Annual Report 2011.pdf - Destination Oakland

destinationoakland.com

Annual Report 2011.pdf - Destination Oakland

We’re listening…

2011 Annual Report

DestinationOakland.com


Message from

the Executive

Officer

Every person who visits one of the

13 Oakland County Parks has a story to

tell—whether it’s a first-time visitor or the

golfer who has played at Glen Oaks Golf

Course for 30+ years.

What they have in common is experiencing

the benefits of outdoor recreation at

Oakland County Parks and Recreation.

The Oakland County

Parks and Recreation

Commission is

dedicated to providing

quality recreation

experiences that

encourage healthy

lifestyles, support

economic prosperity,

and promote the

protection of natural

resources.

In biennial countywide

recreation needs

assessment surveys,

residents continue

to ask for four main

things: more trails

for walking, hiking,

biking and equestrian

use; high maintenance

standards for facilities

and parks; excellent

customer service; and

green space preserved

for future generations.

Our two campgrounds can create a nostalgic feeling for those who camped at Addison Oaks or

Groveland Oaks as a child. Today, we have three generations of campers who return to enjoy traditions

created around a campfire. Themed weekends enhance the experience and spark the imagination.

Some families make annual visits to our two waterparks for family reunions, birthday parties or

something to do on a hot summer day. The waterparks are also popular destinations for day camps

from Oakland County’s 62 cities, villages and townships.

Golfers return to improve their scores and carve out social time in their busy schedules to spend with

family and friends. Five courses offer challenges for all levels of ability from a nine–hole round at Red

Oaks to 18–hole Arthur Hills designed Lyon Oaks.

Visitors to the Wint Nature Center register for the quarterly “Tuning Your Tot” program to introduce

the 3–6-year-old in their family to the wonders of the seasons. This national award-winning, early

childhood program always includes an outdoor activity to bring the information learned to life.

Whatever the reason, 1.6 million people make Oakland County Parks and Recreation part of their

lifestyle to recreate on their own, participate in a program or attend a special event.

This annual report provides a glimpse of what our visitors experienced in 2011. It focuses our

efforts on five countywide initiatives: Urban Recreation; Rural Recreation; Natural Resources and

Environment; Healthy Living; and Sustainability. These are the main components of our 10–year

Strategic Master Plan that guides planning efforts at all levels of the organization. The initiatives are

based on countywide surveys which consistently reveal that residents desire four main things: more

trails for walking, hiking, biking and equestrian use; high maintenance standards for facilities and parks;

excellent customer service; and green space preserved for future generations.

Behind the scenes, the entire parks staff, 65 full-time and 596 part-time employees, strive to operate

the 13–park system at a world-class level, providing quality programs, facilities and customer service.

Equally important are our nearly 400 volunteers who donate their talent and time to support and

enhance our mission. They are our biggest advocates for everything from natural resources stewardship

to dog park events and greenhouse operations.

Feedback from our visitors is important for making improvements. But sometimes, it’s just good to

hear that people like what we’re doing. Such was the case with a comment card from a Washington state

resident who wrote, “Groveland Oaks is the best public park we have been to in the 35 states and four

providences we have traveled. You have a gem that others should emulate.”

Partnerships with professional organizations also help us reach visitors and enhance recreation

programming. One example is the cooperation with Total Golf Adventure Premier Junior Golf which

holds summer camps at several of our golf courses:

“All of our families had a great time at Sunday’s parent-child event, following another terrific summer of soldout

camp sessions. I really appreciate how everyone is so welcoming and friendly to the kids and their parents.

Everyone at Glen Oaks—pro shop staffers, starters, rangers and restaurant staff—went

out of their way to be helpful, always greeting the kids with a smile.”

Dave Robinson, TGA Territory Director

We look forward to providing quality recreation experiences to our residents and

regional visitors in 2012. Visit DestinationOakland.com to plan a camping trip,

waterpark visit, golf outing and more or find us on Facebook to keep up on

what’s happening in your Oakland County Parks.

Daniel J. Stencil, Executive Officer


Urban Recreation

Addressing the challenges and

opportunities in creating access

to recreation in urban environments

Addressing the challenges and

All aboard

opportunities in creating access to

for fun and games

recreation in urban environments

The OCParks Express connects

communities to outdoor recreation

experiences within the parks system.

Trips are offered as a stand-alone

or enhancement for day camps,

senior centers, assisted living/nursing

homes and more. The program

hosted 1,541 individuals with visits

to two waterparks and day-use

parks for swimming, fishing, biking,

geocaching and boating.

Other destinations include the

Waterford Oaks greenhouse and

a stop by the Oakland County

Farmer’s Market so participants can

purchase fresh produce. A tour of

the historic Ellis Barn at Springfield

Oaks includes a visit to Cook’s Farm

Dairy for ice cream.

Seasonal programs include fall color tours through scenic northern Oakland County and the Holiday Light Tour

of outdoor holiday decorations.

“The field trips have allowed our summer program participants who are teens and young adults with Autism

Spectrum Disorder to experience the outdoors. For many, this was the first time they have fished or been on a pedal

boat,” Ann Patronik of the Judson Center, said. “Your staff has been wonderful and flexible in accommodating

our group’s needs. Working for a non-profit, cost is always a deciding factor in our programming and yours is very

reasonable.”

Another group that appreciates the time to recreate is adult children of seniors. An accessible pontoon boat

stationed at Independence Oaks allows seniors with limited mobility to experience a tour of Crooked Lake.

“Instead of focusing on health issues, the parent and adult child can both enjoy one another’s company in the

outdoors,” Sandy Dorey, recreation program supervisor, said. “One of our hayride participants was a 95-year-old lady

who had not beeen on a wagon in more than 30 years. She enjoyed the experience so much that she signed up to do

the trip again and attended the Holiday Light Tours too!”

The program’s cost is funded in part by the Recreation Assistance Partnership Program (RAPP). Initiated in 1982,

the program grants bus transportation and mobile recreation unit visits to underserved areas and populations. In

2011, the parks commission committed $150,000 to RAPP.

• The inaugural Red Oaks

BBQ Sizzler event drew

eight teams and 500

spectators for an outdoor

cook-off for prizes.

• Reading Rangers

rewarded 13,000

students at 200 schools

with free waterpark

passes for “March is

Reading Month”.

• To better serve residents,

Oakland County

Parks and Recreation

opened a new office

in the Southfield

Oakland County Health

Department building,

adjacent to Catalpa Oaks

County Park.

No score, no sweat

To encourage new golfers to pick up the sport, Red Oaks Golf Course hosted a “No Score” league. The noncompetitive

environment offered a clinic before tee off and on-course individual instruction. Fitness and golf

fundamentals were emphasized.

“Red Oaks is our only 9-hole course so it’s a great facility for beginners and intermediate golfers,” Laurie Stasiak,

recreation program supervisor, said. “Fun, fellowship and the relaxed flow of the game encourages them to keep golfing.”

Growing green thumbs of tomorrow

To foster green thumbs and create a new revenue source, indoor and outdoor garden plots were leased at the

Waterford Oaks Greenhouse.

The viability of the community garden concept was tested via a partnership with Centro Multicultural de la

Familia to offer a cultural and nutritional program addressing the needs of a community with limited English

proficiency. The result was two thumbs up.

“What people consider recreation evolves as society changes. Gardening is the perfect recreation opportunity for

seniors or those with limited mobility. And, many residents do not have the space to plant a vegetable garden,” Susana

Ditter, greenhouse coordinator, said.

Plots are leased using a lottery system and include tested soil, basic tools, water and gardening education programs

to help ensure a harvest’s success.


Rural Recreation

Promoting access to recreational

opportunities that are tied to the

landscape of rural Oakland County

Racing pigs and more

After the Michigan State Fair was cancelled because the state could no longer afford to subsidize the 160-year-old

event, many found themselves in search of an experience to fill that void.

“Definitely, the number of adult exhibitors was up this year because they couldn’t show at the state level,”

Oakland County Fair General Manager L.C. Scramlin said. “Ultimately, that loss was our gain. We had a record

attendance of 95,000 visitors this year.”

The five-day event includes a midway with carnival rides, 4–H club exhibits and the Miracle of Birth Barn, a

popular stop for fairgoers to witness the live birth of pigs, calves and lambs. The event has been drawing families to

Springfield Oaks since 1971.

“There’s something for everyone and that’s the draw of the fair,” Scramlin said. “One major success was hosting more

than 900 special needs kids. Other fairs have tried this without much success so we’re doing something right.”

Another “right” was the inaugural Oakland County Idol Contest that drew more than 60 hopefuls competing

for a $500 grand prize.

“This area has rural roots, but a drive through northern Oakland County is more likely to reveal subdivisions

than farms,” Scramlin said. “We can provide a glimpse into our past to see what still sustains us all today—the

farmer and his crops—and teach youth leadership and responsibility at the same time.”

Survey says… ‘safety first’

In biennial surveys, residents consistently respond the parks system “feels safe.” That’s one of the top reasons

more than 1.6 million guests visit the Oakland County Parks each year.

OCPR contracts with the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office to provide deputy patrols from vehicles, horseback

and mountain bikes. Deputies are assigned to campgrounds, waterparks, day-use parks and large special events

such as Fourth of July Fireworks that draw 10,000 spectators. They also assist with educational efforts like archery

hunting regulations and tree stand compliance; and supervise trusty inmate work crews to maintain and beautify

the parks.

“We are proactive with guests by providing them with information,” Sergeant Kelly Sexton said. “A campground

is like a mini community. People are living side-by-side and using the same resources. We want that experience to

be as free of concern as possible.”

Flying pumpkins = recreation

Combining the science of engineering and the sheer thrill of tossing produce hundreds of feet in the air is a fall

event that’s become a spectator favorite at the Lake Orion Pumpkin Launch. Throw in Boy Scouts selling hot

chocolate and popcorn and you’ve got all the makings of a good time.

Competitors build trebuchets, medieval blockade weapons similar to catapults, to hurl pumpkins as far as the

gourds will go. The course record—a whopping 1,184 feet—was set by the Masters of Mayhem team. The event

was a partnership with Oakland Ballistics, a group of people who enjoy building medieval weapons.

• “The Blue and Gray”, a

local student’s film shot

at Orion Oaks, won a

nationwide contest.

View it at channelone.

com/super-8.

• In three months and 100

hours, service groups

and scouts helped

the parks system save

$12,000 by replacing

a pedestrian bridge at

Springfield Oaks.


• Lewis E. Wint Nature

Center was named one of

the top 10 nature centers in

Southeastern Michigan by

Metro Parent Magazine

• Seasonal natural resources

educational displays

are provided free to

communities and libraries

• A free Christmas tree

recycling program annually

saves 3,000 trees from

landfills

Parks Commissioners ceremoniously return fish to Upper

Bushman Lake to dedicate Independence Oaks-North.

Natural Resources

and Environment

Fishing for the future

For more than 35 years, the Oakland County Parks and Recreation Commission had its

proverbial “eye” on 188 acres in northern Oakland County. The property, owned by only

one family since the 1940s, is adjacent to Independence Oaks County Park.

Once the property was acquired in 2010, parks staff constructed a boardwalk and dock

that provides a spectacular view of 31-acre Upper Bushman Lake in the headwaters of the

Clinton River. The lake, which had never been publicly fished, is home to large-mouth bass,

bluegill, pumpkinseed sunfish, rock bass, bullhead catfish, northern pike and crappie.

It’s that unique fishing habitat the parks system hopes to preserve for future generations.

“Implementation of enforceable catch-and-release fishing will offer an unmatched public

fishing experience, the first and only in Oakland County and the Southeastern Michigan region,”

Executive Officer Dan Stencil said. “The initiative will steward fisheries in the Upper Clinton River

Watershed within the Clinton Green Corridor in an ecologically-sustainable way.”

On April 1, 2012 an enforceable catch-and-release regulation will take effect, per Michigan

Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Order 244, by order of the MDNR Director.

New England Aster–

It’s not just the water feature that makes Independence Oaks-North a high quality outdoor space. The one of the native

property is a Michigan Natural Features Inventory Priority One Conservation Area containing rare natural seeds species collected

at Highland Oaks

communities such as Southern Wet Meadow, Wet-Mesic Prairie, Prairie Fen and Hardwood-Conifer Swamp.

County Park.

Independence Oaks-North was acquired with a $945,000 grant from the Michigan Natural Resources

Trust Fund; a $105,000 Carl’s Foundation grant via a partnership and a two-acre donation with Ducks Unlimited;

and a $16,000 donation from the North Oakland Headwaters Land Conservancy. A Passive Recreation and Pathway

License with the Interstate Transmission Company allows for future trail connectivity within the park.

Combating invasive species

Dogs, decoys on payroll

Australian Shepherds Madison and Chase have made a significant impact on goose

control at Oakland County Parks and Recreation’s golf courses.

The working dogs are used for abatement purposes May–June 15 and again early

August–November, chasing geese away from golf courses to reduce health risks to golfers

and staff.

A Michigan Department of Natural Resources goose count performed in the early 1990s

found 300 geese at just one course, according to Park Supervisor Skip Roche. Today, regular

patrol by the dogs has reduced the number of geese using the course to 12.

Staff educates golfers that the dogs aren’t just visiting for playtime. A decal on Roche’s

work truck reads, “Working dog on board.”

“I can tell you they are the celebrities of the golf course,” he said. “We have gotten so

many compliments about what a good job they do.”

At other locations, plastic replicas of a full-sized coyote, complete with faux-fur tail, are

staked in areas where a reduction in goose presence is desired.

Removing swallow-wort, a new invasive plant heavily impacting the northwest part of Oakland County,

was the focus of another partnership. Oakland County Parks and Recreation successfully landed a 2011 Americorps

Student Service Grant in conjunction with the Six Rivers Regional Land Conservancy, North Oakland Headwaters

Land Conservancy, Michigan Nature Association, and Highland, Rose and

Springfield townships.

The Americorps student team canvased nearly 180 acres at two parks removing

the plant, also known as dog-strangling vine, due to its dense, tangling behavior.

Counting birds and butterflies

Oakland County Parks provides important habitat for rare and notable species

like the red-shouldered hawk and yellow rail. These birds were observed during the

annual Oakland Audubon Bird Counts. The Eastern Bluebird is on the rise

at several parks due to a volunteer nest box monitoring program.

The system also participates in the North American Butterfly Association’s

annual count in partnership with the Six River Regional Land Conservancy.

This year the Giant Swallowtail and Baltimore Checkerspot were

tallied in the count.

Photos top and bottom right by John Meyland

Promoting access to high quality

natural areas through the stewardship

of the county’s green infrastructure vision

Giant Swallowtail


Healthy Living

River walking ROCKS!

Sometimes, accommodations just need a little creativity to make an experience happen. Such was the case

of programming the River Ride at Red Oaks Waterpark, a 990-foot-long moving river. Recreation Program

Supervisor Sandy Dorey said walking the river is excellent exercise for those who have had recent knee surgery

or have mobility issues.

Resident Jan Kobert said the unique program enabled her to enjoy the summer months again.

“What an amazing program. You had a way for me to walk more than 2,000 feet in water with my oxygen

tank. What a great change from the last two years of pulmonary rehab,” Kobert said. “Between the golf league

at Red Oaks for individuals with disabilities and the River Walk I am finally getting out and enjoying my

summer again after two years of being inside playing video games. Thank you to Oakland County Parks and

Recreation for helping me become active outdoors again.”

The River Walk was featured by A Wider World, a public broadcasting system television show that focuses on

programs for individuals with disabilities.

Inclusion services and programming by the Adaptive Recreation staff provides recreational and leisure

opportunities for all residents of Oakland County. Certified therapeutic recreation specialists partner with more

than 30 disabled sports organizations, non-profits and schools to offer a wide range of activities.

Adaptive equipment, to help facilitate an experience, includes single rider golf carts, hand-operated pedal

boats, water transfer chairs, cross-country skis and seat canes. A pontoon boat facilitates nature and fishing

opportunities. Wheelchair-accessible cabins offer an overnight camping experience and kids of all ages and

abilities can experience Paradise Peninsula Playscape, a universally-accessible playground at Waterford Oaks.

Walking for health, prizes

Connie Hoffman has walked the Orion Oaks Dog Park trails nearly every morning for the past nine years,

and this year, her ritual paid off.

Hoffman was the grand prize winner of the 2011 Oakland County Walk Michigan Program. She won a stay

on Mackinac Island and participated in the Labor Day Bridge Walk with Governor Rick Snyder.

Walk Michigan is a statewide non-competitive program established by the Michigan Recreation and Park

Association and administered in communities throughout the state to promote healthy lifestyles and physical

activity.

There were 1,476 miles walked within the Oakland County Parks system during a two-month period by

more than 500 contestants.

A twist on camping

Promoting the role of recreation in

supporting quality of life and active

lifestyles of residents and visitors

Two themed programs have campers packing pumpkins and costumes along with their tents.

Boo Bash and Haunted Hallows weekends take advantage of the fall color change and cooler weather to

stir up some non-scary fun. Activities include trick-or-treating, campsite decorating, fireside stories and contests

like pumpkin carving, gourd painting and doughnut-on-a-string eating.

“We’ve had people set up their own haunted houses as well as inflatable pumpkins and ghosts outside their

campers. Some created great graveyard scenes,” Park Supervisor Boyd Brokenshaw said. “It’s fun for everybody

and fulfills our guests’ desire for ‘just one more’ camping weekend before they put away their tents and trailers.”

Keeping skiers safe

• The Warren family of

Florida traveled 3,185

miles by bike to attend

the Great Lakes National

BMX Race at Waterford

Oaks and promote

bicycle motocross as a

fitness activity.

• Golfer Richard Jorgensen

has played Glen Oaks

Golf Course for 35 years

as a league member.

When the snow falls at

Independence Oaks,

hiking trails remain busy.

Most of the trails are

converted to cross-country

ski use and patrolled for

guest safety. The ski patrol

at Independence Oaks

County Park, established

in 1978, is the first of

its kind in Southeastern

Michigan.

Four National Ski Patrollers and

14 volunteers traverse nearly 10 miles of

trails. The unit was named Best Small Patrol

by the Eastern Michigan Region of the

National Ski Patrol.

The park offers groomed trails, rental

equipment and “Learn-to-Ski” schools to

entice more guests to try the winter sport.


Sustainability

Implementing environmental,

social and fiscal practices that will help

ensure long-term viability

The Ellis Barn was originally built on Dixie Highway in Clarkston.

The barn was dismantled piece by piece, moved and reassembled

by ex-Amish barnwrights at Springfield Oaks in 2005.

Backdrop for romance

For the summer nuptials of Sarah Showler and Dennis Twaddle, it was all about location, location, location.

Theirs was the first wedding held at the historic Ellis Barn, a 14,000-square-foot Madawaska Twin Barn

built in 1883. Six generations of the Ellis Family loved and valued the local landmark. Now, new families can

incorporate the centerpiece at Springfield Oaks County Park into their own love stories.

The Showler-Twaddle wedding helped staff assess and develop rental packages for future weddings at the barn.

Opportunities like these will help ensure sustainable use of the historic structure.

• Social media tools,

like Facebook and

Groupon, are used

to generate golfing,

camping and waterpark

revenue, offering visitors

discounted fees.

Photo by Creative Elements Design Studio

The early bird saves the budgetary worm

Budgetary constraints and reduced tax revenues, felt by parks and recreation departments across the United

States, pushed back many projects in 2010. In response, a 15-year forecast for Oakland County Parks and

Recreation’s capital improvement and major maintenance projects was developed.

“We look at a 40-year historic average of $2.5 -$3 million for capital improvement and at least

$1 million for maintenance annually,” Chief of Park Facilities Maintenance and Development Mike Donnellon

said. “Capital improvement means adding new facilities or replacing fully depreciated existing facilities that cost

more than $10,000, like the installation of a new waterslide or restroom facility. Maintenance is fixing what’s

already there, such as roofing or pavement repair.”

Forecasting earlier allows for opportunities to identify and secure partnerships, sponsorships or grants,

begin business plans and identify operational savings ideas. Maintenance projects are grouped systemwide to

realize significant cost savings.

“We know asphalt shingles have a 20–25-year life span so 10 years after a roof is shingled, we forecast out its

replacement,” Donnellon said. “We need that attention to detail so nothing is missed.”

Currently the parks staff improves, maintains and manages more than 200 facilities, buildings and structures

within its 6,700 acres.

“Maintenance of and improvement to existing facilities remains a consistently high priority as indicated

through our county-wide recreation needs assessment surveys. Our visitors are telling us that they want clean,

safe, well-maintained facilities,” he said.

The gift of recreation

A technology initiative has made gifting the outdoors much easier. Rechargeable

gift cards, which can be purchased and accepted at most park locations, were

launched as a component of the system’s Information Technology Roadmap.

“People like the ease of buying the gift cards online and having them mailed to

their home. Previously they had to drive to a park or golf course to buy a paper

gift certificate,” Business Development Representative for Internal Services

Phil Castonia said. “The cards also provide more flexibility and can be used

for annual vehicle permits, golf green fees, waterpark admission and programs.

This initiative has brought us current with modern technology.”

Visioning the future

Historically, Waterford Oaks has been the home of many firsts—the

first wave-action pool and refrigerated toboggan run in Michigan

and the first bicycle motocross track and greenhouse operations

for the parks system. Staff has found that these incubation efforts

are best managed close-to-home, as Waterford

Oaks is also home to the park system’s administrative complex.

Continuing that trend, Waterford Oaks is the first in a new

generation of park master plans being developed by Oakland County

Parks and Recreation staff. With the input of all sections of the

organization, these 10-year plans provide a comprehensive

look at the resources of the county parks and the role they

play in achieving the parks system’s mission.

The revised Waterford Oaks Master Plan

considers financial sustainability, business

planning, phasing of facility development and an

evaluation component.

The master plan documents existing

park conditions, recreational need, other

local plans and forecasted trends. This

information is used to formulate a set of

park concepts, thus serving as long-term

vision for park development.

Additionally, the five-year Recreation

Master Plan update process was initiated.

Both plans are being completed by fulltime

staff and part-time project advisors,

leveraging expertise in key areas.


Parks

ADDISON OAKS

W. Romeo Rd., Leonard

248.693.2432

Conference Center: 248.693.8305

CATALPA OAKS

Greenfield Rd., Southfield

For information–248.858.0906

GROVELAND OAKS

Dixie Highway, Holly

248.634.9811

HIGHLAND OAKS

Milford Rd., Highland

For information–248.858.0906

INDEPENDENCE OAKS

Sashabaw Road, Clarkston

Park: 248.625.0877

Nature Center: 248.625.6473

LYON OAKS

Pontiac Trail, Wixom

For information–248.858.0906

ORION OAKS

Clarkston Road, Lake Orion

For information–248.858.0906

RED OAKS WATERPARK

13 Mile Road, Madison Heights

For information–248.858.0906

ROSE OAKS

Fish Lake Rd., Holly

For information–248.858.0906

SPRINGFIELD OAKS

Andersonville Rd., Davisburg

248.634.7899

WATERFORD OAKS

Activity Center

Watkins Lake Road, Waterford

248.858.0913

Waterpark

Scott Lake Road, Waterford

For information–248.858.0906

Golf Courses

GLEN OAKS

13 Mile Rd., Farmington Hills

248.851.8356

LYON OAKS

Pontiac Trail, Wixom

248.437.1488

RED OAKS

John R, Madison Heights

248.541.5030

SPRINGFIELD OAKS

Andersonville Rd., Davisburg

248.625.2540

WHITE LAKE OAKS

Williams Lake Rd., White Lake

248.698.2700

ROSE

OAKS

HIGHLAND

OAKS

HICKORY RIDGE RD.

NORTH HOLLY RD.

FENTON RD.

FISH LAKE RD.

BUCKHORN LK. RD.

ROSE CENTER RD.

CLYDE RD.

MILFORD RD.

MILFORD RD.

PONTIAC TRAIL

GRANGE HALL

HOLLY

MILFORD RD.

LAKE RD.

HARVEY

MILFORD

OLD PLANK RD.

DUCK LAKE RD.

LYON

OAKS

TRIPP RD.

Commissioners

Gerald A. Fisher, Chairman

John P. McCulloch, Vice Chairman

J. David VanderVeen, Secretary

Pecky D. Lewis, Jr., Chairperson Emeritus

A. David Baumhart III

Robert Kostin

Christine Long

Gary R. McGillivray

John Scott

Eric S. Wilson

Daniel J. Stencil, Executive Officer

Administrative Offices

2800 Watkins Lake Road

Waterford, MI 48328–1917

248.858.0906

1.888.OCPARKS

75

DAVISBURG RD.

ORMOND RD.

ORMOND RD.

PONTIAC TRAIL

WIXOM RD.

GRANGE HALL RD.

GROVELAND

OAKS

SPRINGFIELD

OAKS

59

WIXOM

DIXIE HIGHWAY

WHITE LAKE RD.

WHITE LAKE

OAKS

96

NOVI RD.

Parks Commission

15

ANDERSONVILLE RD.

UNION LAKE RD.

HAGGERTY RD.

ORTONVILLE

WILLIAMS LK.

WILLIAMS LAKE RD.

SEYMOUR LAKE RD.

CLARKSTON

AIRPORT RD.

13 MILE RD.

GLEN OAKS

96

696

SASHABAW RD.

PONTIAC LK. RD.

ORCHARD LAKE RD.

ORCHARD LAKE RD.

Founded in 1966, the Oakland County

Parks and Recreation Commission is

the policy-making board that oversees

the system’s 6,700 acres. Commissioners

are tasked with allocating resources over

13 parks, and making decisions about

purchasing park land, constructing

facilities, preserving maintenance

standards and developing innovative

programs and services.

Find us on

Facebook

75

10

24

LAKE ORION

INDEPENDENCE

OAKS CLARKSTON RD.

ORION

OAKS

SCOTT LAKE RD.

MIDDLEBELT RD.

WALDON RD.

WATKINS

LK. RD.

BALDWIN RD.

WATERFORD

OAKS

PONTIAC

TELEGRAPH RD.

24

LAPEER RD.

JOSLYN RD.

1

OXFORD

24

WOODWARD AVENUE

ADDISON

OAKS

STONEY CREEK

ADAMS RD.

LAKEVILLE RD.

PREDMORE

12 MILE RD.

CATALPA Catalpa Ave

OAKS

ROYAL

11 MILE RD. OAK

NORTHWESTERN

2011 Awards

ADAMS RD.

Greenfield

75

696

LAKE GEORGE

59

BIG BEAVER

LEONARD

KLINE

ORION RD.

STONEY CREEK

14 MILE RD.

13 MILE RD.

ROCHESTER RD.

ROMEO RD.

ROCHESTER

JOHN R RD.

RED

OAKS

75

DEQUINDRE RD.

MADISON

HEIGHTS

Pecky D. Lewis, Jr. was named

Outstanding Public Official by the

National Association of County Parks

and Recreation Officials.

Former Executive Officer Ralph

Richard was inducted into the

Michigan Recreation and Park

Association Hall of Fame.

MRPA Community Service Awards

were granted to North Oakland

Headwaters Land Conservancy,

equestrian Sharon Greene and metal

detector Dennis Rahn.

Independence Oaks Nordic Ski

Patrol given Best Small Patrol Award

from the Eastern Michigan Region of

the National Ski Patrol.

Photo by John Meyland

FY2011 Actual Expense

13%

Fringe Benefits

$2,669,206.25

14%

Depreciation

$2,862,725.90

9%

Internal Services

$1,687,186.35

FY2011 Actual Revenue

3%

Commodities

$669,137.70

Contractual Services

$4,700,164.30

24%

2%

37%

Salaries

$7,481,894.69

38% 60%

Charges for Services

$7,990,396.28

Investment Income

$361,967.33

Taxes

$12,696,435.49

Graphic Design:

Melissa Wagner

Photography:

Patricia Lindsay

Editorial Content:

Desiree Stanfield

Photo Credits

Front Cover:

Skip Moody

Back Cover:

John Meyland

Printed with vegetablebased

inks on recycled

paper by United

Graphics, Mattoon, IL

The Oakland County

Parks and Recreation

Commission provides

equal opportunity

employment, programs

and activities without

regard to race, color,

sex, religion, national

origin, age, marital

status or handicap.

The Oakland County

Parks and Recreation

Commission will

comply with the

Americans with

Disabilities Act and

make reasonable

accommodations to

assist individuals with

disabilities.

The owner of a

$175,000 home

pays $21 annually

to support Oakland

County Parks and

Recreation.


Addison Oaks County Park

DestinationOakland.com

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