SURVIVAL! Are Firefighters A Dying Breed? Spotlight on Geoff ...

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SURVIVAL! Are Firefighters A Dying Breed? Spotlight on Geoff ...

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A ong>Dyingong> ong>Breedong>?

page 4

ong>Spotlightong> on

Geoff Williams

page 17

Technical Rescue

and Worst-Case Weather

page 18


The Firefighter’s 12 Commandments

1 Be sincerely interested in and dedicated to your job. What you are able to contribute to and receive from the department is only limited by

your own degree of personal commitment.

2 Be loyal to the department and to your co-workers. You are a part of the department, and it is a part of you.

3 Be diligent. Learn to know and like your job. Those who never do more than they are paid to never get paid more. Do your best to analyze

and profit by your mistakes.

4 Be aggressive in the pursuit of all education and training opportunities. You are never fully trained. The achievement of each educational

objective only reveals the path to the ever-increasing body of knowledge with which the firefighter must be familiar if he or she is to excel in

this challenging profession.

5 Be conscientious. Recognize and accept your responsibilities. These include assuming responsibility for duties not specifically assigned.

6 Be courteous, considerable, enthusiastic and cooperative. You were assumed to be this kind of person when you were hired.

7 Be especially tactful and considerate in dealing with those who have experienced a loss due to fire.

8 Be constantly aware that you are a representative of the fire department. Be certain that your dress and actions are a credit to this honorable

profession.

9 Be cautious. Guard your speech, both on and off duty. As a member of the fire department it is expected that you may possess information

that should not be revealed. Handle privileged communications as such, but always be willing to discuss the purposes, functions, history and

traditions of the fire service.

10 Be the type of person who inspires confidence and respect. Do this by being honest, fair and trustworthy in all your dealings with others

and by keeping your personal affairs in such order that they would never embarrass you or the department if made public.

11 Be able to accept criticism graciously and praise, honors, and advancement modestly. Be aware of the fact that the human personality

is never completely developed. You have an obligation to all with whom you interact to continually try to improve yours.

12 If any would be great among you, first let him or her learn to serve.

These commandments were found in an article written in the FFMA paper. The author was not listed.

IS ALL NEW!

Fire Chief Magazine Web site redesigned for easier use!

Current month’s issue online!

ICLICK’s easy access to hundreds of professional Web sites!

Convenient links to FETN.com!

Classified Jobs page updated daily!

2 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386


CONTENTS

JUNE 2001

FETN President

Ron Coleman

Director of Education

G. Randy Corbin

Executive Producer

Programming Manager

Gary Grant

Accreditation Manager

Mary Kerr

Educational Consultant

Kerry Kinney

Publisher

Janna Casstevens

Contributing Editors

Scott Evans

Bill Francis

Scott Palmer

Jennifer Spears

Michael Willcox

Art Director

Debbie Billman

Publications Manager

Tiffany McMillian

Graphic Designers

Karl Richter

Mike Barnett

Project Coordinator

Lan Tran

For information about FETN, your subscription, or

programming, please call 800-932-3386

or visit www.FETN.com.

FETN Monthly is published by the Fire & Emergency Television

Network. All rights reserved. This publication may be duplicated only

by authorized subscribers and only for internal use by FETN subscribers.

Copyright ©2001, The Fire & Emergency Television

Network, a division of:

The Firefighter s

12 Commandments

Thou shalt live by them!

FETN s Emergency Medical

Responder of the Year

June Programming

This month’s program descriptions and schedules.

Food on the Stove

This month: Spanish Shrimp.

ong>Spotlightong> on Geoff Williams

Meet Geoff Williams of Scotland, FETN’s first

Advisory Board member overseas.

On Location

Catch a glimpse of FETN’s experts at work.

page 4

page 4

ong>Firefightersong>: A ong>Dyingong> ong>Breedong>?

How seriously do you take firefighter survival?

page 5

Help FETN recognize the best among you. Send in

your nominations today!

pages 6 – 15

page 16

page 17

page 18

Technical Rescue: Prediction,

Assessment and Preparation

by Geoff Williams

Is your Technical Rescue team ready for ‘worstcase’

weather or other natural catastrophes? Geoff

Williams spells out the issues and their solutions.

page 19

FETN JUNE 2001 3


LODD. The acronym sends chills

up your spine. Another line of duty

death. What happened? Why did it

happen?

At this writing, James Heenan of the

West Deptford (NJ) Fire Department,

had just died. He lived three months

only to suffer fourth-degree burns

over 80 percent of his body. Injuries

so bad that he had both his hands

amputated. Bill Ellison of the

Anderson Township (OH) Fire

Department was killed. He was

searching a home for possible victims

when he fell through the floor

and landed in the basement. Bill was

inside the home for nearly 10 minutes

before other firefighters were

able to rescue him.

Let’s tick off the litany of other

LODDs: Worcester, Seattle, Fort

Worth, Storm King Mountain. Now

we're into the multiple line of duty

deaths. Let’s forget euphemisms for

death, like “passed away, lost,

deceased.” Let’s call it what it is:

DEATH. These people DIED. They

were killed. They are gone for good,

and they are not coming back.

Why?

Sometimes things happen. Fire fighting

is a dangerous career. You knew

the risks going into this profession.

The line in the film Backdraft says it

4 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386

ALIVE AND WELL?

Firefighter Survival Depends on You

best: “When you have a bad day, you

go home and start over the next day.

When we have a bad day, somebody

dies.” So what do you do to cut those

bad days to a minimum?

Remember when your mom or dad

said “Be careful” before you went

anywhere without them? Well, it is

the same thing that the fire experts

are saying now, and with every bit of

meaning in it that your parents had.

Harry Carter, retired Battalion

Commander with the Newark (NJ)

Fire Department, wrote in his 1998

text, Firefighting Strategy and

Tactics: The Eight Step Method,

some very simple operational rules,

concerns and operational hints. Dr.

Carter says that it is the simple

things, or ignorance of them, that will

kill you.

Here are Carter’s clues for safe fireground

operation:

1. Human life is your primary concern

2. BIG FIRE — BIG WATER

3. Make sure you have an adequate

source of water

4. Never pass a fire

5. Engine companies must work as

a team

6. Do not shoot water at smoke

7. Vent high, vent low, vent often

8. No one goes in alone!

FDNY Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn

said in an FETN interview some

Need the

LATEST INFORMATION

on NEW STANDARDS

and how to comply?

Check out FETN’s

COMPLIANCE CORNER

years ago, “NEVER assume that the

incident commander knows what you

know.” YOU are the one in the

trenches of the battle. The chief cannot

see that the room you are in is

about to flash or backdraft. YOU are

responsible for knowing the signs of

flashover or backdraft and pulling out

before it does. YOU are responsible

for communicating to your chief.

FETN spent inordinate amounts of

time with Frank Brannigan to get his

Construction for the Fire Service

videos just right to make sure that

you know the hazards of just about

every kind of construction out there.

Look for the signs of collapse! The

life you save will be your own and

that of your team.

We’ve been airing Tim Sendelbach’s

programs in our ong>SURVIVALong>! series

with hundreds of important training

and education points designed to

keep you alive and well throughout

your career. This month’s show talks

about the Illinois Fire Service

Institute’s “Saving Our Own” program

(see show summary on page 8). You

will get to hear directly from those

involved on the night that firefighter

John Nance died.

These things are so simple, yet often

overlooked. Don’t cut corners on

your own safety. Train, read, learn

and be safe. It takes a lot of time, but

it sure beats the alternative.

COMING SOON

to

FETN.com!


FETN is Proud

to Announce

Our First-Ever

Emergency

Medical Responder

of the Year

Award

FETN, through our PULSE program, is proud to be part of the EMS community, and we’re equally proud to announce our first

Emergency Medical Responder of the Year award. We invite you to nominate a fellow Emergency Medical Responder whom you

believe has gone above and beyond the call of duty.

Each month, we will select one nominee to honor in FETN Monthly and on FETN.com. At the end of the year, FETN will

select the EMR of the Year from among the monthly winners.

We will announce the EMR of the Year at JEMS 2002, and he or she will be the guest of honor at a hospitality event there. The

honoree will receive acknowledgement in all FETN communications, along with a special gift.

We are accepting nominations for this prestigious award immediately. To submit your nomination, fill out the application below,

and on a separate piece of paper, describe in 250 – 500 words why you feel your nominee should be considered for EMR of the

Month/Year.

Consider such attributes as his or her dedication to compassionate customer care, attitude toward the EMS mission, commitment

to continuing education and/or mentoring, ability to work effectively with others, and willingness to serve the community away

from work. If possible, please include your nominee’s CV/résumé.

Send this completed form plus your description to the Fire & Emergency Television Network, 4101 International Parkway,

Carrollton, TX 75007, email to maryk@pwpl.com, or fax to 972-309-5112.

I wish to nominate:

Name:

Address:

Department:

Phone:

Fax:

E-mail:

Nomination submitted by:

Name:

Address:

Department:

Phone:

Fax:

E-mail:

FETN JUNE 2001 5




HAZMAT • HAZMAT HAZMAT • HAZMAT



JUNE PROGRAMMING Tested 1

ON THE AIR

AIRCRAFT RESCUE

FIREFIGHTING

These programs help firefighters

comply with CFR

139.319 training requirements.

AMERICAN HEAT

This program presents incident

case studies along with news,

training segments and discussion questions.

CHIEF OFFICER

Chief Officer addresses the needs of a

chief executive officer.

EMS — EMED/PULSE/PULSE PLUS

All programs are based on national standards

and are approved by the Continuing

Education Coordinating Board for EMS

(CECBEMS).

FETN DAILY NEWS

FETN News airs every day following most

programs at :25 and :55 past the hour.

FIREFIGHTER I & II

Programs in this training curriculum

address the needs of in-service, experienced

firefighters.

AIRCRAFT

RESCUE


AIRCRAFT

RESCUE

Aircraft Rescue

APPLICATION OF EXTINGUISHING

AGENTS, PART 3

732-0140 1

You won’t want to miss this lesson on “green” foam.

That’s just one of the tricks Les Omans has up his sleeve

in this third lesson on the application of extinguishing

agents. In this lesson, Les discusses mechanical foams

and proportioning for crash fire rescue. (TOD)

Airs June: 1-3, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24,

25-30


WILDLAND/URBAN INTERFACE

054-0065 1

A recipe for disaster:

1. Take a few acres of wildland.

2. Sprinkle combustible homes throughout.

3. Bake under the summer sun until dry.

Serves hundreds.

The interface has been called “the fire of the future.”

Why? Because the interface is growing larger every

day. And the likelihood that you will respond to an interface

fire increases with each new home that is built on

the outskirts of your community. In this edition of

American Heat, we will profile the Cerro Grande fire of

2000 and the Laguna Beach fire of 1993. We’ll also give

you valuable tips from a variety of experts on how to

deal with the interface issue in your community. Most

importantly, we will introduce you to some of the people

in the communities that were affected. These are the

dramatic stories that CNN didn’t cover. (TOD)

Airs June: 4-6, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

FIRST LINE SUPERVISOR

This curriculum is based on NFPA’s

#1021, Standard for Fire Officer

Professional Qualifications.

HAZMAT

FETN’s HAZMAT curriculum meets

NFPA standards, and complies

with federal mandates.

HAZMAT • HAZMAT

HAZMAT • HAZMAT

INCIDENT COMMAND

054-0064 1

How does the Incident Command structure help manage

a firefighting operation? How SHOULD it work? We’ll

look at Incident Command from the bottom up, and from

the perspective of the front-line responder. We’ll study

how the chain of command on the fireground impacts all

on the scene, and you’ll see that everyone is a crucial

link in that chain. (TOD)

Airs June: 10-12, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

RESCUE SPECIALIST

Subjects include rope rescue,

trench, confined space,

vehicle extrication

and more.

6 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386


1 Tested

EENET

For several years now, FETN has brought you broadcasts

from the Federal Emergency Management

Agency’s (FEMA) Emergency Education Network

(EENET). To better serve you, we’ve taken their weekly

live broadcasts, put them to tape, and aired them

twice daily for three to six days in a row. Because of

the rapidly changing nature of EENET, we no longer list

individual programs in the FETN Monthly. But you can

still find out what’s going to be on the air by watching

FETN for promotional spots advertising EENET programs

and their topics on a monthly basis. Or visit our Web

page — www.FETN.com — for the latest listings.

SHOCK

046-0184 1

The high incidence of trauma and shock is partially

responsible for the development of EMS systems in the

USA. This month on FETN, we will discuss the pathophysiology

of shock, as it relates to trauma, and the methods

of care used to manage these emergencies. (TOD)

Airs June: 7-9, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

SHORTNESS OF BREATH

046-0183 1

In this program, we’ll look at “Shortness of Breath.”

The causes, treatments and care that the EMT-B can

provide will be reviewed, as well as some of the equipment,

drugs and procedures utilized in the care of these

patients. (TOD)

Airs June: 10-12, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

This month, Pulse Plus examines

Americans’ increasing use of methamphetamines. See listing below.

PULSE PLUS:

METHAMPHETAMINES

055-0112 1

ong>Areong> you aware that methamphetamines represent the

fastest growing drug threat in America? The drugs are

lethal and the clandestine labs in which they are created

are fire hazards and potential hazmat situations for

you. (TOD)

Airs June: 1-3, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY

055-0111 1

Every day you face the war on drugs: hallucinogens like

LSD and PCP, methamphetamines like crystal meth, and

combinations of both, like ecstasy. We’ll look at each of

these drugs in depth and explore the cheaper side of getting

high: huffing. GHB and rohypnol, the “date

rape”drugs, are included as well. (TOD)

Airs June: 4-6, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS

055-0109 1

Stroke, seizure and aneurysms are all topics we’ll be

covering in this month’s PULSE. In this discussion, we’ll

look at your differential diagnosis of stroke as well as

pre-hospital management, look at the etiology and phases

of seizures, go over the anatomy of the cardiovascular

system and describe the current philosophies and

practices in cerebral resuscitation. (TOD)

Airs June: 10-12, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

PULSE PLUS:

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

055-0110 1

We’re going to review the NAEMSP/NHTSA standards on

dealing with traumatic brain injury and we’ll look at a

real-life situation in which a motorcycle rider had his

helmet ripped off when he was hit by a car. (TOD)

Airs June: 7-9, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

FETN JUNE 2001 7


JUNE PROGRAMMING Tested 1

News & Specials

AMERICA ON FIRE

700-0554

America on Fire provides firefighters and emergency

medical services personnel a new outlook on technological

advances in the industry, most importantly, the use

of the Internet. FETN’s own fire and EMS expert shares

selected Web sites to help keep you informed of upcoming

events, conferences, or just cool, interesting sites.

Airs June: 4-6, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

RECOGNIZING AND REPORTING

CHILD ABUSE

First aired on our sister station, the Health and Sciences

Television Network, this program provides insight on

how to effectively recognize and report child abuse. As

a first responder, you will find this program invaluable

in helping you protect your community’s children.

Airs June: 25-30

FIRE SERVICE HYDRAULICS

RULES OF THUMB, PART 3

047-0190 1

Using hydraulic principles discussed in Part 2, Chris

DeWolf (Dover, NH, Fire & Rescue) will apply the engine

pressure equation on the training ground. Common pitfalls

and errors will be illustrated to increase driver/operator

efficiency on the fireground. (TOD)

Airs June: 7-9, 13-15, 19-21, 22-24

ong>SURVIVALong>!

APPROACHING THE TRAPPED

OR DOWNED FIREFIGHTER

735-0112 1

The concept of rapid intervention operations and firefighter

rescue continues to be a topic of critical importance.

Despite these continued efforts, we oftentimes

forget to establish a standardized approach in our

efforts to ensure our personal safety in conjunction

with our rescue efforts. This program will detail the

proper procedures to be initiated when approaching a

trapped/downed firefighter and the required actions to

start the rescue process. (TOD)

Airs June: 1-3, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

BACK TO BASICS:

HOSE, PART 1

047-0191 1

Chris DeWolf (Dover (NH) Fire and Rescue) will discuss

some of the basic principles of a firefighter’s most fundamental

tool, the fire hose. In this Back to Basics feature,

Chris will look at the construction of fire hose.

The care and maintenance of hose will be explained and

some of the ways fire hose may be damaged will be

examined. Using back-to-basic terminology, the use of

tools, appliances and other basic hose fundamentals will

be reviewed. (TOD)

Airs June: 1-3, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

ong>SURVIVALong>!

SUB-FLOOR RESCUES, PART 1:

THE COLUMBUS DRILL AND BEYOND

735-0113 1

In 1995-96 with the introduction of the Saving Our Own

program, the Illinois Fire Service Institute focused a

great deal of attention on the fatal incident involving

John Nance and the Columbus Fire Department. As a follow-up

to the many lessons that have been learned from

this devastating incident, we will visit the Columbus

Fire Department and several of those members who

were directly involved to identify the specific chain of

events that occured that fateful night. This program will

also detail the training efforts of the Columbus Fire

Department and several new and innovative techniques

that have been taught across the fire service in hopes

of preventing similar tragedies. (TOD)

Airs June: 4-6, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

FETN CLASSICS

700-0563

The incidents happened nearly 10 years ago, but the

lessons learned from them are timeless. Take a look at

fires and rescues that happened a decade earlier, the

way we fought fires then, and compare it to fire fighting

now. (TOD)

Airs June: 10-12, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24,

25-30

FETN CLASSICS

700-0562

The incidents happened nearly 10 years ago, but the

lessons learned from them are timeless. This edition of

FETN Classics takes a look at fires from the past decade

and how we fought them. Compare with today’s firefighting

for an interesting, informative lesson. (TOD)

Airs June: 7-9, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24,

25-31

8 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386



HAZMAT




1 Tested

HAZMAT • HAZMAT

HAZMAT • HAZMAT

HAZMAT • HAZMAT

HAZMAT • HAZMAT

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7:

MODES OF TRANSPORTATION

FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

737-0113 1

FETN’s 8-hour Hazardous Materials Awareness class,

delivered in 16 individual segments during 2001, counts

as an annual refresher for your Operations certification

and OSHA’s Awareness level certification. Darrel

Begnaud, the “Ragin’ Cajun,” makes the class compliant,

interesting, and full of the information you need.

This month’s installment provides an in-depth look into

one of the greatest threats facing today’s response

forces — emergencies involving hazardous materials in

transit. These emergencies place the general public and

the response forces in great danger due to their proximity

to the release and the unfamiliarity of its true

potential. (TOD)

Airs June: 1-3, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING,

PART 2: PUTTING RADIOACTIVE

MATERIAL TRANSPORTATION

INTO PERSPECTIVE

737-0114 1

This lesson is applicable for EMS and fire/rescue responders

throughout North America. Learn about the four

kinds of ionizing radiation and the dangers to emergency

responders presented by each. The proper shielding and

precautions are taught, as well as compounds that are

the usual sources of radiation. Fission and fissile materials

are explained. The four basic protection principles

are emphasized. This program will make you a better,

safer responder to radiological emergencies, and will

count towards maximizing your department’s ISO rating,

helping satisfy the requirement for a “half-day” of

training on radiological emergencies each year. (TOD)

Airs June: 7-9, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24, 25-30

REFRESHER COURSE,

PART 5: PLACARDS, LABELS

AND SHIPPING PAPERS

737-0111 1

FETN’s 8-hour Hazardous Materials Awareness class,

delivered in 16 individual segments during 2001, counts

as an annual refresher for your Operations certification

and OSHA’s Awareness level certification. Darrel

Begnaud, the “Ragin’ Cajun,” makes the class compliant,

interesting, and full of the information you need.

This program provides an in-depth look into identifying

a potential presence of hazardous materials in transportation

through the use of placards, labels and shipping

papers. (TOD)

Airs June: 4-6, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE,

PART 6: MARKINGS, COLORS

AND MSDS

737-0112 1

This edition studies special markings on transport containers,

signs, markings and colors at fixed sites that

may aid in the identification of a potential presence of

hazardous materials as well as the information located

on material safety data sheets (MSDS). (TOD)

Airs June: 1-3, 13-15, 16-18, 19-21, 22-24

Refresh your hazmat knowledge this month on FETN.

FETN JUNE 2001 9


2001

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

JUNE 1 - 6

EDT CDT MDT PDT

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 pm 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

1:00 12 pm 11:00 10:00

1:30 12:30 11:30 10:30

2:00 1:00 12 pm 11:00

2:30 1:30 12:30 11:30

3:00 2:00 1:00 12 pm

3:30 2:30 1:30 12:30

4:00 3:00 2:00 1:00

4:30 3:30 2:30 1:30

5:00 4:00 3:00 2:00

5:30 4:30 3:30 2:30

6:00 5:00 4:00 3:00

6:30 5:30 4:30 3:30

7:00 6:00 5:00 4:00

7:30 6:30 5:30 4:30

8:00 7:00 6:00 5:00

8:30 7:30 6:30 5:30

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 am 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

Friday, June 1 - Sunday, June 3

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

EENET

EENET

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER, COURSE PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

EENET

EENET

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER, COURSE PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

Monday, June 4 - Wednesday, June 6

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

EENET

EENET

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

EENET

EENET

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

10 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386


2001

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

JUNE 7 - 12

EDT CDT MDT PDT

Thursday, June 7 - Saturday, June 9

Sunday, June 10 - Tuesday, June 12

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 pm 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

1:00 12 pm 11:00 10:00

1:30 12:30 11:30 10:30

2:00 1:00 12 pm 11:00

2:30 1:30 12:30 11:30

3:00 2:00 1:00 12 pm

3:30 2:30 1:30 12:30

4:00 3:00 2:00 1:00

4:30 3:30 2:30 1:30

5:00 4:00 3:00 2:00

5:30 4:30 3:30 2:30

6:00 5:00 4:00 3:00

6:30 5:30 4:30 3:30

7:00 6:00 5:00 4:00

7:30 6:30 5:30 4:30

8:00 7:00 6:00 5:00

8:30 7:30 6:30 5:30

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 am 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

EENET

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

EENET

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

EENET

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

EENET

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

FETN JUNE 2001 11


2001

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

JUNE 13 - 18

EDT CDT MDT PDT

Wednesday, June 13 - Friday, June 15

Saturday, June 16 - Monday, June 18

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 pm 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

1:00 12 pm 11:00 10:00

1:30 12:30 11:30 10:30

2:00 1:00 12 pm 11:00

2:30 1:30 12:30 11:30

3:00 2:00 1:00 12 pm

3:30 2:30 1:30 12:30

4:00 3:00 2:00 1:00

4:30 3:30 2:30 1:30

5:00 4:00 3:00 2:00

5:30 4:30 3:30 2:30

6:00 5:00 4:00 3:00

6:30 5:30 4:30 3:30

7:00 6:00 5:00 4:00

7:30 6:30 5:30 4:30

8:00 7:00 6:00 5:00

8:30 7:30 6:30 5:30

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 am 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! INCIDENT COMMAND 735-0109

EENET

EENET

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

EENET

EENET

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

EENET

EENET

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

EENET

EENET

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

12 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386


2001

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

JUNE 19 - 24

EDT CDT MDT PDT

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 pm 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

1:00 12 pm 11:00 10:00

1:30 12:30 11:30 10:30

2:00 1:00 12 pm 11:00

2:30 1:30 12:30 11:30

3:00 2:00 1:00 12 pm

3:30 2:30 1:30 12:30

4:00 3:00 2:00 1:00

4:30 3:30 2:30 1:30

5:00 4:00 3:00 2:00

5:30 4:30 3:30 2:30

6:00 5:00 4:00 3:00

6:30 5:30 4:30 3:30

7:00 6:00 5:00 4:00

7:30 6:30 5:30 4:30

8:00 7:00 6:00 5:00

8:30 7:30 6:30 5:30

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 am 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

Tuesday, June 19 - Thursday, June 21

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

EENET

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER, PART 7 737-0113

EENET

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER, PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND/URBAN 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

Friday, June 22 - Sunday, May 24

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

AMERICAN HEAT: INCIDENT COMMAND 054-0064

EENET

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 7 737-0113

HOSE, PART 1 047-0191

ARFF: EXTINGUISHING AGENTS, PART 3 732-0140

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 6 737-0112

ong>SURVIVALong>! TRAPPED/DOWNED FIREFIGHTER 735-0112

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND INTERFACE 054-0065

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

HAZMAT REFRESHER COURSE, PART 5 737-0111

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

EENET

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PART 1 735-0113

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB, PART 3 047-0190

PULSE PLUS: TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY 055-0110

FETN CLASSICS 700-0562

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

EMED: SHORTNESS OF BREATH 046-0183

PULSE: CEREBRAL EVENTS 055-0109

FETN JUNE 2001 13


ENCORE

PROGRAMMING

JUNE 25 - 30

EDT CDT MDT PDT

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 pm 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

1:00 12 pm 11:00 10:00

1:30 12:30 11:30 10:30

2:00 1:00 12 pm 11:00

2:30 1:30 12:30 11:30

3:00 2:00 1:00 12 pm

3:30 2:30 1:30 12:30

4:00 3:00 2:00 1:00

4:30 3:30 2:30 1:30

5:00 4:00 3:00 2:00

5:30 4:30 3:30 2:30

6:00 5:00 4:00 3:00

6:30 5:30 4:30 3:30

7:00 6:00 5:00 4:00

7:30 6:30 5:30 4:30

8:00 7:00 6:00 5:00

8:30 7:30 6:30 5:30

9:00 8:00 7:00 6:00

9:30 8:30 7:30 6:30

10:00 9:00 8:00 7:00

10:30 9:30 8:30 7:30

11:00 10:00 9:00 8:00

11:30 10:30 9:30 8:30

12 am 11:00 10:00 9:00

12:30 11:30 10:30 9:30

Monday, June 25 - Saturday, June 30

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND INTERFACE 054-0065

HAZMAT REFRESHER, PT. 7 737-0113

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PT. 1 735-0113

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

HYDRAULICS RULES OF THUMB #3 047-0190

HOSE EPISODE 1 047-0191

AMERICA ON FIRE 700-0554

ARFF: APPLICATION OF EXTINGUISHING AGENTS 732-0135

EENET

PULSE: TOXICOLOGY 055-0111

PULSE PLUS: METHAMPHETAMINES 055-0112

EMED: SHOCK 046-0184

AMERICAN HEAT: WILDLAND INTERFACE 054-0065

HAZMAT REFRESHER, PT. 7 737-0113

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORT 737-0114

ong>SURVIVALong>! SUBFLOOR RESCUES, PT. 1 735-0113

FETN CLASSICS 700-0563

CHILD ABUSE CONFERENCE

CHILD ABUSE CONFERENCE

CHILD ABUSE CONFERENCE

14 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386


AIRCRAFT RESCUE

Application of Extinguishing

1 Agents, Part 3

732-0140

AMERICAN HEAT

Wildland/Urban Interface

054-0065

1

FIREFIGHTER I & II

Back to Basics:

1 Hose, Part 1

047-0191

1

ENCORE

Survival!

Subfloor Rescues, Part 1

735-0113

FIRST LINE SUPERVISOR

FETN Classics

700-0563

1

June — PROGRAMMING

Tested

For Changes

and Up-to-Date

Program Listings

Lightning

Fast

visit

FETN.com!

HAZMAT

Hazmat Refresher Course, Part 7

1 Modes of Transportation for Hazardous Materials

737-0113

1

Radiological Monitoring, Part 2:

Putting Radioactive Material

Transportation into Perspective

737-0114

NEWS AND SPECIALS

America On Fire

700-0554

PULSE/EMS

PULSE: Toxicology

055-0111

1

1

1

PULSE PLUS: Methamphetamines

055-0112

EMED: Shock

046-0184

For complete summaries

of EENET programs

visit

www.fema.gov/emi/eenet.htm

FETN JUNE 2001 15


FOOD

ON

THE STOVE

Heart attack kills more firefighters than any danger on the fireground. In an

effort to keep you alive and well, FETN will be printing select recipes from

the American Heart Association. This recipe comes from the new American

Heart Association Meals in Minutes cookbook (© 2000). It’s not only delicious,

but good for you. Visit www.americanheart.org for more.

Meat

SHOPPING LIST

Spanish Shrimp

Medium shrimp ( 1 ⁄2 pound

uncooked, peeled; about 20)

Produce

Onions, yellow or white

(2 medium)

Bell peppers, red, yellow and

green

Garlic (bottled or fresh)

Limes (2 to 3 medium)

Cilantro

Sauces/Seasonings

Crushed red pepper flakes

Other Ingredients

Olive oil

SPANISH SHRIMP

• Serves 4; 1 1 ⁄4 cups per serving

• Prep time: 10 minutes

• Cooking time: 23 to 24 minutes

Serve this colorful entrée with rice — perhaps topped with a dollop of nonfat

sour cream — so you can enjoy every bit of the sauce. For a Tex-Mex version,

cut the vegetables into smaller pieces and wrap the finished mixture in

flour tortillas.

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil

2 medium yellow or white onions, each cut into eighths (Spanish preferred)

3 cups frozen red, yellow and green bell pepper strips

1 teaspoon bottled chopped garlic or 2 medium gloves of garlic, chopped

1

⁄2 pound uncooked peeled and de-veined medium shrimp (about 20)

1

⁄4 cup of lime juice (2 to 3 medium limes)

1 tablespoon snipped fresh cilantro

1

⁄4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, or to taste

Directions:

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add oil and swirl to coat bottom of skillet.

Sauté onions, peppers and garlic, uncovered, for 15 minutes, stirring

occasionally.

Stir in remaining ingredients. Cook for 7 to 8 minutes, or until shrimp turns

pink, stirring frequently.

Cook’s Tip on Buying Shrimp:

Shrimp loses about 25 percent of its weight when peeled and deveined. Then

the peeled shrimp loses another one-fourth of its original weight when cooked.

If you start with 12 ounces of raw shrimp in the shell, you’ll wind up with about

6 ounces of cooked, peeled shrimp.

i

16 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386


FETN/AMERICAN HEAT

ADVISORY BOARD

Kevin Brame, Battalion Chief

Orange Co. Fire Department

Orange, CA

John Buckman, Chief

German Township Fire Department

Evansville, IN

Steven Edwards, Director

Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute

University of Maryland

College Park, MD

Russ Johnson

Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.

Fairfax, VA

Ken Jones, Deputy Chief

Fairfax Co. Fire and Rescue Academy

Fairfax, VA

Rich Marinucci, Chief

Farmington Hills Fire Department

Farmington Hills, MI

Randy Novak, Bureau Chief

Fire Service Training Bureau

Ames, IA

Brian Pearson, Asst. Chief

Central Pierce Fire-Rescue

Tacoma, WA

Mario Trevino, Chief

Las Vegas Fire Department

Las Vegas, NV

Bruce Varner, Chief

Carrollton Fire Department

Carrollton, TX

Geoff Williams, Deputy Firemaster

MIFireE, MIMgt, ChFI

Central Scotland Fire Brigade, U.K.

EMS

ADVISORY BOARD

Debra Cason

The University of Texas Southwestern Medical

Center

Department of Emergency Medicine Education

Dallas, TX

Jeff Dyar

CEO, The Far View Group

Gettysburg, PA

Art Hsieh

San Francisco Fire Department

EMS In-Service Training

San Francisco, CA

Denis Meade

EMS Educational Consultant

Littleton, CO

John Sinclair, Deputy Chief

Central Pierce Fire and Rescue

Tacoma, WA

Charlene Skaff

F-M Ambulance Service, Inc.

Fargo, ND

ADVISORY BOARD SPOTLIGHT

GEOFF WILLIAMS

International Technical Rescue Expert

This month, FETN is pleased to reintroduce

FETN/American Heat

Advisory Board memberGeoff

Williams, MIFireE, MIMgt, ChFl,

CIETecRI, Deputy Firemaster of the

Central Scotland Fire Brigade, U.K.

Geoff’s 25 years of operational experience

in all ranks of the fire profession

make him a valuable member of the

FETN team.

Geoff has argued that, in the event of

a weapons of mass destruction attack

causing enough structural collapse to

form an urban canyon environment,

many urban search and rescue teams

are not prepared at an accredited level

of capability to ensure the safety of

rescuers and communities.

To address this problem, he designed

and developed the Executive

Command Level (ECL) Management

Development Program for Urban

Search and Rescue Operations. This

officer development program utilizes

an IT-enriched informational database,

which assists ECL management to correctly

manage, pre-plan and train

USAR teams.

He is the author of Incident Command

and Training for Collapsed Structures

and Heavy Tactical Resources. He is a

visiting fellow lecturer at the national

Fire Service College in the U.K. and at

Glasgow Caledonian University, and he

is a regular speaker and tutor at international

conferences and workshops.

While working in the U.S., Geoff was

awarded the California State Fire

Marshal Certificate of Appreciation. He

was also awarded a Distinction and the

Godiva Award for the highest pass

mark of the 1991 Institution of Fire

Engineers Members Examination, as

well as the Ramsey Award for the

overall highest mark internationally. His

training system and operational management

developments in the USAR

field earned recognition in 1992, when

he was awarded the prestigious

Winston Churchill Fellowship.

Geoff’s unique System for USAR

Training and Responses was adopted

in 1995 by the Emergency Services

Bureau of the Australian Capital

Territories Government in Canberra,

Australia. He travelled to Australia to

train that nation’s leading fire and rescue

departments to Level III of his

USAR standards. In 1997, he was

invited to return and train officers in the

Fourth Level of his ECL Management

Development Program.

He was co-founder of and is a

Technical Advisory Board member and

Commander of the International

Emergency Technical Rescue Institute

(IETRI), and he has assisted at the

sites of many structural collapses, both

naturally caused and caused by terrorists.

As a member of a multi-national

team formed from IETRI, he aided rescue

efforts following the recent disastrous

earthquake in Turkey.

Recently, Geoff became only the second

person ever appointed to be the

International Joint Board Executive

Member of the National Institute for

Urban Search and Rescue, based in

the U.S. He has just returned to the

U.K. from Texas A&M University, where

he taught the Taiwanese government’s

USAR officers in the ECL Management

Development Program. And in 2001,

he is scheduled to teach the South

African USAR teams the ECL Program

at the first International Emergency

Technical Institute Conference and

Workshop being held in Johannesberg.

Married with two daughters, Geoff

enjoys running and weight training, as

well as his hobby of collecting (and tasting)

fine wines from around the world.

Turn the page to read more about

Geoff Williams’ work.

FETN JUNE 2001 17


IS YOUR TECHNICAL RESCUE TEAM ALERT

TO ENCROACHING ENVIRONMENTAL CLIMATIC CHANGES?

Predict, Assess, and Prepare Now!

by Geoff Williams

MIFireE, MIMgt, ChFl, CIETecRI

Deputy Firemaster,

Central Scotland Fire Brigade, U.K.

Technical Rescue teams should commence

closer working with meteorological

organizations to initiate predicting

and customizing weather trends.

ong>Areong>as deemed vulnerable should be

assessed and pre-planned for. This

pre-planning should take account of

the type of PPE and rescue equipment

used by rescue personnel in order to

ensure its suitability for this type of

new, encroaching environment.

A review should commence to ensure

that existing strategic command and

control centers can remain operative

during ‘worst-case’ scenarios. Closer

collaboration between all agencies

should be considered to ensure combined

cross boundary operations provide

the best use of resources.

Incentive and Inventive Legislation

Within the USA, under a new law,

states that prepare for natural disasters

are being rewarded. They can get

an extra 20 percent in government

paid cleanup costs if they helped fortify

for hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes,

etc., which includes shoring up

buildings, constructing roads and

water systems, and making utility

18 CUSTOMER SUPPORT 800.932.3386

infrastructures more enduring.

Companies doing cleanup work will be

paid faster and have less paperwork.

The significance of this law is far

more than its content, as it recognizes

the seriousness of natural disasters

and has used incentives to motivate

corrective action and provide a solution.

It is a new concept, and it is

innovative in using incentives to solve

problems. Most practical disaster

problems can be solved with people,

money and material, but the true victory

is achieved by using the mind.

And that brings us back to ourselves.

We can make a difference. President

Kennedy once stated, “One man can

make a difference, and every man

should try.” This phrase well defines

the task of the Technical Rescue services.

Technological Integration

and Application

The International Emergency

Technical Rescue Institute

(http://www.fire.org.uk/ECL) recommends

that we should attach ourselves

to the newly created technologies

that will assist us in predicting

emerging threats and opportunities.

Whether you embrace it or not, our

business is justifiably going international.

During the earthquakes in

India, I observed over the Internet

real-time destruction in that country.

Today, certain previously catastrophestricken

countries have risen like

phoenix from the ashes of destruction.

Turkey now has an international rescue

contingent to save lives and promote

restoration. Such international

missions have immense social

impacts and tend to bring the world

closer together, but equally, the

absence of a nation willing to offer

‘hands-on’ humanitarian aid can have

the exact opposite effect.

We should not spend scarce finances

to build a communications infrastructure

when one already exists. Unfortunately,

that practice is becoming ubiquitous

in order to underwrite global rescue

missions and tackle the omnipresent

terrorist threat. The Internet can be

ever increasingly exploited to serve our

tactical purposes.

We need to ensure our political masters

understand and support our scientific

and technological organizations

in designing systems that will help

alleviate future tragedies.

ECL — Structural Collapse Critical

Crisis Tool Intelligence

I have personally researched over

three thousand global collapse incidents,

and I have analyzed and identified

generic events that continually

recur at some stage during an incident.

I then utilized my “Value Stage

RACE Analysis,” which I designed to

find the types of hindrances they

caused the incident management

teams. It soon became apparent that

the same issues were always present.

Therefore, the task of finding how

these could be best (with hindsight)

managed was the next stage of finding

a solution. Once a solution had

been found, it was then further reanalyzed

to ensure it helped the actual

Technical Rescue team’s rescue

mission. What was simple, plain information

now became transformed into

expert, intelligence-based solutions.

These solutions are now held within

the ECL computer software critical crisis

tool.

Incident Command teams often

underestimate how these ‘events’ and

the people that are linked to them can

severely disrupt and hinder their effectiveness,

if they are not properly dealt

with at a very early stage. Current

incident management teams deal with

the majority of these occurrences as

they arise and until now they have

never systematically been analyzed

as to how they hinder or deviate

teams from their primary objectives.

Utilizing the new ECL has been

proven to increase building/structural

collapse management by 35%, thus

increasing the victims’ chance of survival

and increasing rescuer safety

during the assignment.

For more information, visit:

http://www.globalcrisiscenter.com


on LOCATION

WITH FETN

Tim Sendelbach shoots footage for this month’s Survival! program,

“Subfloor Rescues,” in Columbus, Ohio. See listing, page 8.

FETN JUNE 2001 19


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CG0601

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