2004-05 - Woodsworth College - University of Toronto

wdw.utoronto.ca

2004-05 - Woodsworth College - University of Toronto

Employment

Relations

2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

woodsworth college

university of toronto

woodsworth college

university of toronto

Woodsworth College

119 St. George Street

Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A9

Website: www.wdw.utoronto.ca/er


Employment Relations

2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction 2

Enrolling in the Program 3

Important Note about Prerequisites 3

Major Program 4

Specialist Program 5

Core Employment Relations Course Descriptions 6

Awards 10

Frequently Asked Questions 10

Woodsworth College

Hours of Operation

Telephone Hours

416-978-5783

Monday – Wednesday

Office Hours

Monday – Thursday

Friday

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (4:30 p.m. in July and August)

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (4:30 p.m. in July and August)

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Program Office

Woodsworth College, New Wing

University of Toronto

119 St. George Street

Toronto, ON M5S 1A9

E-mail: er@wdw.utoronto.ca

Website: www.wdw.utoronto.ca/er

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Employment Relations

2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

Introduction

The undergraduate Employment Relations degree program on the St. George campus is

sponsored by Woodsworth College. Employment Relations is an interdisciplinary field which

offers students the opportunity to study the employment relationship in a Canadian

context from the perspectives of economics, history, law, management, political science

and sociology. The program may be pursued on either a full time or part-time basis.

The program allows students to examine the nature of the institutions involved in the

employment relationship and the practices and procedures governing that relationship.

The program provides students with a theoretical background and knowledge of current

developments in the labour field that will serve as a basis for careers in employment

relations and human resource management or for further training at the graduate level.

Over the past twenty years there has been massive transformation in the world of work

because of technological change, restructuring and globalization. The impact of these

changes affects the individual worker as well as society as a whole. Students of

employment relations are well equipped to reflect on the changing nature of work and the

economic and social implications of these changes.

Students in the program will benefit from the resources of the University of Toronto’s

Centre for Industrial Relations. The Centre, which is located adjacent to Woodsworth

College, was founded in 1965 and has become a leading centre for graduate research in

the field. The first Master of Industrial Relations (MIR) program at an English language

university in Canada was established at the Centre in 1975 and was followed by a Ph.D.

program in 1986. The faculty at the Centre are known internationally for their research

and have written the major textbooks in Canada in the areas of labour economics, human

resource management, union-management relations, industrial relations and research

methods. The faculty have also been involved in many significant policy initiatives in

industrial relations in Canada and are active in major international organizations. This

involvement in research and in national and international activities is reflected in their

teaching in the Employment Relations program.

Employment Relations students also have access to the Jean and Dorothy Newman

Industrial Relations Library which was described recently by an external reviewer as "the

best industrial relations library in Canada". Professional library staff provide instruction and

individual research assistance with the extensive electronic resources of the university

including the U of T catalog, periodicals, indexing databases and the internet.

Enrolling In The Program

In order to enrol in the program a student must have completed at least four full course

equivalents including ECO100Y1/105Y1 and SOC101Y1 and have a cumulative grade point

average (CGPA) of at least 2.3 for the major program or 2.5 for the specialist program.

Students who wish to apply to the program based only on transfer credits should have a

minimum CGPA of at least 2.5 (at least a 70% average) in their previous studies for the

major or 2.8 (at least a 73% average) for the specialist program.

The Employment Relations program is available only to degree students registered in the

Faculty of Arts and Science on the St. George Campus. It is not necessary to be registered

at Woodsworth College but it is necessary to be registered at one of the colleges on the St.

George Campus.

Employment Relations is a limited enrolment program. Meeting the minimum

requirements does not guarantee admission.

Students may request enrolment directly on the Student Web Service

(www.rosi.utoronto.ca) from April 1 to May 23. Beginning June 28, students may check

their status on ROSI. Those students who will meet the admission criteria on the basis of

summer courses should request enrolment from July 14 to August 29. Results will be

available on ROSI from September 13.

If you are interested in transferring from another University or are currently enrolled in the

University of Toronto at Mississauga or the University of Toronto at Scarborough please

refer to page 10 of the brochure.

Important Note About Prerequisites

Some of the courses listed in the Employment Relations programs may have prerequisites

that are not part of the programs. Please consult the Arts and Science Calendar for full

course descriptions and details about prerequisites. Some courses may have limited

enrolment or may require approval from the appropriate department(s). All courses are not

offered every session. MGT120H1 is offered in the Summer Session and in the Winter

Session (January to April) only.

Check the Arts and Science calendar and sessional timetables at:

http://www.artsandscience.utoronto.ca

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2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

The Major Program

The major program in Employment Relations consists of seven courses.

Course 1

ECO100Y1

ECO105Y1

Course 2

SOC101Y1

Course 3

WDW244H1

WDW260H1

Introduction to Economics or

Principles of Economics for Non-Specialists

Introduction to Sociology

Labour Relations

Organizational Behaviour

Courses 3.5-5.5

Two and a half credits from the following, a half credit of which must be at the

300/400 level:

ECO239Y1 Labour Markets and Policies

ECO339Y1 The Economics of Labour

HIS313Y1 Canadian Labour and the Left

MGT120H1 Financial Accounting I

MGT223H1 Management Accounting I

SOC207Y1 Sociology of Work and Occupations

SOC297H1 Sociology of Work

SOC317Y1 Industrial Sociology

SOC367H1 Gender, Class and Race

SOC370Y1 Sociology of Labour

SOC375Y1 Sociology of Organizations

WDW346H1 Human Resource Planning

WDW347H1 Training and Development

WDW367H1 Compensation

WDW378H1 Employment Health

Courses 6-7

MGT460H1

WDW430Y1

Human Resource Management

Employment Law

The Specialist Program

The specialist program in Employment Relations consists of ten courses of which at least

four must be at the 300+ level.

Course 1

ECO100Y1

ECO105Y1

Course 2

SOC101Y1

Course 3

WDW244H1

WDW260H1

Course 4

ECO239Y1

ECO339Y1

Introduction to Economics or

Principles of Economics for Non-Specialists

Introduction to Sociology

Labour Relations

Organizational Behaviour

Labour Markets and Policies or

The Economics of Labour

Course 5 One of:

ECO321Y1 Canadian Economic History Since 1500

ECO323Y1 Canadian Economic Development Since Confederation

HIS262Y1 History of Canada

HIS263Y1 Introduction to Canadian History

POL102Y1 Critical Issues in Canadian Politics

POL103Y1 Canada in Comparative Context

Course 6 One credit from:

ECO220Y1 Quantitative Methods in Economics

PSY201H1 Statistics I and

PSY202H1 Statistics II

SOC200Y1 Introduction to Social Research

Course 7

HIS 313Y1

Canadian Labour and the Left

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Employment Relations

2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

Course 7.5-8.5 One and a half credits from:

MGT120H1

MGT223H1

SOC207Y1

SOC 297H1

SOC317Y1

SOC367H1

SOC370Y1

SOC375Y1

WDW346H1

WDW347H1

WDW367H1

WDW378H1

Courses 9-10

MGT460H1

WDW430Y1

Financial Accounting I

Management Accounting I

Sociology of Work and Occupations

Sociology of Work

Industrial Sociology

Gender, Class and Race

Sociology of Labour

Sociology of Organizations

Human Resource Planning

Training and Development

Compensation

Employment Health

Human Resource Management

Employment Law

Core Employment Relations Course Descriptions

ECO100Y1 Introduction to Economics

An introduction to economic analysis and its applications; price determination; the role of

competition; international trade and finance; the theory of production and employment:

the role of money and the banking system; monetary and fiscal policy. NOTE: Graphical and

quantitative analysis are used extensively.

Exclusion: ECO105Y1

ECO105Y1 Principles of Economics for Non-Specialists

An introduction to the principles and methods of economics. Topics: price determination

and industrial organization; employment, income and inflation; international trade and

finance. Emphasis on application of economic analysis to current problems. Students who

intend to complete a minor, major or specialist program in Economics are advised to take

ECO100Y1.

Exclusion: ECO100Y1

ECO239Y1 Labour Market and Policies

Application of economic analysis to current issues in labour policy: immigration,

retirement, education, unemployment, earning differentials, employment and pay equity,

labour unions, minimum wage, income policies.

Exclusion: ECO339Y1

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1 (63%/CGPA2.50)/ECO105Y1(80%/CGPA 2.50)

ECO339Y1 Economics of Labour

The operation of labour markets; determinants of supply and demand for labour; wage

differentials; discrimination; investment in schooling and training; unemployment;

economics of unions.

Exclusion: ECO239Y1, ECO361Y5

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/206Y1;ECO220Y1/227Y1/STA(250H1,255H1)/257H1,261H1)

HIS313Y1 Canadian Labour and the Left

Canadian labour history from political action to collective bargaining in the period from

Confederation to the present.

Prerequisite: ECO244Y1/HIS262Y1/HIS263Y1/WDW244H1

MGT120H1 Financial Accounting I

Introduction to the theory and concepts of financial accounting. Students learn how to

construct and interpret financial statements. Topics include an introductory understanding

of accounting and the context within which accounting occurs.

MGT223H1 Management Accounting I

Basic understanding of cost accounting as used in manufacturing, merchandising, and

service industries. Topics include the purposes of cost accounting, cost classification and

behaviour, costing systems, estimation of costs, and the use of costs in Cost-volumeprofit

analysis. Computer applications are used where appropriate.

Exclusion: MGT123H1

Prerequisite: At least C in MGT120H1

MGT460H1 Human Resource Management

Human resource management is studied from the perspective of the manager/practitioner.

The course focuses on current theory and practices in the major functions of human

resource management. Class exercises and projects are used to provide students with some

practical HR experience.

Prerequisite: MGT262H1/MGT362H/MGT363H1/WDW260Y1/WDW260H1

SOC101Y1 Introduction to Sociology

The basic principles and methods of sociology applied to the study of human societies;

social sources of differing values and conceptions of reality, and the influence of these on

the behaviour of individuals, patterns of relations among groups, and social stability and

change.

SOC207Y1 Sociology of Work and Occupations

The nature and meaning of work in relation to changes in the position of the professions,

unions and government, of women and minority groups, and in industrial societies more

generally. Career choice and strategies, occupational mobility, and individual satisfaction at

work.

Prerequisite: SOC101Y1

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SOC297H1 Sociology of Work

Why do people work? Why do they work so hard? What is the role of management,

technology and other aspects of work in shaping the everyday experiences of workers?

This course will provide an introduction to sociological theories and research on why work

looks the way it does today, what some of the problems are facing workers, and possible

solutions. We will also examine issues of gender, race, and discrimination in the workplace.

Prerequisite: SOC 101Y1

SOC317Y1 Industrial Sociology (formerly SOC316Y)

Labour/management relations in industrial societies; impact of technological change on

work organizations and labour markets; implications for understanding various topics

including social mobility, labour market segmentation, job satisfaction, work/family

relations, immigration and race, power in organizations, union and industrial conflict,

organizational culture, and the social control of industry.

Prerequisite: A 200+ series SOC course

SOC 367H1 Gender, Class and Race

Explores three key sources of inequality in this society: gender, social class, and race.

Examines these three sources of divisions in paid and unpaid work; differences in family by

class, race, and ethnicity; the organization of different communities; and select cultural

issues.

Prerequisite: SOC 101Y1

SOC370Y1 Sociology of Labour

The role and development of labour and the labour movement in Canada, its differential

success in various industries and regions and its impact on other aspects of society.

Pre-requisite: A 200+ series SOC course

SOC375Y1 Sociology of Organizations

Internal structure of formal and informal organizations; bureaucracies; patterns of

interorganizational relations; impact of organizations on social structure and social classes

of different societies.

Prerequisite: A 200+ series SOC course

WDW244H1 Labour Relations

Introduction to the institutions, issues and legislation affecting the employment

relationship in the public and private sectors in Canada, with emphasis on collective

bargaining. The economic and political environment, history of the labour movement,

union organization, certification, contract negotiation, strikes, dispute resolution, contract

administration and grievances.

Exclusion: ECO244Y1, WDW244Y1

Prerequisite: Four courses and a CGPA of at least 2.0.

WDW260H1 Organizational Behaviour

Introduction to the nature of organizations and behaviour of individuals and groups within

organizations, including such topics as culture and diversity, reward systems, motivation,

leadership, politics, communication, decision-making, conflict and group processes. Not

recommended for students in Commerce programs.

Exclusion: MGT262H1, WDW103Y1, WDW260Y1

Prerequisite: Four courses and a CGPA of at least 2.0.

WDW346H1 Human Resource Planning

Essential elements of designing and developing the human resource planning process in

organizations, including organizational change, job design, forecasting needs, and the

relationship of human resource planning to organizational goals and strategies.

Prerequisite: WDW260H1/WDW260Y1

Exclusion: HRM 206H1

WDW347H1 Training and Development

The role of training and development in human resource management, including an

analysis of training and development needs of organizations, and the design,

administration and assessment of training programs.

Prerequisite: WDW260H1/WDW260Y1

Exclusion: HRM 207H1

WDW367H1 Compensation

The theory and process of developing and administering compensation systems. Through

the core compensation principles of efficiency, equity, consistency and competitiveness we

consider such topics as: job analysis, job evaluation, pay levels and structures, pay for

performance, benefits, and compensating special groups of workers.

Prerequisite: WDW260H1/MGT262H1

Exclusion: HRM202H1

WDW 378H1 Employment Health

The influence of legislation, the labour market and collective bargaining on health policies

and programs in the workplace. The rights and responsibilities of employers, employees,

unions and governments for the regulation and promotion of workplace health and safety;

and the implications of evolving demographic, economic, and social factors.

Prerequisite: ECO244Y/WDW244H/244Y and WDW260H/WDW260Y

WDW430Y1 Employment Law (formerly WDW330H/430H)

The major legal structures which regulate the employment relationship in the private and

public sectors: the common law of contract (master/servant law), legislation governing

collective bargaining, the primary statutes (employment standards act, human rights code,

workers’ compensation act, labour relations act, occupational health and safety act).

Exclusion: WDW330H/430H

Prerequisite: ECO244Y1/WDW244Y1/WDW244H1 and WDW260Y1/WDW260H1, enrolment

in an Employment Relations program.

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2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

Awards

The Jack and Lena Meltz Award is presented annually to a Woodsworth College student

enrolled in an Employment Relations program. Financial need is the main consideration.

The award, which has a minimum value of $250, was established by the former

Woodsworth College Principal the late Professor Noah Meltz and his wife, Rochelle Meltz,

in memory of Professor Meltz’s parents.

The Lilian Mary Silcox Prize is awarded annually to the student who has the highest mark

in WDW260H1 – Organizational Behaviour. The prize has a value of $100 and was

established by Professor Peter Silcox, second Principal of Woodsworth College, in memory

of his mother.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What secondary school background do I need for Employment Relations?

A. There are no specific secondary school courses required as prerequisites for first year

courses leading to the Employment Relations program. However, students planning to

take ECO100Y1 in their first year should have completed OAC Calculus and either OAC

Algebra and Geometry or OAC Finite Mathematics. Students must also meet the

admission requirements for the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Information about admissions is available from:

Admissions and Awards Tel: 416-978-2190

315 Bloor Street West E-mail: ask@adm.utoronto.ca

Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A3 http://www.library.utoronto.ca/admissions/

Q. What do I do in first year?

A. Faculty of Arts and Science students do not choose their program of study until the

end of their first four credits. If you wish to study Employment Relations, you should

enrol in SOC101Y1 and either ECO100Y1 or ECO105Y1 in your first year. Students

should also consider taking an introductory course in Canadian politics. This

background will be useful since many of the issues dealt with in Employment

Relations are looked at from a Canadian perspective.

Q. Can I transfer into Employment Relations from another university?

A. Every year some transfer students enrol in Employment Relations programs. Students

thinking of transferring to the University of Toronto (Faculty of Arts and Science, St.

George Campus) should contact Admissions and Awards. Students offering only

transfer credits as the basis for admission to Employment Relations are required to

have a CGPA of at least 2.8 (73%) for the specialist or 2.5 (70%) for the major. This is

slightly higher than the requirement for students who have completed their

preparatory courses at the University of Toronto.

You should note that program admission is determined by the Faculty of Arts and

Science once transfer credit assessment is complete. Admission to the program will

depend on whether program prerequisites and grade requirements have been met.

Results will be communicated to the student in writing, by the Faculty of Arts and

Science, in the transfer credit assessment letter.

Transfer credits from other institutions may not correspond exactly to courses offered

in the Employment Relations program. If your previous studies are from a university

within Ontario, you can check course equivalencies on the Transfer Information

Service website. Not all courses have been assessed but 6500 have.

http://transfer.dag.ca/ontario/

Please contact Admissions and Awards for all admission inquiries for undergraduate

admission to the University of Toronto in any category (full time, full-time with

advanced standing, part-time, part-time with advanced standing).

Information about admissions is available from:

Admissions and Awards Tel: 416-978-2190

315 Bloor Street West E-mail: ask@adm.utoronto.ca

Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A3 www.library.utoronto.ca/admissions/

Q. Can UTM/UTSC students enrol in the Employment Relations Program?

A. Degree students registered in the University of Toronto at Mississauga or the

University of Toronto at Scarborough interested in enrolling in the Employment

Relations program must apply for admission to the Faculty of Arts and Science, St.

George Campus. Program admission is determined by Faculty of Arts and Science once

transfer credit assessment is complete. Admission to the program will depend on

whether program prerequisites and grade requirements have been met. Results will

be communicated to the student in writing, by the Faculty of Arts and Science, in the

transfer credit assessment letter. Please contact Admissions and Awards for all

admission inquiries.

Q. Are there other related programs in the Faculty of Arts and Science?

A. A major program in Sociology could include SOC200Y1, SOC207Y1, SOC317Y1,

SOC367H1, SOC370Y1 and SOC375Y1 all of which are courses in the Employment

Relations program. Sociology students could take as electives HIS313Y1, WDW244H1,

WDW260H1.

Q. Is there a graduate program in Employment Relations at U of T?

A. The Centre for Industrial Relations offers both a Masters degree and a Ph.D. degree in

Industrial Relations. The MIR may be pursued on either a part-time or full-time basis

and normally requires the equivalent of two years of study. However, students with an

appropriate undergraduate background may be exempted from some or all of the first

year MIR courses.

For information, please contact:

Centre for Industrial Relations Tel: 416-978-2927

121 St. George Street Fax: 416-978-5696

Toronto, ON M5S 2E8 E-mail: cir@chass.utoronto.ca

http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/cir/

Q. For what careers might an undergraduate program in Employment

Relations prepare me?

A. Students who wish to pursue careers in areas such as human resources, industrial

relations, the public service, or to become professional union staff will find the

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Employment Relations

2004/05 Undergraduate Handbook

Employment Relations Programs to be a useful preparation. Some graduates proceed

to further studies in law or graduate work in industrial relations or management. An

overview of local possibilities is provided in a Guide to Professional and Graduate

Programs in Ontario by Dyanne Gibson, University of Toronto Press. Prospective law or

MBA students might also wish to consult the most recent editions of A Guide to Law

Schools in Canada and A Guide to MBA Programs in Canada both by Catherine

Purcell, ECW Press.

Q. How can I improve my prospects of securing employment when I

graduate?

A. Use the Career Centre. Among its many services the Career Centre maintains a Career

Resource Library, operates the Graduating Students Employment Service and organizes

the volunteer Extern Program which offers students a chance to explore a career in

the actual workplace.

Several times a month from September to April the Centre offers a series

of workshops on:

Discovering Your Skills and Options

How to Identify Work Opportunities

Marketing Yourself for Today’s Workplace

Interview Techniques

Resume and Cover Letter Writing

A good book in this area for undergraduates is Making it Work: Career Management

for the New Workplace by Marilyn Van Norman, Burgher Books.

For further information, contact:

Career Centre

Koffler Student Services Centre Tel: 416-978-8000

214 College Street Fax: 416-978-8020

Toronto, ON M5T 1R2 http://www.careers.utoronto.ca/

Q. Can the Employment Relations program lead to a professional

qualification?

A. Some courses taken in the program are applicable to the program of studies leading

to the designation of Certified Human Resources Professional (CHRP) awarded by the

Human Resources Professional Association of Ontario.

For information, contact HRPAO Member Services at:

HRPAO Tel: 416-923-2324

Suite 1902

1-800-387-1311(Ontario Toll Free)

2 Bloor Street West` Fax: 416-923-7264

Toronto, ON M4W 3E2

http://www.hrpao.org/

February 2004

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