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Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in the West of England

Building Capacity for Heat Networks Workshop Minutes

13th December 2011


Workshop on building capacity for heat networks

Notes for circulation to all workshop attendees

This workshop brought together a range of stakeholders to discuss opportunities for the implementation of district

heating networks in the West of England with particular attention to the Bristol North Fringe and Central Bath. Findings

of the recent study into the potential for Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in the West of England, and experiences

from experts in the field were presented, followed by focussed discussions on two live case studies to build capacity in

the Bristol North Fringe and in Central Bath.

The workshop explored the process of implementing heat networks in these case study areas. Learning from the

workshop is documented here, and next steps coming out of the workshops are presented in the form of action plans.

Attendees included developers, planning agents, large businesses and public sector organisations with significant heat

demands, planning officers involved with development in Bath and in the Bristol North Fringe area, and others with a

professional interest in developing capacity for heat networks in the West of England.

Workshop details:

Date: Tuesday the 13th December, 2011

Place: Bristol and Bath Science Park

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1 List of attendees

First Name Surname Company Email address

Jane Antrobus South Gloucestershire Council Jane.Antrobus@southglos.gov.uk

Alan

Bailey

Avonmouth and Severnside Green

Industries Forum

Alan.bailey@yahoo.co.uk

Austen Bates Buro Happold Austen.Bates@burohappold.com

Celia Beeson Bristol City Council Celia.beeson@bristol.gov.uk

Chris Bowie-Hill Arup Chris.Bowie-Hill@arup.com

Ray Brown UWE Ray.Briwn@uwe.ac.uk

Gary Crisp Airbus Gary.crisp@Airbus.com

Anthony Davies Buro Happold Anthony.Davies@burohappold.com

Kenny Duncan Crest Nicholson Kenny.Duncan@crestnicholson.com

Rosie Farquhar Tor Ltd Rosie.farquhar@torltd.co.uk

Ian Forsyth Cofely Ian.forsyth@cofely-gdfsuez.com

Alex Gillington Rolls Royce Agillington@geraldeve.com

Tessa Gordelier UWE Tessa.Gordelier@uwe.ac.uk

Julian Greaves Bath Spa University j.greaves@bathspa.ac.uk

Sara Grimes Bath and North East Somerset Council Sara_Grimes@bathnes.gov.uk

Jessica Harper North Somerset Council Jessica.Harper@n-somerset.gov.uk

Richard Hellen Hermes Energy Services Richard@hermesenergyservices.com

Martin Holley Centre for Sustainable Energy Martin.holley@cse.org.uk

Dan Jones South Gloucestershire Council Dan.jones@southglos.gov.uk

Greg Jones Hoare Lea GregJones@hoarelea.com

Chris Knight South Gloucestershire Council Chris.knight@southglos.gov.uk

Mike Luton South Gloucestershire Council Mike.luton@southglos.gov.uk

Cllr David Martin Bath and North East Somerset Council David.martin@bathnes.gov.uk

Emilia Melville Buro Happold Emilia.melville@burohappold.com

Colin Morrison Turley Associates cmorrison@turleyassociates.co.uk

Phil Norrish Utility Partnership Limited phil.norrish@up-ltd.co.uk

Dave Ogborne Wessex Water Dave.ogborne@wessexwater.co.uk

Julian Okoye GENeco Julian.Okoye@geneco.uk.com

Charlotte Parkes Islington Council Charlotte.Parkes@islington.gov.uk

Jonathan Riggall Peter Brett Associates jriggall@peterbrett.com

Jonathan Severs South Gloucestershire Council Jonathan.severs@southglos.gov.uk

Mike Smith Cofely District Energy Mike.smith@cofely-gdfsuez.com

Richard Swinden Peter Brett Associates rswinden@peterbrett.com

Jane Thompson South Gloucestershire Council Jane.Thompson@southglos.gov.uk

Alex Vaughan-Jones Rolls Royce Avaughn-Jones@geraldeve.com

Cllr Martin Veal Bath and North East Somerset Council Martin_veal@bathnes.gov.uk

Alasdair Young Buro Happold Alasdair.Young@burohappold.com

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2 Summary of presentations from the first half of the day (09:30 to 12:30)

09:30 Introduction Brian Glasson Head of Strategic Planning South Gloucestershire Council

09:40 Overview of Renewables and Low Carbon Energy Capacity in the West of England Austen Bates, Buro

Happold

10:00 The Business Case for Heat Networks Alasdair Young, Buro Happold

11:00 District heat network case studies (Southampton) Mike Smith, Cofely

11:30 District heat network case studies London Borough of Islington Charlotte Parks, Islington Council

3 Workshop 1 – Influence and Roles (13:30 to 13:50)

Participants were grouped by role or profession, to

discuss the role and influence they have within from

each stakeholder group’s perspective. This discussion

was framed around concentric ‘circles of influence’, with

matters that are owned or controlled by each actor at the

centre, and those which are only indirectly influenced

at the outer edge. Matters outside of the control of the

stakeholder group, or which have an influence on them,

were placed outside of the circle.





The following notes detail the observations made by

workshop participants on the day. These were recorded

on diagrams which are included in Appendix A

3.1 Unitary Authorities

Figure 1.1: Circles of influence diagrams

Unitary Authority members and officers identified ownership or control of the following:

Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in the West of England

Highway network; UA property such as schools and leisure centres; other assets; redevelopment of council owned land;

planning policy; location of new development; staff and financial resources.

Unitary Authority members and officers have direct influence over the following:

Planning applications; development control influencing the manner in which development goes ahead; the

implementation of planning policy; the requirements of the Community Infrastructure Levy and Section 106 payments;

social landlords; whether district heating is promoted as a low carbon solution.

Unitary Authority members and officers have indirect influence over the following:

Wider public sector; LEP, LSP; encouraging other partners to take the lead; public perception.

Unitary Authority members and officers are influenced by the following:

Natural and physical constraints to heat network technologies; legal constraints to business models and deployment;

regulation of air quality; political issues and competing priorities.

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3.2 Anchor Loads and Developers

Owners of potential heat anchor loads and developers identified ownership or control of the following:

Existing CHP plant (e.g. Rolls Royce site, consented sites identified by Low Carbon South West); development sites and

land assets; procurement of technologies e.g. CHP with the right low carbon fuels.

Owners of potential heat anchor loads and developer have direct influence over the following:

Neighbouring users of heat, and potential customers for heat generated on site (e.g. new housing, MOD estate and HP

close to UWE, new supermarkets etc). This includes the potential of working with neighbours to improve the heat load

profile, and explore the potential to have a business presence in residential areas.

Owners of potential heat anchor loads and developer have indirect influence over the following:

Example setting (this is a strong driver in the HE sector); influence of customers and public acceptability, e.g. the

demonstration of green credentials of district heating to companies and new residents; exploration of alternative fuel

sources e.g. new fuel sources for CHP units.

Outside of circles

Role for Local Planning Authorities in requiring incorporation of district heating networks; big blocks of housing don’t

necessarily lend themselves to district heating, which is viable only above a density of 30-35 dwellings/ha; many

businesses have no interest in acting as energy suppliers

3.3 Professional Services

Professional service providers identified ownership or control of the following:

Their own offices; technical knowledge; physical design of systems; strategy development for clients; collaborating with

stakeholders for joint projects; getting grants and running independent projects.

The following matters fall between ownership/control and direct influence:

Engagement/partnership building; influence/advise developers and community groups; developing route map for

district heating projects; helping manage risk; helping develop planning policy.

Professional services have direct influence over the following:

Knowledge transfer and leap-frogging; developing flexible strategies, keeping big picture in mind.

The following matters fall between direct influence and indirect influence:

Developing resources/tools to enable action e.g. heat map; raising awareness for local authorities and planners;

influencing central policy, informing government; education and learning for behaviour change; education for

developers e.g. on cost saving by energy saving; encouraging developers to think beyond red line and join up thinking;

helping developers deliver CSR.

Professional services identified indirect influence over the following:

Infrastructure-led masterplanning e.g. in the enterprise zone; delivery of exemplar buildings to influence future

construction practices; influencing how LAs spend money e.g. CIL for energy officers.

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3.4 Energy Service Companies (ESCos)

This group approached the workshop from a slightly different perspective to the others, asking what has influence over

district heat network implementation, as well as what is influenced by an ESCo:

The implementation of district heat networks are owned and controlled by:

Some LAs e.g. Islington; E.on; developers and investors in low carbon projects e.g. pension funds.

The implementation of district heat networks are directly influenced by:

Energy companies can support and identify investors, developers etc on low carbon projects; LA and ESCo partnerships;

section 106/CIL; LAs can commission studies; DECC & DCLG create markets and control fiscal incentives; LAs create

favourable conditions including planning policy, particularly through the core strategy.

The implementation of district heat networks is indirectly influenced by:

LA & industry can lobby government; ESCo can create case for funding and investment; ESCo can screen for suitable

sites; feasibility studies energy companies and consultants; promotion of case studies work by ESCos; communication

and awareness raising to LAs; support to small schemes which can be linked to a network at a later stage

Note:

There is a need for regional/sub-regional working, for example coordination of infrastructure which crosses boundaries,

sharing expertise, and aligning planning policy.

4 Workshop 2 – Specific Locations (13:50 -15:20)

For the second workshop, participants were grouped according to geographical area of interest, with the aim of

identifying next steps towards implementation of district heat networks in each area. Maps were provided for each

area, and were sketched on to capture the geographical information provided by workshop participants. These maps

are included in Appendix B for reference.

Workshop participants were asked the following questions:

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1. What are the opportunities for heat networks in the specific location (taking into account anchor loads / new

development / potential land for energy centres etc)?

2. What are the barriers to heat networks in the specific location?

3. What are the different roles of each of the stakeholders present?

4. Which important stakeholders are not present?

5. What further information is required?

6. What are the key next steps for implementing heat networks in the specific locations?

4.1 Bath and North East Somerset

What are the opportunities?

• Bath Abbey and springs

• Central Bath: connecting to Bath College, new hotels etc

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• Using the vaults (this is potentially also a constraint due to heritage status)

• Business Improvement District members

• Bath Western Riverside Development

• River: biomass transport

• Sainsbury’s and Tesco’s new stores: are they future proofed for expansion? These developments have E.on as an

ESCo: are E.on supporting the spend on future proofing?

• Bath Spa University: Could it link up?

What are the barriers?

• Cultural issues, such as heat networks not being mainstream, and current heat distribution systems being

individualistic.

• Is there a community role/ownership option?

• Can waste be used as a fuel source? E.g. slurry , food waste and food production waste.

• Lack of education, which could be addressed through curriculum modules on heating.

Which stakeholders aren’t present ?

• Farmers/landowners: provide them with awareness for e.g. growing biomass, waste.

• Woodland managers, especially sources of willow.

• Supply chain development e.g. of biomass.

• AONB Partnership Committee:

• Bringing L.A.s together for supply chain management and effi ciency.

• Dalkia: an ESCo that collects wood

• Set up a woodland management company? Learn from the Future Bath Plus initiative.

• National trust.

• Supermarkets: these could provide heat networks for the surrounding areas.

Next Steps

• Build on existing study to engage stakeholders

• Investigate allowable solutions/development constraints

• Investigate fi nances for connecting Bath Spa to Twerton

• Contact landowners, especially owners of large areas of land.

• Set up a council action team to form a small core then identify a wider stakeholder group

• Build on contacts developed through the Low Carbon Initiative.

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4.2 Harry Stoke and UWE Site

Area of growth and development

• Plans include three potential areas of new development, including Cheswick Village (1000 homes under

construction), Filton Cemetry (500 homes) and Harry Stoke (a total of 3,200 homes and two primary schools)

• Proposed Bristol Rovers Stadium

• Expansion of UWE site

Opportunities

• Existing major heat demand anchor loads include UWE, MOD, Sainsbury’s, B&Q, Holiday Inn hotel, business parks,

AXA, Filton College, the former HP site, Frenchay Hospital.

• High Electricity demand

• Reasonable heat demand

• Potential for CHP Plant and District Heat Network at UWE site - under consideration

• Hewlett Packard are building an energy centre

• Potential for smaller schemes at Sainsbury’s and MOD sites

• Potential for trigeneration as there is cooling demand.

• Potential for a cluster of heat networks of smaller energy centres serving existing sites with potential to link to the

new developments and grow at later stages

Barriers / Constraints

• The Ring Road is both a physical and a cost barrier

• The M32 between Frenchay Hospital and the other anchor loads

• Density of new proposed housing development is unlikely to be viable for district heating there is a need for high

density development to make schemes for housing viable

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• Improved energy efficiency of new homes may impact on the viability of district heating

• Stakeholders wanting individual control and not wanting to look for shared solutions

• Timing/Phasing of the developments

Roles

• Local Authority

• Planning

• Require people to make provision for District Heating and link into the network

• Highways

• Advocacy – bringing players together

• UWE

• Lead Role as main anchor load

• Advocacy

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• Working with LA and Community

• Potential role for Faculty of Environment and Technology and student involvement

• LSP

Next Steps

• Leadership and Advocacy

• Investigate what others are doing in particular other University schemes including Leicester, and Aston.

• High level talks with the South Gloucestershire Council Chief Executive and the Vice Chancellor of UWE, with the

potential to feedback the results of this workshop to the LSP in January.

• Build on existing work through the Environmental Sustainability Partnership Clean Energy Workstream

• Commission a feasibility study

• Mike from Cofely will provide points of contact and examples of feasibility studies

4.3 Avonmouth and Severnside area

Low Carbon SW

• The heat grid feasibility study is almost complete, and is to be launched April 2012. The design and engineering

phase is to follow. They are looking at a possible connection to central Bristol and routes for distribution

infrastructure. LCSW is taking co-operative approach, involving power generators in the project.

Filton Airfield

• The proximity of Severnside heat sources to existing planned and consented housing development around

Filton Airfield and to the aerospace industry could give potential scale and anchor loads for DH. Northern Fringe

housing developments could total 6,000 dwellings. Can LAs enable collaboration between developers?

Spatial Planning

• There is a need to use planning policy to promote DH and safeguard routes for infrastructure. Low density

housing (below 50 dph) and high levels of insulation will make DH less commercially viable, so masterplanning

may not encourage a built form which is compatible with DH. Fabric energy effi ciency should be prioritised over

DH, and study of lifecycle energy and fi nancial costs should be carried out. Need to identify key sites for a fi rst

phase, then grow the network from these nodes.

Market

• Is there demand for DH in the residential market, and an understanding of the benefi ts?

Stakeholders

• There is a need to include the Port of Bristol, Western Power Distribution and economic development colleagues.

Landowner / developer stakeholders may change after planning approval achieved.

Way leaves / access

• It is crucial to establish these at an early stage. These can be enabled through an ESCo (e.g. landowners off ered

discounted energy in return for access over land).

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Further information needed

• Site specific feasibility work and masterplanning (how to fund?)

Next steps

• Looking at a link to central Bristol, and identifying energy demand, starting with the public sector, including

universities, hospitals, and local authority buildings.

• Bring forward planning guidance through Core Strategies, spatial allocations, Supplementary Planning

Documents Area Action Plans.

• Establish governance model for ESCo/s, including stakeholder influence relative to investment.

• Encourage businesses with high heat demand to locate in Avonmouth / Severnside.

• Obtain breakdown of heat demand and supply by local authorities, following WoE research.

4.4 Cribbs / Patchway / Filton Airfield Area Workshop

Existing and proposed land-uses

Existing major energy users include:

• Rolls Royce – self sufficient supply of electricity and heat.

• Airbus Complex – district heating approach abandoned in favour of cost efficient building by building approach.

• The Mall – major user of electricity but not heat.

• Residential areas - low density suburban areas with mainly private housing.

• Land-uses tend to operate independently and most draw from grid.

Extensive new development planned – both residential and employment:

• Charlton Hayes Residential (Bovis) and Employment (Goodmans)

Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in the West of England

• Former Rolls Royce East works (owned by RR and has permission for employment development)

• Patchway Trading Estate (could be redeveloped as housing)

• Land south of the Airfield (proposed for primarily residential use)

• Filton Airfield (proposed for mixed use redevelopment to include employment land to the east by the A38.)

West of A4018 (current Green Belt).

Opportunities

• Scope to link existing major energy users and extensive planned new development, i.e. a potential good mix of

employment and residential areas. District heating is worth exploring but there are questions about its suitability

for low density private housing. Could serve schools etc.

• Scope for local generation and for use of waste heat from the Severnside area, including heat from waste and

from the proposed power station (Scottish Power). Could the rail link to Severnside provide a corridor for

transport of heat via pipes, possibly over-ground to reduce costs?

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Barriers / Issues

• Land uses are currently quite segregated

• Lots of interests, and a complicated mix of land ownership

• Unclear responsibilities and leadership

• Phasing issues and uncertainties about development timescales

• Commercial viability is not yet proven

• The density of the proposed residential development may not provide suffi cient heat demand (viable density is

likely to be at least 40 dwellings per hectare)

• The requirement for ‘zero carbon’ new development also reduces heat demand. This needs to be taken into

account in assessment of the viability of district heating schemes in the area. Any district heating system would

need to be tailored and sized accordingly.

• In the fi rst instance, it may be more feasible to develop smaller systems around key anchor loads (existing or

proposed) than an area-wide network. But consider a potential to link up in future.

• There are some physical barriers in the area (such as the railway) but these can be overcome (at cost) with

engineering solutions.

• Existing businesses may tend towards self suffi ciency / control rather than be reliant on neighbours / ESCOs for

their future energy needs. However, there was willingness from all present to engage to explore the options.

Next Steps

• A more detailed feasibility study is required. The scope needs to be wider than District Heating. It needs to look at

a range of possible energy solutions for the area, including District Heating.

• As part of the exploration of District Heating potential, options regarding the scale of heating network(s) need

to be identifi ed. For example – are we talking about a larger network incorporating existing anchor loads as well

as the extensive new development sites (and potentially extending to sources of waste heat in Severnside), or

one or more smaller networks centred around the most dense areas of demand from existing and future anchor

loads?

• What is the role of the Local Authority? South Gloucestershire Council owns some assets in the area (such as

Schools) but is not a signifi cant player in terms of energy consumption or land ownership locally. However,

coordination is required in order to develop a shared understanding of the best energy solution for the area.

• Could the Local Authority draft Terms of Reference for an energy solutions feasibility study for the Cribbs /

Patchway / Airfi eld area, for circulation to those present (and other important stakeholders in the area such as

Western Power, BAE, Skanska, Bovis) for consultation / possible joint commissioning?

5 Action Plans for each site

B&NES

• Identify and map internal and external stakeholders and their roles.

• Set up a council action team to form a small core then identify a wider stakeholder group .

• Map the benefi ts of district heating, taking into account fi ndings of the existing study by AECOM .

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• Investigate allowable solutions/development constraints.

• Bring a report on the issue of communal energy infrastructure to the Environmental Sustainability Partnerhsip.

• Investigate financial investment requirements for connecting Bath Spa University to Twerton.

• Contact key landowners e.g. Duchy of Cornwall (owned by Prince Charles) for a better understanding of their

view.

• Build on contacts developed through the Low Carbon Initiative.

Harry Stoke

• Start a dialogue with the South Gloucestershire Council Chief Executive and the Vice Chancellor of UWE, with the

potential to feedback the results of this workshop to the LSP in January.

• Investigate what others are doing in particular precedents in other University schemes including Leicester, and

Aston.

• Talk to other stakeholders in the area, e.g. Sainsbury’s, MOD etc.

• Commission a feasibility study assessing opportunities for all three identified sites.

Avonmouth/Severnside

• Assess the potential for linking to central Bristol, and identify energy demand, starting with the public sector,

including universities, hospitals, and local authority buildings. Continue to re-assess this as circumstances change

(e.g. cost of fuel, cost of installation, new development etc.)

• Bring forward planning guidance through Core Strategies, spatial allocations, Supplementary Planning

Documents and Area Action Plans.

• Establish governance model for ESCo(s), including stakeholder influence relative to investment.

• Encourage businesses with high heat demand to locate in Avonmouth / Severnside.

• Obtain breakdown of heat demand and supply by local authorities, following WoE research.

Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in the West of England

Cribbs/Patchway

• Procure a sustainable energy feasibility study. The scope needs to be wider than District Heating.

• Procure a detailed District Heating feasibility study that assesses options regarding the scale of heating

network(s) to be identified. For example, is a larger network incorporating existing anchor loads as well as the

extensive new development sites feasible, or would one or more smaller networks centred around the most

dense areas of demand from existing and future anchor loads be more feasible?

• Define the role of the Local Authority. South Gloucestershire Council owns some assets in the area (such as

Schools) but is not a significant player in terms of energy consumption or land ownership locally. Therefore an

advocacy and planning role may be the most appropriate.

• The Local Authority is to draft Terms of Reference for an energy solutions feasibility study for the Cribbs /

Patchway / Airfield area, for circulation to those present (and other important stakeholders in the area such as

Western Power, BAE, Skanska, Bovis) for consultation and possible joint commissioning?

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6 Summary of the day

The day started with presentations from experts, including interesting case studies of the Olympic Park, Southampton

and the London Borough of Islington. These set the tone for the workshops which followed, and gave participants the

opportunity to explore issues and next steps with their peers, and focus on specific sites.

Many thanks to all who participated for being open and bringing a wide range of experience and perspectives to the

table. The quality and focus of the ‘next steps’ identified reflects the high level of engagement of those who attended.

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Appendix A: Workshop 1, circles of influence

Figure 1.7: Circles of influence for Unitary Authorities

Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in the West of England

Figure 1.8: Circles of influence for anchor loads and developers

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Figure 1.9: Circles of influence for professional services

Figure 1.10: Circles of influence for ESCos

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Appendix B: Workshop 2, marked up maps of the Bristol

North Fringe specific locations

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Figure 1.11: Marked up map of the Harry Stoke area

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Figure 1.12: Marked up map of the Cribbs and Patchway area

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Figure 1.13: Marked up map of the Severnside area

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Reference

Workshop participants may be interested in following up the following references:

For more information about district heat network implementation in the Olympic Park, the following article from the

Institute of Civil Engineers can be downloaded from the ICE online library:

Providing community energy for the London 2012 Olympic Park, Maybank, Carr, Guest and Laidlaw, ICE 2011.

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