JPIIHS 2013-14 Course Guide - John Paul II HS

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JPIIHS 2013-14 Course Guide - John Paul II HS

Course Guide

2013-2014

Vision: We will make a difference in the world by walking in the footsteps of Pope John Paul II.

Mission: To develop leaders who are critical thinkers, effective communicators, committed to service, and rooted in faith.

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Course Guide

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JOHN PAUL II HIGH SCHOOL

900 COIT ROAD

PLANO, TEXAS

75075

Phone: (972) 867 – 0005

Fax: (972) 867 – 7555

President, Mr. Thomas W. Poore, M.Ed.

Dean of Educational Operations, Mr. Steve Mininger, M.Ed.

Dean of Administrative Services and Director of Athletics, Mr. Rich Gaffney, M.B.A.

Dean of Student Services and Plant Operations, Mr. Steve Hammerle, M.Ed.

Director of Guidance and Counseling, Ms. Paula Nickel, M.Ed.

Coordinator of Curriculum and Instruction, Dr. Marlene Hammerle, Ed.d.

Department Chair, Science

Mr. Vernon Dewees, M.S.

Department Chair, Fine Arts

Mr. Michael Browning, B.M.

Department Chair, Mathematics

Mrs. Linda Watson, M.S.

Department Chair, English Language Arts

Mr. William Eldridge, M.Ed.

Department Chair, Social Studies

Mr. Robert Wade, M.S.

Department Chair, Foreign Languages

Mrs. Laura Hudec, M.A.

Department Chair, Computer Science

Mr. Leon Schram, M.A., M.S.

Department Chair, Physical Education

Mrs. Sue Schleusner, B.S.

Director of Ministries/Department Chair, Theology

Sister Peggy Szeljack CV, M.Ed., M.T.S.

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Course Guide

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HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM

TO THE STUDENT AND PARENT

This guide has been prepared to acquaint you with course selections offered at John Paul II High School and to help you select your

courses and programs wisely during your high school career. You and your parents should take time to familiarize yourselves with this

guide so that you can select those courses which interest you and which will meet graduation requirements.

Your counselor is ready to assist in creating a four-year plan and selecting future courses. Any question concerning graduation

requirements should be addressed to your counselor. Questions concerning course descriptions and content should be addressed to the

department chairperson of the respective department of the course in question.

Please note that elective classes may or may not have sufficient enrollment each year for the class to make. The administration will

determine the circumstances under which an elective class is scheduled.

CALENDAR AND SCHEDULE

There are two semesters. The school day starts at 8:45 a.m. and ends at 3:45 p.m. Each semester will be approximately eighteen weeks

long with two nine week grading periods. Progress reports will be posted at the three week and six week marks of each nine-week

grading period.

Grades 9 through 12 will have an A/B Alternating Block Schedule with four courses on A-Day and four courses on B-Days. Each class

will be eighty-seven minutes in length. In two weeks, most classes will meet five (5) times. One week classes will meet Monday,

Wednesday, and Friday, while the next week classes will meet Tuesday and Thursday. There will be an additional advisory period of

twenty (20) minutes that meets every day. Additionally, the school may offer elective “0” and “X” hour credit earning classes which meet

five days a week in the morning from 7:40 to 8:35 a.m. or after school from 3:55 to 4:50 pm.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The graduation requirements of John Paul II High School are governed by two criteria. Our staff endeavors to provide our students with

a solid theological background in our Catholic faith in which they continue to serve the community and Church long after they leave our

halls. Additionally, we seek to prepare our students for successful matriculation into universities and colleges.

Beginning with the Class of 2014, all students are fulfilling the Recommended program and will earn the same type of diploma. The

Academic Achievement Record (Transcript), rather than the diploma, records individual courses and credits completed. John Paul II

High School requires thirty credits for graduation.

CHRISTIAN SERVICE

Our Lord Jesus Christ and Blessed Pope John Paul II call Christians to service in the name of God and for the benefit of our neighbors.

Our school motto, “Seek to Serve,” echoes this call. All students will have mandatory Christian service hours. Seniors will work 40 total

hours, which they must complete in order to qualify for graduation. Juniors will complete 30, sophomores 20 and freshmen 10 hours of

Christian service. Students will have opportunities through their theology classes as well as other opportunities to earn hours. The

Christian Service Office at John Paul II High School will assist students with this call and will provide opportunities through the senior

theology classes and outside of school for fulfillment of these hours.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS (Beginning with the Graduates of 2014 and beyond)

CORE

REQUIREMENTS

SUBJECT CREDITS SPECIFICS

English Language Arts 4 English I, English II, English III, English IV

Mathematics 4

Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and one additional selection; students who receive math credit for 8 th grade must earn four

math credits in high school.

Sciences 4 Biology, Chemistry, Physics and one additional selection

Social Studies and

World Cultures and Geography, World History, United States History, and one semester each of U.S. Government and Macro-

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Economics

Economics

Foreign Languages 2

Two years of the same foreign language; students who receive foreign language credit in 8 th grade must earn two credits in high

school.

Theology 4 Theology I, Theology II, Theology III; Theology IV

Computer Science 1 Students must take Computer Science.

OTHER

REQUIREMENTS

Physical Education (PE) 1.5

In addition to traditional PE classes, athletics, cheerleading, dance, drill team and the fall semester of marching band qualify as

PE credit.

Health .5

Fine Arts 1

In addition to traditional fine arts classes, courses in Academic Decathlon, Academic Octathlon, and Dance may fulfill the

required two semesters of Fine Arts.

Speech .5

Students must take Communication Applications or students may earn competency credit through Debate, Oral Interpretation,

Academic Decathlon, or Theater Production.

Electives

Students will take additional electives from any department or course offering in the guide. Selections can be for personal

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interest or in preparation for college.

Christian Service

Hours vary by Each year students will have required hours to complete as part of promotion to the next grade; completion of hours will be

year part of the theology grade. Freshmen will do ten, sophomores twenty, juniors thirty, and seniors will complete forty hours.

TOTAL CREDITS 30 Credits Required to Earn a Graduation Diploma from John Paul II High School

GRADE POINT SYSTEM

Most courses earn grade points on a 4.0 scale. Pre-AP courses are designated with an “H” on the transcript and receive grade points on

a 4.5 scale. AP courses are designated with a “P” on the transcript and receive grade points on a 5.0 scale. Physical Education courses,

Independent Studies courses, summer school, correspondence, e-school, and health taken outside of JPIIHS will not receive grade

points.

John Paul II High School no longer ranks students. JPIIHS meets the requirements of House Bill 588 and ranks the top 10% of each

graduating class.

GRADE LEVEL CLASSIFICATION

Grade level classification will be made at the beginning of each academic year and will be based upon the number of credits successfully

completed. Grade level classifications require the following earned credits:

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

6 credits

14 credits

22 credits

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SUBSTITUTIONS FOR PE CREDIT

Participation in the following programs qualifies as a class to meet the school’s PE requirement: Athletics, Drill Team, Cheerleading,

Dance, and the fall semester of Marching Band. With the permission of the Director of Athletics, off campus athletic programs meeting

specific demanding criteria can be scheduled into the class schedule and earn PE credit.

THE HONORS PROGRAM: PRE-AP AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program offers students the opportunity to pursue college-level studies while still in high school and

potentially earn college credit. AP courses challenge students and ease the transition to college. John Paul II High School offers multiple

Pre-AP and AP courses. We encourage all students to consider participation in one or more of these academically challenging courses.

There are set guidelines and requirements for enrollment in these courses including previous academic performance, successful

completion of designated pre-requisite courses, ISEE and standardized test scores, and instructor recommendations. Honors courses in

Foreign Language and in the Performing and Creative Arts are determined through auditions, reviewed work, and accomplishments in

prior classes. Students will be invited to participate by the individual instructor. Students must maintain a passing average to remain in

Pre-AP or AP courses. In comparison to traditional course work, AP courses take a more challenging approach and demand a higher

level of performance by high school students. Advance Placement exams are given in May. By earning the score designated by individual

universities, a student can earn college credit, therefore, saving both time and money during post-secondary studies. Students are

required to take the AP Exam.

The instructor of the Pre-AP or AP course, the respective department chair, the Director of Guidance and Counseling, and the Dean of

Educational Operations may collectively waive entrance requirements for participation and admit a student to a Pre-AP or AP class on a

provisional basis after a meeting with both the student and parent(s). Continued participation will depend on completion of class work

and earning a passing grade.

EXAMS FOR PLACEMENT IN MATHEMATICS AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE

John Paul II High School will administer placement exams to incoming ninth graders who wish to take Geometry their freshman year.

This exam will be administered on specific dates in the spring and summer preceding the student’s freshman year. Interested parents

should contact the department chairpersons or Director of Guidance and Counseling for specific information and dates. Based on

student performance on the exam, the school will determine student placement in mathematics. Incoming freshman who have two years

of a prior foreign language will be placed in Pre-AP I and those who have no formal foreign language will be placed in CP I. At the end

of the first three weeks of school, students wishing to be moved to the second year will need to request a placement test and receive a

passing score to move up a level.

Incoming transfer students who are 10 th -12 th grades will be placed in the next level according to the transcript. Placement tests will be

available on Monday, August 13, at the end of the school day for those students who would like to finalize their placement.

CORRESPONDENCE CLASSES

Students enrolled in John Paul II High School may earn credit for non-core courses through correspondence via Texas Tech University

or through e-school via Plano Independent School District. Students should contact their respective counselor for more information

and specific requirements. The student must pay for the cost of the course. Correspondence and e-school courses will not earn grade

points.

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The number of correspondence or e-school credits that a student may use to meet graduation requirements is limited to two credits.

The only courses a student may take through e-school or correspondence are Health, PE, and Speech or those core classes which a

student needs to retake to redeem credit. Students must receive approval prior to enrolling in classes

SUMMER SCHOOL

A student who fails both semesters of a year-long required course must take summer school to redeem the credit. If a student fails the

second semester of a full year course, he/she must take that semester to earn credit. Summer School courses will not earn grade points.

The counselors must approve all summer school selections before the classes are taken. If a student takes a class without permission,

the school reserves the right to decline to transfer the credit.

John Paul II High School does not permit students to take summer school classes to accelerate in core classes or courses required for

graduation. However, students may take summer school classes in Physical Education, Health, and Communication Applications. Health

and Communication Applications do earn grade points if taken at John Paul II High School.

PREPARING FOR COLLEGE

John Paul II High School is a college-preparatory school with an advanced and demanding curriculum. It is our goal that 100% of our

students will matriculate into the college or university of their choice. Preparation begins the moment a student enrolls in our school. It

begins with the assistance of our counselors, who, working in close cooperation with students and parents select the most appropriate

courses to ease each student’s transition and admittance into college. It is our goal that each student reach his/her maximum college

readiness potential by taking the most demanding courses in which they can demonstrate qualified mastery, earning the highest grades

of which a student is capable.

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COURSE OFFERINGS

LANGUAGE ARTS

Each English course incorporates critical language arts skills – reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical thinking – within the

study of literary selections that will increase a student’s understanding and appreciation for humanity and its diverse heritage. Each

course provides a program of vocabulary study, a writing program, instruction in oral communications skills, and development of higher

order thinking and critical analysis of literary selections. Composition is taught as a process, and each year students write different styles

of essays with ever increasing complexity and depth.

The College Preparatory courses will teach to the PSAT and SAT level of proficiency while Pre-AP and AP classes will employ standards

favored by introductory freshmen and sophomore classes in Literature and Writing. All courses require extensive reading and writing.

Generally, there will be one major reading selection each nine weeks in all literature classes. Moreover, all English courses will have

required summer readings. Students must complete four years of English and one semester of speech.

REQUIRED COURSES

0111 English I CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th

03220100 ENG 1 Prerequisite: None

This course emphasizes skill in the use of conventions and mechanics of written English, the appropriate and effective application of English grammar,

and the effective use of vocabulary. Students are expected to understand the recursive nature of the writing process and to be able to evaluate their own

and others’ writing. English I students read extensively in multiple genres of world literature especially mythologies, epics, early drama, poetry, and

histories including selections from the Bible as well as Greek and Roman Literatures. Students will read one literary selection each six weeks in addition

to other, shorter selections. Students will have summer reading.

0112 English I Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th

03220100 ENG 1 Prerequisite: ISEE Scores

Students study language skills, composition skills, and literary skills. Study during this year will be supplemented with advanced compositions based

upon Advanced Placement literary themes as required in AP English Language and AP World History. Literary analysis skills will be emphasized.

Students will read extensively both inside and outside the class including summer reading requirements.

0123 English II CP (C) 1.0 Credit 10th

03220200 ENG 2 Prerequisite: Eng I

Students in English II continue to increase and refine their communication skills and practice all forms of writing. They are expected to plan, draft, and

complete written compositions on a regular basis. Students edit their papers and writings for clarity and the correct usage of the conventions and

mechanics of written English as well as revise for organization, coherence, and voice. An emphasis is placed on personal forms of writing including

responses to literature, reflective essays, and autobiographical narratives. English II students read in multiple genres of world literature, especially

Medieval, modern, contemporary, and multicultural selections learning literary forms and terms. Students will read one literary selection each six

weeks in addition to shorter selections. Students will have summer reading.

0124 English II Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 10th

03220200 ENG 2 Prerequisite: Eng I Pre-AP

In addition to English II (C) criteria, the language and composition study during this year will be supplemented with advanced compositions based upon

Advanced Placement literary themes as required in AP English Language and AP World History. Literary analysis skills will be emphasized. Students

will read extensively both inside and outside class including summer reading requirements.

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0135 English III CP (C) 1.0 Credit 11th

03220300 ENG 3 Prerequisite: Eng II

Students in English III continue to increase and to refine their communications skills. They are expected to plan, draft, and complete written

compositions on a regular basis. Students edit their papers for clarity and correct usage of the conventions and mechanics of written English and revise

for organization, coherence, and voice. In English III, students practice all forms of writing. English III students read extensively in multiple genres from

American literature and associated world literature. Students learn literary forms and terms associated with selections being read and are able to

interpret to possible influences of the historical context on a literary work. Students will read one literary selection each six weeks in addition to other,

shorter selections. Students will have summer reading.

0136 English III Language & Composition AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th

A3220100 APENGLANG

Prerequisite: Eng II Pre-AP

The Advanced Placement Language and Composition course emphasizes the study of a variety of non-fictional texts and writing tasks. Students learn to

emphasize aims (to inform, to persuade, to express, etc.) of discourse through reading and analyzing great literature, and then try to match in their own

writing the sophistication of model material selected for study in the course. Students will read extensively both inside and outside class, including a

summer reading requirement in multiple genres from American and associated world literatures.

0147 English IV CP (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

03220400 ENG 4 Prerequisite: Eng III

Students read extensively in multiple genres from British literature and other world literary selections. Students learn literary forms and terms

associated with selections, and they interpret the possible influences of the historical context on a literary work. Students will read one literary selection

each six weeks in addition to other, shorter selections. Students in English IV continue to increase and to refine their communications skills. They are

expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. Students edit their papers for clarity and the correct use of the

conventions and mechanics of written English and revise for organization, coherence, and voice. Students are expected to write in a variety of forms.

Students will have summer reading.

0148 English IV Literature & Composition AP (P) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3220200 APENGLIT

Prerequisite: Eng III AP

In this Advanced Placement course, students are engaged in the careful study of literary works of recognized merit from British literature and

contemporary literature in English translation or from the English speaking world including Africa, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Through such

study, students sharpen their awareness of language and their understanding of the writer’s craft. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of

literature; in addition, assignments in writing of expositions, stories, poems, and plays are also appropriate. Students will read extensively both inside

and outside class including a summer reading requirement. Students will read one literary selection each six weeks in addition to other, shorter

selections.

0310 Communication Applications (C) .5 Credit 9th – 12th

03241400 COMMAPP Prerequisite: None

This speech class is a skills development course where the students are evaluated on a variety of speaking situations such as an informative speech, a

problem-solution speech, a sales speech, impromptu speaking, and group projects. In order to develop these skills, the students are introduced to the

basics of speech construction including introductions, argument creation, outlining, structure types, persuasive appeals, language strategies,

conclusions, and delivery issues. The classroom is designed to develop the communication skills that students will utilize in the academic, social, and

workplace settings.

ELECTIVE COURSES

2615 Reading Application and Study Skills/Analytical Studies (C) .5 Credit 9th

03270100 READAPP Prerequisite: Counselor Approval

This course of study is designed especially for entering freshman and includes learning styles, reading, listening, studying, test-taking strategies,

organization, goal setting, research techniques, the learning process, and the writing process.

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0210 Journalism (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03230100 JRNLSM Prerequisite: None

Students enrolled in this course are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis, carefully examining their papers for

clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. Students are expected to write in a variety of forms

and for multiple types of audiences and purposes. Students will become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication

skills. Writing, technology, visual, and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, write, and produce effective

communications. Students will learn journalistic traditions, research self-selected topics, write journalistic texts, and learn the principles of publishing.

0221 Newspaper I (C)

03230140 NP1

0231 Newspaper II (H)

03230150 NP2

0241 Newspaper III (H)

03230150 NP3

1.0 Credit 10th - 12th

Prerequisite: Journalism

1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

Prerequisite: Newspaper I

1.0 Credit 12th

Prerequisite: Newspaper II

0222 Yearbook I (C)

03230110 YBK1

0232 Yearbook II (H)

03230120 YBK2

1.0 Credit 10th - 12th

Prerequisite: Journalism

1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

Prerequisite: Yearbook I

0242 Yearbook III (H)

1.0 Credit 12th

03230130 YBK3

Prerequisite: Yearbook II

In Newspaper and Yearbook, students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written and/or visual communications on a regular basis, carefully

examining their copy for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. Students are expected to

become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication skills. In addition, students will learn journalistic ethics and

standards. Writing, technology, and visual and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, write, and produce

effective communications. Students will refine and enhance their journalistic skills, research self-selected topics, and plan, organize, and prepare a

project(s).

0223 Photojournalism (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

03230800 PHOTJOUR Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

This course introduces students to the basic elements of visual communication. Students learn how to photograph people and major current events in

natural lighting conditions. Organization, printing techniques, and layout are covered. Students will be expected to complete a photojournalism

portfolio assignment for each nine weeks. The assignments will include photographing student events and extracurricular games. Students will be

expected to attend these events after school and on weekends, away from the campus. They will also work closely with staff to generate photographs

and files for the Yearbook, Newspaper, and Webmastering.

DEBATE AND ACADEMIC COMPETITIONS COURSES

SPEECH AND DEBATE

Students who take Debate or Oral Interpretation for the full year will have the opportunity to take and pass a competency exam to earn

credit for Communications Applications.

Debate

Gaining a general understanding of the major forms of debate, studying logic and reasoning and learning to prepare and present actual

debates, oratories, and extemporaneous speeches, are the objectives in this course in argumentation. Participation in competitive

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speech and debate events is a requirement for this class. Debate II-III build on the fundamentals and continue to develop speech and

debate skills. Students who take Debate for the full year will have the opportunity to take and pass a competency exam to earn credit for

Communications Applications and meet their speech graduation requirement. Students involved in Speech/Debate competitions will be

required to work before or after school to prepare. Speech competitions are held on Friday evening and Saturday.

Oral Interpretation

Oral Interpretation I-III are courses designed for students who wish to compete in speech tournaments in interpretive (acting) events.

Students will develop knowledge of the following: literary merit of selections, analysis, selection adaptation, evaluative criteria, the role

of the interpreter, and specific performance techniques. Participation in competitive speech and debate events is a requirement for this

course. Students who take Oral Interpretation for the full year will have the opportunity to take and pass a competency exam to earn

credit for Communications Applications and meet their graduation requirement. Students involved in Speech/Debate competitions will

be required to work before or after school to prepare. Speech competitions are held on Friday evening and Saturday.

0322 Debate I (C)

03240600 DEBATE1

0324 Debate II (H)

03240700 DEBATE2

0326 Debate III (H)

03240800 DEBATE3

0352 Oral Interpretation I (C)

03240200 ORALINTERP 1

0353 Oral Interpretation II (H)

03240300 ORALINTERP 2

0354 Oral Interpretation III (H)

03240400 ORALINTERP 3

1.0 Credit 9th - 12th

Prerequisite: None

1.0 Credit 9th - 12th

Prerequisite: Debate I, Instructor Approval

1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

Prerequisite: Debate II, Instructor Approval

1.0 Credit 9th - 12th

Prerequisite: None

1.0 Credit 9th - 12th

Prerequisite: Oral Interpretation I, Instructor Approval

1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

Prerequisite: Oral Interpretation II, Instructor Approval

ACADEMIC OCTATHLON AND DECATHLON

Academic Decathlon is a varsity team competition; Academic Octathlon is the junior varsity team competition. All students are tested in

Art, Economics, Language and Literature, Mathematics, Music, Science, Social Science and write expressive, well-developed essays.

Decathlon students will develop abilities to make both prepared and impromptu speeches, and respond orally to professional interviews.

Winning teams advance through the regional and state levels of competition, with the opportunity to represent the State of Texas at the

National Competition. The courses are limited to students recruited by the coaches to participate in Decathlon. Students should expect

to spend many additional hours after school and on weekends preparing for the competition and all students are expected to compete at

all contests. Students who take Academic Decathlon for the full year will have the opportunity to take and pass a competency exam to

earn .5 credit for Communications Applications. Participants may use Academic Decathlon and Octathlon courses to fulfill 1.0 fine arts

credit required for graduation or .5 speech credit and .5 elective credit for Academic Decathlon. You may not receive fine art credit and

speech/ACDEC credits during the same year.

0341 Academic Octathlon I (H)

(ACOCT1)

0342 Academic Octathlon II (H)

(ACOCT2)

0343 Academic Decathlon I (P)

(ACDEC1)

0344 Academic Decathlon II (P)

(ACDEC2)

1.0 Credit 9th

Prerequisite: None

1.0 Credit 10th

Prerequisite: None

1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

Prerequisite: None

1.0 Credit 12th

Prerequisite: None

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0510 Academic Decathlon III (P)

(ACDEC3) after school

1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

Prerequisite: None

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics is at the heart of the modern technological, scientific, medical, and business communities. To meet the challenges of

success in school or today’s technology-rich world, all students must develop mathematical skills in a meaningful and retrievable way. At

John Paul II High School, the sequence of classes, content emphasis, mathematics integration, hands-on activities, and use of

technology combine to give students a solid, lasting foundation in mathematics. Students who have completed a high school Algebra 1

course in middle school and want to register for Geometry their Freshman year must take a placement exam. The exams will be

administered on specific dates in the spring and summer preceding the student’s freshman year. Interested parents should contact the

math department chairperson or Director of Guidance and Counseling for specific information and dates.

All students beginning with the Class of 2011 and beyond are required to have four years of mathematics.

0611 Algebra I CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th

03100500 ALG1 Prerequisite: None

The primary focus for students in this course is developing logical reasoning by making and justifying generalizations based on their experiences with

fundamental algebraic concepts, especially functional relationships and problem solving in real situations. Linear and quadratic functional relationships

are examined in a variety of problem situations, and these functions form the basis for the study of equations and the development of algebraic skills.

Students use a variety of representations (concrete, numerical, algorithmic, graphic) and tools as well as having regular access to technology that allows

function plotting, coordinate graphing, algebraic analysis, and computation.

0612 Algebra I Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th

03100500 ALG1 Prerequisite: ISEE Scores, Placement Exam

At an honors or pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Math standards of Algebra I at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster pace

along with higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement math course in

high school. This course will only be offered if there is sufficient student enrollment. Any freshman wanting to enroll in Algebra I Pre-AP must take our

placement exam. Students’ scores on the exam will determine correct placement.

0623 Geometry CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th - 10th

03100700 GEOM Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course addresses the components of the basic structure of geometry such as dimensionality, congruence, and similarity through the study of size,

shape, location, and direct relationships. Connections to algebra and to the world outside of school are generated through a variety of applications and

settings. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, numerical, algorithmic, graphic) as well as having access to technology that allows

geometric constructions, coordinate graphing, algebraic analysis, and computation. Any freshman wanting to enroll in Geometry CP or Geometry Pre-

AP must take our placement exam. Students’ scores on the exam will determine correct placement.

0624 Geometry Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th - 10th

03100700 GEOM Prerequisite: Algebra I Pre-AP, Instructor Approval

At a pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Math standards of Geometry at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster pace along with

higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement math course in high school.

Any freshman wanting to enroll in Geometry CP or Geometry Pre-AP must take our placement exam. Students’ scores on the exam will determine

correct placement.

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0635 Algebra II CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th - 11th

03100600 ALG 2 Prerequisite: Geometry

The primary focus for students in this course is developing logical reasoning by making and justifying generalizations based on their experiences with

fundamental as well as advanced algebraic concepts, especially functional relationships and problem solving in real situations. Building on the study of

first year Algebra, functional relationships are extended to include radical, rational, exponential,, and logarithmic functions. These functions are

examined in a variety of problem situations and form the basis for the study of equations and the development of algebraic skills. Students use a variety

of representations (concrete, numerical, algorithmic, graphic) and tools as well as having regular access to technology that allows function plotting,

coordinate graphing, algebraic analysis, and computation.

0636 Algebra II Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th - 11th

03100600 ALG 2 Prerequisite: Geometry Pre-AP,Instructor Approval

At a pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Math standards for a second year of algebra at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster

pace along with higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement math

course in high school. At this Pre-AP level, the students will experience Higher order thinking skills which lead and parallel future AP concepts.

0647 Pre-Calculus CP (C) 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

03101100 PRECALC Prerequisite: Algebra II

In this course, students use symbolic reasoning and analytical methods to represent mathematical situations, to express generalizations, and to study

mathematical concepts and the relationships among them. Students use functions, equations, and limits as useful tools for expressing generalizations

and as means for analyzing and understanding a broad variety of mathematical relationships. Students also use functions as well as symbolic reasoning

to represent and connect ideas in geometry, probability, statistics, trigonometry, and calculus and to model physical situations. Students use a variety

of representations, tools, and technology to model functions and equations and solve real-life problems.

0648 Pre-Calculus Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

03101100 PRECALC Prerequisite: Algebra II Pre-AP, Instructor Approval

At an honors or pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Math standards for pre-calculus at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster

pace along with higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement math

course in high school.

0651 Math Studies and Statistical Probabilities CP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

03102500 INSTUMTH Prerequisite: Algebra II

This course introduces major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The four themes of the course are: (1)

Exploring data, observing and describing patterns, as well as, departure from patterns; (2) Planning a study; deciding what and how to measure; (3)

Anticipating patterns, producing models using probability theory and simulation; and, (4) Making statistical inferences and confirming models.

Technology is integrated throughout the course, with instruction utilizing the statistics feature of the graphing calculator.

0652 Statistics AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

A3100200 APSTATS

Prerequisite: Algebra II, Instructor Approval

This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination in Statistics. The purpose of this course is to introduce students

to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad themes: exploring

data, planning a study, anticipating patterns in advance using probability and simulation, and statistical inference. This math class is recommended for

students interested in college majors of history, politics, law, economics, and business.

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0654 Calculus AP AB (P) 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

A3100101 APCALCAB

Prerequisite: Pre-Cal, Instructor Approval

Both AP Calculus courses emphasize the concepts and applications of calculus rather than algebraic manipulation or memorization. AP Calculus AB is

equivalent to the first semester of calculus at a university taught over a full year. The extra time allows reviewing of pre-calculus material as needed.

The course introduces students to the four major concepts of single-variable calculus: continuity, limits, derivatives, and integrals. Applications

include: optimization, related rates, slope fields, separable differential equations, volumes of known cross sections, and volumes of revolution. In

accordance with the AP curriculum, all major concepts are taught through the four modes of mathematical representation (algebraic, numeric, verbal,

and graphical). An approved graphing calculator is required. Passing the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Examination at the end of the year can earn

one semester of college credit.

0656 Calculus AP BC (P) 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

A3100102 APCALBC

Prerequisite: Pre Cal Pre AP, Instructor Approval

Both AP Calculus courses emphasize the concepts and applications of calculus rather than algebraic manipulation or memorization. AP Calculus BC is

equivalent to the first two semesters of calculus at a university. This fast paced course covers all the topics of AP Calculus AB plus polar, parametric,

and vector equations, length of a curve, surface area, Euler’s method, polynomial approximations, series, and more. In accordance with the AP

curriculum, all major concepts are taught through the four modes of mathematical representation (algebraic, numeric, verbal, and graphical). An

approved graphing calculator is required. Passing the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Examination at the end of the year can earn two semesters of

college credit.

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

John Paul II High School seeks to prepare all students with a well-rounded moral and academic education including the physical and life

sciences. Beginning with the Class of 2011, students are required to earn four credits in science – of which three must be biology,

chemistry, and physics - to graduate.

0711 Biology CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 10th

0301022 BIO Prerequisite: None

In Biology, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using

critical-thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include structures and functions of cells and viruses;

growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues, and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy

transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; ecosystems; and plants and the environment.

0712 Biology Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th

0301022 BIO Prerequisite: ISEE Scores

At a pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Science standards for biology at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster pace along with

higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement science courses in high

school.

0721 Chemistry CP (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 11th

03040000 CHEM Prerequisite: Bio

In Chemistry, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using

critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter; energy transformations during

physical and chemical changes; atomic structure; periodic table of elements; behavior of gases; bonding; nuclear fusion and nuclear fission; oxidationreduction

reactions; chemical equations; solutes; properties of solutions; acids and bases; and chemical reactions. Students will investigate how

chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.

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0722 Chemistry Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 10th – 11th

03040000 CHEM Prerequisite: Bio Pre AP

At a pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Science standards for chemistry at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster pace along

with higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement science courses in high

school. Note: Students must be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II pre-AP or higher.

0731 Physics CP (C) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

03050000 PHYSICS Prerequisite: Chem

In Physics, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using

critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and

conservation of energy and momentum; force; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and quantum physics. This course provides

students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills.

0732 Physics Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

03050000 PHYSICS Prerequisite: Chem Pre-AP

At a pre-AP level, this course addresses the National Science standards for physics at a greater depth with a broader scope and a faster pace along with

higher expectations for student performance. This course is designed for students who plan to take an advanced placement science courses in high

school. Note: Students must be concurrently enrolled in Pre Cal or higher.

0748 Anatomy and Physiology CP (C) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

12112130 ANATPHY Prerequisite: Bio and Chem

This course offers students further study in human life science processes and structures. Laboratory and computer assisted dissections and study of

related animal body parts to facilitate understanding and knowledge necessary for careers in medical and health-related fields. Students will explore

causes and effects of certain diseases, malfunctioning of organs and systems, as well as environmental factors. Critical skills emphasized include

processing research information, computer skills for acquiring information, and use of scientific equipment for acquiring DNA data.

0750 Biology AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3301022 AP-BIO

Prerequisite: Bio Pre-AP and Chem Pre-AP

This course involves students in the activities and endeavors of science. They formulate hypotheses, design and conduct experiments, and interpret

data. The course focuses on the process of scientific investigation. Students gain skills in investigation and apply those skills to in-depth studies of a

few selected areas of biology. Considerable emphasis is placed on the role of science in society, the complex and extremely important interactions

between science and the problems and decisions that citizens must make.

0700 Environmental Systems CP (C) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

03020000 ENVIRSYS Prerequisite: Bio and Chem

This course specifically covers a branch of biology called ecology that deals with how organisms interact with each other and their environment. The

study of ecological principles and their application to the human situation defines environmental science. Students study a variety of topics that

include: ecosystems and biomes, interrelationships among resources and an environmental system, sources and flow of energy though an

environmental system, and relationships between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems. Lab work, the use of multimedia and

computer simulations, and field investigations are important components of this course. This course will satisfy a 4th

science requirement for

graduation.

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0752 Environmental Science AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3020000 AP-ENVIR

Prerequisite: Bio and Chem

This course provides an advanced level of studies in the relationships of organisms to their environments. Natural and man-made environmental

problems are identified and evaluated, and alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them are explored. This course is laboratory field

oriented with a special emphasis on those topics delineated in the AP Environmental Science course description provided by College Board.

0754 Chemistry AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3040000 AP-CHEM

Prerequisite: Chem Pre-AP

Students study descriptive chemistry of the elements in greater detail than in pre-AP Chemistry. Other topics include crystallography and chemical

bonding. In addition to the laboratory activities supporting these topics, there is some experience with instrumental methods of chemical analysis.

Understanding principles of reaction is enhanced through laboratory investigations in thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. The course

concludes with a study of selected topics in organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry.

0756 Physics AP B (P) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3050001 AP-PHYS B

Prerequisite: Physics Pre-AP and Pre Cal

AP Physics B is an in-depth study of physical concepts and the principles encountered in pre-AP Physics. It also integrates some of the more

specialized areas of physics such as nuclear and modern physics. AP Physics is a laboratory-oriented course with laboratory investigations conducted in

optics, heat, radiation, atomic structure, and nuclear phenomena, and to a lesser extent electricity and magnetism. Students acquire information using

the senses of instrumentation.

0758 Physics AP C – Mechanics; Magnetism/Electricity (A) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3050002 AP-PHYSC

Prerequisites: Physics Pre-AP; Calculus AB

AP Physics C is an in-depth study of physical concepts and the principles encountered in pre-AP Physics It is the equivalent of a one semester

Calculus based College Physics course in Mechanics and a one semester Calculus based College Physics course in Electricity and Magnetism. Students

will also be exposed to advanced laboratory experiences. Students taking this course will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Physics C tests

in the subject. Credit or concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus AB or BC is required. This course will only be offered if there is sufficient student

enrollment.

SOCIAL STUDIES AND ECONOMICS

At John Paul II High School, our goal is to give students the strongest possible understanding of our historical past. This is critical not

only for understanding the origins and traditions of our Roman Catholic faith, but also the cultural traditions of our multicultural

American society. Students are required to have four credits in Social Studies which include two years of world history and geography,

one year of US history, one semester of US Government and one semester of Macro Economics.

REQUIRED COURSES

0811 World Cultures and Geography: To 1450 CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th

03320100 W GEO Prerequisite: None

World Cultures and Geography Studies is a course offering students an overview of the geography and history of humankind from its beginnings until

the Renaissance. The major emphasis is on the regional studies of significant cultures, events, and issues from the earliest times until the late 15th

century. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in core hearths of the

world’s major cultures. Students trace the historical development of important legal and political concepts. Students examine the history and impact of

major religious and philosophical traditions. Students analyze the connections between major developments in science and technology and change in

society, and they use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of evidence. Students study introductory elements

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and themes of geography and examine the impact of cultural and physical geographic factors on major historic events and identify the historic origins of

contemporary economic systems.

0812 World Cultures & Geography to 1450 Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th

03320100 W GEO Prerequisite: ISEE Scores

This pre-AP level course provides students with the opportunity to study at an advanced level the interaction of peoples and cultures across time,

geographical regions, and with their physical environments. Students will explore the various historical regions of the pre-modern world including their

physical geography, history, political culture, economic conditions, and intellectual accomplishments including religion. Emphasis is centered on higher

order thinking and writing skills to introduce students to Advanced Placement curriculum structures, strategies, and expectations.

0821 World History: Since 1450 CP (C) 1.0 Credit 10th

03340400 W HIST Prerequisite: W Cult & Geog

The major emphasis of World History is on the study of significant people, events, and issues from 1450 to the contemporary era. Traditional historical

points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as its impact on

cultures, peoples, and civilizations in other parts of the world. Students evaluate the causes and effects of political and economic imperialism and of

major political revolutions since the 17th century. Students analyze the process by which democratic-republican governments evolved as well as the

ideas from historic documents that influenced that process. Students trace the historical development of important legal and political concepts.

Students examine the history and impact of contemporary religious and philosophical traditions. Students analyze the connections between major

developments in science and technology and the growth of industrial economies, and they use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret,

and use multiple sources of evidence.

0822 World History AP (P) 1.0 Credit 10th

A3333770100 APWHIST

Prerequisite: W Cult & Geog Pre-AP

The AP World History course emphasizes the period from 1000 to the present with careful attention to the cultural, institutional, technological, and

geographic influences among major societies. The global focus includes international interaction among Asia, Europe, Southwest Asia, Sub-Saharan

Africa, and the Americas, comparing and highlighting the nature of change and continuity among societies across time. Students will analyze primary

sources, conduct independent research, read independently, and develop higher order thinking skills associated with the work of modern historians

including the presentation of evidence in a variety of essay formats.

0831 United States History CP (C) 1.0 Credit 11th

033340100 US HIST Prerequisite: W Hist

In this course, students study the history of the United States from colonization to the present. Historical content focuses on the political, economic,

and social events and issues related to industrialization and urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies of the Cold War and post-Cold

War eras, and reform movements including civil rights. Students examine the impact of geographic factors on major events and analyze causes and

effects of the Great Depression. Students examine the impact of constitutional issues on American society, evaluate the dynamic relationship of the

three branches of the federal government, and analyze efforts to expand the democratic process. Students describe the relationship between the arts

and the times during which they were created. Students analyze the impact of technological innovations on the American labor movement. Students use

critical-thinking skills to explain and apply different methods that historians use to interpret the past, including points of view and historical context.

0832 United States History AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th

A3340100 AP US HIST

Prerequisite: W Hist AP

AP United States history is a college level survey course, using college texts and supplemental readings that cover historical events and ideas from the

discovery, colonization, the American Revolution, the founding of the new nation, the Civil War and Reconstruction to modern United States as an

industrial nation and world power. The course emphasizes analysis, primary source documents, independent reading, historical research, and the

enhancement of higher order thinking skills to present evidence in a persuasive essay format.

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0841 U.S. Government and Politics CP (C) .5 Credit 12th

033300100 GOVT Prerequisite: US Hist

Students learn major political ideas and forms of government in history. A significant focus of the course is on the U.S. Constitution, its underlying

principles and ideas, and the form of government it created. Students analyze major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks and balances,

separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights and compare the U.S. system of government with other political systems. Students

identify the role of government in the U.S. free enterprise system and examine the strategic importance of places to the United States.

0842 U.S. Government and Politics AP (P) .5 Credit 12th

A33330100 APUSGOVT

Prerequisite: US Hist AP

This course is a college level course in US Government and Politics, focusing on the Constitution, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, the

structure of the federal government, and civil rights. The course emphasizes assigned readings including contemporary and historical primary sources,

analysis of data, and utilization of higher order thinking skills in order to write persuasive essays.

0540 Macro-Economics AP (P) .5 Credit 12th

A3310200 APMACECO

Prerequisite: US Hist AP

Advanced Placement Macro-Economics is a college-level course, which focuses on the study of the economic system as a whole. Such a course

emphasizes national income, employment, fiscal and monetary policy, analysis of economic growth and policy, international economics and the world

economy

0541 Economics CP (C) .5 Credit 12th

03310300 ECO-FE Prerequisite: US Hist

The focus of this course is on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the United States and

a comparison with those in other countries around the world. Students examine the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses. Students

analyze the interaction of supply, demand, and price and study the role of financial institutions in a free enterprise system. Types of business ownership

and market structures are discussed, as are basic concepts of consumer economics. The impact of a variety of factors including geography, the federal

government, economic ideas from important philosophers and historic documents, societal values, and scientific discoveries and technological

innovations on the national economy and economic policy is an integral part of the course. Students apply critical-thinking skills to create economic

models and to evaluate economic-activity patterns.

ELECTIVES

0854 European History AP (P) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3340200 APEUHIST

Prerequisite: W Hist AP, US Hist AP

The emphasis on this course is on the general narrative history of Europe from 1350 to the present. The study includes an examination of the political,

diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history of Europe. Students will analyze primary sources, conduct independent research, read

independently, and develop higher order thinking skills associated with presentation of evidence in a variety of essay formats.

0855 Sociology (C) .5 Credit 11th – 12th

03370100 SOC Prerequisite: W Hist

Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. As the study of humans in their collective aspect, sociology is concerned with all group

activities: economic, social, political, and religious. Sociologists study such areas as bureaucracy, community, deviant behavior, family, public opinion,

social change, social mobility, social stratification, and such specific problems as crime, divorce, child abuse, and substance addiction. Sociology tries

to determine the laws governing human behavior in social contexts.

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0857 Peer Assistance and Leadership (C) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

N1290005

Prerequisite: Teacher Selection

PAL (Peer Assistance and Leadership) is a class where students are trained in group dynamics, communication and listening skills, peer mediation,

decision-making, and problem-solving. Students develop and participate in community service projects as well as work with off-campus elementary and

middle school students. Some hours earned in this class may fulfill some hours needed for Christian Service.

0858 Psychology AP (P) .5 Credit 11th – 12th

A3350100 APPSYCH

Prerequisite: W Hist

The emphasis of this course is on the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes at an introductory college level. The

human perspective is combined with scientific research by utilizing psychological methods, approaches, theories, and facts to explore and thereby

improve the understanding of human behavior. The course emphasizes assigned readings including contemporary and historical primary sources,

analysis of data, and utilization of higher order thinking skills in order to write persuasive essays. This class will not be available in 2013 – 2014.

0859 Psychology (C) .5 Credit 11th – 12th

03350100 PSYCH Prerequisite: None

The study of psychology is based on historical framework that relies on effective collection and analysis of data. Students study such topics as theories

of human development, personality, motivation, and learning. This course gives students the opportunity to study individual and group psychology.

Students learn how the knowledge, methods, and theories of psychologists are applying to analyzing human behavior. Course content is organized to

help students develop critical attitudes toward superficial generalizations about human behavior, and to achieve a better understanding of human

behavior in general.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

At John Paul II High School, all students will take at least two years of the same foreign language. Any incoming freshman who has two

years of prior Spanish instruction in middle school will be placed in Pre-AP Spanish I and those who have no formal foreign language

training will be placed in CP Spanish I. Any incoming freshman who has had two years of Latin or French instruction in middle school

will be placed in level I of his corresponding language. At the end of the first three weeks of school, any student wishing to be moved

to the second year or another appropriate level will need to request a placement test and receive a passing score to move between

levels.

Any incoming transfer student will be placed in the next level according to his transcript, or at the same level if he transfers during the

academic year. Should a student desire to be placed in a different level, placement tests will be available by request on Monday, August

13 at the end of the school day, or within three weeks of the first day he attends classes.

FRENCH

0911 French I CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03410100 FRENCH 1 Prerequisite: None

French I is an introduction to the French world, its language and its people. The main emphasis is on oral skills while developing reading and writing

skills. The student will be guided in recognizing the interrelationships of languages and will develop a cultural appreciation of the Francophone world.

The focus of this course is on novice proficiency.

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0922 French II Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03410200 FRENCH 2 Prerequisite: French I

French II Honors is an expansion of French II. It is designed to provide opportunities for talented language students beyond those available in the

regular French II Class. It stresses the development of low intermediate proficiency in oral skills, accurate comprehension of contemporary and cultural

reading passages; it expands the use of grammatical constructions and vocabulary, and begins the development of expository composition. Culturally

related activities of selected regions or countries will be explored.

0932 French III Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03410300 FRENCH 3 Prerequisite: French II Pre AP

French III continues to develop the oral skills with added emphasis on reading and writing skills. The focus is on the development of mid to high novice

proficiency. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures continues. Contrast between English and French strengthens the language learning

process. Culturally related activities of selected French-speaking countries or regions will be explored. The focus of this course is an intermediate

proficiency.

0942 French IV AP Language and Composition (P) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

A3410100 APFR-LAN

Prerequisite: French III

This course meets the requirements of an intermediate college course in French studies. It stresses the development of fluency in oral skills,

comprehension of French literature and history, expository composition, and expanded use of grammar. This course utilizes higher level/critical

thinking skills and focuses on the development of accuracy and fluency. The focus of this course is an intermediate proficiency. This course prepares

the student to take the AP French Language exam, which the student will be required to take at the conclusion of the class.

LATIN

1011 Latin I CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03430100 LATIN 1 Prerequisite: None

Latin I is an introduction to the language and to the Romans who spoke it. Basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary are discussed in connection with their

Latin root forms; however, contemporary meanings and correct usage are emphasized. Mythology is viewed as an example of ancient religious beliefs, a

reflection of Roman lifestyles, and a form of literature. The focus of this course is a novice proficiency in reading comprehension.

1022 Latin II Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

03430200 LATIN 2 Prerequisite: Latin I

Latin II H is designed to provide opportunities for talented language students beyond those available in the regular Latin II class. It stresses the

development of accurate reading of Latin literature and history. It expands the use of grammatical constructions and vocabulary, and begins the

development of accurate translation. Language learning techniques will be developed. Culturally related activities of selected regions/countries will be

explored.

1032 Latin III Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

03430300 LATIN 3 Prerequisite: Latin II Pre-AP

This course utilizes higher level/critical thinking skills, stresses the development of oral skills and expands the use of grammar and vocabulary. It

emphasizes stylistic analyses, comprehension of literacy techniques, and accurate reading and translation of original Latin literature and history. The

focus of this course is an intermediate proficiency in reading comprehension.

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1040 Latin IV Language/Literature AP – Vergil/Caesar (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3430100 APLATVC

Prerequisite: Latin III Pre-AP

This course emphasizes the highest level of written and read Latin as studied through the comprehension and interpretation of Vergil’s Aeneid and

Caesar’s de Bello Gallico. It emphasizes stylistic analyses, comprehension of literacy techniques, and accurate reading and translation of original Latin

literature. The student will be required to take the AP (Vergil/Caesar) Examination at the conclusion of the course. The focus of this course is an

advanced proficiency in reading comprehension.

SPANISH

1111 Spanish I CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

3440100 SPAN 1 Prerequisite: None

Spanish I is an introduction to the Spanish world, its language and its people. The main emphasis is on oral skills while developing reading and writing

skills. The student will recognize the interrelationships of languages and will develop a cultural appreciation of the Hispanic world. The focus of this

course is on novice proficiency.

1112 Spanish I Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

3440100 SPAN 1 Prerequisite: Spanish I

Spanish I Pre AP is an in-depth preparation of Spanish I concepts in preparation for Spanish II Pre-AP. It is designed to provide opportunities for

talented language students beyond those offered in the regular Spanish I class. It stresses the development of proficiency in oral skills in an immersion

atmosphere, accurate comprehension of contemporary and cultural reading passages; it expands the use of grammatical constructions and vocabulary,

and begins the development of basic writing skills. Culturally related activities of selected regions or countries will be explored.

1121 Spanish II CP (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

3440200 SPAN 2 Prerequisite: Spanish I

Spanish II continues to develop the oral skills with added emphasis on reading and writing skills. The focus is on the development of mid novice to

high novice proficiency. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures continues. Culturally related activities of selected Hispanic countries or

regions will be explored.

1122 Spanish II Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

3440200 SPAN 2 Prerequisite: Spanish I

Spanish II Pre AP is an expansion of Spanish II. It is designed to provide opportunities for talented language students beyond those offered in the

regular Spanish II class. It stresses the development of low intermediate proficiency in oral skills, accurate comprehension of contemporary and cultural

reading passages; it expands the use of grammatical constructions and vocabulary, and begins the development of expository composition. Culturally

related activities of selected regions or countries will be explored.

1131 Spanish III CP (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

3440300 SPAN 3 Prerequisite: Spanish II

Spanish III continues to develop the oral skills with added emphasis on reading and writing skills. The focus is on the development of novice mid to

intermediate proficiency. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures continues. Culturally related activities of selected Hispanic countries and

regions will be explored. The focus of this course is an intermediate proficiency.

1132 Spanish III Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

3440300 SPAN 3 Prerequisite: Spanish II Pre-AP

Spanish III Pre-AP is designed to provide talented language students opportunities beyond those offered in other language classes. It utilizes high

level/critical thinking and focuses on the development of mid-intermediate proficiency in oral skills, comprehension of Spanish literature history,

expository composition, and expands the use of grammar and vocabulary.

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1142 Spanish IV Language & Composition AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3440100 APSPALAN

Prerequisite: Spanish III Pre-AP

This college level course emphasizes reading, writing, and speaking of the language at nearly a bilingual level. The development of fluency in oral

skills and expanded use of grammar are strongly emphasized. The focus of this course is an advanced proficiency. Students utilize higher level/critical

thinking and focus on the development of accuracy and fluency in the written and spoken language.

1152 Spanish V Literature and Composition AP (P) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3440200 APSPALIT

Prerequisite: AP SPANLAN: Instructor Approval

This course meets the requirements of Spanish collegiate studies. It stresses the development of fluency in oral skills, comprehension of Spanish

literature and history, expository composition, and expanded use of grammar. It utilizes high level/critical thinking and focuses on the development of

accuracy and fluency. While Level AP Spanish IV emphasizes oral skills, AP Spanish V emphasizes written skills. The student will have the opportunity

to take the advanced placement/IB examination at the conclusion of this course.

1156 Advanced Spanish Cultural and Linguistic Topics (P) .5 to 1 Credit 11th – 12th

03440800 SPANCLT Prerequisite: Span3 Pre-AP, Instructor Approval

This course in cultural and linguistic topics introduces students to the study of other cultures in a language other than English. Students study the

historical development, literary accomplishments, geographical aspects, cultural aspects, and linguistic aspects of selected regions or countries.

Students may be concurrently enrolled in an AP Language course. This course may be scheduled in conjunction with The AP Literature offerings over

two years as a way of preparing students for the demanding reading list which accompanies each AP Literature course.

Alternatively, students may spend the summer abroad in an /accredited freshmen college level program in a Spanish speaking country. Approval of the

department chairperson AND the Director of Guidance and Counseling is required prior to enrolling in the program. The summer option will receive ½

to 1 credit: ½ credit will be awarded for at least three weeks study abroad and 1 credit for six of more weeks.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

John Paul II High School will be a state of the art learning facility utilizing wireless and advanced technologies in all classrooms.

Students and instructors will utilize technology whenever appropriate to facilitate learning. Students must complete one year of the same

technology course. Students will be expected to be able to use laptop computers and to utilize their varied applications. Many incoming

freshmen will take Computer Science or Pre-AP Computer Science but students may delay taking the course until later years.

REQUIRED COURSES

1211 Computer Science (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03580200 TACS1 Prerequisite: None

This course serves as an introduction to computers and the study of managing and processing information. Knowledge of personal computers,

operating systems, and programming skills to control operations are taught. The emphasis is on solving real world problems by means of computer

programming (software engineering). Student will learn an introduction to the Java programming language integrated with Lego Robotics NXT

programming.. Some topics include data types and variables, classes and methods, control structures, graphics, Object Oriented Programming, and

the ethical and social implications of using computers and the Internet.

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1212 Computer Science Pre-AP (H) 1.0 Credit 9th– 12th

03580200 TACS1 Prerequisite: Alg I Pre-AP

This course serves as an introduction to computers and the study of managing and processing information. Knowledge of personal computers,

operating systems, and programming skills to control computer operations are taught. The emphasis is on logical thinking and solving problems by

means of computer programming. Students will learn an introduction to the Java programming language. Some topics include data types and

variables, classes and methods, control structures, graphics, Object Oriented Programming, arrays, simple animation and the ethical and social

implications of using computers and the Internet. The honors course goes at a faster pace and covers more topics than the college preparatory

Computer Science I course.

ELECTIVE COURSES

1231 Multimedia (C) .5 Credit 10th – 12th

03580600 TAMULTIM Prerequisite: Computer Science

Multimedia develops an understanding of the integration of media in the form of text, graphics files, still pictures, movies and sound. Students start by

learning to manage many different file and media formats with a variety of software applications to handle media, such as Picture Manager, MovieMaker

and Vegas Movie Studio. The course concludes with a team project that integrates all the media formats into a major presentation.

1233 Webmastering (C) .5 Credit 10th – 12th

03580800 TAWEBMAS Prerequisite: Computer Science

Webmastering develops an understanding of the structure, functions and technical foundations of the World Wide Web, the Internet and Intranets.

Students start by developing basic proficiency in creating static web pages with HTML, which is followed by designing interactive web pages, with a

scripting language, like ASP. Students finish with a major team project that involves the creation of an “E-Commerce” web site. The team project is

an integrated project, which includes the Multimedia technology of the prerequisite course with the dynamic web page creation of the current

webmaster course.

1213 Computer Science A AP (P) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

A3580100 APTACS1

Prerequisite: Comp Sci Pre-AP or

Pre AP Algebra II and Instructor Approval

This course serves as an introduction to computers and the study of managing and processing information. The emphasis is on solving real world

problems by means of computer programming (software engineering). Student will learn a thorough introduction to the Java programming

language. Some topics include data types and variables, classes and methods, control structures, arrays, string manipulation, graphics, animation, file

management, recursion, ethical and social implications and object oriented techniques. Students will finish the course by working in small teams to

create a major programming project, which usually is a video game that can be played on the Internet.

1258 Advanced Graphics Programming (H) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

M1236212 VGD

Prerequisite: AP Comp.Sci A or Webmastering

Advanced Graphics Programming is a course that teaches and explores advanced computer science concepts from a graphics point of view. This uses a

unique video game case study approach. Students design, develop, and enhance a sequence of video games. Video games include puzzles, Tic-Tac-

Toe, Connect-Four, Tetris, Plumberman, Solitaire and many other well known games.

THEOLOGY

Our first educational goal at John Paul II High School is that “students and staff will deepen their commitment to our Christian faith. We

help students be attentive to the call of God in their lives by increasing their knowledge of Religion. The Department of Theology

provides a program of formal religious training based upon the teachings of Jesus Christ and the Roman Catholic Church as expounded

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y the Catechism of the Catholic Church and the Doctrinal Elements of a Curriculum Framework For the Development of Catechetical

Materials For Young People of High School Age established by the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops. By encouraging

students to deepen their personal understanding and relationship with the Lord, by providing opportunities for prayer and worship, and

by promoting Christian Service, the department and Campus Ministry strive to create a sense of community by which students seek to

serve God, the Church, society and each other. Students must have four credits in theology in order to graduate. Freshmen, sophomores

and juniors will all take the same courses but seniors have theology elective courses.

1313 Theology I: The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture (C) .5 Credit 9th

XXXXXXXX REVELATION

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will

come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In the course they will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration, and its

value to people throughout the world. If they have not been taught this earlier, they will learn how to read the Bible, and will become familiar with the

major sections of the Bible and the books included in each section. The students will pay particular attention to the Gospels where they may grow to

know and love Jesus Christ more personally.

1314 Theology I: Who Is Jesus Christ? (C) .5 Credit 9th

XXXXXXXX WHOISJESUS Prerequisite: Theology I 1313

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Mystery of Jesus Christ, the Living Word of God, the second Person of the Blessed Trinity. In

this course students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate revelation to us from God. In learning about who he is, the students will also learn

who he calls them to be.

1323 Theology II: The Mission of Jesus Christ (The Paschal Mystery) (C) .5 Credit 10th

XXXXXXXX MISSION Prerequisite: Theology I 1314

The purpose of this course is to help students understand all that God has done for us through his Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study,

students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with him which is accomplished through the Redemption

Christ won for us. Students will learn that they share in this Redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. They will also be introduced to what it means

to be a disciple of Christ and what life as a disciple entails.

1324 Theology II: Jesus Christ’s Mission Continues in the Church 5 Credit 10th

XXXXXXXX MISSIONCONT Prerequisite: Theology II 1323

The purpose of this course is to help the students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the Living Jesus Christ. They will be

introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The students will

come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both Divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn not

so much about events in the life of the Church but about the sacred nature of the Church.

1333 Theology III: Sacraments as Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ (C) .5 Credit 11th

XXXXXXXX SACRAMENTS Prerequisite: Theo II 1324

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the Sacraments,

and especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the Sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout

life.

1334 Theology III: Life in Jesus Christ (C) .5 Credit 11th

XXXXXXXX LIFEINJESUS Prerequisite: Theology III 1333

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that it is only through Christ that they can fully live out God’s plans for their lives. Students

are to learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples.

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1344 Theology IV: Sacred Scripture (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

XXXXXXXX SCRIPTURE Prerequisite: Theology III 1334

The Purpose of this course is to give an overview of Sacred Scripture with an introduction to the basic principles for understanding and interpreting the

Bible. Because of the extent of the scriptural material, this outline will not try to cover the vast content, but rather offer comments about Scripture’s

purpose and religious significance. Given the limits of a semester of study, it will not be possible to introduce all the books of the Bible here. But every

effort is made to project a sense of the unity of the narrative the divine plan of salvation, the presence of God’s action in this record of his Revelation

and his desire to share his merciful love with us. It is suggested that for the detailed curriculum, comments on authorship, date of composition,

formation of text of each book of the Bible be drawn from Introductions in the New American Bible or from the Catholic Study Bible for the New

American Bible. This outline cites catechetical references from the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) and the Compendium (C) and the US

Catholic Catechism for Adults (USCCA) for various explanations of Scripture with the intention of integrating catechesis and scripture.

1346 Theology IV: History of the Catholic Church (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

XXXXXXXX HISTORY Prerequisite: Theology III 1334

Course Four presented a catechesis of the Church and the Body of Christ in history: its nature and meaning, images, marks, its life and ministry, guide

to moral life, and the role of prayer. This elective can supplement that catechesis on the Church. The purpose of this course is to supply the students

with a general knowledge of the Church’s history from Apostolic times to the present. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded

by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him throughout history through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is

the living Body of Christ today and, as such, has both Divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn about the Church’s 2000 years of

history and about how the Church is led and governed by the successors of the Apostles.

1347 Theology IV: Living as a Disciple of Jesus Christ in Society (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

XXXXXXXX LIVINGDISCIPLE Prerequisite: Theology III 1334

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Church’s Social Teaching. In this course students are to learn how Christ’s concern for

others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission. This course will not be available in 2013-2014.

1349 Theology IV: Ecumenical and Inter-religious Issues (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

XXXXXXXX ECUMENICAL Prerequisite: Theology III 1334

The purpose of this course is to help the students understand the manner in which the Catholic Church relates to non-Catholic Christians as well as to

other religions of the world. Building on the foundational truth that Jesus Christ established the Catholic Church and entrusted to her the fullness of

God’s Revelation, the course is intended to help students to recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in non-Catholic

Christian churches and ecclesial communities as well as in non-Christian religions. It is also intended to help them to recognize the ways in which other

systems of belief and practice differ from the Catholic faith.

CHRISTIAN SERVICE

The intent of Christian Service is to instill our motto, “Seek To Serve”, as a way of life. As a requirement for graduation, all four year

students are to complete 100 hours of Christian Service. Christian Service is defined as “Charity in Action to our Neighbor.” Students

receive Christian service hours for activities done only outside of the school day. Volunteer services must be directed towards charity

and do not include community service to non-profits of a political, research, social, or non-charity fund-raising nature. There is an

additional endeavor to have the students give of their time and talent rather than their treasures. The Christian Service Coordinator will

manage assignments and verification of hours.

1359 Christian Service (N)

00001359 SERVICE

Students will complete Christian service as part of their high school experience and senior graduation requirements. Freshmen must complete 10 hours,

sophomores 20 hours, juniors 30 hours and seniors must complete 40 hours of Christian Service for a total of 100 hours in order to graduate.

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FINE ARTS

At John Paul II High School, all students must earn one credit of fine arts in the area of fine arts. The Fine Arts Program at John Paul II

High School consists of Performing and Visual Arts. For certain subjects, students must follow a prescribed path of study, which is

listed below. The goal of the Fine Arts Program is to provide students with a well rounded education in any fine arts discipline they

choose to follow at John Paul II High School.

Visual Arts Courses

In Art II, Art III, and in the AP art classes, sections are often scheduled together. Sculpture and Ceramics are called 3-D while Painting

and Drawing are 2-D. Each semester the class will teach a different aspect and students may take either. For instance, ceramics is taught

in the fall and sculpture in the spring. Drawing is a fall topic and painting is a spring topic.

1411 Art I: Introduction to Art (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03500100 ART1 Prerequisite: None

Art 1 is the first course in the high school art sequence. It is an exploration of the basic techniques in design, drawing, painting, printmaking, and

sculpture, with emphasis on creative problem solving. Students will develop an understanding of the creative process by examining and discussing

works of art from various cultures and periods.

1421 Art II: 2D Drawing/Painting (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

03500500 ART2DRAW Prerequisite: Art I and Permission of Instructor

1423 Art II: 3D Ceramics/Sculpture (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

03500900 ART2CRMC Prerequisite: Art I and Permission of Instructor

Art II 2D and 3D offer students their first in-depth experiences in a variety of methods and techniques. In 2-D (Drawing and Painting) the technical

aspects of painting and drawing include the vehicles, pigments, finishes, brush effects and related mediums will be examined through demonstration,

discussion, experimentation, and problem solutions. Styles and the history of art as reflected in paintings and drawings will be analyzed as students

explore the traditions and contributions of various cultures. The 3D classes (Ceramics and Sculpture) provide students experiences using various

methods and equipment to create original works from clay and other materials. Studies will include hands-on experiences in modeling, hand building,

throwing on the wheel, and glazing. The historical and cultural importance of ceramics and sculpture will be explored.

1431 Art III 2D Drawing/Painting (C) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

03501300 ART3DRAW Prerequisite: Art II 2D or 3D and Permission of Instructor

1433 Art III 3D Ceramics/Sculpture (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

03501800 ART3CRMC Prerequisite: Art II 2D or 3D and Permission of Instructor

Art III classes are expansions of the understanding of techniques and skills developed in Art II. The student will have the opportunity to gain greater

depth of experience in techniques and processes of their choice. Specialization will be encouraged. This course is recommended for students preparing

for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations.

1441 Art IV 2D Drawing/Painting (C) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

03502300 ART4DRAW Prerequisite: Art III 2D or 3D and Permission of Instructor

1443 Art IV 3D Ceramics/Sculpture (C) 1.0 Credit 10th – 12th

03502700 ART4CRMC Prerequisite: Art III 2D or 3D and Permission of Instructor

Art IV is the culmination of the techniques and skills developed in Art II and III. The student will have the opportunity to further explore the media,

techniques and styles of art they have been exposed to in the previous 2 years. The studio time devoted to their specific interests will enable them to

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create a portfolio of their work that may be used to further their goals for applying for college art education. The student will be active in planning their

art work concentrating on their specific interests with instructor oversight.

1442 Art IV Studio 2D AP (P) 1 Credit 12th

A3500400 AP2DDP

Prerequisite: Art III Pre AP and Instructor App

This course is intended to assist students in preparing for the College Board examination in 2-Dimensional Design. This type of design involves

purposeful decision-making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. For this portfolio, students are asked to

demonstrate proficiency in 2-D design using a variety of art forms. These could include, but are not limited to, graphic design, typography, digital

imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, drawing, and other forms of art.

1444 Art IV Studio 3D AP (P) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3500500 AP3DDP

Prerequisite: Art III Pre AP and Instructor App

This course is intended to assist students in preparing for the College Board examination in 3-Dimensional Design. A variety of approaches to

representation, abstraction, and expression may be part of the student’s experience. These might include traditional sculpture in a variety of materials,

architectural models, apparel, ceramics, 3-D fiber arts or metal work, among others.

1446 Art IV Drawing AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3500300 APSTARTD

Prerequisite: Art III Pre AP and Instructor App

Advanced Placement Drawing is individualized course and continues the development of the student’s technical skills, creative thinking, and art

knowledge. In consultation with the teacher, each student initiates challenging creative projects and research which will develop greater depth of

experience and under-standing. Each student will compile a portfolio of creative work for presentation, keep a workbook/sketchbook record complete

with preparatory drawings and planning notes which support the portfolio presentation, and prepare research projects in art history and art

appreciation.

1448 Art History AP (P) 1.0 Credit 11th – 12th

A3500100 APHISART

Prerequisite: World History AP

th

This survey course examines the painting, sculpture, and architecture from prehistory through the 20 century. The first semester begins with Paleolithic

cave art, continues through ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, classical Greece and Rome, and ends with European Medieval and Renaissance art and

architecture. The second semester covers the major European movements from Baroque through Neoclassical, Romantic, Impressionism, Cubism, and

Neo-Realism. Nonwestern art and architecture with cross-cultural connections is also studied. This course will not be available in 2013-2014.

Performing Arts Courses

Instrumental Performance Courses

The music program at John Paul II High School has the opportunity to give students a strong foundation in music history and in the

knowledge and technical skills of musical performance. Substantive music education is capable of engendering the depth of

understanding and personal commitment required for students to sustain meaningful, lifelong relationships with music—as appreciators

or musicians.

The goals for the students in John Paul II High School’s music education programs include: demonstrating an understanding of the

components of artistic performance; understanding elements of music, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and pitch, as they are used in

musical composition, analysis, and performance; listening to and participating in music as audience members and learning to make

informed choices about music and musical performances; demonstrating an understanding of the roles and significance of music in

various cultures and historical periods; and utilizing musical knowledge and skills in work and vocations after school.

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1510 Instrument Ensemble: Brass (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03151700 MUS1INEN Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

1520 Instrument Ensemble: Woodwinds (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03151800 MUS1INEN Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

1540 Instrument Ensemble: Strings (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03152000 MUS1INEN Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

These music groups are designed for the novice student who has no or little prior experience with a musical instrument. Students develop an

appreciation of good music and develop advanced instrumental skills through the study, rehearsal, and performance of various types of levels of

instrumental music. Students also study music theory. Students are involved in the rehearsal and performance of medium to difficult band music in the

marching band as well as concerts, individual and small ensemble, and TAPPS events.

1530 Instrument Ensemble: Percussion (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03151900 MUS1INEN Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

1550 Instrument Ensemble: Keyboards (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

03152100 MUS1INEN Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

In the these specialty classes, students learn and then strengthen their skill in the art of playing percussion instruments such as Cymbals, Snare Drum,

Tenor Drum, Quads, and Bass Drum, etc or keyboards such as piano, harpsichord, or organ. In addition to the percussion and keyboard playing, the

students will learn the fundamentals of music including recognizing various notes, counting rhythms, reading music, proper gripping of the sticks and

placement of hands, and strategies of performance.

1512 Concert Band I (C) 1.0 Credit 9th

03150100 MUS1BAND Prerequisite: Instructor’s Approval

1522 Concert Band II (C) 1.0 Credit 10th

03150200 MUS2BAND Prerequisite: Concert Band 1

1532 Concert Band III (C) 1.0 Credit 11th

03150400 MUS4BAND Prerequisite: Concert Band 2

1542 Concert Band IV (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

A3500300 APSTARTD Prerequisite: Concert Band 3

This course is designed for students who have the ability to perform above the novice level of the Instrument Ensemble in the areas of technical ability,

sight reading, and audio perception. Students will continue to develop their technical ability and musicianship through the rehearsal and performance

of the concert band literature. Performances will include marching band, concerts, contests and solo and ensemble contests. Beginning in the school

year 2010/2011, the fall semester will earn .5 PE waiver. To receive PE waiver for the fall semester, the student must remain in Concert Band for the full

year.

1514 Symphony I (C) 1.0 Credit 9th

03150500 MUS1SYMP Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

1524 Symphony II (C) 1.0 Credit 10th

03150600 MUS2SYMP Prerequisite: Symphony 1

1534 Symphony III (C) 1.0 Credit 11th

03150700 MUS3SYMP Prerequisite: Symphony 2

1544 Symphony IV (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

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03150800 MUS4SYMP Prerequisite: Symphony 3

This course is designed for the instrumental student with several years experience who has developed significant skills in the areas of technical ability,

sight reading, and audio perception on their chosen instrument. Students will continue to develop their technical ability and musicianship through the

rehearsal and performance of the most demanding and symphonic literature. Performances will include concerts, contests and solo and ensemble

contests.

1515 Symphony I (H) 1.0 Credit 9th

03150500 MUS1SYMP Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

1525 Symphony II (H) 1.0 Credit 10th

03150600 MUS2SYMP Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

1535 Symphony III (H) 1.0 Credit 11th

03150700 MUS3SYMP Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

1545 Symphony IV (H) 1.0 Credit 12th

03150800 MUS4SYMP Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

This course is designed for the advanced instrumental student who has proven through audition the ability to perform at an above average level in the

areas of technical ability, sight reading, and audio perception. Students will continue to develop their technical ability and musicianship through the

rehearsal and performance of the most demanding and concert literature. Performances will include concerts, contests and solo and ensemble contests.

1551 Music Appreciation (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

N1170059 MAPPRECO

Prerequisite: None

Music appreciation is a course which surveys the history of Western classical music. The course focuses on the great compositions and composers and

is designed to be an enjoyable introduction to the world of classical music. The first semester will introduce the basics of music appreciation (sound,

harmony, melody, rhythm, and form) through the Classical Period. The second semester will cover the Contemporary periods including Jazz. The

semesters may be taken separately or for a full year. No musical background or training is assumed or required.

Vocal Performance Courses

1561 Fundamentals of Vocal Techniques (C) 1.0 Credit 9th – 12th

N1170100 VCTECH

Prerequisite: None

Students with no previous vocal or choir training will study the vocal techniques that are the fundamentals of singing—posture, breath management,

vowel production, consonant production, musical line, vocal flexibility and the ability to interpret music with expression and appropriate style. Each

student is expected to make progress in each area of the fundamentals of singing through class participation and daily practice. Students apply their

study of the physiology of the voice to their technical studies. Students will learn proper vocal hygiene and professional care of the voice, exposure to

diction in several languages, and the Kodaly system of solmization. Students will memorize repertoire for concerts and vocal solo and ensemble

Festivals. They are evaluated through introductory music theory work, sight-singing work as well as recital performances. Please note this class is a

prerequisite for Musical Theatre and Choir.

1615 Mixed Choral Choir I (C) 1.0 Credit 9th

03150900 MUS1CHOR Prerequisite: *

1625 Mixed Chorale Choir II (C) 1.0 Credit 10th

03151000 MUS2CHOR Prerequisite: *

1635 Mixed Chorale Choir III (C) 1.0 Credit 11th

03151100 MUS3CHOR Prerequisite: *

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1645 Mixed Chorale Choir IV (C) 1.0 Credit 12th

03151200 MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: *

Students continue to develop vocal techniques needed to audition for the top performing choirs and to develop an appreciation of good choral music.

Desirable vocal skills will be stressed through the rehearsal and performance of a variety of styles of choral music. Participation in competition as

individuals in sole and ensemble contests is expected as well as participation as a choral group. Formal concert dress attire is required. *Students will

audition the first week of class to determine correct level placement.

Theater Performance Courses

Every production’s integrity and ability to interpret playwright’s intent relies on consideration of historical and cultural heritage. Good

theatre is built on a strong tradition of musical theatre and cannot be fully appreciated or enjoyed without knowledge of the theatrical

productions that preceded it. Only through continuous, open response and evaluation can actors grow and maintain their abilities. The

casts and crews engage in constant reflection on their technical performances and artistic choices to achieve a recognized standard of

excellence.

Theater Arts

1711 Theater Arts I (c) 1.0 Credit 9th

03250100 TH1ARTS Prerequisite: None

1711 Theater Arts II (c) 1.0 Credit 10th

03250200 TH2ARTS Prerequisite: Theater Arts 1

1711 Theater Arts III (c) 1.0 Credit 11th

03250300 TH3ARTS Prerequisite: Theater Arts 2

1711 Theater Arts IV (c) 1.0 Credit 12th

03250400 TH4ARTS Prerequisite: Theater Arts 3

These courses are designed as a survey in the fundamentals of theatre production including the role of the actor in the interpretation of dramatic

literature, the development of the physical theatre, theatre history, and dramatic literature. The student is also involved in the physical and mental

processes of learning to act with emphasis on interpretation, body movement, and characterization. Subsequent years focus on the extension of the

students’ knowledge in the principles of acting, comedic and dramatic theory, stagecraft, advanced movement, experience in scene and/or play

production, critique and refinement of techniques.

Technical Theatre

1713 Technical Theater I 1.0 Credit 9th

03250500 TH1TECH Prerequisite: None

1723 Technical Theatre II 1.0 Credit 10th

03250600 TH2TECH Prerequisite: Technical Theatre I

1733 Technical Theatre III 1.0 Credit 11th

03251100 TH3TECH Prerequisite: Technical Theatre II

1743 Technical Theatre IV 1.0 Credit 12th

03251200 TH4TECH Prerequisite: Technical Theatre III

In Technical Theatre, Students are exposed to basic principles of theatrical design, such as unity, balance, proportion, and color. Students explore their

understanding by building three-dimensional models of sets and scenery; drafting floor plans; and drawing set elevations. Students are involved with

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production/performance tasks such as basic crew assignments and front of house responsibilities—i.e. ushering, passing out programs, and taking

tickets for school productions.

Theatre Production

1735 Theater Production I 1.0 Credit 9th

03250700 TH1PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I

1751 Theatre Production II 1.0 Credit 10th

03250800 TH2PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Production I

1752 Theatre Production III 1.0 Credit 11th

03250900 TH3PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Production II

1753 Theatre Production IV 1.0 Credit 11th

03251000 TH4PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Production III

These advanced courses provide a laboratory learning experience for the exploration, development, and synthesis of all elements and components of

the theatre through production activities. Students are involved with a specific aspect of the production, such as cast, technical crew, stage manager,

stage crew, costume designer, wardrobe mistress, props, set designer, publicity, or support staff. Each student completes assigned tasks, demonstrating

individual accountability and necessary skills and techniques. Determining the intent of the playwright and communicating intent to an audience is

considered in every production decision that is made. Students learn that all facets of a theatrical production work together to achieve a common goal.

Participants demonstrate personal commitment by preparing for each rehearsal. Students learn the importance of stage production etiquette. Students

will be expected to participate in preparing and staging plays for the community and for contests. A full year of Theatre Production may fulfill the 1

credit of fine arts requirement. Students who take Theater Production for the full year will have the opportunity to take and pass a competency exam to

earn credit for Communications Applications.

Musical Theatre

1755 Musical Theatre II 1.0 Credit 10th

N1170109 MUSTHEA2

Prerequisite: Musical Theatre I

1756 Musical Theatre III 1.0 Credit 11th

N1170110 MUSTHEA3

Prerequisite: Musical Theatre II

1757 Musical Theatre IV 1.0 Credit 10th

N1170115 MUSTHEA4

Prerequisite: Musical Theatre III

This class focuses on the theoretical and experiential exploration of the component skills necessary for the music theatre forum. Students acquire skills

for application to the difficult aesthetic task of vocal delivery combined with a portrayal of a believable character. Students learn about the function,

anatomy, care, and use of the vocal instrument.

Dance Performance Courses

High school dance programs are designed for all students, including those with no prior dance experience and those with differing

degrees of formal dance training. Students have many opportunities to discover and develop personal talents and to expand their

perceptions of self, community, and the world. Dance training in high school is essential for students wanting to continue their

education in dance. Level I, II, III, and IV dance courses may be selected to fulfill the fine arts and/or physical education requirements

for graduation. Dance may count as credit for fine arts or physical education.

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Dance as Fine Arts

1811 Dance I 1.0 Credit 9th - 10th

03250100 DANCE 1 Prerequisite: None

1821 Dance II 1.0 Credit 10th - 11th

03250200 DANCE 2 Prerequisite: Dance I

1831 Dance III 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

03250300 DANCE 3 Prerequisite: Dance II

1841 Dance IV 1.0 Credit 12th

03250400 DANCE 4 Prerequisite: Dance III

Dance I is an introduction to the genres of ballet, tap, modern, and ethnic dance presented in cultural and historical context. Learning the vocabulary,

principles and elements of each style is important. The class focuses on students’ development of kinesiological body awareness, technical facility,

spatial expressiveness, and personal creativity. Skills learned in Dance I are refined and reinforced in all upper level classes.

Dance as Physical Education

1812 Dance I 1.0 Credit 9th - 12th

03250100 DANCE 1 Prerequisite: None

1822 Dance II 1.0 Credit 10th - 12th

03250200 DANCE 2 Prerequisite: 1811 or 1812

1811 Dance III 1.0 Credit 11th - 12th

03250300 DANCE 3 Prerequisite: 1821 or 1822

1811 Dance IV 1.0 Credit 12th

03250400 DANCE 4 Prerequisite: 1831 or 1832

The Cardinal Belles Drill Team (C)

The Cardinal Belles is our competitive dance and drill group that performs for sporting events. Dance experience is necessary and

tryouts are required. The course emphasizes proper intermediate and advanced dance techniques, team building, self-discipline,

responsibility, motivation, and dedication. Students have many opportunities to be part of an elite performance dance group. This

course meets the school graduation requirements for both Fine Arts and Physical Education. Drill Team will be scheduled in the Fall

Semester and earn one-half credit of PE. Choreography is a Spring Semester course and will earn one-half credit of Fine Arts.

2213 Drill Team I 1.0 Credit 9th

03820501 Prerequisite: Try Out

2223 Drill Team II 1.0 Credit 10th

03820502 Prerequisite: Try Out

2233 Drill Team III 1.0 Credit 11th

03820503 Prerequisite: Try Out

2243 Drill Team IV 1.0 Credit 12th

03820504 Prerequisite: Try Out

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

At John Paul II High School, we will educate the whole student. This includes helping students make wise health choices and staying

physically active for mental and spiritual health. Students must have three semesters of Physical Education and one semester of Health.

Students enrolled in athletics, dance, drill team, cheerleading or the fall semester of marching band may receive physical education

credit for their participation in these activities up to the maximum required for graduation. Students may take up to two additional

classes in either PE or athletics which count as electives. Athletics, health, and PE classes do not receive any grade points but they do

count towards classes required for graduation. John Paul II High School will also offer 11 th and 12 th graders the chance to become a

student trainer as part of our sports medicine program. Additionally, students who do not make the competitive athletic teams may

remain in the Athletics program as team managers. The coach of the associated sport and the athletic director must approve these

students. These classes will fulfill the 1 ½ credits required for physical education, but not health. Student trainers and managers must

attend all practices and games with the athletes to receive credit.

Physical Education

1915 Physical Education: Team Sports (N) 1 to .5 Credit 9th - 12th

03860105 PETS1 03860115PETS2 03860125PETS3 Prerequisite: None

Students in Team Sports are expected to learn the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the relationship between physical activity and health

throughout their lifespan. Throughout this course, students are expected to develop health related fitness as well as an appreciation for team work and

fair play. The primary goal of this course is to provide a foundation for enjoyment and continued social development through physical activity that will

span the student’s lifetime. Team sports that will be a part of this class are Basketball, Flag Football, Soccer, Ultimate Frisbee, Team Handball and

Volleyball. Students may take this semester class for credit up to three times.

1917 Physical Education: Individual Sports (N) 1 to 1.0 Credit 9th - 12th

03850104 PEIS 03860114 PIES2 03860124 PIES3 Prerequisite: None

Students in Individual Sports are expected to exhibit a physically active lifestyle and understand the relationship between physical activity and health

throughout their lifespan. Participation in various individual sports allows students to develop health-related fitness while acquiring movement skills

and knowledge. Students are encouraged to participate in individual sports activities that are not only enjoyable, but can be pursued throughout life.

Agility, Flexibility and Strength activities will also be a part of this class. Individual Sports that will be a part of this class are Tennis, Golf, Bowling and

the following indoor racquet sports; Racquetball, Pickleball, Badminton and Speedminton. Students may take this semester class for credit up to three

times.

1918 Sports Medicine .5 Credit 10th - 12th

N1150040 SPORTSMED

Prerequisite: Teacher Approval

This course provides an opportunity for the study and application of the components of sports medicine including but not limited to: sports medicine

related careers, organizational and administrative considerations, prevention of athletic injuries, recognition, evaluation, and immediate care of athletic

injuries, rehabilitation and management skills, taping and wrapping techniques, first aid/CPR/AED, emergency procedures, nutrition, sports

psychology, human anatomy and physiology, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise. Sports Medicine is an elective and does not count as a

Health credit needed for graduation.

Health

1911 Health I (c) .5 Credit 9th - 10th

03810100 HLTHED1 Prerequisite: None

Health I is a semester course for ninth and tenth graders which will meet the health requirement needed for graduation from high school. Our Health at

John Paul II high school is designed to enable our students to be responsible, respectful, informed and capable when making decisions which would

impact upon the well-being of themselves and others.

Health I will investigate a range of human interactions. Areas to be explored include making responsible decisions; communicating effectively;

physical, social, mental & emotional health; building self-esteem; adolescent relationships & responsibilities; the use, misuse & abuse of drugs, alcohol

and tobacco; human sexuality; families & family relationships, preventing abuse & violence; and peer pressure.

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Course Guide

Updated July 2013


Emphasis is placed on the acceptance of responsibility by each student. Each individual must be responsible for his/her own health and behavior and

must continually search for ways to better understand health maintenance and human interactions. A Textbook is optional however, a workbook is

required for this course.

1916 Health II (c) .5 Credit 11th - 12th

03810200 HLTHED2 Prerequisite: None

Health II is a semester course for eleventh and twelfth graders which will meet the health requirement needed for graduation from high school. Health

II is a continuation and reemphasis of healthy lifestyle choices with a focus on maintaining healthy body systems. Included in the course are muscular,

respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, skeletal, and endocrine systems. Special emphasis is placed on sexual reproduction and STD’s. Health career

paths will be explored.

Health II covers growth and development, nutrition, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, disease control, mental health, personal hygiene, health in the

environment and first aid. The students will be student certified in CPR. The course is designed to make students aware of health related issues in

order to make reasonable decisions about their life-style.

This course also emphasizes the importance of making healthy lifestyle choices and using resources to assist in making those choices. Highlighting the

availability of reliable website, the course offers students the opportunity to search for health information on-line and to do self-assessments.

Additionally, the course covers nutrition and exercise, chronic diseases, reproductive health and sexually transmitted diseases, mental health, safety,

community health and alternative medicine. A textbook is required for this course as well as a CPR certification fee..

Athletics

John Paul II High School is committed to offering students, both men and women, a full range of extracurricular athletics. Level I

indicates a Freshmen sport; Levels II – IV indicate Junior or Sub-Varsity or Varsity levels. Most sports are either fall or spring. Students

who participate in one or more sports, will have their schedules adjusted accordingly.

The only requirement for the first year of athletics is a medical release, but all participants will require a coach’s permission for

subsequent participation. All athletic programs will involve after school practices and competitions including some holidays and

weekends, and may involve additional costs. For more information, contact the Athletic Director or the Head Coach of the individual

sport.

CO-ED Sports 9th 10th 11th 12th

Cheerleading I, II, III, IV 2210, 2220, 2230, 2240

Drill Team I, II, III, IV 2213, 2223, 2233, 2243

Swimming I, II, III, IV 2211, 2221, 2231, 2241

Tennis I, II, III, IV 2214, 2224, 2234, 2244

Boys’ Sports 9th 10th 11th 12th

Fall Sports

Football I, II, III, IV 2210, 2020, 2030, 2040

Cross Country I, II, III, IV 2018, 2028, 2038, 2048

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Course Guide

Updated July 2013


Spring Sports

Baseball I, II, III, IV 2011, 2021, 2031, 2041

Track and Field I, II, III, IV 2017, 2027, 2037, 2047

Golf I, II, III, IV 2016, 2026, 2036, 2046

Year Round

Wrestling I, II, III, IV 2013, 2023, 2033, 2043

Basketball I, II, III, IV 2014, 2024, 2034, 2044

Soccer I, II, III, IV 2015, 2025, 2035, 2045

Girls’ Sports 9th 10th 11th 12th

Fall Sports

Volleyball I, II, III, IV 2113, 2123, 2133, 2143

Cross Country I, II, III, IV 2116, 2126, 2136, 2146

Spring Sports

Softball I, II, III, IV 2110, 2120, 2130, 2140

Track and Field I, II, III, IV 2117, 2127, 2137, 2147

Golf I, II, III, IV 2015, 2125, 2135, 2146

Year Round

Basketball I, II, III, IV 2112, 2122, 2133, 2142

Soccer I, II, III, IV 2114, 2124, 2134, 2144

34

Course Guide

Updated July 2013

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