465 $15,507

$2,500 $2,500

$6,900

$4,000

$25,000 $25,000

$30,000

$8,400 $12,875

$9,050

$10,143

$145,000

$11,576

$2,000 $2,000 $2,000

$11,775

$16,187

$16,594

$2,500 $2,578 $5,310

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Major Projects 2009+

2009-2011 2011-2013 2013-

Amberley:

- upgrade town centre

with footpaths, benches,

landscaping

- upgrade Amberley Pavilion

$400,000

$21,000

Hanmer Springs:

- purchase of some of the ex

Queen Mary Hospital land

- secure historic buildings

on ex Queen Mary Hospital

land

- complete construction of

hall refurbishment

- commence redevelopment

of the commercial centre

- upgrade reserves

$400,000

LOCAL FACILITIES

AND MAINTENANCE

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates 920,503 992,245 1,061,583 1,148,043

Development Impact Fees 148,928 219,422 219,422 219,422

User Fees 183,077 169,535 169,105 169,725

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 1,252,508 1,381,202 1,450,111 1,537,191

Expenditure

Operational Costs 1,238,540 1,308,825 1,293,951 1,337,975

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 1,238,540 1,308,825 1,293,951 1,337,975

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) 13,968 72,377 156,159 199,216

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital * 4,692,476 * 4,844,375 571,560 971,296

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 4,692,476 4,844,375 571,560 971,296

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 4,678,508 4,771,998 415,400 772,081

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 51,997 50,350 51,911 53,472

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus 300,622 319,792 320,869 327,543

Reserves 4,325,889 4,401,856 42,620 391,065

Total Funding 4,678,508 4,771,998 415,400 772,081

* Figure includes $3.4 million for the purchase

of Queen Mary land. This was originally

budgeed in 2005/06 and has been carried

forward to 2006/07.

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DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 3: Property

PROPERTY

Background

Council owned properties have a major role to play in

achieving the Council’s social, cultural and recreational

objectives, mostly relating to the provision of facilities,

infrastructure, amenities and utilities. The Council has

over time acquired an extensive portfolio of properties in

order to provide a wide range of services and facilities for

our residents and businesses.

Property involves Council owned sites and buildings,

such as pensioner housing, carparking areas and Council

buildings.

The Council holds a small range of commercial properties

that provide a financial return through a rental income, as

well as having a long-term contribution to the communities’

goals. We buy land for roading, reserves and other

community facilities in advance of urban development,

when the land can be bought at a lower cost. This is to

ensure sufficient council housing is retained for strategic

and social purposes.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Property activity contributes to the Community

Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play”, as

Council provides these facilities for social, economic and

recreational use. It is important that these are affordable

and relevant to the community, as well as accessible, safe

and healthy.

Current Situation

The Council owns a small number of commercial premises

that are generally leased to small businesses. We receive

revenue through the rental of these premises.

Council owns 31 housing units for the elderly – 9 in

Amberley, 13 in Cheviot, 4 in Hanmer Springs and 5 in

Waikari. Council also owns 3 residential houses – 1 in

Amberley, 1 in Cheviot and 1 in Hanmer Springs.

Land will need to be acquired to relocate the Amberley

Recycling Depot around 2007/08. This is explained in more

detail in the Waste Minimisation section.

The rental for pensioner housing has been reviewed and

will increase by $10 per week from July 2006. This is to

meet the rising cost of maintenance and repairs.

Funding

Pensioner and residential housing are funded by market

rents. Any shortfall is made up from the district rate on

capital value. Capital expenditure is funded through either

loans or cash reserves.

Maintenance and Operating

Generally, all properties are well maintained. Maintenance

and upkeep is undertaken by contractors approved by

Council. Because of the rural nature of the district and

shortage of tradespeople to meet demand, there are at

times, delays in maintenance servicing.

Assumptions and Risks

Council intends to continue to own, control and manage

its properties within the district. Although we have an

aging population in the district, Council has no plans to

increase pensioner housing at this stage.

Plans for the Future

An extension is planned for the Amberley Council office

at a cost of $380,000 to accommodate future growth

and reduce current overcrowded conditions. Much of

the need for this addition has arisen from population

and development growth in the district and additional

compliance costs caused through changes in legislation.

The Amberley office was last extended in the early 1990s

and is no longer adequate to accommodate the staffing

required to service the district.

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Performance Measures

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Property Goal: To ensure that venues for social, recreational, economic and cultural

reasons meet the needs of the local community

Target

To maintain the pensioner

housing stock

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

Contractors are employed to Contracts monitoring records

undertake work needed to confirm work done as per

maintain pensioner housing stock contract specifications

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

√ √ √ √

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

To have pensioner housing Plan and assess for pension

occupied by occupants who housing demand

qualify

To maintain Council owned Contractors are employed

properties for public use to undertake work needed

to maintain Council owned

buildings

To ensure that all Council Regularly review leases and

owned property not required property portfolios

for Council or public use is

leased out

Major Projects

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Extension of Amberley $380,000

Council office to

accommodate increased

staffing levels

90% of occupants are over the

age of 60 and meet the income

criteria

Pensioner housing stock has a

95% occupancy rate

Contracts monitoring records

confirm work done as per

contract specifications

All buildings not required

by Council or the public are

leased out within 6 months of

being vacant

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√ √ √

√ √ √



√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 179,980 185,500 191,250 197,001

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 179,980 185,500 191,250 197,001

Expenditure

Operational Costs 102,988 108,052 102,979 110,286

Interest - - - -

Depreciation 80,500 97,641 140,020 140,020

Operating Costs 183,488 205,693 242,999 250,306

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (3,508) (20,193) (51,749) (53,305)

PROPERTY

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 20,207 403,000 - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 20,207 403,000 - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 23,715 423,193 51,749 53,305

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 2,007 20,193 51,749 53,305

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 21,708 403,000 - -

Total Funding 23,715 423,193 51,749 53,305

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Activity 4: Public Toilets

Background

The Council provides public toilets in most townships in

order to meet the expectations of visitors and residents,

and to meet its statutory duties under the Health Act 1956,

which urges local authorities to promote and conserve the

public health within their district, by providing ‘sanitary

works’ including ‘sanitary conveniences’ for the use of the

public.

Some existing toilets in our district may not be in the most

suitable location. This is primarily due to historical public

aitudes, which required toilets to be discretely hidden

away, whereas modern safety-conscious aitudes prefer a

more obvious, easily accessible, well-lit facility.

All new toilets are sited where they are highly visible to

maximise safety for the users and to reduce the risk of

vandalism. Adequate car parking is also available nearby.

All public toilets are built with principal objectives in

mind, including the provision of effective cleaning and

maintenance regimes and the insurance of accessibility,

visibility and privacy.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Public Toilets activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work

and Play”. Council provides these facilities for the wellbeing

and convenience of its residents and visitors. It is

important that these facilities are accessible, safe and

healthy.

Performance Measures 2006-2016

81

Current Situation

Page 81

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

There are 14 toilet blocks throughout the district located

on reserves, and 16 district public toilets.

Council policy is that, in towns where public toilets are

warranted, one toilet shall be funded by the general rate.

Any additional toilets are charged to the respective ward

except when the demand for a public toilet exceeds one

and the need is driven by visitors to the area rather than

locals.

Plans for the Future

Public Toilets Goal: To provide and maintain public toilets at strategic localities

throughout the district

Target

To maintain public toilets at

a standard that residents are

satisfied with

What will we do towards achieving the

target

Employ staff and contractors to

maintain and clean the districts

public toilets

Regularly inspect public toilets

Undertake an annual residents

satisfaction survey

The existing Hawarden public toilet is to be replaced with

a new facility to meet the Hurunui standard in Horsley

Down Road in the 2006/07 financial year.

Council also intends to review its toilet strategy to

determine best locations for new toilets in presently

unserviced (or poorly serviced) towns for construction in

2010/11 and 2013/14.

Capital Projects

-Replacement public toilet

to be built in Hawarden

-New toilet for Coulbeck

Reserve, Leithfield

-New public toilets for

Amberley Beach

-New public toilets

(location to be determined

from priority schedule)

How will we know we have met our

target

Contracts monitoring records √

confirm work done as per

contract specifications

75% of residents surveyed are √

satisfied with the quality of

the district's public toilets

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$70,000

$50,000

$52,000

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +







$106,200

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

PROPERTY

Funding

District toilets are funded by

100% district Uniform Annual

Charge. Ward toilets cost is

included in township maintenance

expenditure, which is 100%

Uniform Annual Charge on the

local ward. Council is considering

other future funding methods such

as seeking sponsorship or selling

advertising space.

If the Council decides to apply

surplus from the Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools and Spa operation

the amount of the contribution is

subtracted from the district rate.

If any of the Capital Expenditure

caters for future growth, then that

portion of the expenditure that

relates to growth will be funded

from future lots via Development

Contributions and loans.

Maintenance and Operating

The maintenance of these

facilities, including cleaning

and replenishing of supplies, is

contracted out under Council’s

approval.

Assumptions and Risks

Council intends to continue to

own, control and manage public

toilets throughout the district,

but will also be considering

alternative funding sources such

as sponsorship.

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets

Targeted Rates

Development Impact Fees

User Fees

Interest Received

Subsidies & Grants

Other Income

Total Activity Income - - - -

Expenditure

Operational Costs 234,372 257,343 266,362 307,570

Interest

Depreciation 26,356 31,100 33,600 38,910

Operating Costs 260,728 288,443 299,962 346,480

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (260,728) (288,443) (299,962) (346,480)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 160,000 172,000 - 106,200

- Renewals

Debt Repayment

Capital and Debt Repayment 160,000 172,000 - 106,200

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded

Funding Required 420,728 460,443 299,962 452,680

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 42,518 30,852 0.111 -

Loans (Net)

HSTR Surplus 218,210 257,590 299,962 346,480

Reserves 160,000 172,000 - 106,200

Total Funding 420,728 460,443 299,962 452,680

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Activity 5: Cemeteries

Background

Council is required to establish and maintain suitable

cemeteries under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964.

Council also sets and charges fees for the use of these

cemeteries.

Council is commied to maintaining, preserving and

embellishing the cemeteries within the district, while

protecting buildings, monuments, vegetation and

enclosures in the cemetery from destruction or damage.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Cemeteries activity contributes to the Community

Outcome “A Desirable Place to Live, Work and Play”, as

Council provides these facilities for the peace-of-mind

and convenience of its residents. It is important that

these facilities are accessible, affordable, safe and well

maintained.

Current Situation

There are 9 cemetery reserves throughout our district; these

are located at Balcairn, Cheviot, Culverden, Glenmark,

Hanmer Springs, Horsley Down, Rotherham, Waiau, and

Waikari.

There are approximately 3,000 vacant plots currently

available.

Some of our cememteries do not have cremation plots

available.

Plans for the Future

Most of the district’s cemeteries have at least 200 years

remaining before they will run out of space. Waiau

Cemetery is to be extended in 2007/08 to provide for more

burial space.

It is predicted that the demand for plots within the district’s

cemeteries will increase gradually over the next 10 years,

due to the increasing age of the baby boomers coupled

with an increasing population with the district.

Funeral Directors have indicated that there is generally an

increasing trend away from cemetery burials as people are

moving towards cremation services. However, this does

not appear to be the trend in the Hurunui District.

Long-term development and landscaping plans are in place

or being developed. Over 1500 new plots are planned.

The construction of berms (berms are a concrete strip that

the head stones and memorial plaques are layed on) will

take place in several of the district cemeteries to cater for

new interments.

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Berms make it easier to do general maintenance, such as

grass mowing and help make the cemeteries look tidier.

The reserves management strategy identifies the provision

of toilets as a management requirement for cemeteries.

However the provision for toilets in all nine district

cemeteries is currently not feasible due to high cost of

installation.

Funding

Maintenance is funded from the district rate on the Capital

Value. Interment costs are through user charges.

If the council decides to apply surplus from the Hanmer

Springs Thermal Pools and Spa operation the amount of

the contribution is subtracted from the District Rate.

Maintenance and Operating

General maintenance and upkeep such as grass mowing,

weed spraying, rubbish removal, fencing, grave topping

and digging, and landscaping, is undertaken by contractors

approved by Council.

Generally, all cemeteries within the district are well

maintained. All cemeteries have areas marked for future

grave and cremations sites, which will be continued to be

developed taking into consideration the denominations

of Anglican, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, and nondenominational.

Assumptions and Risks

Plans for cemeteries in the Hurunui are based on the

assumption that our current 9 cemeteries will continue to

meet the needs of our growing and aging population for

many years to come.

Improving Services

Landscaping in Cheviot,

Rotherham and

Culverden Cemeteries

Extend Waiau Cemetery

to provide for more burial

space

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$7,000

$10,300

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Cemeteries Goal: To ensure the nine district cemeteries are of sufficient size to meet

the needs of the district and to provide a peaceful, tranquil and

aesthetically pleasing environment

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To have sufficient plots

available in all wards to meet

current and future demands

Plan and assess for plot demand

and acquire and designate land

accordingly

Cemetery records verify

availability keeping up with

demand





Extend Waiau Cemetery to

accommodate more plots into the

future

Waiu cemetery is extended


To have well-maintained

and aesthetically pleasing

cemeteries

Contract gardeners, groundkeepers

to maintain cemeteries

Contracts monitoring records

confirm work done as per

contract specifications





Landscape Cheviot, Rotherham

and Culverden Cemeteries

Landscape plans are achieved

as specified



Construct new berms in

CEMETERIES

Glenmark, Cheviot and Waikari

Cemeteries

Instal Information boards in

gazebos in cemeteries

Undertake an annual residents

satisfaction survey

New berms are constructed

Information boards installed

70% of residents surveyed

consider the standard of

cemeteries to be satisfactory









Capital Projects

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Berm construction in

Glenmark, Cheviot and

Waikari Cemeteries

Information boards installed

in Gazebos

$10,000 $10,630

$5,155 $5,300

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 37,500 42,500 43,818 45,135

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 37,500 42,500 43,818 45,135

Expenditure

Operational Costs 128,668 125,118 139,307 132,875

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 128,668 125,118 139,307 132,875

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (91,168) (82,618) (95,489) (87,740)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 15,000 10,000 5,155 15,930

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 15,000 10,000 5,155 15,930

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 106,168 92,618 100,644 103,670

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates - - - -

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus 101,168 82,618 95,489 87,740

Reserves 5,000 10,000 5,155 15,930

Total Funding 106,168 92,618 100,644 103,670

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DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 6: Grants & Service Awards

CEMETERIES

Background

Council is required by legislation to disperse grants.

It facilitates the distribution of funds from the Sports

and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC) and Creative

Communities New Zealand. Local residents are represented

in the distribution commiees along with Councilors.

The Council also has a variety of achievement based award

schemes available to people in the district to recognise and

reward excellence.

The provision of grants and awards is an integral

component of Council’s strategy to empower local

communities and assist them in achieving their vision

and strategic outcomes, by encouraging and rewarding

community spirit in sporting, arts and environmental

initiatives.

With the provision and presentation of grants and service

awards, the Council also recognises the depth of voluntary

work throughout the district, while also encouraging

secondary school students to show ability, aitude, and

determination.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Grants and Service Awards activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “A Desirable Place

to Live, Work and Play”, by acknowledging, rewarding and

encouraging people’s contribution to their communities,

and personal achievements.

Current Situation

Council has four Service Awards, which are all presented

on an annual basis. They are:

1. Community Service Awards for a long periods of

exceptional service by residents of the district

2. Secondary School Achievers Awards for promising

secondary students who will benefit from additional

financial assistance to undertake further study

3. Mainpower Hurunui Natural Environment Fund to

encourage and assist with voluntary work that benefits

the natural environment

4. Hurunui Heritage Fund to encourage and assist with

voluntary work that protects, enhances, explains or

restores significant heritage values of the district

two government funded initiatives. They are:

1. Creative Communities New Zealand Fund to

encourage and assist the community to participate in

arts and cultural projects

2. SPARC to encourage and assist sporting teams and

groups to participate in sporting activities within the

district

Plans for the Future

It is expected that growth in the district will increase demand

for grants to enable local communities to participate in

sport, recreation, arts, cultural, environmental and heritage

activities in future years. However, there is no provision at

this stage for Council to increase its contribution.

Council will continue to seek opportunities where funding

can be facilitated.

Funding

100% Uniform Annual General Charge.

Maintenance and Operating

The Hurunui District Council acts as an agent in

administering and distributing grants on behalf of two

government funded initiatives – SPARC and Creative

Communities New Zealand.

Both organisations provide assistance to Council in

managing the schemes, by seing the criteria in which

funding can be distributed to community sporting groups

and arts projects etc. The specific organisations also set

out the roles and responsibilities Council and the third

party (Assessment Commiees) have in administering the

scheme.

Council has adopted a third party approach, where the

Assessment Commiee have been elected to assess all

applications from the various funding rounds and distribute

funds to the successful applicants the commiee believes

fit the criteria established by the specific organisations.

Council acts as an agent and disburses grants on behalf of

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Assumptions and Risks

Council intends to continue to provide funding opportunities

to local community groups, through government funded

organisations and/or other organisations and to increase

the numbers of organisations through which it facilitates

funding where possible. Council aims to provide

opportunities for the local communities to participate

in sport, recreation, arts, cultural, environmental and

heritage activities.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Should government funding or externally sourced funding

cease to become available, Council will need to reconsider

its position regarding the ongoing financial support of

its grants. As our population grows, there could be an

increased community expectation that more grants and

service awards be provided.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Grants and Service Awards Goal: To encourage and assist residents and the community

to realise their goals and ambitions and to reward voluntary work that benefits the

social fabric of the community and/or the natural environment

Target

To aract applications from

candidates

To continue to fund grants

and service awards

What will we do towards

achieving the target

Advertise the availability of

awards, grants and community

funds in local media, service

centres and libraries

Distribute funds on behalf of

Sport and Recreation New

Zealand (SPARC) and Creative

Arts New Zealand

Council makes a financial

contribution toward the awards

and grants

How will we know we have

met our target

Applications have been

received in all categories of

grants and service awards:

Secondary Education School

Achievers Award

Community Service Awards

Mainpower Hurunui Natural

Environment Fund

Hurunui Heritage Fund

All available funding is

distributed to applicants

Council makes a financial

contribution each year

Council will seek additional Additional funding is

funding from potential supporters received from alternative or

new external sources

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06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √



WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees - - - -

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants 22,625 15,500 5,000 5,000

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 22,625 15,500 5,000 5,000

Expenditure

Operational Costs 131,611 130,590 123,880 126,810

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 131,611 130,590 123,880 126,810

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (108,986) (115,090) (118,880) (121,810)

CEMETERIES

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - - - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - - - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 108,986 115,090 118,880 121,810

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 117,589 123,693 127,483 130,413

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves (8,603) (8,603) (8,603) (8,603)

Total Funding 108,986 115,090 118,880 121,810

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Growth and Development

Overview

Growth and Development deals with three separate

activities that Council undertakes in order to improve

our community’s economic well-being and strive towards

achieving our community outcomes. These activities are:

• Activity 1: Tourism

• Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

• Activity 3: Economic Development

Why is Council Involved?

The Council is involved in promoting the district through

tourism and destination marketing as it recognises that

the visitor industry provides for major economic benefits

and is important for the future growth of the district.

Aracting investment and new businesses into the district

brings new job opportunities for residents, encourages

more people to sele in the district and therefore, increases

the breadth and depth of the economy. Rural community

services and facilities are frequently under threat through

depopulation; however, focusing on sustainable growth

should negate this effect.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

not considered an essential service in time of an extreme

emergency or situation.

Financial Information

The following page provides financial information relating

to the Growth and Development group of activities for the

next 10 year period.

Growth and Development Related Activities

The remainder of this section gives more information about

the three separate growth and development activities

undertaken by Council.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

The Council recognises the uniqueness of the district and

opportunity for diversification to encourage employment

and business opportunities.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Growth and Development category of activities

contributes to the community outcome “A thriving local

economy”. An increase in local economy means an

improvement in people’s opportunities, access to quality

services, living standards, and hence, general well-being.

Emergency Management

The Council is developing a business continuity plan

to detail the procedures that are to be followed in an

emergency. This is to enable essential services to continue

to function to the fullest possible extent, even though this

may be at a reduced level, during major breakdown or

during and aer any civil emergency.

Activities in the Growth and Development category are

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APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 10 Years

Growth and Development

GROWTH AND

DEVELOPMENT

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - - - - - - - - -

Targeted Rates 220,346 236,887 245,676 245,676 245,676 245,676 245,676 245,676 245,676 245,676 245,676

Development Impact Fees - - - - - - - - - - -

User Fees 576,000 680,140 852,551 892,854 907,681 922,804 938,231 953,965 970,014 986,385 1,003,082

Interest Received - - - - - - - - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - - - - - - - - -

Other Income - - - - - - - - - - -

Total Activity Income 796,346 917,027 1,098,228 1,138,530 1,153,357 1,168,481 1,183,907 1,199,642 1,215,691 1,232,061 1,248,759

Expenditure

Operational Costs 865,962 1,044,315 1,139,478 1,166,915 1,186,737 1,206,566 1,226,472 1,246,125 1,265,216 1,284,761 1,304,999

Interest - - - - - - - - - - -

Depreciation 40,802 33,650 34,694 35,737 36,679 37,587 38,462 39,270 39,977 40,650 41,289

Operating Costs 906,764 1,077,966 1,174,171 1,202,651 1,223,416 1,244,154 1,264,935 1,285,395 1,305,193 1,325,410 1,346,288

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (110,418) (160,938) (75,944) (64,121) (70,059) (75,673) (81,028) (85,753) (89,502) (93,349) (97,529)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 31,500 413,000 14,000 - 30,000 - - - - 30,000 -

- Renewals - - - - - - - - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - - - - - - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 31,500 413,000 14,000 - 30,000 - - - - 30,000 -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - - - - - - - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - - - - - - - - -

Funding Required 141,918 573,938 89,944 64,121 100,059 75,673 81,028 85,753 89,502 123,349 97,529

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 32,998 56,422 29,692 17,383 19,623 21,671 23,591 25,147 26,122 27,327 28,998

Loans (Net) - - - - - - - - - - -

HSTR Surplus 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 Continued over

40,000

Reserves 68,920 477,516 20,252 6,738 40,436 14,002 17,436 20,606 23,380 56,022 28,531

Total Funding 141,918 573,938 89,944 64,121 100,059 75,673 81,028 85,753 89,502 123,349 97,529

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Activity 1: Tourism

Background

The Council provides an information and coordination

role in promoting the district, mainly through the Hurunui

Tourism Board to encourage economic growth. In addition,

the Council continuously strives to build and strengthen

working relationships with businesses, agencies and

individuals, to facilitate the development of sustainable

tourism.

Tourism includes destination marketing to aract visitors

to the district and also the development of industry

capability for self promotion and asset development.

This results in the provision of good quality information

and the development of community assets such as public

toilets, rest areas, and walking tracks, which are used by

visitors as well as the local community.

Recent years have seen a dramatic change in the business

landscape in both the Waipara Valley and Hanmer Springs.

Multiple businesses have been established - more than

twice the national average.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s tourism activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A thriving local economy”. Tourism

encourages new businesses to invest in the district and

generate employment opportunities. Aracting new

families to the district means having a population to sustain

more businesses, while also growing visitor numbers in a

sustainable manner.

Current Situation

Hurunui Tourism is the destination marketing organisation

promoting the Hurunui District and the Alpine Pacific

Triangle Touring Route.

Hurunui Tourism is tasked with increasing visitor

expenditure and length of stay, by growing visitor numbers

in a sustainable manner and targeting high value markets.

In order to maximise visitor spend in the local economy,

Hurunui Tourism targets international visitors, especially

those countries that make up our key international

markets.

During 2005, Hurunui Tourism has been through a reengineering

process particularly focused on funding.

Tourism is now funded by targeted tourism rating

and industry project contributions, with a marketing

contribution from the Hanmer Spring Thermal Pools and

Spa. Council acts as the conduit to collect the targeted

funds.

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

As the above graph shows, tourism guest nights in

the Hurunui District have increased by 71% from 1999

to 2005, a figure that is well ahead of Canterbury and

national statistics, which show an increase of 49% and 39%

respectively.

Over 80 operators subscribe to and are listed on the

dedicated Hurunui Tourism website, www.hurunui.com.

Plans for the Future

The Tourism Board’s role is now clearly to champion the

international visitor markets and put its energies into

effectively branding and marketing the region as one of

New Zealand’s most outstanding visitor destinations.

Through a revised marketing strategy, Hurunui Tourism

will place its focus on the Alpine Pacific Triangle (and its

associated icon destinations and activities) as the most

effective means to promote the region internationally.

Funding levels looking ahead to 2016 have been kept

within current budget levels. Over the next ten years,

more funding will be generated by increasing revenues

and participation in the website, touring guide and other

services; with the intention of placing less reliance on the

targeted rate over time. Joint ventures with groups, local

business associations and other neighbouring regions will

further leverage marketing investment. External funding

may be sought from central government and other funding

agencies.

To enable a more equitable rating system, Council will

seek an inclusion fee to be paid by Hurunui operators

who wish to purchase Hurunui Tourism services but do

not currently pay the targeted tourism rate.

Funding

Tourism and District Promotion will be funded 100%, less

contributions from businesses (including the Hanmer

Springs Thermal Reserve) on all rateable properties that

Council considers receive direct benefit from Tourism and

District Promotion. Further details on the Targeted Rate

are provided later in this document in the Revenue and

Financing Policy.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Maintenance and Operating

Hurunui Tourism is governed by a Board comprised

of both Hurunui District Councillors and independent

members who in turn, are a sub-commiee of the Council.

Paid positions include a full time General Manager and a

full time Clerical Assistant.

Assumptions and Risks

Growth has occurred within the district in recent years

and this is expected to continue, however, not necessarily

at the same high rate. External factors, such as a natural

or man-made disaster, or pandemic could have a major

impact on Tourism should such an event occur. Because of

the unknown nature of a disaster occurring, this has not

been factored into Tourism’s budget plans.

Major Projects

New Tourism information

board in Hanmer Springs

Improving Services

Update existing Tourism

information boards

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$14,000

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$6,000 $6,400

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Tourism Goal: To provide focus, direction and priorities for the Hurunui District to

facilitate the development of economically, ecologically and socially

sustainable tourism

TOURISM

Target

To grow visitor numbers to

the Hurunui District

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

Carry out destination marketing Number of visitors to the

to promote the district and the district who stay overnight

Alpine Pacific Triangle Touring will increase to:

Route via Hurunui Tourism's

website, advertisements in media, 290,000

and aending and conducting

seminars.

295,800

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +



Establish and maintain

relationships with tourism

operators and clients.

301,700

307,700



Assess needs and plan for future

demands

To increase the number of

overnight visitors to the

Hurunui District

The growth in the number

of overnight guests to the

Hurunui District at least

matches the average for

NZ (In 2005, the NZ rate of

growth was 4.6%)

√ √ √ √

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates 220,346 236,887 245,676 245,676

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 121,000 100,500 100,500 100,500

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 341,346 337,387 346,176 346,176

Expenditure

Operational Costs 398,766 456,903 392,428 392,914

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 398,766 456,903 392,428 392,914

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (57,420) (119,516) (46,252) (46,738)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 13,000 13,000 14,000 -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 13,000 13,000 14,000 -

Vested √ Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 70,420 132,516 60,252 46,738

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates - - - -

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000

Reserves 30,420 92,516 20,252 6,738

Total Funding 70,420 132,516 60,252 46,738

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DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 2: Visitor Information Centre

Background

The Council is involved in tourism and promoting the

district as it recognises that the visitor industry provides

for economic growth and is important for the future

growth of the Hurunui District.

A significant number of visitors arrive in the district with

the expectation that visitor information will be readily

available as is the international norm. There are no bonded

travel agents in the Hurunui District.

The Council provides an information and coordination

role in promoting the district, so that the district can take

advantage of the economic growth that the visitor industry

offers.

Plans for the Future

The Hanmer Springs Visitor Information Centre is

located within the Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and

Spa complex. The complex is to undertake a major

reconstruction to bring the facilities, including the visitor

information centre, up to date, and capable of meeting

growing customer expectations. More information about

these developments is shown in the Hanmer Springs

Thermal Pools and Spa activity section.

The information centre will also receive an upgrade and

a new look when the renovations to the building take

place. The information centre will be relocated within the

building to beer aract customers and to allow for beer

flow and thorough fare.

VISITOR

INFORMATION CENTRE

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Visitor Information Centre activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “A thriving local

economy”, through encouraging visitors to the area to stay

longer and use local services and hospitality.

Current Situation

The district’s main visitor centre is in Hanmer Springs and

operates seven days per week. Hanmer Springs is a major

visitor destination and the visitor centre’s main focus is

to provide an international level of service. The Council’s

Service Centres in Amberley, Cheviot and Amuri provide

limited visitor information. This section refers to the

Hanmer Springs Visitor Information Centre rather than

the service offered through the Council offices.

Our Hanmer Springs Visitor Information Centre is a

member of the New Zealand Visitor Information Network

(VIN). VIN is the officially recognised provider of reliable

New Zealand information, with centres in 94 locations

throughout New Zealand. Accreditation to the network

ensures that staff are knowledgeable and provide objective,

quality information.

Visitors to our Hanmer Springs facility can access a range

of information and are able to make direct bookings for

accommodation, travel (air, road, rail and ferry), tours,

accommodation, sightseeing and aractions. Other services

offered include restaurant information, local events and

entertainment, maps and guide books, itinerary planning

and advice, and gis, souvenirs, stamps and phone cards.

In the 2004/05 financial year, the Hanmer Springs

Information Centre experienced an 8% growth in

customers, as well as a 29% increase in bookings.

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In the past, the information centre has focused mainly

on the provision of information to tourists and visitors.

A new focus will be to expand the product range and to

increase revenue in the future to become self funding.

This will be achieved by expanding the merchandise range

to include consumable goods. The focus on the provision

of information will remain dominant, and over the coming

years, investment in technology will be with the intention

of enhancing booking processes and customer service.

Funding

100% user charge with the shortfall being met by Uniform

Annual General Charge.

Maintenance and Operating

The Visitor Information Centre is managed by the

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa General Manager

and staffed from self contained budgets with financial

contribution from Council. Once the Hanmer Springs

Visitor Information Centre has undergone its renovations,

it is not expected it will require further substantial

investment for the next 10 years.

Assumptions and Risks

It is expected that revenue generated from the information

centre will temporarily decrease during the renovation

period, but to steadily improve thereaer. Should the

expected increased ne profits not occur from 2008/09, the

Visitor Information Centre will continue to be reliant on

Council funding.

Council’s plans regarding the Visitor Information

Centre activity are based on the assumption that New

Zealand’s economy and tourism industry will continue

to be buoyant. Should an adverse event such as a Civil

Defence emergency hit the Hurunui, Council would need


to reconsider its plans accordingly. Emergency situations

such as a substantial earthquake, tsunami or pandemic

would have adverse impact on our economy and tourism

industry, and would hence, significantly affect the Visitor

Information Centre.

Major Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Upgrade the visitor $400,000

information centre in

Hanmer Springs

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Visitor Information Centre Goal: To promote the highest quality of visitor information

services to local communities, visitors, the wider tourism industry and

consumers as they make their travel decisions

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

To increase the number of Offer assistance with itinierary

bookings for accommodation planning as well as providing

and services

information and arranging

bookings for accommodation,

travel, tours, sightseeing and

aractions

To offer excellent customers

service and information

How will we know we have met our

target

Bookings for accommodaton

and services will increase by:

Undertake customers satisfaction At least 80% of customers are

surveys

satisfied with the service and

information they receive

To generate a surplus to Expanding the range and The Visitor Information

enable the Hanmer Springs diversity of retail products offered Centre will generate annual

Visitor Information Centre to for sale

surpluses of:

become self funding

- $2,948

For the Hanmer Springs

Visitor Information Centre

to be of an international

standard

5%

3%

2%

$23,637

$21,827

Redevelop the information centre The information centre will be

to beer meet the expectations of upgraded

our visitors

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06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +


√ √


√ √ √ √





WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 455,000 579,640 752,051 792,354

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 455,000 579,640 752,051 792,354

Expenditure

Operational Costs 434,888 555,104 697,049 724,000

Interest - - - -

Depreciation 40,802 33,650 34,694 35,737

Operating Costs 475,690 588,754 731,743 759,737

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (20,690) (9,114) 20,308 32,617

VISITOR

INFORMATION CENTRE

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 18,500 400,000 - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 18,500 400,000 - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 39,190 409,114 (20,308) (32,617)

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 690 24,114 (20,308) (32,617)

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 38,500 385,000 - -

Total Funding 39,190 409,114 (20,308) (32,617)

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Activity 3: Economic Development

Background

Council joined forces with the Waimakariri District

Council in 2001 to form the North Canterbury Economic

Development Board. The Board developed and manages

“Enterprise North Canterbury”. The Board takes a

leadership role in promoting economic development for

both districts.

Enterprise North Canterbury is an economic and business

development agency that promotes the North Canterbury

region to encourage people into our area to live, work and

visit. The Hurunui Tourism Board also plays an important

role in Hurunui’s economic development.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Economic Development activity contributes

to the Community Outcome “A thriving local economy”,

through assisting local businesses to develop, flourish and

grow, and by encouraging people into our area to live,

work and visit.

Current Situation

Recent years have seen a dramatic change in our district’s

business landscape. Multiple businesses have been

established in Waipara Valley and Hanmer Springs, more

than twice the national average, and this trend appears set

to continue. Businesses are experiencing noticeable labour

growth with a strong increase in the number of jobs since

2002 and predictions for more jobs in the next few years.

There is a significant trend in business growth as well as

an increase of annual sales, as the median sales growth is

expected to rise to 10% over the next few years. There is

evidence of new markets in New Zealand and overseas

while many businesses are developing new products.

Enterprise North Canterbury works in conjunction with

our district’s employers by providing access to information

and assistance to establish, develop, train and strengthen

local businesses.

Plans for the Future

To assist our district’s economic development, the Hurunui

Tourism Board is working with a ‘Three Year Marketing

Strategy 2006-2009’. Its core objectives are to increase visitor

expenditure and length of stay, grow visitor numbers

in a sustainable manner, provide widespread benefits

throughout the district, and ensure quality underpins the

industry and community response to visitor needs.

Enterprise North Canterbury’s ‘Strategic Plan 2004-2009’

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Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

sets future goals to assist economic development in the

North Canterbury region. It plans to undertake a review

of regional development programmes, participate in

planning and policy development initiatives, provide

industry specific training programmes, identify skill

shortages and implement programmes to aract a skilled

workforce. In addition, Enterprise North Canterbury plans

to promote remote learning and business management,

undertake research to identify and protect population

growth drivers, and train, sponsor and celebrate new

business entrepreneurs.

Funding

Council provides Enterprise North Canterbury with an

annual grant of $32,000. This is 100% funded through the

general rate. The grant is to be increased to $50,000 per

year from 2007/08.

Maintenance and Operating

The activity Economic Development is in part, the

cumulative impact of a number of activities (other activities

include Hurunui Tourism, Visitor Information Centre,

Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa), although this

section focuses on the service provided by Enterprise North

Canterbury. Council contracts out this service by way of

an annual grant which is reconfirmed each year. Besides

the grant, there are no other costs or capital expenditures

involved.

Assumptions and Risks

The continuation of the grant made to Enterprise North

Canterbury is dependent on there being continued returns

and gains made.

Council’s plans regarding economic development are

based on the assumption that New Zealand’s economy

will continue to be buoyant. Should an adverse event such

as a Civil Defence emergency hit the Hurunui, Council

would need to reconsider its plans accordingly. Emergency

situations, or environmental, would have adverse impact

on our economy, and would hence, significantly affect our

district’s economic development.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Economic Development Goal: To aract investment and new businesses that bring new

job opportunities for residents, encourage more people stay or to sele in

the district thus increasing the breadth and depth of the local economy

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To aract new businesses to

the Hurunui District

We have a joint venture with

Waimakariri District Council,

being the North Canterbury

Economic Development Board to

promote the Hurunui District by

providing access to information

and assistance to establish,

develop, train and strengthen

local businesses

The number of new

businesses registered for GST

continues to grow

√ √ √ √

To have high rates of

employment in the Hurunui

District

Encourage business growth

and consequently, employment

opportunities for people in the

district

Employment rates in the

Hurunui District are not

lower than the national

average

√ √ √ √

ECONOMIC

DEVELOPMENT

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees - - - -

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income - - - -

Expenditure

Operational Costs 32,308 32,308 50,000 50,000

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 32,308 32,308 50,000 50,000

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (32,308) (32,308) (50,000) (50,000)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - - - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - - - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 32,308 32,308 50,000 50,000

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 32,308 32,308 50,000 50,000

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves - - - -

Total Funding 32,308 32,308 50,000 50,000

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DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Environment and Safety

ENVIRONMENT

AND SAFETY

Overview

Environment and Safety deals with six separate activities

that Council undertakes in order to improve our

community’s well-being and strive towards achieving our

community outcomes. These activities are:

• Activity 1: Resource Management/Planning

• Activity 2: Civil Defence

• Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

• Activity 4: Building Compliance

• Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor Licensing

• Activity 6: Animal Control

Why is Council Involved?

The Council is involved in environmental and safety

services in order to provide for the social, cultural and

environmental well-being of our people.

In relation to Resource Management/Consents, the

Resource Management Act requires the Council to control

the actual or potential effects on our land, air and water,

and obliges us to have a District Plan in place.

The Council has a statutory requirement to be involved

in Civil Defence under the Civil Defence and Emergency

Management Act 2002.

The Council has a statutory requirement to provide a Rural

Fire Service within the gazeed Rural Fire District under

the Forest and Rural Fire Act 1979 and the Fire Service Act

1975.

The Council administers building inspections, as it has a

statutory requirement to enforce the building code and

regulations under the Building Act 2004 and Building

Regulations 1992.

The Council has statutory obligations related to the

Health Act 1956, the Lier Act 1979, the Food Act 1981

and the Food Hygiene Regulations 1974 to provide health

inspections.

in animal control under the Dog Control Act 1996, the

Dog Control Amendment Act 2003, and the Impounding

Act 1955. The Council also has responsibilities under the

Animal Welfare Act 1999.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Environment and Safety category of activities

contributes to the community outcome “Environmental

Responsibility”, as managing our natural resources as

safely as possible is essential so that we can protect and

improve the environment we live in.

In addition, Council’s Environment and Safety category

of activities contributes to the community outcome “A

Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, as adequate emergency

and regulatory services are vital in providing for our

communities’ social and cultural well-being, and to ensure

that our people are well protected.

Assumptions

Emergency Management

The Council is developing a business continuity plan

to detail the procedures that are to be followed in an

emergency. This is to enable essential services to continue

to function to the fullest possible extent, even though this

may be at a reduced level, during major breakdown or

during and aer any civil emergency.

Civil Defence and Rural Fire Control take priority in

the event of civil emergency. Licensing and consent

services are not considered an essential service in times

of an extreme emergency or Civil Defence emergency,

while environmental services would operate in a lesser

emergency.

Environment and Safety Related Activities

The remainder of this section gives more information

about the seven separate environment and safety activities

that council undertakes.

The Council is involved in liquor licensing, as it has

statutory obligations under the Sale of Liquor Act 1989 to

undertake responsibilities as the District Licensing Agency

for its District.

The Council has a statutory requirement to be involved

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Financial Summary - Next 10 Years

Environment and Safety

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - - - - - - - - -

Targeted Rates 171,000 191,000 199,673 209,594 214,830 219,879 224,741 229,229 233,156 236,896 240,449

Development Impact Fees - - - - - - - - - - -

User Fees 918,950 988,618 960,965 993,144 1,018,070 1,044,587 1,067,790 1,089,209 1,107,949 1,125,798 1,142,754

Interest Received - - - - - - - - - - -

Subsidies & Grants 13,656 37,800 90,800 10,800 10,800 12,300 12,300 12,300 14,300 14,300 14,300

Other Income - - - - - - - - - - -

Total Activity Income 1,103,606 1,217,418 1,251,438 1,213,538 1,243,700 1,276,766 1,304,831 1,330,738 1,355,405 1,376,994 1,397,503

Expenditure

Operational Costs 1,662,890 1,944,839 1,926,455 1,993,839 2,054,810 2,076,108 2,122,858 2,166,012 2,203,772 2,242,754 2,276,965

Interest - - - - - - - - - - -

Depreciation - - - - - - - - - - -

Operating Costs 1,662,890 1,944,839 1,926,455 1,993,839 2,054,810 2,076,108 2,122,858 2,166,012 2,203,772 2,242,754 2,276,965

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (559,284) (727,421) (675,017) (780,301) (811,110) (799,342) (818,027) (835,275) (848,367) (865,760) (879,462)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 87,300 116,250 120,000 12,550 25,000 - - - - 25,000 -

- Renewals - - - 32,000 - 32,000 - 32,000 - 32,000 -

Debt Repayment - - - - - - - - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 87,300 116,250 120,000 44,550 25,000 32,000 - 32,000 - 57,000 -

101 Page 101

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - - - - - - - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - - - - - - - - -

Funding Required 646,584 843,671 795,017 824,851 836,110 831,342 818,027 867,275 848,367 922,760 879,462

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 546,861 677,894 724,630 762,067 797,621 789,291 807,509 824,326 839,041 856,075 869,436

Loans (Net) - - - - - - - - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - - - - - - - - -

Reserves 99,723 165,777 70,387 62,784 38,489 42,051 10,518 42,949 9,326 66,685 10,026

Total Funding 646,584 843,671 795,017 824,851 836,110 831,342 818,027 867,275 848,367 922,760 879,462

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


RM / PLANNING

Hurunui District Council

Activity 1: Resource Management /

Planning

Background

Council has statutory functions under the Resource

Management Act which relates to the use of land, air, and

water. The purpose of this Act is to promote the sustainable

management of natural and physical resources.

Council is required to have a District Plan in place. The plan

sets out objectives, policies and methods which identify

the resource management issues confronted within the

district and how they will be managed.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Resource Management and Planning activity

contributes to the Community Outcome “Environmental

Responsibility”, through providing strategic and forward

planning of the district’s natural and physical resources.

Providing direction through concept development

planning and performance standards means our natural

and physical resources are protected and remain sustainable

into the future. The District Plan provides standards that

all development must comply with to ensure a clean and

safe environment exists for people to live in.

Current Situation

Council’s District Plan became operative in August 2003.

This plan identifies key resource management issues for

our district, and Council’s objectives, policies and methods

for addressing each of those issues.

In order to achieve the objectives and policies set out in

the District Plan, Council sets rules and standards which

developments must meet. Council processes a large

number of resource consent applications by people who

want to engage in those activities. Two thirds of these

relate to subdivision consents.

About 95% of those applications are granted by the Council

without public notification, within 20 working days of the

application.

The Council has become aware of a combined fault/slope

hazard risk at Mount Lyford Village in the Amuri Ward

from work undertaken by Environment Canterbury. The

Council has authorised the commissioning of a geotechnical

study of the area to determine the extent of the potential

hazard and the impact this may have landowners in

the effected area. The Council expects this work to be

completed late in June 2006 and is seeking feedback on the

funding model proposed for this work (pg 201).

Plans for the Future

Council must monitor changes in the district, and, in 2008,

report on the plan’s performance. In 2013, the District Plan

will be reviewed in its entirety.

Council can promote changes to the District Plan at any

time, as can anyone else. Any proposed changes must go

through a public consultation process. It is expected that

there will be changes happening during the life of the

District Plan.

Council will place a greater emphasis on biodiversity

over the life of this plan. Biodiversity is a term relating to

the number and variety of indigenous organisms found

within a specified geographic region. Native plants and

creatures of the Hurunui are important to our district, and

are features treasured by many in our community.

Council has legal responsibilities under the Resource

Management Act 1991 that include controlling the effect

of the use of land for the purpose of maintaining native

biological diversity, and in all decisions, recognising

and providing for the protection of areas of significant

native vegetation and important environments of native

animals.

Council’s vision is to work together with our communities

without the need for the current listing of significant

natural areas (SNAs) in the District Plan. Having a listing

of SNAs has created a barrier between the Council and

communities, and we wish to, in the future, co-operate

with private landowners and other agencies to overcome

these difficulties and at the same time respect private

property rights.

The District Plan’s effectiveness is going to be reviewed in

2008. We hope that, by then, we can show a proven track

record of partnership and co-operation between Council

and landowners, so that there will be no need to include a

listing of SNAs in the next District Plan. We will need to be

able to show that, due to us working together, there have

been measurable gains for the district’s important values

and native biodiversity.

In order to achieve this vision, Council will develop

a strategy over the next three years, that involves

establishing a ‘baseline’ record of the district’s biodiversity

and significant values, and a record of protection efforts

since the District Plan was notified in 1995. The strategy

furthermore involves funding Council’s efforts to

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encourage private landowners to protect special areas on

their land. Council has accepted $64,000 funding from

the Biodiversity Advice Fund which is used to fund work

by a contractor(s) to offer advice to landowners. Council

also intends to develop a monitoring plan to measure the

improvement of the district’s biodiversity, and look into

changes to the District Plan that could bring in incentives

for landowners protecting these areas.

Depending on the outcome of the Mount Lyford

hazardscape investigation the Council may undertake

changes to the District Plan to recognise the extent and

scale of hazards. This may have implications with respect

to the scope and type of activities that can be undertaken

in the area as a permied activity.

Funding

Environment – Resource Management Act Policy

50% district rate on capital value (known as the ‘planning

rate’), and 50% District Uniform Annual General Charge.

Environment – Resource Management Act Consents

Resource consents 100% user charges. Council may waive

consent fees as provided for in the Resource Management

Act and its remission policy on consent fees.

50% district rate on capital value (known as the ‘planning

rate’), and 50% District Uniform Annual General Charge.

Maintenance and Operating

Council manages the Resource Management/Planning

activity from its Amberley based office. Council has its

own policy and planning staff, and from time to time, will

engage consultants for specialty areas or when demand

exceeds staffing resources.

Assumptions and Risks

The Resource Management Act and the District Plan are

the main drivers of actions in this activity. It is assumed

that there will be changes to the District Plan before it is

required to be reviewed in 2013. This ability is important to

enable Council to respond to the district’s environmental

issues and changing demographics.

Improving Services

Bio-Diversity Government

Grant to initiate consultative

process with landowners for

biodiversity initiatives

Review of biodiversity to

promote the protection of the

district's natural ecology

Growth strategy project

for Cheviot and the beach

selements between the

Conway and Motunau Beach

selements

Amberley Beach erosion risk

assessment and selement

options

Amberley Beach

renourishment work

Coast Care grant to assist the

group to manage the coastal

resource for the community

Review of landscape

provisions in the District

Plan to assist policy direction

Review of heritage inventory

to preserve and protect

district's heritage

103 Page 103

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$32,000

$10,000 $10,300 $10,600

$24,000

$15,000

$36,000

$3,000 $3,000 $3,000

$42,500

$10,600

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Resource Management Goal: To promote the sustainable management of the districts

natural and physical resources

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To have a system in place to

monitor the effectiveness and

efficiency of the District Plan

Developing environmental

indicators and information

gathering systems to measure the

effectiveness and efficiency of the

District Plan

Indicator set developed

and information gathering

systems in place

An effectiveness and

efficiency report will have

been completed on the

District Plan



To decide on all resource

consent applications within

statutory timeframes

Ensure appropriate resources are

in place to process and determine

resource consents received

100% of all resource consent

applications are decided

within 20 working days

√ √ √ √

RM / PLANNING

To ensure that those operating Establish a system to monitor land 30% of land use consents

land use consents comply use consents issued

are checked for compliance

with the terms of the consents

issued

with the terms of the consent

(Excluding set back and Hanmer

Springs design standard

consents)

√ √ √ √

To have a biodiversity

strategy for the district

Develop a wrien biodiversity

strategy for implementation by

2007

Council will have a wrien

biodiversity strategy is in

place


To manage vehicle access at

Ashworths Beach to reduce

environmental damage to

Ashworth Ponds

Manage vehicle access to the Vehicle access is precluded

beach through the provision of from Ashworth Ponds

education initiatives, fencing, and

provide rangers on the ground

in conjunction with Environment

Canterbury and the Department

of Conservation

√ √ √

Continued on next page

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Performance Measures 2006-2016 Cont.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

To finalise the Hanmer

Springs Urban Growth

Strategy

Consider impacts from the

strategy and process any

resulting District Plan change

recommendations

Hanmer Springs Urban

Growth Strategy is in place

A range of actions arising

from the strategy are

implemented (to be

determined)


√ √ √

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

To complete township Undertake consultative processes A plan for each town is

concept plans for Culverden, with each of the identified completed

Rotherham and Waiau communities to identify

community development needs Implementation plans have

and wishes

been prepared for each

township

To complete a growth Undertake a review of growth The plan is complete

strategy for Cheviot and the and development and land

beach selements between the demands, and implement a

Conway and Motunau Beach consultative process before

selements

making recommendations for

changes to the District Plan

105 Page 105



√ √ √

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 373,250 327,750 271,903 280,056

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 373,250 327,750 271,903 280,056

Expenditure

Operational Costs 718,403 844,741 768,357 813,408

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 718,403 844,741 768,357 813,408

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (345,153) (516,991) (496,454) (533,352)

RM / PLANNING

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - - - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - - - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 345,153 516,991 496,454 533,352

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 367,764 493,821 496,454 533,352

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves (22,611) 23,170 -

Total Funding 345,153 516,991 496,454 533,352

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Activity 2: Civil Defence

Background

Council has a statutory requirement to be involved in

civil defence under the Civil Defence and Emergency

Management Act 2002.

Council coordinates planning, programmes, and activities

related to local civil defence emergency management in

the areas of reduction, readiness, response, and recovery.

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

Council aims to have an efficient organisational structure

and suitably trained and competent personnel, including

volunteers, available for effective emergency management.

Recruitment drives for civil defence volunteers are

essential to maintain the numbers of personnel needed in

a civil defence emergency. Training is crucial and Council

intends to improve its training strategy of both staff and

volunteers.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Council also works collaboratively with other local

authorities in Canterbury to develop and maintain a

Regional Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan.

Council strives to assist other groups in the implementation

of civil defence emergency management, promote and

raise public awareness of the legislative requirements of

the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Act 2002,

and monitor and report on compliance with the Act.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Civil Defence activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, as

Council ensures capacity exists to protect the Hurunui

District and its people in times of crises.

Current Situation

In the Hurunui District, there are four Sector Posts

(Waikari, Waipara, Greta Valley and Waiau), four Sector

Headquarters (Cheviot, Culverden, Hawarden and Hanmer

Springs), and a District Headquarters (Amberley). Over

seventy volunteer personnel from diverse backgrounds

are involved in the running of these centres.

Key relationships have been established with the

Waimakariri District Council, Kaikoura District Council,

the greater Canterbury Region and the National Civil

Defence Emergency Management Headquarters (CDEM)

as well as critical emergency service providers (fire, police

and ambulance).

Plans for the Future

Council intends to increase its capacity to deal more

effectively with a civil defence emergency when the time

arrives. Staffing is going to be increased in the 2006/07

year so that Council has a dedicated officer to manage

both the civil defence and rural fire activities.

The increased human resources will enable Council to

focus on training, staffing needs, planning and resourcing

in a more effective way than it has been able to do in the

past.

Funding

100% Uniform Annual General Charge aer taking into

account the small central government contribution via an

annual grant.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to manage and operate all its

emergency functions from its Amberley office.

Assumptions and Risks

Planning and preparing for an emergency situation that

may not happen requires making assumptions. Civil

defence planning is based on the assumption that a serious

natural disaster will occur, such as an earthquake. The

Hurunui District is positioned on a fault line that is said to

be overdue to move. Also, a significant part of the Hurunui

District is coastal, and therefore at risk from tsunamis.

Other natural risks include flooding and adverse weather

conditions. Good planning and preparation is crucial,

therefore Council has taken its role in civil defence very

seriously.

107 Page 107

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Civil Defence Goal: To be prepared for and have the ability to respond to and recover

from any Civil Defence emergency

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To respond immediately to

any civil defence emergency

Develop local civil defence

and emergency maintenance,

plans and standard operating

procedures (SOPs)

Emergency plans and SOPs

are reviewed and updated

each year

√ √ √ √

Encourage volunteers in the

district to join and participate in

training and planning

% of identified volunteers

participate in at least one civil

defence exercise per year

40%

50%

50%

60%





CIVIL DEFENCE

The number of volunteers

Identify how many volunteers are for each township has been

required in each township and identified

actively recruit them

The number of volunteers

matches the number

identified as being required

To have trained staff to staff a Organise and undertake staff No less than 50% of Amberley

civil defence headquarters training exercises

based Council staffed are

trained







A training schedule is in place

and updated each year





Improving Services

Major Projects

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Purchase of car chargers

for hand held radios for

emergency personnel

Purchase of 2 additional

satellite phones - Conway,

Hawarden

$1,520

$3,000 $3,100

- Purchase and installation

of generators to sector

headquarters and medical

centres to operate during

a power outage

- Satellite phone

- Portable transmier

$26,250

$3,000

$7,000

$13,400 $13,800

$12,550

108

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees - - - -

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants 2,300 2,300 2,300 2,300

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 2,300 2,300 2,300 2,300

Expenditure

Operational Costs 116,149 131,054 135,116 140,512

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 116,149 131,054 135,116 140,512

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (113,849) (128,754) (132,816) (138,212)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 46,300 36,250 - 12,550

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 46,300 36,250 - 12,550

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 160,149 165,004 132,816 150,762

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 118,849 108,754 132,816 138,212

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 41,300 56,250 - 12,550

Total Funding 160,149 165,004 132,816 150,762

109 Page 109

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 3: Rural Fire Control

RURAL FIRE CONTROL

Background

Council has a statutory requirement to provide a rural

fire service within the gazeed rural fire district under

the Forest and Rural Fire Act 1979 and the Fire Service Act

1975.

Council’s rural fire services include vegetation fire fighting,

fire prevention and inspection services associated with

administering restricted or banned fire seasons.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Rural Fire Control activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, by

ensuring there is capacity to protect people, property and

natural assets in times of crises.

Current Situation

The rural fire service operates under a District Fire Plan set

by statute. Within the Hurunui District, there are five rural

fire parties which are based at Waikari, Waiau, Conway

Flat, Motunau Beach and Greta Valley.

Approximately 80 volunteers are involved in this activity

including 10 rural fire officers and a principle and deputy

rural fire officer. Each rural fire party has a tanker and

portable pump, and there is a tanker available at Cheviot.

Council gives information and broadcast warnings

regarding fire hazard conditions. This includes fire bans

during periods of extreme fire hazards, and to make,

amend or revoke bylaws for the purpose of carrying out

fire prevention and control measures.

Plans for the Future

Council is planning to increase its paid staff in this area

by employing a dedicated officer to manage both civil

defence and rural fire. This will ensure that there is a focus

on emergency management and that Council can respond

appropriately in times of an emergency.

General upgrading of all equipment related to rural fire

control will continue to ensure that all fire parties have the

physical resources needed to fight fires.

Council will continue to promote, encourage and carry out

appropriate fire prevention and control measures in the

interests of public safety, including maintaining a wrien

fire plan, observing and assessing weather and other fire

hazard conditions, and removing or reducing fire hazards,

which may endanger vegetation.

Funding

Fighting fires: exacerbator pays. Other costs: Aer the

Rural Fire Authority Equipment subsidy, 80% from

ratepayers in the rural fire authority area, the other 20%

from the balance of the district rated on Capital Value.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to manage and operate all of

its emergency management functions from its Amberley

office.

Assumptions and Risks

The Hurunui District can be subject to extreme drought

conditions during the summer months and it is then that

callouts for fire services are particularly high. Of significant

risk to our rural community is the constant need to recruit,

train and retain volunteers to be available when there

are fires. A major risk is the issue of health and safety.

Obviously, fighting fires is a dangerous activity and it is

essential that volunteers are fully trained to prevent injury

or loss of life to themselves and others. Fire plans and

appropriate resources are critical to mitigate these risks.

Volunteers are crucial to this activity and recruitment

drives must be ongoing to sustain required numbers for

each rural fire force established in our district. Numbers of

volunteers have been dwindling over the past years which

is of real concern. Full training is provided to volunteers

to ensure they are able to carry out their duties safely.

110

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Performance Measures 2006-2016

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Rural Fire Goal: To safeguard life and property from fire in forest and rural areas and

other areas of vegetation

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

To respond to rural fires in Develop a wrien fire plan with

time to prevent loss of life and fire prevention and control

property

strategies

How will we know we have met our

target

Fire plan and strategies are

reviewed and updated each

year

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

√ √ √ √

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

To have sufficient trained

volunteers to respond to

rural fires

Assess volunteers requirements

for the district

Recruit volunteer fire fighters to

staff fire parties

Provide suitable training for

volunteer fire fighters

No loss of life has occurred

Volunteer requirements have

been identified

The number of volunteers

matches the number

identified as being required

90% of volunteers are trained

to the basic NZQA unit

standard requirements













WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

Major Projects

Replacement tanker for

Waiau, and

Tanker garage

Replacement fire

appliance for Conway Flat

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$40,000

$40,000

$120,000

111 Page 111

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates 171,000 180,000 188,673 198,594

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 12,400 12,000 12,372 12,744

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants 11,356 35,500 88,500 8,500

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 194,756 227,500 289,545 219,838

Expenditure

Operational Costs 175,506 210,542 234,338 237,030

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 175,506 210,542 234,338 237,030

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) 19,250 16,958 55,207 (17,192)

RURAL FIRE CONTROL

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 7,000 80,000 120,000 -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 7,000 80,000 120,000 -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required (12,250) 63,042 64,793 17,192

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates - - - -

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves (12,250) 63,042 64,793 17,192

Total Funding (12,250) 63,042 64,793 17,192

112

Page 112


Activity 4: Building Compliance

Background

Council carries out processing building consents and

undertakes compliance work, as it has a statutory

requirement to enforce the building code and regulations

under the Building Act 2004.

Council must provide services relating to licensing and

consents. Council ensures the processes associated with

these are delivered in a timely and cost efficient manner.

Processing building consents and inspections are an

important part of Council’s role.

Council’s role is to ensure that buildings are safe, have

suitable amenities, are appropriately licensed and are

constructed and used in ways that promote sustainable

development. Council does this through the administration

and enforcement of the building code and Building Act

2004.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Building Compliance activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, by

ensuring that people are safeguarded from possible injury

or loss of amenity when using any building.

Current Situation

Building and building sites are inspected at several

stages of their development. Council issues well over 500

building consents annually, including private buildings,

public buildings, and businesses. Permits to operate are

also issued to amusement ride providers at shows and

events around the district. Inspections are carried out on

these to ensure that such activities operate in accordance

with safety standards.

In addition, the district’s private swimming pools are

inspected to ensure ongoing compliance with the ‘Fencing

of Swimming Pools Act’ requirements.

Plans for the Future

The Building Act 2004, which became operative in 2005,

requires that all Councils become Building Consent

Authorities.

All Councils had to register by May 2006, and must

subsequently gain accreditation by 2007. Accreditation has

ongoing costs as Council has to ensure that its building

officers are appropriately qualified.

Regarding the inspection of private swimming pools under

the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act, it is planned that all

113 Page 113

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

private swimming pools are inspected every 3 years in the

future, instead of the past practice of inspecting pools once

in every 10 years.

The Hurunui District is subject to significant growth

and is one of the fastest growing areas in New Zealand.

Resourcing this area is important to accommodate

demand and to comply with timeliness standards around

the processing of consents.

Funding

Building consents 100% user charges. Building

administration other than consents processing (including

some advice) funded 100% District Rate on Capital Value.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to perform the Building

Inspection activity from its Amberley office.

Assumptions and Risks

The Hurunui District is going through a growth phase

which is expected to continue for some years, albeit at

varying levels. The rate of growth impacts on the number

of building inspections undertaken. Labour shortages

in building inspection offices means it can be difficult to

recruit staff when required.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Building Compliance Goal: To improve, promote, and protect public safety within the

Hurunui District

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To decide on all building

consent applications within

statutory timeframes

Ensure appropriate resources are

in place to process and determine

building consents received

100% of all building consent

applications are decided

within 20 working days

√ √ √ √

That all public buildings in

the district have a current

Building Warrant of Fitness

Employ qualified staff to inspect

public buildings to ensure

compliance

No less than 30% of all

registered public buildings

with a compliance schedule

are inspected each year

√ √ √ √

Council building officers

are trained to a professional

standard

Require staff to receive recognised All Council building

building accreditation training officers participate in

BOINZ accredited training

programmes

√ √ √ √

All registered private Employ qualified resources to

swimming pools comply with inspect private swimming pools

the Fencing of Swimming to ensure compliance

Pools Act

No less than a third of all

registered private swimming

pools are inspected each year

√ √ √ √

BUILDING

COMPLIANCE

Improving Services

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Swimming pool audits

process (3 yearly)

$9,000

114

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - 11,000 11,000 11,000

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 372,000 456,000 470,477 484,954

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 372,000 467,000 481,477 495,954

Expenditure

Operational Costs 409,065 458,036 484,077 491,198

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 409,065 458,036 484,077 491,198

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (37,065) 8,964 (2,600) 4,756

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 34,000 - - -

- Renewals - - - 32,000

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 34,000 - - 32,000

Vested Assets - No expenditure

Required

- - - -

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 71,065 (8,964) 2,600 27,244

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates (13,435) (25,964) 2,600 (4,756)

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 84,500 17,000 - 32,000

Total Funding 71,065 (8,964) 2,600 27,244

115 Page 115

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


PUBLIC HEALTH &

LIQUOR LICENSING

Hurunui District Council

Activity 5: Public Health and Liquor

Licencing

Background

Council has statutory obligations related to the Health Act

1956, the Lier Act 1979, the Food Act 1981 and the Food

Hygiene Regulations 1974 to provide health inspections.

It is also required under the Sale of Liquor Act 1989 to

undertake responsibilities as the District Licensing Agency

for the district.

Council manages food safety by identifying and controlling

food safety risk factors, as well as ascertains and removes,

by regular inspections, any nuisances or any conditions

likely to be offensive or injurious to health. Liquor

licensing is important as it contributes to the control and

reduction of liquor abuse.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Health Inspections and Liquor Licensing

activity contributes to the Community Outcome “A Healthy,

Safe Place to Live”, by safeguarding people from possible

illness through the administration and enforcement of the

food hygiene and liquor licensing regulations.

Current Situation

There are close to 150 registered premises in the

district, which are inspected annually, including food,

campgrounds, hairdressers, apiaries, and offensive trades.

Permits to operate are also issued to food stands at shows

and events around the district, and inspections are carried

out to ensure that these are operating at appropriate health

standards.

All of the water schemes in the district are monitored to

test compliance with the Drinking Water NZ Standards.

Testing is done within an approved laboratory situated in

Council’s Amberley office. The district’s public swimming

pools are also inspected to ensure health standards are

being met.

All notifiable infectious disease reports are investigated

and reported on. These are the common parasitic and

bacteria infections such as campylobacter, salmonella,

giardia and cryptosporidium.

Inspections are also carried out on a significant number

of complaints received each year regarding nuisance

activities or activities that may be injurious to health.

These include noise, smoke, dust, smell, spraying, food

concerns, effluent and sewerage disposal.

club licences, 40 applications for special licences and 70

applications for renewal of managers’ certificates.

Inspections are carried out in association with issuing of

licenses to ensure premises meet the requirements of the

Sale and Liquor Act and the terms of the license issued.

Plans for the Future

Growth in the district will continue to see an increase in

liquor license applications and managers’ certificates.

Likewise with health inspections as food premises and

bars develop in the area. Council will continue to perform

its statutory responsibilities in this area; therefore, the

future will be mainly business as usual.

Funding

Health Inspections:

The cost of actual inspections will be met from 100% user

charges. Any shortfall to be met 50% from the District

Rate on Capital Value and 50% District Uniform Annual

General Charge.

.

Liquor Licensing:

Maximum fees will be payable as set out in the Liquor

Licensing Act. Any shortfall will be met 50% from the

District Rate and 50% from District Uniform Annual

General Charge.

Maintenance and Operating

Council contracts “Food and Health Standards” to

undertake and advise on its health functions, including

food and water testing, inspecting premises, and

investigating health issues. Other administrative tasks,

such as the processing licenses, are performed by Council

staff.

Assumptions and Risks

Council is intending to continue the practice of contracting

out the inspection and health check aspects of this activity

as long as this continues to be the most cost efficient method.

Long term projections for the district indicated that there

will continue to be growth, and therefore increased demand

for inspections and licensing. Contracting out aspects of

the tasks enables Council to respond to changing demands

more efficiently than doing it all in house.

Each year, Council deals with approximately 54 applications

(new and renewals) for on-licences, off-licences, and

116

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Performance Measures 2006-2016

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Public Health and Liquor Licencing Goal: To improve, promote, and protect public safety

within the Hurunui District

Target

All food and liquor premises

are registered

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

Employ staff to process and grant All new food and liquor

licenses

premises are inspected in the

first year of operation

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

√ √ √ √

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

All reported infectious

diseases are investigated

Investigate complaints about poor All complaints are

food handling and unsanitary

conditions

investigated within 20

working days

Engage a contractor to do Infectious diseases are

compliance checks and

investigated within 5 working

investigations

days

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

117 Page 117

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 82,500 84,500 85,322 86,143

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 82,500 84,500 85,322 86,143

Expenditure

Operational Costs 146,783 153,884 160,657 163,454

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 146,783 153,884 160,657 163,454

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (64,283) (69,384) (75,336) (77,311)

PUBLIC HEALTH &

LIQUOR LICENSING

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - - - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - - - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 64,283 69,384 75,336 77,311

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 64,283 84,384 75,336 77,311

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves - (15,000) - -

Total Funding 64,283 69,384 75,336 77,311

118

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Activity 6: Animal Control

Background

Council has a statutory requirement to be involved in

animal control under the Dog Control Act 1996, the Dog

Control Amendment Act 2003, and the Impounding Act

1955. The Council also has responsibilities under the

Animal Welfare Act 1999.

This activity ensures that dogs and stock are kept under

control at all times for the safety and well-being of the

community and the animals. Council has a responsibility

toward ensuring that all dogs in the district are registered

and that their owners properly aend to their welfare.

Council undertakes some public education and publicity

to encourage owners of dogs and animals to take personal

responsibility for their animals.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Animal Control activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “A Healthy, Safe Place to Live”, as

Council ensures that dogs and other animals do not injure,

endanger, or cause distress to any person or to any other

animals or protected wildlife.

Current Situation

The Hurunui District has approximately 5,000 registered

dogs (around 2,000 owners). Annually, Council receives

around 380 complaints regarding dogs which require

follow up investigation. The majority of these are ‘general

nuisance’ complaints, mostly involving barking and

wandering.

Around 10 infringement notices are issued each year, the

majority of which are for registration related breaches. 35-

40 dogs are impounded each year and nearly a quarter of

these are put down. Council manages animal pounds.

Around 170 callouts are received each year concerning

stock, with the majority of the complaints regarding

wandering. Fortunately, very few incidents in the district

have involved neglect. Approximately 15 sheep and cale

are impounded annually.

Plans for the Future

Major changes have taken place recently, to the way

in which dog registration information is collected due

to legislative requirements. Council is responsible for

supplying information to the National Dog Database. The

updated National Dog Database came into being in July

2006.

From that date, Councils are responsible for ensuring that

119 Page 119

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

new dogs (except working dogs), and dogs that have been

impounded for the second time within 12 months are

micro-chipped.

Council, over the next 12 months, will be initiating a

review of the existing dog control policy and the dog

control bylaw.

Funding

The cost of Council’s involvement in dealing with stock is

funded 100% from exacerbators (those who have caused

the problem). The balance of remaining costs is to be met

from the District Rate on Capital Value.

The dog registration process and standby, including the

keeping of records, is funded by the owner for the dog

registration fee.

In the case of following up dog complaints, whoever causes

any incidents pays. Any shortfall (complaint unfounded,

dog gone, etc) is funded by dog registration fees.

Maintenance and Operating

This activity is dealt with by a mix of staff and a contractor.

Council employs a contractor to follow up complaints and

to impound dogs and stock when necessary on a 24/7

basis. Council staff are employed to do the administrative

tasks such as dog registration. At the time of going to print,

the current dog control contract is due to expire. Council

will re-assess the cost to establish whether Council should

continue to contract out this function or employ staff.

Assumptions and Risks

Council is assuming an increased administrative workload

once micro-chipping is in place. It is expected that there

may be reluctance from some to chip their dogs.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Animal Control Goal: To enforce statutory regulations regarding the care and control of

dogs and stock

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To respond to complaints Ensure resources are in place to

regarding dog and other enforce statutory regulations

animals that may be causing a

nuisance or hazard

Dog and other animal

complaints are responded to

within 24 hours.

√ √ √ √

To ensure that dogs in the

district are registered

Administer dog registrations and

take compliance action where

necessary.

All dogs the Council has a

record of are registered in

accordance with the Dog

Control Act 1996

√ √ √ √

To review the Council Dog

Control Policy and Bylaw

Initiate public consultation and A reviewed dog control policy

update the dog control policy and is in place

bylaw

A reviewed dog control bylaw

is in place



ANIMAL CONTROL

120

Page 120


Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 78,800 108,368 120,892 129,247

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 78,800 108,368 120,892 129,247

Expenditure

Operational Costs 96,984 146,582 143,909 148,236

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 96,984 146,582 143,909 148,236

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (18,184) (38,214) (23,017) (18,989)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - - - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - - - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 18,184 38,214 23,017 18,989

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 9,400 16,900 17,424 17,948

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 8,784 21,314 5,594 1,042

Total Funding 18,184 38,214 23,017 18,989

121 Page 121

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


UTILITY SERVICES /

INFRASTRUCTURE

Hurunui District Council

Utility Services / Infrastructure

Overview

Utility Services/Infrastructure deals with six separate

activities that Council undertakes in order to improve our

community’s well-being and strive towards achieving our

community outcomes:

• Activity 1: Roading Network

• Activity 2: Solid Waste Household Collection

• Activity 3: Transfer Stations

• Activity 4: Sewerage

• Activity 5: Stormwater/Drainage

• Activity 6: Water Supply

Why is Council Involved?

Council delivers utility services and infrastructure in

order to provide for the well-being, health and safety

of our people. Much of what Council does in this area

is regulated and therefore, a requirement for Councils to

undertake the fore mentioned activities.

Council is required to ensure local roads and bridges are

safe, and that there is a sufficient supply of safe water

to meet the needs of the district, make provision for the

disposal of waste and sewerage, and manage stormwater

drainage.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Utility Services/Infrastructure group of activities

is the main contributor to the community outcome,

“Essential Infrastructure”. Council is the primary agent

responsible for establishing a high-quality network of

utility services that are essential to our communities’ wellbeing.

Emergency Management

The Council is developing a business continuity plan

to detail the procedures that are to be followed in an

emergency. This is to enable essential services to continue

to function to the fullest possible extent, even though this

may be at a reduced level, during major breakdown or

during and aer any civil emergency.

Water supply, sewerage and roading network receive

priority in the event of civil emergency, while the remaining

Council activities in the Utility Services/Infrastructure

group are not considered an essential service in times of

an emergency.

Financial Information

The following page provides financial information relating

to the utility services and infrastructure group of activities

for the next 10 year period.

Utility Services/Infrastructure Related Activities

Recently, Council undertook an independent review of the

Engineering Department which deals with infrastructure

related activities. A key recommendation from the report

is to increase staff resources to beer manage the demands

of our expansive rural district regarding roading, water

and sewerage services, and future growth. The plans for

each of these activities in the following pages, incorporates

the recommended levels of additional staffing.

The remainder of this section gives more information

about the seven separate utility services and infrastructure

related activities undertaken by Council.

Also important, Council’s Utility Services/Infrastructure

category of activities significantly contributes to the

community outcome, “Environmental Responsibility”.

The proper disposal of waste and managing how land will

be used now and in the future is critical for the protection

and improvement of the environment we live in.

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Financial Summary - Next 10 Years

Utility Services / Infrastructure

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

Revenue

Vested Assets - 858,010 887,646 916,483 944,403 970,208 995,096 1,017,868 1,039,325 1,058,607 1,078,289

Targeted Rates 3,395,719 3,595,510 3,821,576 4,037,075 4,229,953 4,480,008 4,624,194 4,764,936 4,974,481 5,268,028 5,481,643

Development Impact Fees 383,246 412,611 371,568 371,568 369,345 296,011 296,011 309,345 309,345 309,345 293,344

User Fees 77,300 255,764 240,979 242,202 235,217 210,386 212,154 213,786 215,214 216,574 212,532

Interest Received 101,361 172,144 17,618 15,371 12,421 11,877 7,767 6,233 3,632 3,068 1,267

Subsidies & Grants 2,275,932 2,933,951 3,673,591 2,942,797 3,234,964 3,110,018 3,182,293 3,249,008 3,307,383 3,362,979 3,415,795

Other Income 150,000 225,000 218,572 225,144 231,080 236,804 242,316 247,404 251,856 256,096 260,124

Total Activity Income 6,383,557 8,452,989 9,231,550 8,750,638 9,257,383 9,315,312 9,559,831 9,808,580 10,101,236 10,474,696 10,742,994

Expenditure

Operational Costs 5,677,953 6,278,728 6,551,731 6,854,325 7,091,100 7,401,059 7,520,784 7,719,985 7,836,230 8,028,140 8,118,306

Interest 219,082 261,914 412,288 516,532 575,933 605,993 623,661 632,427 688,563 740,415 749,841

Depreciation 2,809,018 3,541,517 3,741,315 3,959,883 4,134,866 4,302,921 4,448,283 4,577,299 4,698,767 4,812,202 4,921,869

Operating Costs 8,706,052 10,082,158 10,705,334 11,330,740 11,801,899 12,309,973 12,592,728 12,929,712 13,223,560 13,580,756 13,790,016

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (2,322,495) (1,629,169) (1,473,784) (2,580,103) (2,544,515) (2,994,662) (3,032,898) (3,121,132) (3,122,324) (3,106,059) (3,047,022)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 2,279,437 4,295,600 4,194,551 1,579,346 1,489,754 1,184,777 742,417 858,709 684,092 600,062 610,453

- Renewals 2,583,411 3,307,210 3,977,506 3,468,254 3,233,072 3,480,908 3,612,507 3,662,283 5,087,122 4,144,263 4,355,881

Debt Repayment 114,099 158,113 268,724 320,669 364,368 407,396 445,869 492,747 569,132 622,531 676,798

Capital and Debt Repayment 4,976,947 7,760,923 8,440,781 5,368,268 5,087,193 5,073,080 4,800,793 5,013,740 6,340,346 5,366,856 5,643,132

123 Page 123

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- 858,010 887,646 916,483 944,403 970,208 995,096 1,017,868 1,039,325 1,058,607 1,078,289

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded 910,221 1,182,407 1,256,859 1,345,443 1,426,098 1,502,120 1,568,880 1,632,993 1,695,355 1,753,864 1,808,087

Funding Required 6,389,222 9,065,695 9,545,353 7,519,411 7,150,013 7,535,829 7,259,906 7,519,747 8,806,639 7,777,658 7,960,356

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 3,119,468 3,080,267 3,294,570 3,491,824 3,606,779 3,703,512 3,797,342 3,885,052 3,963,422 4,038,923 4,111,569

Loans (Net) 351,800 2,705,000 2,010,960 1,469,720 974,400 1,001,270 698,330 795,720 1,950,580 736,280 884,320

HSTR Surplus - - - - - - - - - - -

Reserves 2,917,954 3,280,427 4,239,823 2,557,867 2,568,834 2,831,048 2,764,234 2,838,975 2,892,638 3,002,455 2,964,467

Total Funding 6,389,222 9,065,695 9,545,353 7,519,411 7,150,013 7,535,829 7,259,906 7,519,747 8,806,639 7,777,658 7,960,356

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 1: Roading Network

ROADING NETWORK

Background

Council undertakes the professional and technical work

involved in providing the ongoing management of the

district’s roading network. Council obtains partial funding

for road construction from Land Transport NZ. Public

ownership of the road corridor ensures appropriate

property access and freedom of travel throughout the

area.

The Roading Network activity deals with the dayto-day

operation, maintenance and improvements of

road pavement (reconstructions and upgrades), signs,

street lighting, parking, cleaning, bridge maintenance,

and various road safety activities. These initiatives are

supported through policy development and forward

planning, including linking in with transport and land use

planning and road safety coordination.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Roading Network activity is the major contributor

to the Community Outcome, “Essential Infrastructure”.

Council provides for an effective and safe roading system

that links people, places and businesses.

Current Situation

The Hurunui district’s roading network comprises of

approximately 1,703 km of state highways and district

roads 268 bridges, 40km of footpaths, 54km kerb and

channel, 795 streetlights, 9449 traffic signs and 43km of

culvert pipes. Each road in the roading network has been

categorised into a roading hierarchy based on the road’s

purpose and level of use.

Current and desirable levels of service have been defined

against urban and rural road hierarchy categories. There

are 4 carriageway service indicators (capacity; ride quality;

safety; appearance; and responsiveness) and 4 associated

roading asset service indicators (footpaths; kerb and

channel; bridges; streetlighting; roadmarking; and signs).

The road hierarchy established is designed to meet the

expected levels of service, although incomplete inventory

data for some assets limits a full assessment.

Plans for the Future

The roading network uses a significant share of Council’s

annual expenditure, and this will continue on a long term

basis. The council assesses demand via a programme

of monitoring and traffic counting on a rotational basis

to collect data about trends, and a works programme is

developed as a result of this data..

Hurunui is a large district with a small population,

therefore it is crucial that priority is given to roads and

bridges that serve important functions, such as road safety,

and have high use.

Council has been undertaking only minor seal extension

over the past few years. The last major work was the Inland

Kaikoura Rd completed in 2002. Council wishes to take

advantage of any external funds available to reduce the

length of unsealed roads in the district. Bridge maintenance

and replacements is also a priority focus during the next

several years, as the maintenance programme on these has

been restricted by funding limitations in the past.

Many timber bridges built aer Word War II are now

nearly at the end of their economic lives, and will have to

be replaced during the life of this plan. An assessment on

the state of our 268 bridges has been recently completed

and priorities have been established. 36 bridges with

timber superstructures will need to be replaced over the

next 10 years. Included in this priority list are the Herds,

Armstrongs, Noniti, Williams, Seaward, Ensors, Woods

and Greys Road bridges.

Consideration will need to be given to the location and

traffic count of each bridge to determine how they are

replaced. For example, there could be situations where

bridges have very low volumes of traffic and serve perhaps

only one or two households. Because of the significant

cost, it may be a beer solution to replace these with fords

instead. Consultation with relevant people and sectors of

the community will be done before decisions such as this

are made.

Council is an active member of the Hurunui District Road

Safety Co-ordinating Commiee. This commiee has

developed a Hurunui Community Road Safety Strategy

for 2006 to 2011. The plan provides a framework for a

road safety policy and initiatives in our district, together

with practical, long term community solutions.

A summary of the Hurunui Community Road Safety

Strategy is aached to this document as an appendix. A

copy of the full document is available at the Amberley

Council office.

There is provision made in this plan for additional staffing

(subject to a seperate council process) in order to improve

services, provide quality controls, and monitor contractor

performance.

Funding

Operational

For the Council contribution, 100% District Rate on

Capital Value for operations, roads and bridges to be

known as the Roading Rate.

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Capital

Capital improvements above $100,000 to be funded by

loans or reserves over 20 years funded from the District

Rate on Capital Value. Other Capital Expenditure to be

funded as operational.

Capital Works

Capital improvements over $100,000 are to be funded by

loans over 20 years with the funding cost met from the

District Wide Rate on Capital Value. This District Rate is

known as the Roading Rate. Other Capital Expenditure to

be funded as operational.

Maintenance and Operating

Land Transport NZ subsidies of up to 60% for improvement

projects such as seal extension and major safety works are

dependent on reaching the funding criteria.

Consideration is required on the ongoing ownership of

very low trafficked roads and bridges currently justified

on a community and social basis. In consultation with the

Police and Land Transport Safety Authority, the Council

maintains and annually reviews, a road safety strategy for

the district. Council implements this through an annual

road safety action plan.

The Hurunui District roading network encompasses and

requires:

• Ownership or agreed use of land under roads

• Road pavements and surfacings to provide a

carriageway for the safe movement of people and

goods

• Culverts, watertables and a stormwater system to

provide drainage

• Signs, barriers and pavement markings to provide

road user information and safe transport

• Bridges to carry traffic over waterways

• Footpaths, walkways and cycle-lanes to transport

pedestrians and cyclists

• Street lighting to provide safe and comfortable

movement of vehicular and pedestrian traffic at night

• Carparking facilities not able to be provided adjacent

to traffic lanes

Assumptions and Risks

125 Page 125

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

From research carried out for the Regional Land Transport

Strategy, future traffic growth is predicted to be at a level

of 2% per annum. This level of traffic growth is linked

to population growth in established urban centres and

the coastal margins between Amberley and Christchurch,

an increase in vehicle ownership within the district,

industrial growth and development in both the primary

and value-added sectors, and the popularity of Hurunui

as a tourist destination. Increasing traffic volumes are

most significantly expected to impact on the district’s

arterial road network. Project costs are based on current

practice, standards and local knowledge of materials and

construction costs.

Cost estimates and plans for the roading network have

been based on the assumption that Council will qualify

for funding from Land Transport NZ for certain projects.

Council’s asset register has been prepared based on the

best available information. Some work still needs to be

done to ascertain the exact relevant details of all of the

roading assets, and to be able to accurately ascertain

their condition, serviceability and future useful life, and

from there accurately predict future needs. Council has a

comprehensive Risk Management Strategy for the roading

assets. This strategy has been prepared in accordance with

the process outlined in AS/NZS 4360: 1999 and establishes

the context for risk management in Council. The strategy

is to be implemented by identifying what risks there are

and when they may happen.

Assets

Valuations shown for each network asset type are as at 2005

and are prepared using Council’s historical cost estimates

and current contract prices. These are approximate

replacement values for audit and Asset management

purposes only and may not reflect market values.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Network Valuations

Asset type

Gross Replacement

as at 30/6/05

Depreciated

Replacement Cost

as at 30/6/05

Pavement

Formation

44,649,220 44,649,220

Pavement Layers 50,418,525 42,156,570

Pavement Surface 15,424,419 8,476,030

Bridges 58,681,453 37,748,691

Culverts 10,651,320 5,053,463

Structures 287,381 283,393

Fords 77,616 64,378

Footpaths 1,965,973 1,435,157

Drainage (K&C etc) 3,193,785 2,058,293

Street Lighting 1,043,615 441,788

Traffic Signs 1,027,676 661,991

Land Under Roads 5,905,829 5,905,829

Total 193,326,814 148,889,803

ROADING NETWORK

Improving Services

Road maintenance to

improve road conditions

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$1,300,000 $1,385,000 $1,470,000

Major Projects

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Georges Road - new seal $500,000

Bridge renewals $320,000 $329,920 $339,840

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Performance Measures 2006-2016

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Roading Network Goal:

To maintain and enhance a safe and effective land

transport system

Target

To maintain the district’s

roads to a standard

appropriate to their use and

traffic volume

What will we do towards achieving How will we know we have met our target 06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

the target

Assess roads and bridges,

plan for their maintenance

and upgrade, and contract

out the work and monitor

performance accordingly

RAMM survey data for Hurunui

roads compares favourably with

other rural Councils similar to

Hurunui District

Audits of the roading network

undertaken by Land Transport NZ

confirm that the roading network is

of a satisfactory condition

45 kilometres of sealed roads have

waterproof sealing applied per year

% of residents surveyed consider

the standard of sealed roads to be

satisfactory:

80%

















DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

To maintain smooth sealed

roads throughout the district

Undertake an annual % of residents surveyed consider

residents satisfaction survey the standard of unsealed roads to

Undertake a “roughness”

survey for all rural and

urban arterial and collector

roads annually and half of

all local roads

be satisfactory:

80%

The surface condition index is

less than the mean value of all NZ

sealed rural roads

The smooth travel exposure index is

greater than the mean value for all

sealed roads (currently 86%)

The sealing of Georges Road is

completed

127 Page 127

√ √ √ √

√ √ √

√ √ √




Continued on next page

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016 Cont

Target

What will we do towards achieving How will we know we have met our target 06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

the target

To increase the amount of

sealed roads within the total

network (currently 563 km)

Be alert to external funding

sources to finance seal

extensions where there is

economic justification to

do so

Annual LTSA statistics show an

increase of at least 1km in the

length of the sealed road network

each year

√ √ √ √

To maintain all bridges to a

safe standard

Assess bridges, plan for

their maintenance and

upgrade, and contract

out the work and monitor

performance accordingly

All bridges are able to carry class

1 loads (motorcar, light motor

vehicle)

A bridge replacement priority

programme has been developed



√ √ √

Herds and Armstrongs bridges

have been replaced


ROADING NETWORK

To reduce injury causing and

fatal crashes on local roads

Participate in the Hurunui

District Road Safety Coordinating

Commiee to

promote a positive road

safety culture

An employee is a member of the

Hurunui District Road Safety Coordinating

Commiee

Council provides funding for

toward the employment of a road

safety co-ordinator

The number of road crash fatalities

and injuries on local roads reduces

each year .













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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - 400,000 410,400 420,000

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees - - - -

Interest Received 92,682 45,990 (0) 11,411

Subsidies & Grants 2,275,932 2,933,951 2,792,472 2,942,797

Other Income 150,000 225,000 218,572 225,144

Total Activity Income 2,518,614 3,604,941 3,421,444 3,599,352

Expenditure

Operational Costs 2,341,803 2,475,723 2,664,421 2,823,785

Interest - - - -

Depreciation 1,898,797 2,351,214 2,433,701 2,520,284

Operating Costs 4,240,600 4,826,936 5,098,122 5,344,069

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (1,721,986) (1,221,995) (1,676,678) (1,744,717)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - 857,700 390,749 402,498

- Renewals 2,370,671 2,477,300 2,580,330 2,708,760

Debt Repayment 17,000 25,000 83,000 91,000

Capital and Debt Repayment 2,387,671 3,360,000 3,054,079 3,202,258

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- 400,000 410,400 420,000

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 4,109,657 4,981,995 5,141,157 5,366,975

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 2,530,479 2,434,216 2,542,496 2,676,771

Loans (Net) - 360,000 164,960 169,920

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 1,579,178 2,187,779 2,433,701 2,520,284

Total Funding 4,109,657 4,981,995 5,141,157 5,366,975

129 Page 129

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 2: Solid Waste Household Collection

SOLID WASTE

HOUSEHOLD COLLECT

Background

Council has an obligation under the Local Government Act

2002 to be involved in solid waste. Household collection

refers to the collection of residual solid waste and

recyclables via kerbside collection services and transfer

stations, and is a component pertinent to achieving a clean

and healthy atmosphere for our people to enjoy.

Council has a Solid Waste Management Plan in place,

which is also a requirement of the Local Government

Act and which follows the National Waste Strategy. A

summary of this plan is aached as an appendix.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Solid Waste Household Collection activity

contributes to the Community Outcome, “Essential

Infrastructure”, as solid waste management is an

integral part of any community’s structure and a service

every community expects. This activity is also a key

aspect toward achieving some aspects of the outcome,

“Environmental Responsibility”. The care and disposal of

solid waste is an important environmental issue now and

into the future.

Current Situation

Council provides a weekly kerbside refuse collection

service to 14 urban communities, including Amberley,

Amberley Beach, Cheviot, Culverden, Gore Bay, Greta

Valley, Hanmer Springs, Leithfield, Leithfield Beach,

Motunau Bay, Rotherham, Mt Lyford, Waiau, and Waikari.

Rural households along the route the collection vehicle

travels may elect to use the kerbside collection service.

practices with its community collection contracts and

undertake regular monitoring and review. In addition, it

plans to regularly review the most appropriate systems

of administration and operation in conjunction with the

renewal of operating contracts.

Funding

Household collection is funded through 100% Uniform

Annual Charge for each dwelling in each urban area

based on the cost of collection in that urban area. Rural

ratepayers on the route can have their rubbish picked up

for the same cost plus a marginal collection charge.

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to contract out its household

collection service as being the most economical and

efficient method for the conceivable future.

Assumptions and Risks

Hurunui is a growing district and as such, household

waste is also growing and expected to continue. The cost

of disposal is likely to continue to increase; therefore, it

is important that Council acts pro-actively to educate

consumers about alternative methods of dealing with waste

in an effort to reduce it. The price of fuel has increased

since the collection service contracts were last negotiated

which will impact on the cost of future contract tenders.

Council does not provide a commercial rubbish collection

but there are several private contractors in the district

offering this service.

Plans for the Future

Council intends to continue to administer a kerbside

collection service for urban and some rural areas in a

manner that is cost effective, environmentally friendly

and that will meet the needs of our communities.

A key issue regarding the management of solid waste is

how to reduce rubbish. Council intends to investigate

options regarding making those who use household

collections pay more in an aempt to reduce waste. It will

also consider processing putrescible (household) waste to

minimise residual waste having to be sent to the landfill.

Council plans to continue to promote best operating

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Performance Measures 2006-2016

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

Solid Waste Household Collection Goal: To ensure a well-managed solid waste disposal

system is available for all the district’s residents

Target

To provide a weekly

household waste collection

service in urban areas

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

Employ a contractor to collect Household waste is collected

and dispose of household rubbish from residents in urban areas

from urban households each week

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

√ √ √ √

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

To reduce and process

household waste

80% of urban residents (who

Undertake an annual residents get rubbish collected) are

satisfaction survey

satisfied with the household

collection service

Task the Solid Waste Minimisation A household waste reduction

Board and Solid Waste Manager policy is developed

to explore options and develop a

household waste reduction policy A plan to process household

putrescible waste is

Explore options to reduce waste developed

through a user pays system

Targets for waste reduction

are developed

An acceptable ‘waster pays’

pricing mechanism is in place

131 Page 131









WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates 448,000 477,815 480,000 509,760

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees - - - -

Interest Received - - - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 448,000 477,815 480,000 509,760

Expenditure

Operational Costs 447,892 481,813 496,750 511,686

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - - - -

Operating Costs 447,892 481,813 496,750 511,686

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) 108 (3,998) (16,750) (1,926)

SOLID WASTE

HOUSEHOLD COLLECT

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - - - -

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - - - -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required (108) 3,998 16,750 1,926

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates - - - -

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves (108) 3,998 16,750 1,926

Total Funding (108) 3,998 16,750 1,926

132

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Activity 3: Transfer Stations

Background

Council has a responsibility under the Local Government

Act 2002 to be involved in solid waste. The provision of

transfer stations is an aspect of solid waste management.

The term ‘transfer’ refers to the transport of solid waste

and recyclables from temporary storage facilities to a long

term disposal facility (e.g. landfill) or appropriate resource

recovery endpoint (e.g. TerraNova, export overseas).

Transfer stations are hence a component pertinent to

achieving a clean and healthy atmosphere for our people

to enjoy.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Transfer Stations activity is a primary contributor

to the Community Outcomes, “Essential Infrastructure”

and “Environmental Responsibility”. Transfer stations

are essential to local infrastructure and necessary for the

health and quality of life of our community, our local

economy and environment. The management and care

of our transfer stations has important impacts on our

environment, and Council endeavours to reduce any

negative impacts.

Current Situation

Council provides and administers transfer station facilities

to enable community access to waste disposal facilities,

while striving to maintain them in a clean, tidy and safe

manner and in the most environmentally friendly and cost

effective way.

Council is a shareholder of Transwaste, which opened

a regional landfill at Kate Valley in 2005. Five other

neighbouring local authorities are also shareholders.

Council owns and maintains five transfer stations in the

district. These are located at Cheviot, Hanmer Springs,

Culverden, Amberley and Waiau.

The Amberley transfer station is operated by Hurunui

Recycling, three are operated by Waste Control New Zealand,

and the Hanmer Springs transfer station is operated by

Hanmer Refuse Services. The compactor at Amberley is

owned by the Council and the compactors at the three

transfer stations besides Hanmer Springs are owned

by work contractors. There is no compactor at Hanmer

Springs. Containers to transport the waste are owned by

the respective contractors.

All residual waste from transfer stations goes to the regional

133 Page 133

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

landfill in Kate Valley. Seperated green waste goes to the

composting plant in Christchurch, with the exception of

Hanmer Springs’ green waste, which is currently shredded

and stockpiled on the closed refuse tip area.

The Hurunui District has six closed landfills which have

resource consents issued by Environment Canterbury. The

closed landfills are located at Cheviot, Culverden, Hanmer

Springs, Waiau, Waikari and Waipara. Groundwater

levels are tested regularly at these landfills to ensure they

present no risk to the environment.

Plans for the Future

Our growing population and trend towards increasing

amounts of packaging and waste material present an

ongoing challenge in waste management.

The modest transfer stations already in place in the district

are expected to be able to cope with increased volumes,

but obviously transport costs to landfills will increase in

proportion to the volume increase.

While continuing to oversee the maintenance and operation

of the waste transfer stations to ensure that best practicable

standards are being met, Council will also audit the waste

station operations from time to time to warrant compliance

with any resource consent conditions.

The regional landfill at Kate Valley is located within the

Hurunui District and replaced the Burwood landfill in

Christchurch. Council has an ongoing responsibility and

commitment to ensure that landfill operations comply at

all times with the consent conditions granted by both the

Hurunui District Council and Environment Canterbury.

As a minor shareholding partner in Transwaste Canterbury

Ltd (TCL), Hurunui District Council will receive annual

dividends for the joint venture, in accordance with TCL’s

shareholder agreement and divident policy. Indicative

dividends of approximately $48,000 pa (2005 dollars) as

projected by TCL have been included in overall council

revenue in this plan.

Funding

Landfills are charged at the rate of 100% to the user. This is

subject to Council seing a maximum charge to encourage

use and discourage illegal dumping. The shortfall should

be a charge to the District Uniform Annual General

Charge.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to continue to own its transfer stations

and to contract out their operation and the cartage of

residual waste to the regional landfill. Environmental

consultants monitor groundwater bores at the district’s

closed landfills.

Assumptions and Risks

Hurunui’s increasing population and expansion of

disposable goods and packaging present Council with

an ongoing challenge to manage not only the disposal of

waste, but the landfills. Hurunui’s modest transfer stations

are expected to cope with increasing volumes, although

transport costs to landfills will increase due to fuel costs.

In the future, there may be a need to reduce the number

of transfer stations in the district. Higher standards of

landfills will add to the increasing costs to dump refuse.

Major Projects

Relocate Amberley

Recycling Depot from

its present site (new

location yet to be

determined)

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$400,000 $1,567,120 - $424,800

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Transfer Stations Goal: To ensure a well-managed solid waste disposal system is

available for all the district's residents

TRANSFER STATIONS

Target

Relocate the Amberley

Recycling Station to a more

suitable location

What will we do towards achieving the

target

Acquire land and designate

accordingly for the recycling

station to operate

How will we know we have met our

target

Relocation of Amberley

Recycling Station

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +


To have operational transfer

stations for the disposal of

rubbish within the district

Employ contractors to manage, Contracts monitoring records

operate and maintain the district's confirm work done as per

5 transfer stations

contract specifications

√ √ √ √

Transfer Stations comply with Audit the Amberley Recycling

resource consent conditions Depot each year

The Amberley Recycling

Depot complies with all

resource consent conditions

√ √ √ √

To minimise the amount of

residual waste that has to go

to landfill

Consider ways to divert waste

including an acceptable 'wasterpays'

pricing mechanism

A plan to minimise the

amount of residual waste

going to landfill


Residual waste to landfill

reduces



134

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates - - - -

Development Impact Fees - - - -

User Fees 65,000 68,000 70,108 72,216

Interest Received - 90,000 - -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 65,000 158,000 70,108 72,216

Expenditure

Operational Costs 573,989 752,815 777,508 804,557

Interest - - - -

Depreciation - 5,736 43,736 81,736

Operating Costs 573,989 758,551 821,244 886,293

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (508,989) (600,551) (751,136) (814,077)

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 54,000 430,000 1,567,120

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment 54,000 430,000 1,567,120 -

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 562,989 1,030,551 2,318,256 814,077

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates 528,989 630,551 751,136 814,077

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 34,000 400,000 1,567,120 -

Total Funding 562,989 1,030,551 2,318,256 814,077

135 Page 135

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 4: Sewerage

SEWERAGE

Background

The Local Government Act 2002 places obligations on

Council to provide wastewater services. This activity

covers the safe collection, treatment and disposal of

wastewater from urban areas of the Hurunui District in

seven separate schemes.

Council provides this service to support the development

of the district and to protect the physical environment

and the health of the community through good sanitary

practice. At the same time, Council works to ensure that

adverse environmental impacts are avoided, minimised or

eased.

Council has in place an Assessment of Water and Sanitary

Services. A summary of this assessment is included into

this document as an appendix.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Sewerage activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “Essential Infrastructure”, as it

provides appropriate treatment and disposal of waste water

in order to ensure for the well-being of our community

and environment.

Current Situation

The district operates 7 separate sewerage schemes, serving

all but 4 urban localities. All use oxidation ponds for

treatment of sewage and 14 pump stations are operated

within the pipework.

Amberley 992 Active connections

82 Undeveloped sites

1225 Pan connection equivalents

Reticulation installed between 1974 and 1977 with a single

pond treatment and land disposal onto pasture (free

draining sandy soil) adjacent to the coast.

Cheviot 198 Active connections

17 Undeveloped sites

316 Pan Connection equivalents

Reticulation and aeration tank installed in 1964, upgraded

to single oxidation pond plus border-dyke disposal in

1982 and further improved in 1999/00 to a multi-pond

facility with spray irrigation to pasture and overland flow

polishing prior to discharge to adjacent waterway when

the irrigation area is saturated.

Greta Valley 24 Active connections

7 Undeveloped sites

43 Pan connection equivalents

Reticulation and treatment/disposal facility installed in

1979 for a Council funded subdivision with one pond

treatment and disposal to land (travelling irrigator) or to

nearby waterway when the soil conditions are too wet for

irrigating.

Motunau 114 Active connections

2 Undeveloped sites

114 Pan connection equivalents

Reticulation, treatment and disposal area installed in

1987 in response to meet community and public health

expectations, using a dual pond for treatment (with

aeration) and land based discharge onto pasture (private

title) with border dyke application.

Hanmer Sp 897 Active connections

264 Undeveloped sites

1394 Pan connection equivalents

Reticulation installed 1971 with dual pond treatment

and discharge to the Chaerton River, replacing the

older reticulation and seling tank (installed in 1949

in the hospital property) which was not meeting local

expectations.

Hawarden 108 Active connections

12 Undeveloped sites

145 Pan connection equivalents

Reticulation and treatment/disposal facility installed in

1966 with twin ponds and overflow to an open drain.

Waikari 137 Active connections

10 Undeveloped sites

178 Pan connection equivalents

Reticulation and treatment/disposal facility installed in

1967 with twin ponds and overflow to the Waikari River

with discharge altered to land disposal via spray in 1996

on adjacent farmland.

Plans for the Future

Two new sewerage schemes are proposed – one in

Culverden and the other in Waipara, but both will

be dependent on Central Government funding and

community endorsement.

136

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An increase in demand for waste water collection has arisen

mainly in Hanmer Springs and Amberley due to growth.

Both facilities are currently able to meet immediate growth,

particularly Hanmer Springs, where sewage mains have

been upsized in part to meet growth. Growth is expected

to be slow in other urban areas and not to the degree where

there will be any significant impact on infrastructure.

Several upgrades are being planned for the next several

years. These are highlighted under the Capital Projects

chart.

Projects that will be carried out to manage the impact

of growth are set out in the Development Contributions

Policy (pages 234- 262).

There is provision made in this plan for additional staffing

(subject to a seperate council process) in order to improve

services, provide quality controls, and monitor contractor

performance.

Funding (for each scheme)

Capital – Significant Council capital expenditure should

be funded by loan for the life of the investment, if loans

are not raised then it will be from annual rates.

The Council may loan fund sewerage main extensions

with the loan repayments met by those properties

directly benefiting where the majority of the property

owners agree to the extension.

If any of the Capital Expenditure caters for future growth

of the scheme, then that portion of the expenditure that

relates to growth will be funded from future users via

Development Contributions.

Landowners with new connections will pay the cost of

connecting to the nearest main plus, if a new subdivider,

puing in the sub-main.

Property owners wanting new connections will pay

those costs necessary for the connection and any

levies as specified in the Development Contributions

policy. The Council should pay any costs of scheme

requirements that are over and above those necessary

for the connection and the direct costs

Maintenance and Operating

Council intends to retain ownership of all wastewater

assets on behalf of the communities they serve. Asset

management, basic design work, contract documentation,

137 Page 137

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

tendering, record keeping, operation and routine repairs

and maintenance is to be carried out by Council staff,

including operators. Larger budget capital works may

be let as contracts in accordance with Council’s tendering

and purchase policy. Decisions affecting wastewater

networks will be made in concert with ward commiees

and Residents Associations.

Larger repairs and emergency works may also be contracted

to preferred or available contractors. Preference will

be given to locally based contractors for these activities

where their prices are competitive. External consultants

will be engaged only for specialised tasks, where skills are

not available in house or where Council or the community

seek such inputs.

Assumptions and Risks

Effort is ongoing to establish the useful lifespan of

underground and fixed wastewater assets. Most of the

reticulation is AC pipe and is affected by both sewage and

soil conditions. Much of the newer reticulation is PVC.

Expected life for manholes and PVC is 80 years and AC,

50 years.

External stresses determine useful life of assets, being soil

conditions, quality of installation, additional loadings,

and maintenance. The inability to pin-point these means

approximate values are applied. The inherent variations

in-situ makes it difficult to accurately formulate renewals

priority programme, but will be refined as additional

information is obtained.

Acceptability of treatment and disposal alters also with

time and expectations may require improvements to

be implemented in the future where they have not been

identified in long term projections.

It is assumed that for the subsidised projects in this

activity to progress, that they will receive the subsidies as

identified.

All wastewater networks operate under current resource

consents for all emissions and discharges. These conditions

are generally set with agreement of Council utilities staff

and are administered by Ecan. Most of the consent terms

will not expire until 2018 - 2030, except for the Cheviot

consent which expires in December 2008. It is assumed

that a new consent will be issued as no new constraints

exist or are proposed to limit the collection of wastewater

or to appropriately treat and dispose of its effluent.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Assets

Valuations shown for each network are as at 1 st July 2005

and are prepared using Council’s historical cost estimates.

The values are rounded to the nearest $100.

Network Valuations

Network Replacement Cost Depreciated Values

Amberley Area $7,414,299 $5,012,366

Cheviot $1,802,477 $934,359

Greta Valley $440,710 $222,556

Motunau $6961,265 $660,321

Hanmer Springs $6,422,839 $4,451,054

Hawarden $942,579 $398,203

Waikari $1,764,193 $786,148

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Sewerage Goal: To provide proficient, cost-effective sewage disposal schemes

relevant to the needs of the community

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

SEWERAGE

To protect public health Provide and maintain sewerage Reports from Ecan confirm

through compliance with disposal and treatment facilities in that Hurunui's sewerage

sanitary standards

most urban areas of the district disposal comply with consent

conditions

To maintain sewerage systemsEmploy and train staff to maintain All system failures are

sewerage systems

repaired or cleared within 12

hours of notification

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

To construct new reticulated Consider local requests for new

sewerage schemes when local sewerage schemes and identify

Funding source for a new

Waipara sewerage scheme is


communities agree to fund

any relevant external funding

investigated

them

sources

A new sewerage scheme for

Culverden is investigated


138

Page 138


Major Projects

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Amberley Sewer

- upgrade oxidation ponds

(assuming 50% subsidy from

Govt - Total = $1 million)

- Replace AC pipe with PVC

-Pond upgrade

$250,000

$88,000

$240,000

$250,000

$270,000

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

Hanmer Springs Sewer

- Replace pipeline through

Queen Mary

-Upgrade ponds (assuming

40% subsidy from SWSS)

- Install new main in

Hanmer Springs Rd

Waikari Sewer

- New sewerage pump and

switchboard

$400,000

$8,000

$302,000

$368,000

$134,000

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

139 Page 139

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - 335,710 349,810 363,910

Targeted Rates 374,063 415,390 455,194 491,252

Development Impact Fees 100,512 71,612 75,013 75,013

User Fees 300 300 300 300

Interest Received - 4,236 836 1,371

Subsidies & Grants - - 301,400 -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 474,875 827,248 1,182,553 931,846

Expenditure

Operational Costs 229,270 245,471 260,555 260,690

Interest 84,753 77,402 121,506 157,753

Depreciation 238,393 318,251 349,956 380,625

Operating Costs 552,416 641,124 732,017 799,067

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (77,540) 186,123 450,536 132,779

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital 618,200 743,000 644,477 416,256

- Renewals 9,000 21,700 425,657 76,856

Debt Repayment 41,483 42,452 63,694 84,700

Capital and Debt Repayment 668,683 807,152 1,133,828 577,812

SEWERAGE

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- 335,710 349,810 363,910

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded 238,393 318,251 349,956 380,625

Funding Required 507,831 638,488 683,146 428,318

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates - - - -

Loans (Net) (67,500) 563,000 782,000 702,800

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 575,331 75,488 (98,854) (274,482)

Total Funding 507,831 638,488 683,146 428,318

140

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Activity 5: Stormwater / Drainage

Background

Council and Environment Canterbury have statutory

responsibilities in relation to the management of

stormwater drainage, flood control and stormwater quality

in our district. In addition, the Local Government Act 2002

requires Council to carry out an assessment of stormwater

drainage services to communities in our district. See

the summary of the Water and Wastewater Assessment

included in this document as an appendix.

Council provides drainage services where a community

has requested our involvement or where it is efficient to

be involved. This includes managing drainage in localised

areas to protect them from the effects of surface flooding.

Stormwater is rain that has run off hard surfaces such as

roofs, roads and car parks. Stormwater management aims

to protect human and ecological values by preventing

or reducing the effects of stormwater on the human and

aquatic environment.

Council monitors stormwater systems in the district for any

conditions that may be injurious to health under the Health

Act. It also provides resource guidelines for those involved

with stormwater management devices, while controlling

standards so as to minimise problems of flooding and

adverse effects to property or the environment.

In addition, Council gathers information regarding

health impacts of stormwater, controls inappropriate

interference with any nuisances around watercourses, as

well as responds to the cultural sensitivities of streams

and waterways in the district.

Community Outcomes

The Council’s Drainage activity contributes to the

Community Outcome “Essential Infrastructure”, as it

ensures that properties, public safety and the receiving

environment are protected from the flooding and erosion

effects of surface flooding.

It also provides for environmental wellbeing by preventing

stagnant water from forming contaminated pools and

ensuring discharged water is clean.

Current Situation

Small land drainage schemes set up by the former North

Canterbury Catchment Board are maintained by Council

for the Ashworths drains, Leithfield Outfall drain,

Newcombes Road drains and Jed River, areas. Annual

maintenance is limited to occasional drain clearing.

The Hurunui District has only a very small quantity of

stormwater pipes in its townships. Most stormwater is

disposed of to kerb and channeling, and open drains.

Most of the Hurunui District’s stormwater disposal systems

comprise infrastructure that is maintained by private

141 Page 141

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

individual property owners. This includes on-site soakage

disposal, open drains/creeks, piped networks outfalls, silt

traps, and detention structures.

Plans for the Future

New housing developments in Hanmer Springs and

Amberley will increase the demand for more extensive

stormwater disposal systems in these towns. There are no

plans to expand on land drainage services.

An extension of the existing Hanmer Springs piped

stormwater system is proposed over the next ten years.

Improvements to the Amberley system and the Leithfield

Outfall Drain are also proposed.

Council will progressively move towards managing all of

its urban stormwater responsibilities in a more holistic,

integrated and life cycle way.

Projects that will be carried out to manage the impact

of growth are set out in the Development Contributions

Policy (page 234).

There is provision made in this plan for additional staffing

(subject to a seperate council process) in order to improve

services, provide quality controls, and monitor contractor

performance.

Funding

100% drainage rates based on the defined area drained.

(These will be charged per hectare, on rateable land value,

rateable capital valued as per rateable assessment or a

combination the drainage area plan specifies).

Stormwater is funded by 100% targeted rate based on the

area benefiting. If any of the Capital Expenditure caters

for future growth of the scheme, then that portion of the

expenditure that relates to growth will be funded from

future users via Development Contributions.

Maintenance and Operating

The Council will continue to maintain drainage systems

within rating areas, as classified by the former North

Canterbury Catchment Board. Contractors carry out

minimal work each year to maintain the system as and

when needed.

Only relatively small amounts of money are rated and

subsequently spent on land drainage. The only significant

maintenance issue is on the Leithfield Outfall Drain

where the influx of permanent residents to Leithfield has

increased the demand for a more permanent solution to

the ocean outfall.

Council’s role in stormwater management is to maintain a

small network of underground pipes, kerbs, channels, and

open drains. Kerbs and channels are maintained as part of

the Council’s road maintenance contracts. A proportion of

the costs are met by LTNZ.

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Performance Measures 2006-2016

Stormwater and Drainage Goal: To prevent or minimise adverse effects of surface

flooding and stormwater discharge

Target

What will we do towards achieving the

target

How will we know we have met our

target

06/07 07/08 08/09 09 +

To minimise the risk of

flooding in urban areas

Employ staff to maintain drainage All complaints about flooding

and stormwater systems, and to are responded to within 24

assess risk areas

hours





Pipe under the Heritage

(Hanmer Springs) is replaced

with larger pipe


An integrated storm

management plan is in place

for Amberley


To maintain drainage systems Assess, grant and monitor

in accordance with resource consents

consents

All drainage systems comply

with resource consents

√ √ √ √

STORMWATER /

DRAINAGE

Major Projects

Hanmer Springs

- upgrade Hanmer Springs

stormwater system

2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

$300,000 $300,000

Leithfield & Leithfield Beach

- upgrade Leithfield Outfall

Drain

$240,000

142

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Financial Summary - Next 3 Years

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

INTRODUCTION

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Revenue

Vested Assets - - - -

Targeted Rates 38,810 64,365 82,646 84,342

Development Impact Fees - 36,494 36,494 36,494

User Fees - - - -

Interest Received - 6,409 10,020 -

Subsidies & Grants - - - -

Other Income - - - -

Total Activity Income 38,810 107,268 129,161 120,836

Expenditure

Operational Costs 90,743 59,420 24,116 62,752

Interest - 19,200 22,530 36,154

Depreciation - 2,160 7,020 12,420

Operating Costs 90,743 80,780 53,667 111,326

Operating Surplus / (Deficit) (51,933) 26,488 75,494 9,510

Capital Expenditure

- New Capital - 240,000 300,000 300,000

- Renewals - - - -

Debt Repayment - - - -

Capital and Debt Repayment - 240,000 300,000 300,000

Vested Assets - No expenditure

- - - -

Required

Less Depreciation Not Funded - - - -

Funding Required 51,933 213,512 224,506 290,490

Funded By:-

District Wide Rates - 15,500 938 976

Loans (Net) - - - -

HSTR Surplus - - - -

Reserves 51,933 198,012 223,568 289,514

Total Funding 51,933 213,512 224,506 290,490

143 Page 143

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

Activity 6: Water Supply

Background

Council is required to provide water services and a water

and sanitary services assessment in accordance with the

Local Government Act 2002. A summary of Council’s

Water and Sanitary Services Assessment is included in this

document as an appendix.

Council is responsible for the ongoing maintenance of

public infrastructural assets, improving public water

supply schemes, and providing high quality water

treatment and distribution service.

Council categorises its water supply as follows:

On-demand water supply covers the abstraction, treatment

and reticulation of potable water (drinking water) to

urban communities in the Hurunui District, where water

is delivered to consumers’ taps under pressure.

Amberley:

Amberley’s 570 consumers use

from 500 to 1,350 cubic metres of water per day. Water is

drawn from a shallow gallery on the Kowhai River and a

123m deep bore near Leithfield (1960’s). The network was

installed from 1955 onward. The Kowhai River supply is

aerated and disinfected with UV light. The deep bore water

is untreated and quite hard. Peak demand is beginning to

exceed available flow. Growth has been an issue in recent

years.

Leithfield Beach: Leithfield Beach’s 218 consumers use from

100 to 630 cubic metres of water per day. Water is drawn

from a 119m deep bore at the domain, fed into reservoirs

and pressure fed to the mains by a cluster of surface pumps.

Bore water is reliable but moderately hard. The water is

not treated. Growth has had some impact on supply but

not in recent years. Supply appears to meet peak demand.

Network installed in 1952 and mostly upgraded in 1980.

WATER SUPPLY

Restricted water supply covers the abstraction, treatment

and reticulation of stock and domestic water to rural

properties in our district, where water is delivered to

consumers’ tanks at a set rate of flow on a continual basis,

being “units” of water.

Council aims to provide an efficient and cost effective water

supply for now and into the future. It also encourages

the sustainable use of our limited water resources for

agricultural, horticultural and domestic purposes, while

discouraging waste.

Community Outcomes

Council’s Water activity is a crucial contributor to the

Community Outcome “Essential Infrastructure”. Water

is rated as a top priority for people in the Hurunui.

Council is responsible for the water supply in the district,

including ensuring that all reticulated systems operate

as efficiently as possible, that the conditions of all water

permits are complied with, that the average consumption

is maintained or reduced providing cost-effective public

supplies, and providing adequately located pressured

connections for fire fighting.

Current Situation

On-Demand Water Supply (Urban):

On-demand water is supplied to 7 of the urban communities

in the district from 8 high pressure schemes consisting of

9 water intakes and 60 km of pipe. Other communities

(Cheviot, Gore Bay, Rotherham and Motunau) are supplied

via tanks from restricted rural supplies. All but Leithfield

Beach have metered connections.

144

Culverden:

Culverden’s 202 consumers use

from 200 to 950 cubic metres of water per day. Water is

drawn from a shallow bore (12.2m deep), aerated and

fed into a single reservoir (90m3). Storage capacity is

low. Surface pumps on variable-speed drives supply

constant mains pressure. Water is chlorinated and some

corrosiveness remains in the water. Concern exists with

nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater. Supply

meets demand. Growth is not an issue. Installed in 1964.

Waiau:

Waiau’s 170 consumers use from

130 to 610 cubic metres of water per day. Water is drawn

from a shallow bore adjacent to the Mason/Waiau River

fork and treated with UV and chlorine (if water is dirty).

Bore pumps pressurise the main and feed into 180m3

reservoir on the top terrace. Water quality is variable with

river conditions. Water storage is minimal. Supply well

meets peak demand. Growth is not an issue to contend

with. Installed in 1963.

Waipara: Waipara’s 114 consumers use from 70 to

190 cubic metres of water per day. Water is drawn from

a 29m deep bore on the Waipara River flat, east of SH1.

Water quality can alter marginally with river conditions.

Water is not treated. Bore pump pressurises mains and

feed reservoirs on McKenzie Road. Water storage is

minimal. Growth has not been an issue to date, but may

alter with viticulture in the locality. Supply easily meets

demand. The Railway area was installed in 1950, but most

of the town in 1966.

Hanmer Springs: Hanmer Springs 914 consumers use from

350 to 1,350 cubic metres of water per day. Water taken

from the Rogerson and Dillons Rivers, west of Hanmer

Page 144


Springs with a 14000m3 open reservoir to buffer river

flood periods. Water is treated with chlorine and lime

dosing (pH connection). Most of the town is gravity fed,

but pumps boost pressure to Conical Hill sections. Town

storage is adequate. Good storage in open reservoir at

intake. Supply easily meets demand. Being a tourist

location places emphasis on water quality. Older sections

were installed in 1925, with most of town from 1966

onwards. Old pipes have been replaced.

Hawarden-Waikari: Hawarden and Waikari’s 477 consumers

use from 300 to 1,200 cubic metres of water per day. Water

is drawn from either a shallow gallery (Waitohi River)

or 24m deep bore (Hurunui River). Water is UV treated

and has chlorine back-up for dirty water conditions. A

combination of rural and urban consumers are on restricted

supply (Medbury Road). There are some supply issues

with the gallery going dry in summer. Deeper bore has

beer water quality, but has had pipe integrity problems.

Some growth in demand but supply is still meeting it. The

main installation was done in 1964.

Restricted Water Supply (Rural):

Twelve rural communities (localities) in the district are

serviced by Council operated restricted flow water supplies

providing water to consumers as “units” of water supplied

into individual tanks. One Unit is 1800 litres per day over

24 hours, except for Balmoral and Amuri Plains, where a

unit is 1000 litres per day over 24 hours. The Hurunui

and Cheviot accounts cover four separate schemes within

each of their areas. The Ashley supply covers part of the

Hurunui District and part of the Waimakariri District.

Ashley: The Ashley scheme has 1,447

connections which use from 2,300 to 4,500 cubic metres of

water per day. The Ashley scheme straddles the Hurunui

District and Waimakariri District boundaries but the

entire scheme is owned and operated by Hurunui District

Council. People who own properties in the Waimakariri

District are separately rated for Water by the Hurunui

District Council.

Water is drawn from several sources. The main intake is

a cluster of five shallow bores on Lower Seon Road. The

northern section is fed from two deep bores at Smiths Road

(122m) and Kowhai River Road (129m). There are twelve

additional pump booster points on the network, additional

to the intake pumps. The network was installed from 1972

onward. The main intake of water river is aerated and

disinfected with UV light. Smiths Road water is filtered

to remove manganese. The Kowhai River Road water

is treated to reduce hardness. Peak demand is met with

145 Page 145

Hurunui Long Term Community Plan 2006 - 2016

available flow. Growth has been an issue for over a decade

with lifestyle sub-divisions.

Amuri Plains:

Amuri Plains has 88 connections

which use from 390 to 607 cubic metres of water per day.

Water is drawn from two shallow bores, close to the Waiau

River and pumped to a 270m3 concrete reservoir located on

a ridge to the south. Water gravity flows to all consumers

from here. Bore water is reliable and clean. Water is

treated by UV light. Growth has had minimal impact on

supply. Supply appears to meet the peak demand of rural

consumers and the selement of Rotherham. The network

was installed in 1981.

Balmoral: Balmoral has 47 connections which use

from 375 to 560 cubic metres per day. Water is drawn

normally from a weir on the Awatui Stream, then gravity

feeds down to two timber tanks (500m3 total). Flow is

gravity to all consumers from here. If the weir flow is

unavailable, water is pumped from the Pahau River below

the main. Water is chlorinated before any supply points.

Supply meets demand. There has been no growth in

connections, but some increase in unit sales has occurred.

The system was installed in 1982.

Waiau Rural:

Waiau has 66 connections which

use from 560 to 910 cubic metres of water per day. Water

is drawn from a shallow bore adjacent to the Waiau River

and is not treated. Surface pumps pressurise a rising main

and feed to a 270m3 concrete reservoir on a ridge to the

north of the bore. There are ten separate boost/inline pump

stations. Water quality is variable with river conditions.

Water storage is minimal for the demand. Supply well

meets peak demand. Growth is not an issue to contend

with. The system was installed in 1975.

Cheviot: Cheviot has 638 connections with water

usage as follows:

1. Cheviot Main - 540 connections, usage from 790 to

1,320 cubic metres per day

2. Parnassus - 45 connections, usage from 180 to 430

cubic metres per day

3. Blythe - 17 connections, usage from 70 to 120 cubic

metres per day

4. Kaiwara - 36 connections, usage from 250 to 380 cubic

metres per day

Water is drawn from shallow bores for all 4 networks in

this area, with 2 adjacent to the Waiau River and 2 by the

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT

REPRESENTATIVES

WARD PROFILES COMMUNITY

OUTCOMES

APPENDICES POLICIES FINANCIAL OVERVIEW GROUPS OF

COUNCIL ACTIVITIES


Hurunui District Council

WATER SUPPLY

Hurunui River. This network also supplies the urban area

of Cheviot plus Gore Bay. There are 14 additional boost

pump stations across all four areas. Water quality can

alter marginally to significantly with river conditions for

all intakes. No supply points are treated. Water storage

is minimal for all networks. Growth has been minor to

date and limited to the Cheviot Main area. Supply meets

demand, with some constraint on the Cheviot main supply.

Water quality is an issue. Installation of all networks took

place between 1970 and 1971.

Hurunui: Hurunui has 585 connections with water

usage as follows:

1. Hurunui Main - 381 connections, usage from 1,200 to

1,700 cubic meters per day

2. Lower Waitohi - 65 connections, usage from 360 to

550 cubic metres per day

3. Upper Waitohi - 117 connections, usage from 600 to

800 cubic metres per day

4. Peaks - 22 connections, usage from 60 to 120 cubic

metres per day

Water is drawn from shallow bores for the Peaks (Hurunui

River) and Lower Waitohi (Waitohi River) networks and

from galleries for the Hurunui Main (Hurunui River)

and Upper Waitohi (Waitohi River). The Hurunui Main

network also supplies the urban areas of Motunau Beach,

Greta Valley and Scargill. There are 17 additional boost

pump stations across all four areas. Water quality can

alter marginally to significantly with river conditions for

all intakes, particularly the two galleries. Water is treated

with chlorine for the Upper Waitohi network. Water

storage is minimal for all networks. Growth has been small

over the past 10 years but has increased with new demand

around the Waipara area (which affects all networks other

than Peaks). Supply meets demand. Water quality is an

issue with the Hurunui Main and Upper Waitohi, mainly

colour. Installation of the networks occurred from 1967.

Plans for the Future

Current demand for water is monitored using flow meters

and recorded on a daily basis.

Future demand for water is assessed using population

projections (as outlined in the Development Contributions

Policy section of this document) and assuming average

household occupancy of 2.5 people. Every new lot in rural

scheme areas has been assessed as requiring one unit of

water.

On-Demand Water Supply (Urban):

Amberley: Increasing demand from growth in

Amberley will be met by an additional bore and some new

pipework, and increased reservoir storage.

Leithfield Beach: There is limited potential for growth at

Leithfield Beach with defined urban boundaries so there

is adequate capacity for long term needs. It is proposed to

drill a new bore in 2009 /10 to improve security of supply.

Culverden: There is adequate capacity for short to

medium term growth in this locality.

A deeper well is to be developed in thenear future to

address concerns about nitrates, and in the hope of

removing the existing chlorine treatment.

Asbestos Cement pipe replacement will commence in

2013/14

Waiau:

There is adequate capacity and lile

anticipated growth in this locality. Treatment is considered

satisfactory. The reservoir roof will be replaced in 2009/10

and provision has been made to replace asbestos cement

pipes from 2013/14.

Waipara: Potential growth in this area could require a second

well to be installed to meet expected demand, along with

additional reservoirs.

Quality of the supply is proposed to be improved subject

to Central Government funding being available.

Hanmer Springs: In spite of significant growth in the area

the water supply has sufficient capacity to meet demand in

the medium term. Additional reservoir storage is proposed

to provide a buffer against short term peak demand.

Water quality is being addressed through the provision of

a new treatment plant.

Replacement of asbestos cement pipe is programmed to

commence in 2010/11.

Hawarden - Waikari: Limited growth is projected, will not

require significant upgrading other than to increase

reservoir storage in Waikari.

There are no plans to improve water quality at this stage.

Restricted Water Supply (Rural):

Ashley: High growth in lifestyle blocks,

particularly south of Amberley, requires a continual

programme of upgrades to meet demand.

A new bore has been installed at Glasnevin, and will be

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commissioned in the near future.

The treatment plant at Carter Holt Harvey Panel Plant is to

be relocated to the main well field, and provision has been

made for a further well source at the Saltwater Creek end

of the scheme area.

Amu