RICK MATHER ARCHITECTS - Black Dog Publishing

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RICK MATHER ARCHITECTS - Black Dog Publishing

RICK MATHER ARCHITECTS

Robert Maxwell Tim Macfarlane Patrick Bellew

RICK MATHER ARCHITECTS

Robert Maxwell

Tim Macfarlane

Patrick Bellew

A series of plans was developed with the client in October

and November 1993 with the decision to locate the pool

at the basement level as an integral part of the basement/

foundation structure. A solid concrete frame structure

was chosen to deal with the large voids in floors, the large

span over the pool, and as a means of improving thermal

mass. Structural glass is used extensively through the

house including: the balustrading to the roof gardens, the

RICK MATHER ARCHITECTS

Robert Maxwell

ISBN 1-904772-38-2

Black Dog Publishing

Architecture Art Design Fashion History

Photography Theory and Things

UK £29.95

US $45.00

CAN $69.95

Black Dog Publishing

Tim Macfarlane

Patrick Bellew


Contents

3

010

010

010

Title of the main text by Robert Maxwell

Optimising by Minimising by Tim Macfarlane

Environmental Design by Patrick Bellew

15

23

28

33

34

39

50

58

63

68

75

85

91

98

100

108

116

120

130

134

140

159

000

000

000

000

Keble College Oxford

Lincoln Architecture School

University of Lincoln Masterplan

Hoffman House Hamstead

Neal’s Yard Penthouse Covent Garden

The Priory Hampstead

National Maritime Museum Greenwich

The Wallace Collection

Royal Horticultural Society

Ashmolean Museum Oxford

Dulwich Picture Gallery

University of Southampton Masterplan

JMU Design Academy Liverpool

Coking Works Masterplan Chesterfield

South Bank Centre Masterplan London

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Greenwich Landscape Masterplan

University of East Anglia Norwich

Residential Quarter Central Milton Keynes

Homes for the Future Glasgow

ISMA University of Reading

Urvois House Holland Park

@venue Restaurant St. James’s

Mirazur Restaurant Côte d’Azur

Lyric Theatre Hammersmith

Eastbourne Cultural Centre

overleaf Design Academy, John Moores

University, Liverpool.

left ARCO Building, Keble College,

Oxford.

010

010

010

010

timeline

selected bibliography

recent and past colleagues

index


The Priory

Hampstead

Rick Mather Architects were

approached by the client in August

1993 to design a new family

residence on a site in Hampstead

in a limited competition with three

other architects, chosen by the

client because she liked their work.

Following some sketch designs and

visits to our previous work we were

appointed on 20 September 1993.

The winning sketch is very much

like the final design. The project

started on site in the spring of 1995,

following a separate demolition

contract for the existing house,

and was completed early in 1997.

This house adds to the tradition

of Modernist villas in Hampstead,

starting in the 1930s with houses by

Maxwell Fry, Samuel & Harding and

Connell, Ward & Lucas.

There is a house in Hampstead, known as The Priory, where Rick Mather Architects

have again taken pleasure in a nuanced use of plate glass. This is a white-walled

villa in the classical tradition: Modern, but orderly. Seeking it, there is no doubt when

one has found it—it has a presence: a good deal of calm white wall, with limited

openings judiciously placed; a corner window without glazing bars or corner mullion.

The horizontal plate glass porch roof and vertical roof terrace screens give a hint of

power in reserve, but there is nothing roguish about the effect. Seen from the road

it presents a modest two-storey mass, set back a full house width from the street,

screened by a high wall and fence. To the rear, the three-storey garden side towards

the falling ground is virtually invisible. Externally it suits its environment perfectly: there

are plenty of other white walls in this area, some are modern villas, even famous ones,

and some are Arts and Crafts, fin de siècle romantic houses: no cause for alarm.

Internally, it is altogether not your ordinary interior. In effect sensational, and

sensational because it engages actively with the senses. There is a swimming pool

in the lowest floor, and its presence is evident from all the other levels because the

living room floor incorporates at key points windows that allow you to look down on it.

I say windows, but they are transparent sections of the floor that can be walked upon

if you are feeling strong. Some parts of the house have voids that extend right up to

the roof, so there is a play of space. Above all, if only because of the pool, there is a

play of light. At the time of my visit we were under the regime of the standard overcast

northern sky, but there was still this sense of light coming at you from all sides. In

brilliant sunlight, the effect must be spectacular.

39

opposite The Priory, Hampstead.

Garden view.

above Street view.

This is Modernism in the tradition of Modernism, owing a debt to the classic villas

of Le Corbusier. Although horizontal sheets of plate glass are used to seal off the

immediate pool environment, the space rises vertically from the lowest to the highest

levels. The flow of space through all three storeys creates a sense of sculptural

intention. Or, looking at it the other way, the space gradient runs downhill from the

entrance on the middle level to the garden outlet at the far end of the pool, but this

frontality is countered by the movement at right angles that flows from the study area


Hoffman House

Hampstead

33

One of the first examples of all-glass

construction, a house in Hampstead

was remodelled to create greater

interaction with its garden. The

kitchen, living and dining area to

the lower ground floor have been

restructured to include a unique

garden room constructed purely of

laminated heated glass.

With no precedent for a structure

of heated double glazed glass and

a total lack of interest or skills from

the big UK glass manufacturers, the

structural engineer Tim Macfarlane,

the builder Pat Carter and Rick

Mather Architects developed a

completely new glazing system.

Roof and walls are formed by

frameless double glazed panels with

an invisible film that reflects heat, and

conducts electricity. This generates

radiant heat which is reflected into

the building in winter, and solar gain

out in summer, making it comfortable

to use all year round. The panels

are supported on three laminated

glass beams and columns to make a

completely transparent structure.


enlarged lower courtyard improving

the link between the two levels.

The upper courtyard was covered

with a lightweight glass roof

(manufactured in Prague) which

enabled the creation of a Sculpture

Court, animated by a cafe, which is

now the central focus of the whole

building. The court, which is a

tempered, daylit and unconditioned

space to accommodate selected

items of sculpture, also provides

greater accessibility to the gallery

spaces. The successful new cafe has

zinc-clad waiter stations, with a bar

concealing the dumbwaiters which

rise discreetly from the new kitchen

below.

63

Trees provide shade in this internal

room. Environmental control is

achieved by natural ventilation with

automatically opening vents at eaves

level. Heating and cooling are from

pipes embedded in the new Portland

Stone courtyard floor.

opposite The Wallace Collection. New

stair links the original courtyard level to

the newly excavated basement.

above One side of the pyramidal roof is

upturned to enclose the bay window below.

below The museum stayed open for the

duration of the construction work.

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