Jan/Feb 2004 - ASET

aset.ab.ca

Jan/Feb 2004 - ASET

APEGGA loses

appeal over word

‘engineer’

TECHNOLOGYALBERTA

JAN/FEB 2 004

Alberta Society of Engineering Technologists

2004

Convention


APEGGA loses appeal

over word ‘engineer’

of

Professional

TheAssociation

Engineers,

Geologists and Geophysicists of

Alberta (APEGGA) recently lost

an appeal in the Alberta Court of

Appeal regarding use of the word

‘engineer’ by Edmonton software

executive Raymond Merhej. The

decision upholds a lower court

decision on the matter.

The court held that use by

information technology

professionals of titles such as

‘system engineer’ or ‘system

engineer representative’ does not

infringe on the protected words

“There was no

evidence before

the court of any

injury to the

public interest.”

‘professional engineer’ in the

absence of evidence that the

person is representing himself as a

“professional engineer”.

Neither Merhej, nor APEGGA,

claimed that Merhej was

representing himself as a registered

professional engineer when he

used the title ‘system engineer’ in

the course of his work. APEGGA’s

concern was “for the best interest

of the public”.

The Court of Appeal decision

reads: “Is the respondent

impliedly representing that he is

registered? The answer can only

be arrived at by looking at the

facts as the chambers judge has

found them. The respondent

works in the field of information

technology and has a certificate

from Apple Canada describing

him as a ‘system engineer

representative’. That title and that

of ‘system engineer’ have been

used extensively and, for some

time, in the information

technology industry.

“The appellant (APEGGA) has

acknowledged, and the

respondent has put forward

evidence, that there is a great deal

of overlap in that industry. There

was no evidence before the court

of any injury to the public

interest. The chamber judge

correctly concluded that the

public is not likely to be deceived,

confused or jeopardized by the

respondent’s use of the title

‘system engineer’.

“There are similarities between

this case and that of a recent

graduate from a

Faculty of

Engineering, not

yet registered,

who might

describe himself

or herself as a

‘civil engineer’.

That person

would not be

held to be in

breach of the Act

unless he or her

was found to be representing that

he or she was registered. Yet it

might be more likely the public

would be confused by that

example than the case before us.”

The decision is an important

one for Alberta, says ASET

Executive Director Tim Schultz.

“We believe that this decision

is another clear example of the

need for changes to Alberta’s

professions legislation respecting

engineering and technology and a

number of other disciplines. It’s

quite clear, once again, that the

current definition of ‘professional

engineering’ in Alberta is

problematic from an enforcement

perspective.”

The word ‘engineer’ is used by

many other professionals who are

not registered members of

APEGGA, including railway

engineers, power engineers,

aircraft maintenance engineers

and flight engineers.

TECHNOLOGYALBERTA

Volume 21 | Number 1 JAN/FEB 2004

The Alberta Society of Engineering Technologists

2100 – 10104 103 Avenue NW

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 0H8

phone: 780-425-0626 or

1-800-272-5619

e-mail: asetadmin@aset.ab.ca

website: www.aset.ab.ca

fax: 780-424-5053

This publication is also available

electronically on the ASET website at

www.aset.ab.ca

Editor: Jay Fisher (JF)

Layout: The Virtual Group Ltd.

Printer: Centralweb Press

Advertising rates start at $180/issue -

for full publishing schedule and

advertising specs contact ASET or

visit the website at

www.aset.ab.ca/pubrates.html

Deadline for next issue: March 8,

2004

COUNCIL

President:

Allan Yeung, R.E.T., Edmonton

Syncrude Canada Research Centre

First Vice President:

Scott Turner, R.E.T., CCEP

Rocky Mountain House

KeySpan Energy Canada

Second Vice President:

Mel Metzger, C.E.T., Calgary

VECO Canada Ltd.

Past President:

Randy Doherty, R.E.T., Bonnyville

Imperial Oil Resources

Councillors:

Roger Breski, C.E.T., P.Eng., Calgary

Breski Management Consulting Services

Lacey de Kock, C.E.T., Grande Prairie

Autopro Automation Consultants Ltd.

Larry Stone, C.E.T., Edmonton

Bird Construction

Robyn Swanson, C.E.T., P.Eng.,

Cochrane

Fekete Associates Inc.

Derek Tsang, A.Sc.T., Edmonton

Wika Instruments Canada

Tim Waters, C.E.T., Lethbridge

WA Environmental Services Ltd.

Public Members:

Elaine McCoy, Q.C., Calgary

Macleod Institute

Chris Sheard, LL.B., Edmonton

Fairman Holt Inc.

CCTT Director:

Lois Sterner, R.E.T., Calgary

ATCO Gas

CHAPTER CHAIRS

Calgary: Norbert Lange, C.E.T.

Cold Lake: Ajaz Quraishi, C.E.T., PE

Edmonton: Bill Walkhouse, C.E.T.

Fort McMurray: Orest Romaniuk, C.E.T.

Grande Prairie: Monty Lynes, C.E.T.

Lethbridge: Clayton Kunz, C.E.T.

Lloydminster: Adam Budenski, C.E.T.

Medicine Hat: Randy J. Adam, R.E.T., PE

NWT: Vacant

Red Deer: Dwain Mueller, C.E.T.

ASET OFFICE

Executive Director:

Tim Schultz, M.S.A., B.Comm.

Registrar: Stephen Addo, R.E.T., B.Sc.

Communications Director: Jay Fisher

Finance Director: Elizabeth Willis

Executive Assistant: Deb Key

Registration Co-ordinator: Carol Reimer

Education and Volunteer Co-ordinator:

Christina Brindley

Communications Co-ordinator: Sherry Gettis

Projects Co-ordinator: Charlotte Munkedal

Certification Co-ordinator: Jackie Sousa

Receptionist: Yvonne Tse

Accounting Assistant: Sandra Gardiner

Clerical Assistant: Kathy Kadla

NOTE: Editorial opinions, reports and similar

articles published herein do not necessarily

reflect the opinion or policy of the Council

or the Society.

Canadian Publications Mail Agreement 40065106

Return undeliverable Canadian Addresses to:

The Alberta Society of

Engineering Technologists

2100–10104 103 Avenue NW

Edmonton, Alberta T5J 0H8

e-mail: asetadmin@aset.ab.ca

2 January - February 2004 | BREAKING NEWS


Welcome to 2004…a year

that will see continued

progress for ASET on

many fronts.

As you all know, ASET

recently scored a victory by

staving off a hostile takeover by

APEGGA. This event creates the

foundation for plans and strategies

in 2004 and represents a huge

step towards achieving full

professional recognition for the

practice of our members. The

legislation issue is now much

better understood by our elected

representatives and we have

definitely gained the ear of the

provincial government,

particularly in the last six months.

Our success is your success. It is

the enormous support from the

membership that has taken us to

where we are.

Although Human Resources

and Employment Minister Clint

Dunford has decided not to make

changes to existing professional

legislation, he and his colleagues

realize that the issue will not go

away. With continued reasoned

arguments by ASET and our

partners, there will come a day

when applied science, information

and engineering technology is

recognized in Alberta law for what

it actually is now – a distinct

profession unto itself.

The working world knows

it…many government officials

now know it…and in time our

laws will recognize it as

well…technology is a field

populated with many competent

and capable individuals. These

well-trained, respected

professionals have proven their

worth many times over in the last

40 years. In order to protect the

public they should be licenced

and self-regulated like any other

profession.

My sincere thanks go out to all

those individuals who made the

effort to contact their elected

representatives and make the case

for legislation. Your support for

the ASET Council in recent

months has been truly

overwhelming. I look forward to

continuing our legislation quest

this year, and to the day when all

of our efforts will pay off.

With all of the activity

surrounding legislation, it’s easy to

overlook the many other areas

where ASET is moving forward.

For 2004 ASET will be

continuing its steady growth in

size and profile. We’ll be

promoting our new Certified

Computer Information

Technologist (C.C.I.T.) credential

with the IT community and

participating in more activities in

this fast-paced, exciting field.

We’ll also be working with

colleges and technical institutes to

increase the number of accredited

programs throughout Alberta.

To assist in the growth of the

organization, ASET will soon be

calling on all members to pitch in

and help by encouraging a

colleague to apply for

membership and gain

professional certification. We’ll be

circulating referral cards for this

purpose to you in the near future.

This ‘refer-a-friend’ campaign

will be simple, yet definitely

rewarding for all members of

ASET. Our best estimate

indicates that our membership

could easily double to 30,000 or

more if eligible technicians and

technologists applied for

certification. To turn this

possibility into a reality, we’ll be

offering incentives to members in

2004 to help their colleagues gain

an ASET credential.

We’ll also continue to work

closely with other Alberta

technical organizations, as well as

our colleagues in other provinces.

The new National Technology

Week (Nov. 1-8, 2004) being

pioneered by the Canadian

Council of Technicians and

Technologists is one such

endeavour that will increase our

public profile and encourage

technical careers.

As always, your ASET Council

will remain open to input and

suggestions from our members.

Our members have already told

us to stay focused on achieving

professional legislation and that’s

just what ASET is going to do.

Drop me a line via the ASET

office and give me your thoughts

on this issue.

One smallstep

to be followed by more of the same

a message

from the president

▲ Allan Yeung, R.E.T.

ASET President Allan Yeung, R.E.T.,

can be reached through the ASET office

at asetadmin@aset.ab.ca

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE | January - February 2004 3


Nominees

for The

Alberta

Society of

Engineering

Technologists

The ASET Nominating

Committee, chaired by

Past President Randy

Doherty, R.E.T., has reviewed

individual ASET members

seeking nominations for positions

on the 2004-2005 Council. The

committee submits the following

approved nominees.

Members are encouraged to

keep this publication filed for

easy reference so that when the

ballots are received, members

may be able to put a face and

personal background to the

names on the ballot. Ballots will

be mailed to all members by

April 1, 2004.

FOR PRESIDENT

Scott Turner, R.E.T., CCEP

The dedication of

ASET’s volunteers,

and that of our

Council and our

staff, contributes

daily to the growth and prosperity

of technicians and technologists in

Alberta. The contributions of

these people exemplify what it

means to be a professional. I am

sincerely honored to be associated

with this organization, and for the

nomination to be your president

for the 2004/2005 term.

The past five years on ASET’s

Council have flown by and I have

enjoyed every minute of it. I am

truly fortunate to have had the

support of my employer, and that

of my family, in my pursuit of

serving my profession. I owe them

both a deep debt of gratitude. The

experience I have gained over this

period, along with the feeling of

satisfaction that I have received in

return, has rewarded me many

times over for my time. I would

encourage all members of ASET

to get involved and reap the

rewards of representing Alberta’s

technicians and technologists.

I am a graduate of the

Mechanical Engineering

Technology Program at SAIT with

over 15 years of experience in the

business, technical engineering

and operations aspects of the

petrochemical and gas midstream

industry. I am currently employed

as the Environment, Health &

Safety Coordinator with KeySpan

Energy Canada in the Rocky

Mountain House area.

This last year ASET celebrated

40 years of technology

professionals in Alberta…a

milestone to be sure. This last year,

you the members of ASET, also

contacted our government MLAs

about the future of the technology

profession in Alberta and your

support has been tremendous. It is

important that Council act on

2004/2005Council

DUTIES FOR COUNCIL POSITIONS

President

■ chair Council, Executive

Committee, AGM, special general

meetings;

■ as a member of Executive

Council, review and make

recommendations on staff benefits

and salaries, financial affairs, other

pertinent executive matters;

■ in the event of a tie, cast the

deciding ballot;

■ prepare president's address for

TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA and

Annual Report;

■ endeavour to visit each chapter

once during term;

■ appoint members to Ballot

Counting Committee;

■ attend meetings of CCTT;

■ undertake other actions to

ensure adherence to the Society's

strategic plan;

■ term - one year.

First vice president

■ be a member of Council and

the Executive Committee;

■ as a member of the Executive

Committee, review and make

recommendations on staff benefits

and salaries, financial affairs, other

pertinent executive matters;

■ act as liaison between Council

and a chapter;

■ undertake other actions to

ensure adherence to the Society's

strategic plan;

■ assume chair and

responsibilities of president in his

or her absence.

■ term - one year.

Second vice president

■ be a member of Council and

the Executive Committee;

■ as a member of the Executive

Committee, review and make

recommendations on staff benefits

and salaries, financial affairs, other

pertinent executive matters;

■ act as a liaison between

Council and a chapter;

■ undertake other actions to

ensure adherence to the Society's

strategic plan;

■ term - one year.

Councillors

■ act as liaison between Council

and a chapter;

■ attend all regular scheduled

Council meetings;

■ undertake other actions to

ensure adherence to the Society's

strategic plan;

■ term - two years.

DUTIES FOR

COUNCILPOSITIONS

4 January - February 2004 | COUNCIL NOMINATIONS


ehalf of the membership and it

was reassuring to hear from so

many that we stay the course.

Although our underlying desire

continues to be legislation

recognizing applied science,

information and engineering

technology as a distinct profession,

we must also continue to provide

value and meet the needs of our

current and future members. I

believe in the core business of our

association, which is the

protection of the public by

ensuring certification of qualified

members, accreditation of

educational programs and the

promotion of technical

professionals in Alberta and

throughout Canada.

We must continue to forge

relationships with industry leaders,

educational institutions, employers

and other interest groups and

associations. We form these

relationships in order to have

them better understand the

qualifications and expertise of

ASET membership and to

demonstrate how important

technicians and technologists are

to this province.

The future will bring some

exciting challenges and I look

forward to the opportunity to work

with Council, staff and you, the

members of ASET, in seeing these

challenges come to fruition. I

would like to thank you for your

support and encourage you to

attend the May 1, 2004 Annual

General Meeting in Edmonton.

FOR 1ST VICE PRESIDENT

Mel Metzger, C.E.T.

The last year has

presented various

challenges and

successes for the

ASET team. The

team that I speak of consists of the

ASET Council and staff, but most

important of all are the active

members of ASET. Without the

support of everyone the

accomplishments of 2003 would

not have been possible. Because of

the continuing support and

dedication displayed by my

colleagues, it is with extreme

pleasure that I accept the

nomination for first vice president

representing ASET for 2004.

For 40 years the ASET name

has been spoken and written

proudly by both members and

supporters who represent various

technical disciplines. As technical

leaders within the Alberta

industries, we must continue to be

recognized for the numerous

contributions we provide

regarding the practice of applied

science, information and

engineering technology

professions in Alberta.’

We are all aware of the

legislation issue that ASET is

presently faced with, but we must

not focus all of our energies on

one specific goal. Our strength is

our membership; therefore,

assuring that the interests and

needs of our members are

addressed continues to be an

important part of the ASET

Executive and Council.

We must also identify and

support the requirements outlined

by Alberta industry. These

demands are continuously

directed toward the need for

certified technical professionals.

With the projected growth

within Alberta, what better

opportunity can the ASET team

have than to fulfill the expectations

of both individuals and businesses

alike as higher standards of

knowledge, expertise and

professionalism become

requirements for everything we do?

I look forward to the challenges

that the ASET team will face this

year. Some will be a continuation

from previous years and some will

be approached as new

opportunities. I would like to

thank all of the members of ASET

for their previous support, both for

the Society and myself, as I

welcome the opportunity to

represent my colleagues during

the upcoming term.

FOR 2ND VICE PRESIDENT

Robyn Swanson, C.E.T.,

P.Eng.

My term as an

ASET councillor is

almost up.

There have been

some successes and

disappointments during the two

years, but I have always felt that we

have made forward progress. This

in large part is due to the support

and involvement of the general

membership.

We still have work that needs to

be completed to ensure

technologists get the recognition

they deserve and I hope to be a part

of that process in some capacity.

I am honoured to be

considered as a candidate for

second vice president of ASET

and will continue to promote the

contribution that technologists

make in the workplace.

I look forward to continuing to

work towards legislation for

technologists and in a strong and

relevant organization to serve you

the membership.

Derek Tsang, A.Sc.T.

It is truly an honor

and a privilege to

be nominated for

the position of

second vice

president by my fellow technicians

and technologists.

Over the past four years, I have

found being on Council to be a

very exciting and rewarding

experience. With the help of

fellow councillors and staff, I have

fought hard for technologists and

technicians throughout Alberta in

the quest for legislation.

The idea of legislation for

technicians and technologists is

something I strongly believe in.

As ASET continues to grow and

as industry continues to change,

it becomes even more important

then ever that technicians and

technologists be recognized and

become accountable for their

actions. Legislation will allow

technicians and technologists to

do so.

As a graduate of the Chemical

Technology Program at NAIT,

and as an employee of a major

instrumentation company, I

understand and appreciate the

importance of this legislation and

what it is to be recognized as a

professional in their designated

field of practice.

During my two terms as

councillor, I have acquired many of

the skills and knowledge required

for the position of second vice

president. I have been shown what

it takes and what is needed to be

part of the ASET Executive by

current and past members. Coupled

with my work experiences, I strongly

believe that I can take on the role

and succeed in a professional and

responsible manner.

I look forward to and welcome

the opportunity to once again

represent the ASET membership

on Council.

FOR COUNCILLOR

Roy Clark, C.E.T., A.Sc.T.

I am honoured by

my nomination for

the position of

councillor for

ASET. Since

moving to Lloydminster in 1982, I

have been involved with the local

chapter serving as secretary,

treasurer, vice chair and as chair.

In 2003 I worked with the chapter

to develop our new scholarship,

the first scholarship being awarded

in fall of 2003.

Currently I serve on the

Accreditation Board of ASET and

over the years I have attended

several Council meetings as the

chapter representative from

Lloydminster.

With this experience, I have an

interest representing the

membership on Council as ASET

addresses several of the current

issues, including professional

recognition, accreditation,

professional standards and the

continuing effort to raise the profile

of the technologist in Alberta.

My discipline is mechanical

engineering technology. I am a

graduate from Kelsey Institute in

Saskatoon in 1972 and have been

registered since then. I worked

COUNCIL NOMINATIONS | January - February 2004 5


with Underwood McLellan

Engineering as a mechanical

designer and later as a

construction co-ordinator with its

sister company, Spantec Ltd.. In

1982 I started with the Saskatoon

Public School Division as an

Assistant Maintenance Supervisor

and I have been working in

facilities administration since then.

For the last 12 years I have

been in my current position as

Facilities Administrator for the

Lloydminster Public School

Division. This position involves all

areas of facilities maintenance,

caretaking, utilities monitoring,

IAQ monitoring as well as the

design, tendering and contract

administration for the aggressive

facilities upgrading the school

division is undertaking.

I am also registered in

Saskatchewan with SASTT and I

am an Associate Member of

ASHRAE. I am active locally and

sit on the Board of Directors of the

Walter Slim Thorpe Centre and

the Construction Committee for

the Lloydminster Multi-Plex

Leisure Centre. Some activities in

the past are a director with the

1997 Alberta Summer Games,

Bid Committee for the 2004

Saskatchewan Summer Games,

vice president of the Lloydminster

SPCA, secretary for Saskatchewan

Chapter of CEFPI, president of

the Samoyed Association of

Canada and positions with variety

of other local organizations.

Thank you for this opportunity.

Kevin Harrison, R.E.T.

I am honored to

be nominated for a

position on the

ASET Council. I

have been a

member of ASET since 1990 and a

volunteer for the past year on the

ASET Accreditation Board. During

this time, my awareness has been

heightened to the important role

ASET plays in keeping the

technical schools accountable to

their students and to industry.

I previously served on the

ASET Council for two years from

2001 to 2003 as a Councillor.

During that time, I saw many

advancements in ASET that made

me proud to be a member of

ASET, and proud that I was able

to participate in the decisionmaking

process for these changes.

As a Council member I took great

pride in making sure that the

membership were aggressively

listened to and the appropriate

actions were taken.

I have been employed by the

Edmonton Police Services for the

past 14 years as an Electronic

Surveillance Specialist. I

graduated from the Electronic

Engineering Technology Program

at NAIT in 1986. I feel privileged

to have the support of an

employer that allows me to stay on

the leading edge of technology.

Safety and security has now

moved to the forefront of our dayto-day

lives and the need for

securely sharing this technological

information has become

paramount. As a result, I also

lecture throughout North America

on applying these technical

advancements to law enforcement.

These are exciting times for

ASET. l look forward to being

part of the Council that

successfully spearheads legislation

to provide professional status and

legal ‘right to practice’ for all

ASET members. Thank you for

your support. I look forward to the

opportunity to once again serve

the membership on Council.

Scott Matheson,

R.E.T., G.S.C.

I relish the

opportunity to

continue my

contribution to

ASET as a

councillor for the 2004/2006 term.

As a team player, I look forward to

building consensus and

commitment working towards the

successful completion of the goals

and objectives of our Society.

As a proactive problem-solver, I

will endeavor to add value to the

members through my experience

on various boards and committees

in the province. I have also gained

much insight to the organization

by serving as a member of ASET's

Professional Development

Committee, Registration Board,

and Editorial Committee.

This experience has provided

me with an understanding of the

Society, as well as its unique needs

and aspirations. Being voted

ASET’s 2003 Technologist of the

Year was a tremendous honour

and it serves to recognize the

dedication that I have to the

technology industry in Alberta.

Having attended school on the

west coast I feel my experience as a

house captain, rugby team, rowing,

cycling, and swim team captain

provides me with leadership

abilities necessary to affect change.

Working for three years in the U.S.

as a construction manager exposed

me to some cultural diversity

working with our friends to the

south, but more importantly

provided a comparison work/life

environment. You don't have to

travel far from Alberta to appreciate

what we have right here.

As a 17-year PCL employee and

owner, my current responsibility as

Edmonton District Construction

Services Manager requires

exceptional organizational skills to

manage the procurement of over

$200 million of work volume

annually. Reporting to me is an

estimating team that is second to

none. Community service is a

prerequisite to the daily activities

in our very busy department, and I

intend to make the most of my

time on Council giving back to the

technology community we are all a

part of.

As a member of the Ethics

Practitioners Association of

Canada, Chair of the Advisory

Board for Construction

Engineering Technology at NAIT

and consultant for the course

content for the new Project

Management Applied Degree

Program at Grant MacEwan

College, I am confident I will add

value to members and our Society

by raising the profile of technicians

and technologists in Alberta.

The technician/technologist

culture must be embraced by all

members, and as a councillor, I

intend to work hard at enhancing

ASET's deliverables to its

members.

Gord Rajewski, R.E.T.

My name is Gord

Rajewski, I am a

Registered

Engineering

Technologist with

20 years of experience. My area of

discipline is building science and I

have spent much of my career in

the investigation, diagnosis and

repair of building envelope

concerns. I am a principal with the

firm of A.D. Williams Engineering

Inc. and am based in Edmonton.

I am seeking the opportunity to

serve on the ASET Council in

order to further promote the

capabilities of ASET members. It

has been my observation that our

members have played a significant

role in the growth and success of

our Alberta economy, but have

not always received the

recognition for this work.

If elected, I would bring my

energy, experience and enthusiasm

to the further promotion of ASET

in our province.

I would welcome the

opportunity to serve our members,

and look forward to being part of

ASET's future.

ASET considering new dates

for Annual General Meetings

ASET will likely be making adjustments to the timing of the

Society’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) and election beginning in

2005. Instead of an AGM at the end of April or in early May, it was

determined that it would be beneficial to hold the AGM in late

February or early March. The earlier dates would provide a better

opportunity for newly elected members to become more familiar

with their positions on Council before entering the slower summer

months. Currently there is a long break from the AGM to the

September Council meeting.

6 January - February 2004 | COUNCIL NOMINATIONS


Doug R. Symon, C.E.T., C.P.M.

It is with great

pleasure and

privilege that I

accept the

nomination from

my colleagues at ASET to run as

your councillor. I have thoroughly

enjoyed the Calgary local chapter,

the ASET Annual General

Meeting and member meetings,

tours and functions through the

years.

Since graduating from Building

Construction Engineering

Technology in 1986, my exciting

career has been progressively and

successfully challenging. The

experiences have been rewarding,

spanning from Engineering

Technologist III and Contract

Manager with Alberta Public

Works, to Construction and

Project Management in the

commercial, industrial and

telecommunication sectors.

As Project Manager for

Clearnet, I was a successful key

player in the largest, fast-paced

PCS and ‘Mike’ build in Alberta

from 1997 to 1999. For the past

three years, as Construction

Manager/Project Manager, I have

been with the international firm of

Morrison Hershfield Limited –

Telecommunications Division. I

am currently working on the

Alberta SuperNet, one of the

largest and most advanced highspeed

telecommunications

networks in the world.

I obtained certification in the

Mount Royal College Project

Management Program and I have

been a member of the Project

Management Institute (PMI)

since 2001. My co-workers at

Morrison Hershfield Limited have

nominated me, three years

running, for the Teamwork Award.

As an active member of The

78th Fraser Highlanders, with a

rank of Volunteer Sergeant – Honor

Guard, I have the privilege of

promoting boys’ and girls’ highland

piping, drumming, dancing,

marching, and musketry training.

The skills I have developed in

managing, organizing, budgeting

and negotiation are important

assets for the role as councillor. I

welcome the opportunity on

Council in contributing to the

bright future of ASET, in

committing to the values, goals

and strategic plan; and working

with local chapters and the unique

diversified professional community

of our members.

Thank you for your support. I

look forward to representing you

on Council.

CODE OF CONDUCTfor ASET Council members

At its September, 2000 meeting

Where a Council member,

a positive impression of ASET. I

acting in that capacity, puts

ASET’s Council agreed to

will preserve and enhance the

his/her personal interests ahead of

adopt the following Code of

good reputation of ASET and will

those of the members of ASET.

avoid behavior that might damage

Conduct for Council members.

I will not knowingly take

ASET’s image.

All prospective nominees are

advantage of, or benefit from,

information that is obtained as a Interpretation

asked to sign the code before

result of my official duties and The president of ASET shall

entering their terms.

responsibilities as a member of ensure that the practice of this

the ASET Council.

policy will be fair, just, and

I will hold close all

equitable in all situations of

information deemed by the ASET interpretation and application.

Council to be confidential.

Resources

I will be mindful of resources

that are in my trust on behalf of

ASET, and will help establish

policies that ensure the

maximization of secure and

protected resources.

Although I expect to be

reimbursed for legitimate

expenses incurred on behalf of

the Society, I will keep all such

expenses reasonable and will

discuss expenses that may be in

question with ASET’s president.

STATEMENT OF

COMMITMENT

In governing for, and on behalf

of the members of the Alberta

Society of Engineering

Technologists (ASET), I am a

custodian in trust of the assets of

the Society. ASET’s members

recognize the need for competent

and committed elected Council

members to serve ASET and have

put trust in my sincerity and

abilities. In return for that trust,

the members of ASET deserve

my utmost effort, dedication, and

support.

Therefore, as a member of the

ASET Council, I acknowledge

and commit to a high standard of

ethics and conduct as I apply my

best efforts, skills and resources in

the interest of ASET and its

members. As an ASET councillor,

I will perform my duties in such a

manner that members’ confidence

and trust in the integrity,

objectivity and impartiality of

ASET are preserved and

enhanced. To do otherwise would

be a breach of the trust.

ETHICAL GUIDELINES

General

As I participate in discussion

and vote on issues I will always

put the interests of the ASET

membership at the highest

priority.

I recognize that I am obligated

to act in a manner that will stand

up to the closest public scrutiny.

It is my responsibility to

contribute to ASET Council any

suggestions on ways to improve

ASET’s policies, standards,

practices or ethics.

I recognize that my position on

Council does not entitle me to

treatment or consideration

beyond that received by any other

member of ASET.

When necessary, I will

immediately declare myself in

conflict of interest, real or

perceived, while conducting

business on behalf of ASET. I

recognize that the minutes of a

meeting may reflect that conflict.

Examples of conflict of interest

include, but are not limited to,

the following:

Where a Council member

enters into a personal contract

with ASET or where he/she is a

director of another organization

that contracts to provide goods

and/or services to ASET.

Where a Council member or a

person known to that Council

member, profits personally as a

result of his/her position on the

ASET Council.

Gifts and hospitality

I will adhere to ASET’s policy

on accepting gifts, favors or

benefits and will act in the best

interests of ASET when accepting

the hospitality of others.

Representing ASET

I recognize that, during my

term on Council, I represent

ASET and will likely be seen to

do so at all times. I will do so in

such a way as to leave others with

Enforcement

The president is ultimately

responsible for immediate

interpretation, application and

enforcement of the Council

members’ Code of Conduct

policy. If the president’s conduct

is in question, the first vice

president will assume

responsibility for enforcement.

Penalties for breach of the Code

of Conduct range from exclusion

from discussion on an issue, to

removal from office. In any event,

ASET bylaws must be followed.

If, as an ASET Council

member, I have personal opinions

that are contrary to ASET’s

official position on any issue, I

understand that when speaking

on the topic in public I have the

following choices: To state

ASET’s position and reiterate

Council’s support for that

position, without expressing a

personal opinion, or resign my

position as a member of the

ASET Council.

COUNCIL NOMINATIONS | January - February 2004 7


first and only female R.P.T.s may evaluations and reservoir reports in

have originally thought that they the commitment of huge sums of

would be heading for the patch, money.

but both have spent nearly their In the early 1990s takeovers

entire careers there…one in within the oil and gas sector were

various offices in Calgary and one occurring almost daily. Friis and

primarily in the field.

many others were directly affected

As one of 10 children raised on a by the seemingly endless changes.

farm near Mameo Beach, Friis

ENCOR was eventually bought

picked the emerging field of out by BP and later became part of

computer training to study in 1981. Talisman Energy, but Friis left the

She enjoyed math and the concepts firm before the sale and took a job

came to her relatively easily.

with General Atlantic, a small U.S.

Upon graduation, however, she firm. She stayed for four years

thefirstladies

Alberta’s first two female R.P.T.s are both in oil/gas industry

▲ Shirley Friis, R.E.T., R.P.T.(Eng.)

Friis,

WhenShirley

R.E.T.,

R.P.T.(Eng.) began her technical

education, she enrolled in SAIT’s

Computer Technology Program.

Over 20 years later, she’s now a

Senior Engineering Technologist

with Burlington Resources

Canada in Calgary.

Sue Trefry, R.E.T., R.P.T.(Eng.)

also started out her career

outside the oil and gas

industry, enrolling in

NAIT’s Civil

Engineering

Technology

program. Twentyfive

years later,

she’s a Field

Template Coordinator

for

Imperial Oil

Resources

in Cold

Lake.

Neither

one of

Alberta’s

couldn’t find a job in her chosen

field, so with the help of a sister in

Calgary she landed a position with

Westar Petroleum. There were

bills to pay so she dove into the

job, analyzing well logs and

learning the process of reservoir

evaluation.

Little did she know she would

be the first female technologist in

Alberta to be licenced to practice

independently in the field.

The job at Westar lasted five

years and included lots of

opportunity to take courses in

specific reservoir subjects,

including the complex economics

involved with oil and gas

development. Her computer

training proved to be a major help,

since she was one of the few

people who felt at ease with the

increasingly computerized aspects

of the business.

“I wasn’t scared of it like some

were. It was basically all

programming languages and so it

came easy for me,” Friis said

recently.

She next took a job at ENCOR,

again working in the reservoir

analysis area, which proved to be a

perfect fit. At first she assisted the

engineering staff, but over the

course of several years her role

grew to include her own property

areas of responsibility. Others in

the company were using her

before switching to the acquisitions

side of Canrise Resources, another

tiny firm that started with only five

staff.

Canrise was in turn bought by

Poco Petroleum in 1998, which

was itself bought by Burlington

Resources a year later. Throughout

the many moves, including one

short stint as a private consultant,

Friis was gaining more and more

experience and was well on her

way to becoming a recognized

expert in her specialty area.

The role of reservoir analyst is a

critical one in the oil/gas sector,

with companies making multimillion

dollar decisions based on

their work. Overstating or

understating the estimated reserves

can cause significant problems,

since companies have folded over

incorrect reports. In one instance

her employer made an $80 million

bid based on her input.

Today, Friis says she’s

comfortable in her reserves analyst

role with Burlington. She enjoys

working with her team as well as

the high level of responsibility she

has been given. Some days she

misses being part of a small

company, where versatility is so

critical, but she sees no reason to

look elsewhere right now.

Along the way Friis was

originally certified by ASET in

1990 and later progressed to

8 January - February 2004 | FEATURE STORY


R.E.T. status in 1993. She decided

to pursue an R.P.T. credential in

2001 in order to improve her level

of recognition, she says.

“My mother always told

us…take care of yourself. Keep

your options open.”

career

started off with a

SueTrefry’s

summer job

pulling chain with a Canadian

National Railways survey crew

between years at NAIT. After

graduating she took another

surveying job with Genstar

Developments, but she didn’t

much care for working outside in

the winter.

A surveying co-ordinator’s job

came open at Imperial Oil in

1979, so she made the switch.

Based in Edmonton, the position

took her all over northern Alberta

and B.C., including Boundary

Lake and Judy Creek, supervising

up to six contractors at a time and

working with project engineers to

complete the work assigned.

Imperial closed the Edmonton

office in 1981, which meant Trefry

and her husband Mike (also a

Civil grad working for Imperial)

would move to Calgary for the next

three years, where she took on the

role of a pipeline technologist. The

job involved “lots of paperwork”,

she says, including writing

submissions for the Alberta Energy

and Utilities Board to win

approvals for pipelines, licences to

operate and changes to existing

licences.

In 1984 Imperial offered to

move both of the Trefrys to the

Cold Lake area, where they both

would become construction

supervisors; Sue in plant facilities

and Mike in the field. The firm’s

first cyclic steam operations were

about to begin production at the

time and a huge amount of

construction work was to be done

over the next 10 years.

As more and more facilities

were built, Sue gained more and

more experience in dealing with

contractors, as well as other

departments within the company.

Balancing the pressures of

scheduling, cost, quality and safety

became commonplace for her and

part of the daily routine.

In 1986 Trefry switched to the

role of field satellite construction

supervision, which involved the

installation of numerous pumping

and steaming heavy oil production

pads. As the business slowed down

and some of her work was

contracted out, she also took on

the role of project technologist,

managing smaller modification

jobs to existing facilities.

As her knowledge and

experience grew, Trefry’s

responsibilities did as well. Project

development, including defining

the work needed, and then hiring

the necessary engineering and field

contractors, became her forte. She

also needed to weigh the real

needs of various projects and

choose the ones that stood to pay

off with increased production or

lowered costs.

Annual budgets don’t allow for

every project to be completed, so

the technical group tries to select

those that will de-bottleneck the

plants in some way, Trefry explains.

Her project technologist

position lasted until 1993, after

which the jobs were centralized in

Calgary and pre-approved

contractors were available to do

work without the previous bidding

process. The net result is lower

costs and more consistency

between jobs.

With project management

positions gone, Trefry went into

Imperial’s technical group and

became a mechanical technologist

providing support for ongoing

operations. Facility changes

required engineered drawings, so

she attended piping and code

courses to improve her skills.

The job lasted eight years and

involved hundreds of individual

projects, mostly with

existing facilities,

she says. In

2001 she took

on a new role

of operations

interface for

new field

projects.

Known as a

field template

manager, Trefry now acts as an

interface between operations and

projects to implement

optimizations in field designs. The

work serves to address problems,

reduce cost and trial new

equipment.

Additional pumping satellite

stations are being planned and

built continuously, so the position

is a busy one. With each project

she must review designs, assess risk,

pull the right teams together and

work with staff in Calgary to get

the job done.

One of Trefry’s current jobs

involves the building of a new 24"

steam line as part of an Imperial

capacity enhancement project for

the Cold Lake region.

The added responsibility, along

with encouragement from other

Imperial staff, led her to apply for

R.P.T.(Eng.) status in 2001. She

completed the process in 2003.

Although she doesn’t use her new

stamping authority every day, it

does come in handy for

mechanical projects, she says.

She also has become deeply

involved with Imperial’s

business/education partnership

with local schools. The programs

encourage youth to

pursue

academic

subjects,

consider

technical

careers

and

develop

employability skills to better

prepare them for their future.

Working with area students

gives her great pleasure, Trefry says.

Her initial stints as a career fair

speaker have led to her developing

workshops and school curriculum,

as well as co-ordinating work

experience programs and

mentoring individual students.

Her partnership work includes

participation in a new museum

and interactive oil/gas interpretive

centre built on an old radar site in

the area. Local students built

displays for the centre, including

‘Wally the oil barrel’ and cyclic

steam animations. It is a “real

world project", with high-quality

displays all built with students, who

gain both technical and

employability skills through their

participation.

With three teenagers and a busy

lifestyle, Trefry says she is in no

hurry to change positions or

employers. She now has 24 years in

with Imperial and her husband

Mike is also still with the company

working in the environmental area.

“We have a good, balanced life

here. It’s a great place to raise your

kids.” (JF)

Sue Trefry,

R.E.T., R.P.T. (Eng.)

FEATURE STORY | January - February 2004 9


Newsbriefs

Minister decides no changes are needed

to professional legislation in Alberta

Alberta Human Resources and Employment Minister

Clint Dunford recently decided to not pursue any

changes to current professional legislation regarding

engineering and technology in the province.

The decision, announced Dec.15, 2003, does not follow

recommendations made by either ASET, or the Association

of Professional Engineers, Geologists and Geophysicists of

Alberta (APEGGA). Both organizations had significant,

although diametrically opposed recommendations for

change.

ASET’s President Allan Yeung, R.E.T., says the decision is a victory for

the organization because it maintains ASET’s independence.

“We believe this decision, while not the progressive change ASET

sought that would have recognized applied science, information and

engineering technology as a true self-regulating profession, does at least

stop the attempt by APEGGA to take over the certification of technicians

and technologists in Alberta.”

ASET has been attempting to fill a void in public policy in Alberta

through progressive professional legislation that would regulate the

applied science, information and engineering technology professions in a

manner that is consistent with other professions in Alberta. ASET

maintains that the technology professions are separate and distinct from

those of engineering and geoscience.

This request was countered by APEGGA with a proposal to merge

ASET with its organization – a step that would have effectively ended

ASET’s 40-year-old mandate. Dunford made it clear that while he was

not yet prepared to move forward with legislation, he was not prepared to

see ASET disappear.

“After a thorough examination of the situation, aided by Alberta

government MLA Tony Vandermeer, Minister Dunford came to the

conclusion that a merger of APEGGA and ASET was not appropriate

and we wholeheartedly concur with that decision,” Yeung explained.

“Minister Dunford’s rejection of APEGGA’s proposal to take over

ASET would not have happened without the tremendous support of

ASET members who contacted their government MLAs to tell them

about the future of the technology professions in Alberta. Thank you so

very much for making this happen! Now we need you to contact your

MLA and thank him or her for their efforts on your behalf. It is important

that we provide this feedback to the MLAs.

“Unfortunately the Minister has decided that nothing will be done

regarding legislation to recognize applied science, information and

engineering technology as a profession in its own right. This is not

acceptable. This debate has gone on far too long and the government

must finally take action. Your profession must be treated in the same

manner as the forestry, health and accounting professions. All those

professions are recognized within professional legislation, so why is your

profession treated differently?”

In thanking members for their support Yeung also made it clear that

their efforts would not be lost.

“We intend to continue our quest for legislation that would see ASET

have the authority to license and govern the practice of applied science,

information and engineering technology. Our members continue to

make it clear – this must be done,” he added.

10 January - February 2004 | NEWSBRIEFS


Seven NAIT programs receive re-accreditation using new, quicker system

The first programs at NAIT to be re-accredited under a new

national biennial review process received their certificates late last year

in a ceremony at the institute. The new process was developed by the

Canadian Technology Accreditation Board and allows for program

content reviews every two years, rather than an all-new accreditation

every five years. The process saves considerable time, money and any

potential gaps in accredited status.

Attending the event were (back row, left to right): ASET Registrar

Stephen Addo, R.E.T., B.Sc., Computer Engineering Technology

(CNT) Programs Head J.D. Silver, Learning Innovation Consultant

John Boyle, President Dr. Sam Shaw, Electrical Engineering

Technology (ELT) Assistant Program Head Bob Davis, ELT Program

Head Greg Collins, ELT Assistant Program Head Ted Bird, ELT

Administrative Assistant Simonne Bourassa, ELT Assistant Program

Head Tom Kennedy, Academic Vice President Paul Hunt,

Telecommunications Engineering Technology (TET) Assistant

Program Head Colin Polanski, Dean, School of Electrical and

Electronics Technology Ron Kachman and TET Assistant Program

Head Lawrence Rodnunsky.

(Seated, left to right): Electronics Engineering Technologies (EET)

Assistant Program Head Cliff Chapman (avionics), EET Program

Head Dave Burry, CNT Assistant Program Head Al Davison

(computer), EET Assistant Program Head Dennis Morland

(electronics), retired ELT Program Head Al Loughlin, CNT Assistant

Program Head Brian Nelson (network) and TET Program Head Reg

Westly. Congratulations to all!

Wind farm officially opened

The new McBride Lake Wind Farm was officially opened late last year

south of Fort McLeod. Enmax Corp. and Vision Quest Windelectric

jointly own the $100 million facility, which features 114 turbines on 50-

metre towers.

The new facility has a maximum total output of 75 MW and is

expected to produce approximately 235,000 MW/hours of electricity per

year; enough for 30,000 homes. Vision Quest operates the facility and

Enmax purchases all electricity generated.

Petro-Canada donates Gulfstream turboprop to SAIT

Petro-Canada recently donated a $1.6 million Gulfstream G-1

turboprop aircraft to SAIT’s aviation maintenance training programs. The

aircraft is the largest in the SAIT fleet and came with an additional

airframe, plus parts and up-to-date avionics equipment. The aircraft will

be stationed at SAIT’s new Art Smith Aero Centre for Training and

Technology currently under construction at the Calgary International

Airport. Scheduled opening date is August, 2004. Students in aircraft

maintenance, avionics, aircraft structures and gas turbine overhaul will

benefit from the gift.

Nominations open for Emerald Awards

Nominations are now being accepted for Alberta’s annual Emerald

Awards, which recognize individuals and organizations for environmental

excellence. Categories include Not-for-profit Organization/Individual

Commitment, Community Group, Corporate or Institutional Leadership,

Education, Large Business, Government Institutions, Small Business,

Research and Innovation, Climate Change and Youth.

Deadline for nominations is February 29, 2004. Announcement of

award recipients will be made in June. For further details and nomination

information, see the website at www.emeraldawards.com

www.nait.ab.ca

Business Fact

Only 31 per cent of Canadian

businesses invest in employee training

NAIT President W. A. Sam Shaw, PhD

Canadian businesses lag behind the

U.S., United Kingdom, Australia and

Japan in workforce training, according

to the Organization for Economic Cooperation

and Development. That’s a

sobering statistic for companies trying

to compete in the global economy.

NAIT President Sam Shaw knows that

people are a company’s most valuable

resource. In fact, he’s so sure of the

connection between workforce skills

and company productivity that he

personally instructs an evening class

in business skills.

NAIT’s wide range of industry-related

part-time courses, and our ability to

customize training to suit employers’

specific needs, makes us right for

your company. Just ask our President.

Phone: (780) 378-5000 e-mail: training@nait.ab.ca

Subscribe to NAIT’s training e-newsletter, Training Track

at www.nait.ab.ca/coned

Bring on the future

NEWSBRIEFS | January - February 2004 11


illions. It’s been

called one of industry’s

Itcosts

most hidden problems. And

yet it’s everywhere, attacking our

buildings, our bridges, our roads

theevil

we

asrust

know

Howard Wallace, C.Tech.

and our industrial plants. Left

unchecked, the results can be

deadly — a break in pipe, a liquid

spill or a release of toxic gas.

It’s not a new problem. We

know it as corrosion. And here in

Alberta our oil and gas facilities

are especially vulnerable. Every

year, weathering, soil contact

and corrosive petroleum

products add wear and tear

on thousands of

kilometres of oil and

gas pipe.

Controlling the

effects of corrosion has

spawned a growing

industry in new products

and services. Still, many

engineers and technologists

have little or no formal education

in the science of corrosion.

Raising this education level has

continued to be a barrier in the

fight against corrosion.

But that’s all about to change.

And helping to lead the charge

are ASET members Doug

Kellow, R.E.T., R.P.T. (Eng.), and

Howard Wallace, C.Tech., as well

as the Southern Alberta Institute

of Technology (SAIT).

Last spring Kellow and

Wallace became the first to

graduate from SAIT’s new

corrosion technology certificate

program, an experience they say

heightened their awareness of the

different opportunities of

corrosion control.

“Corrosion is a difficult,

complex science,” says Kellow,

technology manager for Brenntag

Canada, a leading producer and

distributor of industrial chemicals.

“There can be many different

reasons for corrosion in a pipeline

or a gas plant — the raw fluids

and gases being handled, and the

changing conditions in the

reservoirs and pipeline systems.

“By providing a well-rounded

education in all aspects of

corrosion, this course provides a

big picture view of the issue so that

you come up with better solutions,”

he says in describing the program,

the first to be offered at a postsecondary

institution in Canada.

Wallace, a corrosion technical

specialist at the Alberta Energy

and Utilities Board (EUB),

concurs.

“You get a thorough overview

of corrosion mitigation and

prevention, and what we can do

to protect public safety and the

environment.”

For Kellow and Wallace, the

work to complete the 10-course

program was challenging, with six

hours of instruction each week

over two years.

“It was a pretty heavy course

load for two guys already working

full-time,” Kellow says of the

program, which is aimed at

technicians, engineers and

technologists in industry.

But the effort, they say, was

well worth it. Through classroom

discussions and laboratory

workshops, the two learned from

some of North America’s leading

experts. The curriculum was wide

ranging, everything from the

causes of corrosion to techniques

for corrosion monitoring,

inspection and testing to an

overview of the latest in anticorrosion

pipe coatings and

technologies.

12 January - February 2004 | FEATURE STORY


“The instructors came from

different backgrounds —

industrial chemistry, consulting

engineering, engineering

technology and academia. But the

one thing they had in common

was their technical experience

and their ability to share real-life

case study examples,” Kellow says.

He and Wallace say the course

has provided immediate benefits

to their jobs.

“It’s helped me to ask better

questions on the job,” says Kellow,

who oversees 20 employees and a

research and development

laboratory in Calgary, supplying

anti-corrosion technologies and

chemical products to oil, gas and

petrochemical companies

throughout western Canada.

Technical services staff at the

facility are frequently called on to

evaluate pipeline systems or gas

processing plants to recommend

products and services — for

example, pipe cleaning, chemical

additives or monitoring and

maintenance — that protect the

long-term life of their assets.

“Depending on the clients’

needs, we’re asking more

questions about their pipeline and

plant systems — how they were

installed and commissioned, how

they’ve been operated and what’s

changed — versus just taking a

snapshot of what’s happening

today,” adds Kellow, whose

company includes Petro-Canada

and Devon Canada on its

extensive client list.

“The more knowledgeable you

are about their situations and the

issues they face, the more

assistance you can provide.”

Wallace, who enrolled in the

SAIT program to broaden his

technical skills, says he’s pleased

with the program’s practical

nature.

“It’s always been important for a

regulatory agency like the EUB to

understand the mechanisms for

corrosion, so that we can work with

industry to better support corrosion

control. This course provides some

essential tools to do that.”

Corrosion control is a top

priority for Wallace, as he

provides pipeline technical advice

to the regulatory agency’s team of

field inspectors. On any given day,

the team may visit pipelines and

oil and gas plants, checking for

compliance with safety and

environmental regulations. If a

rupture occurs in a pipeline, they

are dispatched to investigate the

causes of the accident.

From his Calgary office,

Wallace stays in close touch with

inspectors to make sure the right

questions are asked: Does a

pipeline operator have the right

manuals in place to manage

corrosion? Is a pipeline operator

using protective chemicals

throughout its system? Are inline

inspection devices being used to

detect potential weaknesses?

“In one of the SAIT courses,

we discussed the different types of

pipe coatings, how they should be

applied and what their limitations

are. Having that extra knowledge

has helped me to better support

our team at the EUB.”

As suits their job

responsibilities, Kellow and

Wallace approach corrosion

control from different perspectives

and interests. Kellow is intrigued

by the chemistries of corrosion

and their commercial

applications. Wallace

constantly stresses the link

between responsible

operating practices and

public safety.

But in listening to the pair talk

about what corrosion protection

means to the future of Alberta’s

oil and gas business, it’s obvious

they share some of the same

language, plus some of the same

convictions. And that’s the

importance of corrosion control to

industry’s future.

“One of the biggest challenges

in North America is how we’re

going to protect the longevity of

our industry infrastructure and

assets against corrosion, because

the costs of replacing these

facilities are astronomical,” Kellow

explains.

“Whether we’re dealing with

aging infrastructure or new

facilities, it’s critical that we

maintain our pipelines and our

plants so that we protect the

public and the environment,”

Wallace adds.

The consistent theme that runs

throughout their talk has, no

doubt, been shaped by the many

discussions they’ve shared

throughout the program. But it

also shows a lifelong interest that

has been shaped by their handson

experience as technologists.

Kellow, a Calgary native,

originally trained at SAIT as a

journeyman tinsmith, becoming a

sheet metal apprentice in 1983

and working on several large

construction projects such as

Calgary’s Petro-Canada Tower.

When job prospects in the field

began to dwindle, he

reconsidered his options and

quickly returned to school, this

time into SAIT’s petroleum

technology program.

“Wanting to stay in Alberta, I

recognized that the oil and

gas business, as the major

industry in the province,

would provide me with a

strong future.” His

father had worked as an

oilfield driller in Turner

Valley during the

early 1950s.

Following

Doug Kellow,

R.E.T., R.P.T. (Eng.)

graduation in 1987 and a stint

with Texaco Canada as a field

technologist, he entered the

corrosion technology business in

1988 when he joined Travis

Chemical (later Brenntag

Canada) as a technical services

representative.

“My job was to go out and

troubleshoot facilities — oil and

gas pipelines, oil batteries and gas

plants, you name it — review the

operations and come up with

chemical treatment solutions to

problems.“ He took on his current

position in 2000.

“I soon realized this was an

area that fascinated me. Simple

things like temperature,

topography or gas-water

production — all these affect

corrosion in a pipeline. It’s an

issue that’s always changing and

immensely complex.

You’ll never know it

all. And I find that

exciting.”

Wallace echoes

similar sentiments.

He says his interest

in pipelines goes

back more than

two decades, to

1976,

FEATURE STORY | January - February 2004 13


theevil

we know

asrust

when as a welder’s helper, he was

hired for a summer job on a gas

pipeline construction project near

Whitecourt, Alberta.

“I quickly got hooked on the

business,” says Wallace, who

studied welding as part of his high

school education in Medicine Hat.

“There was the thrill of being

outdoors. It was challenging. And

the money was good, especially

for a young person.”

After a job as an apprentice

welder at the Alberta Department

of Highways, he joined Canadian

Western Natural Gas (later

ATCO) in 1979, taking on

increasing responsibilities, first as a

pressure welder and later as a

quality assurance coordinator,

auditing and inspecting

gas pipe for pipeline

integrity.

Kellow and Micheal Brown (right) in

Brenntag Canada’s R & D lab in Calgary.

He returned to school in 1992

and graduated from SAIT’s

Welding Engineering Technology

Program in 1994. From 1997 to

2000, Wallace worked as a

pipeline integrity specialist at Colt

Engineering, before joining the

EUB in 2001.

“I learned that, in designing

pipeline integrity, you’re

designing for tomorrow, not just

for today. If you want to protect

the integrity of the pipeline, you

have to select the right materials

and put in place the right

practices. And corrosion is one of

the key considerations.”

Throughout their careers,

Kellow and Wallace have

witnessed a growing interest in

corrosion control technology in

Alberta, as oil and gas producers

upgrade their facilities to meet

changing environmental

regulations and to safely handle

growing volumes of corrosive

materials, like sour gas

and produced water.

“Here in Alberta

we deal with such

extreme weather

conditions and

diverse operating

conditions.

Because oil and

gas production is

so critical to our

future, industry

has responded by

developing

world-class

corrosion control

technology.

Companies are

implementing

sophisticated

mitigation systems

and designing more

corrosion-resistant

materials into their

facilities,” Kellow says.

It’s a momentum

that Kellow and

Wallace would like

to see continued,

helped in part by

education programs

like those at SAIT.

As members of a

special SAIT

committee, they continue to stay

closely involved in the program’s

development, advising on course

content and promoting the

program within industry. Kellow

also serves as career chair for the

Calgary chapter of the National

Association of Corrosion

Engineers (NACE), an

international industry

organization committed to the

study of corrosion and new

technologies.

“Doug and Howard have been

great in giving us feedback and

helping us to continually improve

the program,” says Michael

Brown, SAIT’s projects coordinator

for manufacturing and

automation and a key organizer

behind the program.

According to Brown, about 50

professionals are pursuing their

corrosion technology certificate at

SAIT. Brown hopes to boost these

numbers further, through new

changes in the program format.

Based on input from Kellow,

Wallace and other NACE

members, SAIT plans to

introduce an intensive two-month

version of the certificate program

later this spring. Also in the works

for this year is an information

night to expose SAIT students to

industry contacts and job

opportunities in the corrosion

technology field.

“Our goal is to make it easier

for busy professionals to take this

training. Also, we want to provide a

post-diploma course that will allow

fresh graduates from SAIT and the

university to enter the corrosion

industry with a lot of knowledge

ahead of time,” Brown adds.

Kellow predicts a bright future

for job opportunities in corrosion

technology.

“Corrosion technology is a very

diverse field of expertise, and it’s

going to be huge in the future.

Industry is telling us that more

corrosion technology training is

needed in our oil and gas

business. Getting this training will

make engineering technologists

more effective on the job and

more hireable.”

14 January - February 2004 | FEATURE STORY


Newsbriefs

Correction on sponsorship

A photo caption in the Nov/Dec 2003

issue of TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA

stated that ASET had again sponsored the

NAIT rope bridge building contest held

in the fall. Due to a combination of

circumstances, sponsorship has not

occurred as intended. ASET apologizes

for this error and regrets any

inconvenience it may have caused.

Volunteers needed for

program accreditation

reviews

The Canadian Technology Accreditation

Board (CTAB) is looking for ASET

members to help in upcoming

technology program reviews this year.

The accreditations will be done at

institutes and colleges across the country.

To qualify you must be a certified

technician or technologist.

For further information call CTAB

at 1-800-891-1140, ext. 24, or visit

www.cctt.ca

Win

This

TV!

All eligible ASET members who

return their completed salary survey

questionnaires will have a chance

to win this 32” Toshiba television if

their forms are received on or before

April 30, 2004. The survey form is

already available on-line at

www.aset.ab.ca and can be completed

NOW. In addition, paper forms will be mailed to all members in late March as part of their

update and ballot package. The television was provided by Manulife Insurance Ltd, which offers

ASET members the Great Performer group life insurance program. An early-bird winner of an

RCA home theatre system provided by Maritime Life and Garrett Agencies was to be chosen

January 30. The final prize of a leather duffel bag provided by Meloche Monnex will be drawn

June 30. Drop into the ASET web site today and fill in the form!…or, be sure to watch for the

pink sheet in your mail in March!

TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA | January - February 2004 15


2004

SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS

ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS

$7,500 in scholarships presented

The Engineering Technology Scholarship Foundation

(ETSFA) presented $750 cheques and certificates to

10 technical institute and college students all over Alberta late

last year. At top, ASET Past President Len Anderson, R.E.T. (far

left) presented scholarships to (left to right): William Thompson

(SAIT Architectural), Frederick Luu (DeVry Electronics), Sanjay

Nagalingam (SAIT Electrical) and Gavin Heath (inset photo - SAIT

Geomatics). Above left, ASET Medicine Hat Chapter Chair Randy

J. Adam, R.E.T., PE (left) presented a scholarship to local college

student Daniel Zandbeek (Power

Eng.). Bottom left, ASET Past

President Dan Ethier, R.E.T.,

presented a scholarship to local

college student Shelly Brown (Eng.

Design & Drafting). Above right,

ASET Past Presidents Jim Purvis,

R.E.T. (far left) and Dave

Farquharson, R.E.T. (far right)

presented scholarships to NAIT

students (left to right) Travis Long

(Computer Eng.), Gary Henrickson

(Petroleum) and Geoff Regnier

(Instrumentation). At left, Past

President Randy Doherty, R.E.T.

(left) presented a new scholarship to Grant MacEwan College

student Kevin Maneschyn (Info. Technology Systems

Management). New scholarships for students at Red Deer

College, Olds College, Grande Prairie Regional College and

Lakeland College will commence in 2004. Congratulations to all

the winners!

16 January - February 2004 | SCHOLARSHIPS


By Ken East

Recent significant unplanned cost overruns on oilsands related mega

projects in Alberta have contributed to a slowdown in the release of

over US$35B in new industrial and oil and gas construction

projects. Owners are deliberating over the risks involved before making

future investments. Does this sound like a familiar story where you are?

The Construction Owners Association of Alberta (COAA) was

established in 1990 to unite owners and contractors in this oil-rich

province. The COAA is already renowned in Canada for its highly

successful initiatives in industrial

safety and workforce development.

Its latest area of focus has been the

very topical area of ‘rework’ - the

hard cost of repeating work because

it is not planned and executed

efficiently the first time around.

Rework is a common execution

risk affecting the success of

construction projects worldwide. In a

major effort to eliminate it, the

COAA has developed a ‘best

practice’ product - the Project

Rework Reduction Tool, PRRT TM .

Above all, PRRT aims to restore

control and confidence to execute

small, mid-size and even large

projects on time and within budget.

PRRT is an interactive project

management software tool that is

designed to promote better leadership, accountability and management

practices at all stages during the execution of industrial projects in

process industries.

It was developed to address the simple premise that disasters in the

execution of industrial projects can be mitigated early on by honest

detection and evaluation of deficiencies in the design and project plans.

PRRT makes the evaluation process easy and readily facilitates proven

improvement options to avert common rework cause issues. It was

developed to engage all project stakeholders. If implemented as early as

possible in a project’s timeline, the COAA is convinced it will improve

the likelihood of project success by averting the particularly wasteful and

costly field rework at construction sites.

The best thing about PRRT is that it’s free, thanks to initial industry

sponsorship.

PRRT is especially designed to assist project managers, their teams and

other stakeholders in performing regular ‘health checks’ on their projects.

It is a tool to complement traditional project controls criteria of time and

cost alone by addressing the ‘softer’ issues of project administration that so

often go unchecked.

Rework detection and evaluation

The COAA team first identified the factors causing rework using

extensive feedback from its membership. It categorized them into five

broad sections, in order of influence:

■ Engineering and reviews

■ Construction planning and scheduling

■ Leadership and communications

■ Materials and equipment supply

■ Human resource capacity

In order to reach a meaningful level of detail for analysis and

mitigation, these are then divided into 20 categories (see Figure 1.), then

into 93 detailed subcategories.

‘Project Rework

Reduction Tool’

promises enhanced

performance for

industrial construction

projects

Figure 1. Principal sections and categories

In the first principal area, PRRT employs easy-to-use but challenging

questionnaires to rate performance against known rework-causing factors.

Figure 2. provides a typical example of the interactive and easy-to-use

questionnaire format. There are separate questionnaires for each of five

key phases during project execution.

FEATURE STORY | January - February 2004 17


Figure 2. Typical questionnaire screen

The evaluations, or ratings, produce a Project Rework Reduction

Index (PRRI), which effectively predicts the severity of rework on the

project and highlights where attention is most needed to mitigate its

impact. (Figures 3 and 4) They are ideal for team reviews (in-house or

with client), group presentations and project reporting.

PRRI permits the tracking of a project’s ‘health’, or rework trends over

its entire timeline: through the five key phases from the initial conceptual

design phase through to completion of construction and into plant

commissioning (Figure 5).

Figure 3. PRRI tile chart

Goldmine of best practices

and lessons learned

Evaluations are but the first important step. After having detected

deficiencies in the project in the PRRI Evaluation Area, PRRT offers

users its second principal area - a Definitions and Suggestions Database

to mitigate the impact of rework to the project. This is made up of a

definition as to the significance of each subcategory, plus a

comprehensive compendium of suggestions, extensive construction

industry best practices and a myriad of lessons learned from other

industrial and process industry projects (Figure 6.)

18 January - February 2004 | FEATURE STORY


Figure 4. Dashboard element chart

The database area provides valuable and proven ideas and resources

to quickly combat rework causes as the industrial or oil & gas project

develops. The wealth of knowledge contained in this database was

derived from extensive experience contributed by the COAA

membership and published sources, including the Construction Industry

Institute. Based in the U.S.A., this research institute’s mission is to

improve the competitiveness of the construction industry.

Comprehensive and easy-to-use checklists and templates are also

available within this suggestions area, as well as links to related

organizations offering useful information, often for free.

PRRT can also be used to conduct independent project performance

audits. Additional key features are its resource library and bookshop. One

of the tool’s key attributes is its ability to benchmark separate projects

during their separate development phases.

Figure 6. Typical definitions and suggestions database screen

veteran and inexperienced project teams alike, regardless of project size.

Kevin Nabholz, president of the COAA and senior vice president of

major projects with Suncor Energy Inc., recently commented that he is

“convinced there is a dramatic opportunity to improve the execution of

major projects, especially in the area of rework.”

He added that project teams everywhere could benefit from the

‘Alberta experience’ that underpins both principal areas within PRRT.

Sponsorship has resulted in PRRT v2.0 being available for FREE

DOWNLOAD from the COAA website:

www.coaa.ab.ca/costreduction/prrt

Ken East is business development manager with Horton Chicago

Bridge and Iron Ltd. in Calgary.

Figure 5. Project trend graph

Most importantly, it’s a valuable training tool for new project personnel

– it provides a rapid and readily accessible resource into the practicalities

of executing complex industrial construction projects. Such a vast array of

experience has never before been made available in this innovative way.

Used appropriately and proactively, PRRT will lead to a greater

awareness by the stakeholder teams as to the factors of rework that often

beset construction projects, and early enough so their impact on a

project’s budget may be mitigated.

Ken East, leader of the PRRT sub-committee, himself with a 20-year

career in the industry internationally, claims the new tool will greatly aid

FEATURE STORY | January - February 2004 19


*

PULL THIS SE

* PULL THIS SECTION OUT AND POST IN A PROMINENT LOCATION *

CHAPTERS’CALENDAR

CALGARY

When: Wednesday, February 4, 2004

What: City of Calgary Bonnybrook

Wastewater Treatment Plant

tour (www.calgary.ca)

Time: 7:30 – 9:30 pm

Contact: Roy Scarisbrick, C.E.T., ph.

403-560-4840 (bus.) or e-mail:

roy@headwaysystems.com

Deadline: Tuesday, February 3, 2004

Safety gear required: Bonnybrook will loan

safety glasses and hardhats

When: Tuesday, February 10, 2004

(date change!)

What: Emercor Building Systems

Plant tour, West of Calgary near

Calaway Park

Time: 6 - 7:30 pm

Contact: Norbert Lange, C.E.T. at

403-517-3116 or e-mail:

lange_n@yahoo.com

When: Thursday, February 12, 2004

What: Annual mini-olympics social

Location: Schanks Athletic Club,

9627 Macleod Trail South,

Calgary, Alberta

Time: 6 pm

Cost: members: $27,

non-members: $32

Contact: The ASET office at

1-800-272-5619 or

charlottem@aset.ab.ca to register.

Advance payment is required.

Come out for our annual mini-olympics. This

popular event is a great opportunity for

networking with other technologists. The fee

includes three competitions, prizes, snacks and

two drink coupons.

When:: Thursday, February 26, 2004

What: ATCO Structures tour

(www.atcostructures.com)

Time: 1:30 – 3:30 pm

Max. group size: 20 persons

Contact: David Stewart, C.E.T.,

ph. 403-233-8271 or e-mail:

inroadsguru@shaw.ca

Deadline: Monday, February 23, 2004

Safety gear required: ATCO will supply

any needed safety gear

When: Tuesday, March 9, 2004

What: Big Rock Brewery tour

(www.bigrockbeer.com)

Time: 1:30 – 3:00 pm

Max. group size: 30 (Book early!)

Cost: $5 (Includes tasting four

products in a souvenir mug.)

Contact: Norbert Lange, C.E.T.,

ph. 403-295-6351 (res.),

403-517-3116 (bus.) or e-mail:

lange_n@yahoo.com

Deadline: Monday, March 8, 2004

When: Thursday, March 11, 2003

What: Calgary Chapter Annual

General Meeting

Time: 7 pm

Location: Danish Canadian Club,

727 11 Ave SW, Calgary

Who: ASET members only

Contact: Norbert Lange, C.E.T. at

403-517-3116 or e-mail:

lange_n@yahoo.com

The ASET Calgary Chapter Annual General

Meeting is your opportunity to get involved.

This meeting will provide updates on local

events and planning. We will also have some

of the ASET head office executives out, so this

will be an opportunity to meet them and hear

what's happening in the province. This

meeting is also your opportunity to elect the

chapter executive for the coming year. Snacks

and beverages will be provided.

When: Wednesday, March 24, 2004

What: CPR & Alstom Transport

locomotive maintenance shop

tours (www.cpr.ca)

1st tour: CPR locomotive maintenance

shop tour

Time: 6 – 7 pm

2nd tour: Alstom Transport locomotive

maintenance shop (contractor

to CPR)

Time: 8 – 9 pm

Max. group size: 12 persons at each of CP

and Alstom

Contact: David Stewart, C.E.T.,

ph. 403-233-8271 or e-mail:

inroadsguru@shaw.ca

Deadline: Monday, March 22, 2004

When: Thursday, April 22, 2004

What: Calgary Transit C-Train

Anderson Maintenance Shop

tour (www.calgary.ca)

Time: 8:00 – 9:30 am

Max. group size: 20 persons

Contact: Michel Reinberg, A.Sc.T.

ph. 403-230-6679 (office),

403-710-1711 (cell) or e-mail:

michel.reinberg@gov.calgary.ab.ca

Deadline: Wednesday, April 21, 2004

Safety gear required: no open-toed shoes

When: May 2004

What: Dinner speaker

Where: Danish Canadian Club,

727 - 11 Ave. SW, Calgary

Cost: TBA

By popular request. Plan to attend our first

dinner speaker event of the year. Watch the

ASET website or TECHNOLOGY

ALBERTA for details.

For more updated information on upcoming events for 2004,

TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA and Chapter Notices. Next deadlin


CTION OUT AND POST IN A PROMINENT LOCATION

*

COLD LAKE

Contact:

Ajaz Quraishi, C.E.T., PE,

ph 780-639-4114,

780-639-4058 or e-mail:

ajaz@accountingplus.ab.ca

EDMONTON

When: Thursday, April 8,

2004

What: Tour of Micralyne

Time: 2 pm

Micralyne is a world leader in

the design and fabrication of

MEMS (Micro-Electro-

Mechanical-Systems) silicon, glass, and thin

film components. The tour will include a

technical presentation and tour of their 40,000

square foot facility, including 8,000 square feet

of clean room.

Contact: Bill Walkhouse, C.E.T. to register

for the tour. Sign up early, spaces

will fill quickly! A maximum of

25 spaces are available.

When: Saturday, June 5, 2004

What: Annual Golf Tournament

Time: 9 pm

Where: Pioneer Meadows Golf and

Country Club

Details to follow. Watch the ASET website for updates.

Contact: Bill Walkhouse, C.E.T.,

ph 780-992-5043, or

fax 780-992-5520 or e-mail:

bwalkhouse1@westaim.com

FORT McMURRAY

Contact:

Orest Romaniuk, C.E.T.,

ph 780-791-6605,

780-598-1456 or e-mail

oromaniuk@hotmail.com

GRANDE PRAIRIE

Contact:

Monty Lynes, C.E.T.,

ph 780-539-1373,

fax 780-539-1377, or e-mail:

monty@aronservices.com

Chopping wood for charity

Several members of the ASET

Cold Lake Chapter recently lent a

hand cutting birch firewood to earn

$1,000 for the group’s bursary

fund. Imperial Oil donated the

wood to non-profit organizations.

Past President Randy Doherty,

R.E.T. (inset) took on a large log.

The group took the odd refreshment break

(above). Pitching in were (left to right): Ted

Plouffe, Doherty, Brian Popowich, C.E.T., Cyril

Morgala, Jack Gamble, Henry Kolasa, Dan

Lastiwka, and Ed Nachura.

LLOYDMINSTER

Contact: Adam Budenski, C.E.T.,

ph 780-808-0008

First-ever Lloyd scholarship won

The joint ASET/SASTT Lloydminster Chapter

recently presented its first scholarship to a local

high school graduate attending a technical

training program. Chapter Chair Adam Budenski,

C.E.T. (left) presented the $500 scholarship to

SAIT Architectural Technology student Adam

Huber at an awards ceremony in November.

Congratulations Adam H!

LETHBRIDGE

Contact:

Clayton Kunz, C.E.T.,

ph 403-317-3365 or e-mail:

kunzc@agr.gc.ca

MEDICINE HAT

Contact:

Randy J. Adam, R.E.T., PE, ph

403-526-0272 or 403-502-8475

or e-mail: radam@mhc.ab.ca

RED DEER

APEGGA’s Central Alberta Branch has extended

an invitation to all ASET members to participate in

their ‘Lunchtime Forum’. A series of presentations

scheduled for the lunch hour on the first Tuesday of

each month, at the Red Deer Provincial Building.

Scheduled Presentations (subject to change):

When: February 3, 2004

Topic:

‘Diamonds in Alberta’, by Roy

Eccles, P.Geol., Alberta

Geological Survey

When: March 2, 2004

Topic: ‘Special Areas Water Supply

Project’, by Andrew Durham,

P.Eng., Alberta Environment.

When: April 6, 2004

Topic: ‘RedR, Registered Engineers for

Disaster Relief ‘, by Dave

Chalcroft, P.Eng.

When: May 4, 2004

Topic: ‘Restoring the Historic

Michener Building, a Victim of

Fire’, by Mark Cooper, P.Eng.,

Alberta Infrastructure’

When: June 1, 2004

Topic:

‘Geothermal Heating and

Cooling in Central Alberta’, by

Richard Ferrand, P.Eng., Earth

Geothermal

Contact: Dwain Mueller, C.E.T.,

ph (res.) 403-784-3442, (bus.)

403-784-3518 or e-mail:

drafting@rennmill.com

watch the ASET website at www.aset.ab.ca, future issues of

e for CHAPTERS’ CALENDAR submissions: March 8, 2004


By Isidor Buchmann

runtime of a portable

device directly related to

Isthe energy stored in a

battery? The answer should be

‘yes’ but in reality, the runtime is

often governed by other

deficiencies than depleting

capacity alone.

This article examines the

cause of unexpected downtime

and short battery life. We look at

four factors - declining capacity,

increasing internal resistance,

elevated self-discharge and

premature voltage cut-off on

discharge. We evaluate how these

regenerative deficiencies affect

nickel, lead and lithium-based

batteries. We address

advancements in modern battery

analyzers and evaluate how these

instruments can identify and

often restore weak batteries before

battery related problems occur.

Declining capacity

The amount of charge a

battery can hold gradually

decreases due to usage and aging.

Specified to deliver a capacity of

100% when new, the battery

requires replacement when the

capacity drops to below 80% of

the nominal rating.

The energy storage of a battery

can be divided into three

imaginary sections consisting of:

available energy, the empty zone

that can be refilled, and the

unusable part (rock content) that

increases with aging. Figure 1

What causes

batteries to

fail?

Figure 1:

Battery

charge

capacity.

Three

imaginary

sections of

a battery

consisting

of available energy, empty

zone and rock content.

illustrates these three sections.

In nickel-based batteries, the

so-called rock content is

commonly present in the form of

crystalline formation, also known

as memory. To prevent memory,

nickel-based batteries should be

deep-cycled once every one or

two months. If no full discharge is

applied for four months and

longer, a restoration becomes

increasingly more difficult the

longer service is withheld. The

two nickel-based chemistries used

in radio communications are the

rugged Nickel-cadmium, a

battery that has been around for

the last 50 years, and the higher

energy-dense but more delicate

Nickel-metal-hydride.

Performance degradation of

the Lead-acid battery is caused by

sulfation and grid corrosion.

Sulfation is a thin layer that forms

on the negative cell plate if the

battery is being denied a fully

saturated charge. Sulfation can,

in part, be corrected with cycling

and/or topping charge. The grid

corrosion, which occurs on the

positive plate, is caused by overcharge.

Lithium-ion battery loses

capacity through cell oxidation, a

process that occurs naturally

during use and aging. The typical

life span of a Lithium-ion battery

is two to three years, whether

used or not. Storing the battery in

a cool place at a 40% charge

minimizes aging. An aged

Lithium-ion cannot be restored

with cycling or any other external

means.

Increasing internal

resistance

The capacity of a battery

defines the stored energy — the

internal resistance governs how

much energy can be delivered at

any given time. While a good

battery is able to provide high

current on demand, the voltage

of a battery with elevated

resistance collapses under a heavy

load. Although the battery may

hold sufficient capacity, the

resulting voltage drop triggers the

‘low battery’ indicator and the

equipment stops functioning.

Heating the battery will

momentarily increase the output

by lowering the resistance.

A battery with high internal

resistance may still perform

adequately on a low current

appliance such as a flashlight,

portable CD player or wall clock.

Two-way radios, laptops and

emergency equipment, on the

other hand, require heavy current

bursts. Figure 2 simulates low and

high internal battery resistance with

a free-flowing and restricted tap.

Nickel-cadmium offers very

low internal resistance and

delivers high current on demand.

In comparison, Nickel-metalhydride

starts with a slightly

higher resistance and the

readings increase rapidly after 300

to 400 cycles. The internal

resistance of Lead-acid batteries is

very low. The battery responds

well to short current bursts but

has difficulty providing a

sustained high load. Over time,

Figure 2: Effects of internal

battery resistance.

A battery with low internal

resistance is able to provide

high current on demand. With

elevated resistance, the

battery voltage collapses and

the equipment cuts off.

the internal resistance increases

through sulfation and grid

corrosion. Lithium-ion has a

slightly higher internal resistance

than nickel-based batteries. Aging

gradually increases its cell

resistance and Lithium-ion loses

its performance due to elevated

resistance rather than capacity

loss.

Elevated self-discharge

All batteries suffer from selfdischarge,

of which nickel-based

batteries are among the highest.

The loss is asymptotically; the

self-discharge is highest right after

charge and then levels off.

Nickel-based batteries lose 10% to

15% of their capacity in the first

24 hours after charge, then 10%

to 15% per month afterwards.

One of the best batteries in terms

of self-discharge is Lead-acid; it

only self-discharges 5% per

month. Unfortunately, this

chemistry has the lowest energy

density and is ill suited for

portable applications. Lithiumion

self-discharges about 5% in

the first 24 hours and 1% to 2%

afterwards. Adding the protection

circuit increases the discharge by

another 3% per month. Figure 4

illustrates a battery with high self-

22 January - February 2004 | FEATURE STORY


discharge.

The self-discharge on all

battery chemistries increase at

higher temperatures. Typically,

the rate doubles with every 10ºC

(18ºF). A noticeable energy loss

occurs if a battery is left in a hot

vehicle.

Usage and aging also affect

self-discharge. Nickel-metalhydride

is good for 300 to 400

cycles, whereas Nickel-cadmium

may last over 1000 cycles before

high self-discharge affects the

performance. An older nickelbased

battery may lose its energy

during the day through selfdischarge

rather than actual use.

The battery gets flat at the end of

the day, even if not used. Discard

a battery if the self-discharge

Figure 3: Effects of high

load impedance.

Self-discharge increases with

age, high cycle count and

elevated temperature.

Discard a battery if the selfdischarge

reaches 30% in 24

hours.

reaches 30% in 24 hours.

Nothing can be done to

reverse self-discharge. Factors that

accelerate self-discharge in nickelbased

batteries are damaged

separators induced by excess

Bruce Weiss C.E.T.

Agent

crystalline formation, allowing

the packs to cook during

charging, and high cycle count,

which promotes swelling in the

cell. Lead and lithium-based

batteries do not increase the selfdischarge

with use in the same

manner as their nickel-based

cousins do.

Premature voltage

cut-off

Not all stored battery power

can be fully utilized. Some

equipment cuts off before the

designated end-of-discharge

voltage is reached and precious

battery energy remains unused.

Applications demanding high

current spikes push the battery

voltage to an early cut-off. This is

especially visible on batteries with

elevated internal resistance. The

voltage recovers when the load is

removed and battery appears

normal. Discharging such a

battery with a moderate load on a

battery analyzer will sometimes

produce residual capacity

readings of 30% and higher.

The premature voltage cut-off

is not caused by the equipment

and high internal battery

resistance alone, warm

temperatures also play a role.

Heat lowers the battery voltage

and initiates an early voltage

cutoff. A multi-cell battery pack

may contain a cell with an

electrical short. Memory on

nickel-based batteries causes a

further decrease in voltage,

contributing to an early cutoff.

Excellence

Independently Owned and Operated

Serving Edmonton and Area

Bus. (780) 481-2950

Fax: (780) 481-1144

Toll Free: 1-866-481-2950

Web Site: bruceweiss.com

Email: bruce@bruceweiss.com

Figure 4:

Illustration of

equipment

with high cutoff

voltage.

Some portable

devices do not

utilize all

available

battery power

and leave

precious energy behind.

Why ‘charge-and-use’

alone is not sufficient

The battery charger has limited

diagnostic capabilities and cannot

detect a weak battery. The green

‘ready’ light does not verify battery

performance but simply reveals

that the pack is fully charged.

Weak batteries charge quicker

and remain on ‘ready’ longer than

strong ones. Bad batteries tend to

gravitate to the top and become a

target for the unsuspecting user.

In an emergency situation when

quick charging action is required,

the batteries that are on ‘ready’

may be deadwood. In the

meantime, the good packs are

Figure 5: The green ‘ready’

light on a charger does not

provide performance

verification. It simply reveals

that the battery is fully

charged.

still charging because they have

more capacity to fill.

Manufacturers of portable

equipment stress the importance

of regular battery testing. Battery

analyzers ensure that all batteries

meet the required performance

level.

A simple way to manage a

battery fleet is by attaching a

small label to the pack revealing

service date, next service due and

battery capacity. The system is

self-governing in the sense that

the user only picks a battery that

is properly labeled and has

correctly been serviced. All other

batteries are segregated for

service. Some battery analyzers

automatically generate a label

when removing the battery from

the analyzer.

Figure 6: Label printer.

The label printer

automatically spits a label

with each battery service.

The labels contain the service

date; next service date due,

battery capacity and internal

battery resistance.

Summary

Rechargeable batteries do not

die suddenly but gradually get

weaker over time. Implementing

regular battery maintenance greatly

reduces unexpected downtime

caused by weak batteries.

The battery often escapes the

scrutiny of scheduled calibrations

and inspections that is mandatory

for other equipment. Routine

battery analysis is often relaxed

and little effort is made in

keeping track of the battery’s

state-of-health, cycle count and

age. Weak batteries get mixed

with new packs and the system

becomes unreliable.

Unexpected downtime due to

failing batteries can cause tense

moments for the equipment

operator. Some people may go so

far as to seek legal compensation

for personal damages suffered by

a failing battery. Many

organizations are beginning to

take a proactive approach in

terms of battery maintenance and

record keeping. And this is done

without the lawyers watching over

their shoulders.

Isidor Buchmann is the founder of

Cadex Electronics Inc. in

Vancouver.

FEATURE STORY | January - February 2004 23


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24 January - February 2004 | TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA


Win a trip for two to Las Vegas from SAIT Alumni Relations.

Beat the odds and enter to win a Las Vegas vacation. If you are a SAIT alumnus simply go

to www.sait.ca/alumni and click on the ASET contest link to enter. If you're lucky you'll win

airfare and three nights accommodation for two, plus we'll throw in $500 Canadian

spending money so you'll start out ahead of the game.

As a SAIT alumnus you can enjoy networking, mentoring, keeping in touch with your SAIT

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TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA | January - February 2004 25


Management

sponsorship

of ITis critical...

Align

opportunities

with benefits

By Cameron Palmer, P.Eng.

Whatis it that differentiates IT successes

from failures? Why is there such a

variance in typical management

perceptions of the value of IT to the company?

■ IT is a strategic enabler

■ IT is a commodity

■ IT is a cost center

■ IT is a critical success factor

■ I don’t know and I don’t care

Why have we let these tiny electrons drive such a wedge

in people’s perceptions and polarize their thinking?

If you are looking for a rational answer to this problem,

you should flip over to the Dr. Phil show, because it starts

with two single cells at the start of birth…the DNA of the

human embryo.

The equivalent DNA particles in the business world are

opportunity and benefits. Bring these two parties together in

a rational way and you have the makings of a successful

venture. Miss either of these components and you have the

equivalent of slow burnout or a fast melt down.

Timing is always critical and this is perhaps what got us

into this dilemma. In the earlier phases of the IT evolution,

there was a technology-driven search for a business problem

to solve with the new technology. Then with the advent of

the PC and distributed processing the technology was

available to everyone and the business-driven benefits

tended to come in discrete, difficult to measure terms.

If this lack of clarity exists around your water fountain or

your boardroom then you may want to sit up and take

notice. This can result in a tremendous cost in terms of lost

business opportunities and lost productivity that few

organizations can absorb.

26 January - February 2004 | IT FEATURE


Opportunity

It is no secret there is

tremendous pressure on

organizations to improve their

competitive position and improve

financial performance. Two of the

most widely shared business

opportunities that exist across

business sectors are:

1. Reducing business

cycle times

2. Reducing overhead costs

Whether it is the business cycle

of finding reserves to commercial

venture in the oil and gas sector,

or reducing the time to get a new

product idea to market in

manufacturing, these business

drivers are significant.

Benefits

Defining benefits to justify your

projects is nothing new for all

businesses. Some people may do a

better job than others, but

everyone does it in one way or

another. Civil engineers have

been doing it for centuries in

structural projects.

So what is the big deal about

aligning business opportunity with

benefits for information

technology projects? The answer

is that there are no IT projects

unless you are in the technology

business.

In the vast majority of

businesses, the IT component is

important, but it is only one of the

many change components a

business must manage to capture a

business opportunity:

■ Systems and technology

■ People and organization

■ Culture

■ Business process

■ Products and services

So how do we grown adults get

into situations where the IT

organizations are responsible for

defining and stewarding

business benefits?

Conversely, why does a

chief information

officer believe that he

or she can be successful

by proceeding with IT

related-initiatives in

isolation without the sponsorship

of the business?

Aligning

opportunities and

benefits

To make this less embarrassing

for those adult DNA embryos

caught in this situation, let’s roll

back time and find a more

effective way of aligning

opportunity with benefits. By the

way, I was one of these adult

embryos before I got

enlightened and

developed these

guiding principles:

1. Decision

making – Focus

on timely access

to information

It is important to recognize

that information systems’ primary

purpose is to enhance and

improve decision making. It is

critical to have the business users

involved in defining their decision

making needs to take advantage of

the technology. In this respect, IT

is an enabler.

In many companies, data is in

abundance. But easy access to

high-graded information for

effective decision-making is at a

premium. In this respect, senior

management must play a

leadership role to ensure that all

levels within the organization have

the information to make effective

decisions to meet the company’s

performance goals and objectives.

2. Business and IT Plan –

Technology and business

plan are inseparable

The role of management has

become more complex because of

the rapidly changing work

environment and strong

competitive forces of the world

marketplace. Managing both

internal and external change has

become a more critical part of the

business landscape.

The same is true for

the need to manage

the change in the IT

environment.

Defining how IT can

enable success

requires a holistic view

with IT management an

equal partner in the management

decision-making process. This

facilitates success by reducing the

risk of IT not effectively

contributing to the company’s

goals and objectives.

The need for business and IT

integration applies during all

business environments. During

periods of growth, the integrated

plan allows for improved access to

information for improved

decision-making and new

opportunity identification.

During periods of

contraction, it enables

reduced staff levels to

continue to make

effective decisions.

3. Business

ownership – Management

sponsorship of IT is

imperative

Many industries such as those

related with supply chain

management have had the

pressure of competition and

customer demands force a more

active involvement by senior

management. This has accelerated

their learning process and the

recognition of the direct

relationship between improved

information access, decision

making and business performance.

As we move further into the

information age, the demands on

management will increase to

establish a clear direction for the

application and effective

management of the company’s

information environment. This

will require their increased

understanding of this critical

change management component

and their active involvement to

capture the company’s business

opportunities.

Some of management’s

strategic planning and execution

decisions include:

■ Aligning opportunity with

benefit

■ IT spending levels

■ Business candidates for process

streamlining

■ Company-wide IT capabilities

■ IT service levels

■ Security and privacy risks

■ Defining accountability

4. IT planning process –

Participation creates

ownership for delivering

value

The one aspect of planning

that is continuously overlooked is

that the journey is just as

important as the end product. The

commitment to the plan and the

insight of how to deliver the

opportunity and capture the

benefit occurs during the planning

process. It is for this reason that IT

planning should be a collaborative

effort between business and IT.

The strategic planning process

brings an opportunity to create a

community of people who share

knowledge and take ownership to

deliver the goals and objectives. As

a result, IT planning should be an

integral part of business planning.

Effective participation of both

management and staff is critical

with a ‘top down’ process that

defines the management goals and

objectives, plus a ‘bottom up’

process to gain the new ideas and

innovative solutions to support the

business goals and objectives. The

participation in these integrated

plans solidifies the validity and

impact of the IT change

component.

5. IT governance – IT

delivery is a critical success

factor

The business and IT strategy

not only requires participation in

the development of the plans, but

in the effective execution of the

plans as well. Management needs

to play an ongoing role to provide

the governance of the IT change

agent to ensure:

■ Alignment with the business

strategy

■ Value/cost relationship related

to the business value

■ Delivery of high quality, high

efficiency and predictable levels of

service

Only with active management

and staff participation in the

definition of the opportunity and

stewardship of the benefits, can IT

achieve its full potential as a

change agent.

Cameron Palmer is the chief operating officer of

Strategic Performance Solutions in Calgary.

IT FEATURE | January - February 2004 27


FieldAviatoin

Down to

the bare

bones

ASET’s Calgary

Chapter toured

Field Aviation’s

overhaul and

maintenance

facility recently and saw a

number of different aircraft in

varying states of repair. The de

Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter

shown here was in for a major

overhaul, which includes

nearly complete disassembly,

testing, repairs and upgrades.

The Dash 8 seen below was

being prepared for storage.

Field services a large variety of

regional aircraft from all

around the world at its Calgary

facility. It also sends teams to

repair aircraft in situ.

28 January - February 2004 | CHAPTER TOUR


SHOPTour03

Avionics service,

refurbishments and

modifications are all part of

Field’s work. Several ASET

members work at the facility,

which also has its own

engineering department,

upholstery shop and paint

facilities. At top right, an aileron

is being overhauled. At right is a

pair of jigs used by Field to test

torque wrenches being used in

the shop. The test units

themselves are also regularly

sent out for testing. Below right,

exhaust ducts for a turboprop

engine await reassembly.

Below, seats that have been

recovered are awaiting their

bottom cushions.

CHAPTER TOUR | January - February 2004 29


Group

benefits

and services

Add

Value

to ASET membership

members are

ASETrecognized to be

an attractive, professional target

audience for many group benefit

providers. For that reason, the

plans available to members cover a

broad range of services and are

constantly evolving to suit the

wants and needs of the

membership. All members,

including students, have access to

the plans.

The ASET website at

www.aset.ab.ca contains all up-tothe-minute

information on

benefits and services offered to

members. In most cases, direct,

secure links to the providers are

also available on the site.

Check the offerings to see how

you can save!

ASET's combined buying

power can save you money for

services that you may use

regularly already. Members have

reported saving enough on one of

the ASET plans to cover the cost

of their membership for the year.

If you can use two or more

services, imagine the benefits!

Most benefits and services can

be accessed using your ASET

membership card. For others,

application forms for some of

these benefit services can be

requested through ASET.

From a nationwide, on-line

employment referral service to

bargains in the latest cell phone

technology, ASET likely has a plan

that you can use. In addition,

many of the benefit/service

provider companies contribute to

the Engineering Technology

Scholarship Foundation of Alberta

(ETSFA), so your patronage

contributes to the future of the

technology professions. To find out

more and to apply on-line for many

of these programs, go to:

www.aset.ab.ca/groupbenefits.html

ASET Member MasterCard

MBNA Canada

Bank and ASET

are partnered in a

unique program

that provides ASET members with

a premium credit card program

while also allowing members to

demonstrate pride in the

profession. In addition, with each

use of the credit card you will be

supporting the future of the

technology professions as royalties

are paid into the Engineering

Technology Scholarship

Foundation of Alberta.

You can apply online by going

to the application link on ASET’s

website. You may also contact

ASET directly for a VIP

application or call MBNA for an

application at 1-800-416-6345.

Cell phones and

air-time plans

Cityfone Telecommunications has

entered into a group discount

program for ASET members,

offering two services now: cellular

phones and service and land-line

long distance service. Cityfone's

new wireless network partner,

Rogers, ensures wide-spread

coverage in Alberta - but at

preferred prices for ASET

members.

Cityfone's new long distance

program for telephones is offered

at 5.9 cents/minute anytime,

anywhere in North America.

The ASET group benefits web

page includes a secure link for

members to order on-line or call

Cityfone at 1-888-322-2160.

CTEN job referral

system – www.cten.ca

The Canadian Technical

Employment Network (CTEN) is

the national job referral system

that puts technology professionals

in touch with prospective

employers searching for quality

technical staff with specific

knowledge and expertise. There is

a small fee for posting jobs on this

network. It is free to professional

technicians/technologists to

register themselves. Note: student

members must be within one

month of graduation. The CTEN

(www.cten.ca) site is also

30 January - February 2004 | MEMBER BENEFITS


accessible from ASET’s home

page.

Home/auto insurance

TD Meloche Monnex is the main

provider of home and *automobile

insurance services to members of

professional, university and college

organizations. To discover more

about your insurance coverage

options with TD Meloche

Monnex call 1-877-536-7755 or

visit their website:

http://www.melochemonnex.com/

en/aset/index.jsp

(*Due to provincial legislation, the

automobile insurance program is

not offered in British Columbia,

Manitoba and Saskatchewan.)

Group term life &

accident insurance

Through Manulife Financial,

members have access to the Great

Performer program offered to

technicians and technologists

across Canada, and the highly

competitive rates associated with

that program. Manulife offices are

located in Edmonton, Calgary,

Red Deer, Lethbridge and Grande

Prairie. Call 1-800-668-0195.

Disability, group health

and dental insurance

Plans are offered to members by

Maritime Life as part of a national

program (CCPE sponsored) for

engineers and technologists.

Other coverages available include

business overhead expense and

accident insurance. Contact the

authorized representative in

Alberta - Garrett Agencies.

Garrett Agencies is

proud to be the

endorsed Authorized

Marketing Representative for the

ASET (CCPE) plans in Alberta

and the Territories. For over 30

years Garrett Agencies has been

providing life, disability, business

expense, extended health care and

dental advice and service for

multiple association plans. Their

combination of experience,

knowledge and level of service

commitment to the association

members and products places

them in a unique position to

accurately assist ASET members

with their insurance planning and

the options available in the

industry. Telephone: 403-263-6077

or 1-800-661-3300.

Auto rentals

ASET

members

receive a 10

per cent discount off Hertz

Standard Rates or a minimum five

per cent discount off Hertz

Leisure Rates at participating

Canadian and U.S. locations plus

special international discounts.

You will be quoted the best rate

for your rental needs at the time

of reservation. Quote the ASET

discount #1405791 when you

reserve your car and present your

ASET membership card. Hertz

reservations: 1-800-263-0600 or

visit the direct link for ASET

members on our website.

ASET

also has

an

agreement with National Car

Rental. National Car Rental's

Affinity Benefits Program Contract

ID is 3612486, Code 02.

National's main telephone

number is 1-800-CAR RENT

(227-7368).

Consumer Goods

Shoes/boots

Red Wing

Shoes stores

carry a wide

variety of

safety boots, hiking, sports, casual

and dress shoes in men's and

women's styles. A 15 per cent

discount off regular prices are

available at Red Wing company

stores located in Edmonton and

Calgary as well as at associate

stores in Lethbridge (Shoemasters)

and Red Deer (Parkland Shoe

Repair). The discount program

will also apply to the company's

mobile stores which travel to work

sites and smaller centers. Show

your valid ASET membership

card as identification to access the

discount program. View a full

lineup of Red Wing products at:

www.redwingshoe.com

Men’s clothing

Moores Clothing for Men stores,

including those outside Alberta

provides ASET members and their

families a 10 per cent discount on

all regular and sale-priced

merchandise. Existing ASET

members received their

Moores/ASET discount card with

their current membership card

and dues receipt. All new

members will receive their

discount card with their new

member package.

Women’s clothing

ASET is currently negotiating

with a women’s clothing store.

Watch the website for updated

information.

Electronics, software

products, DVDs, videos,

CDs and books

A & B Sound stores

welcome ASET

members who are

now eligible to

receive discounts on electronics,

software products, DVDs, videos,

CDs and books at A&B Sound

stores throughout Alberta. CDs,

videos books and DVDs will

receive 10 per cent discounts on

white tag items. Yellow and red

tag items are new releases, which

have been competitively priced

and/or are already on sale, and in

most cases no further discounts

are offered (even to A & B Sound

staff). Significant discounts are

also available on electronic

equipment such as televisions,

DVD players, home theatre

packages, cameras, computer

products, car stereos, remote

starters and more. For full details

on how to access your ASET

member discount at A&B Sound

stores, visit ASET’s group benefits

web page for a customized link to

find a store nearest you.

Hotel discounts

ASET negotiates Corporate

Rates with various hotels from

time to time. Currently the

following are providing corporate

rates to ASET members:

■ Best Western Village Park Inn,

1804 Crowchild Trail N.W.,

Calgary - Toll free reservations:

1-888-774-7716. ASET Corp. Rate

= $89/single/double+tax.

■ The Sutton Place Hotel,

10235 101 Street NW, Edmonton -

Toll free reservations:

1-866-378-8866. ASET Corp. Rate

= $119.00+tax for Superior Rooms

(single/double), Club Floor Rooms

$154.00+tax. Website:

http://www.suttonplace.com

IMPORTANT: Members who have

terminated membership with ASET

are no longer eligible for the same

group programs. Participation in

some programs can continue,

although usually at higher rates.

Project Management Professional (PMP) Exam

Preparation Workshop (www.promanagementtraining.com)

Feb. 21-22

Feb. 28-29

Calgary

Calgary

Airport Travel

Lodge Hotel

Workshop fees:

$875+GST

Due to the tremendous success of the previous workshop in Calgary

last November, Pro management training Ltd is pleased to offer

another comprehensive 4-days (2 weekends) workshop. The main

objective of this workshop is to review the five phases of a project

and to prepare the attendees for the PMP exam. Attendees will

develop a clear understanding of the concepts and tools used in the

various components of project management and practice applying

them in a comprehensive case study based on actual large project.

The workshop will focus on helping attendees to improve the project

delivery while balancing time and budget constraints. Individual

strengths and weaknesses in managing projects will be evaluated.

For Information: visit www.promanagementtraining.com

or contact workshop presenter: Alex Iskander, P.Eng, PMP at

(403) 607-3303 or (403) 239-7636 or fax (403) 239-7636

MEMBER BENEFITS | January - February 2004 31


Call

for

2004

ASET

Each year at the Annual Convention

ASET members and others are

recognized for their outstanding

contributions to the Society, or to the technical

community in general.

ASET members are urged to review the list

of award categories and consider nominating a

deserving colleague or organization. The ASET

Awards Committee reviews nominations

submitted to the ASET office and makes the

award decisions.

The ASET Certificate of Appreciation and

Certificate of Recognition, Award of Merit,

Honourary Membership and Honourary Life

Membership Awards and ASET Plaque will be

awarded at the Annual General Meeting on

Saturday, May 1, 2004 at the Sutton Place

Hotel.

The ASET Technical Excellence,

Technician/ Technologist of the Year and

Technical Employer of the Year awards will be

presented during ASET’s Awards Banquet

Celebration Saturday, May 1 at the Sutton

Place Hotel.

Reasons for nomination and proposed

wording for the award itself are to be supplied

on the Awards Nomination Form, which is

available on the ASET website at

www.aset.ab.ca/awards.html, and by calling the

ASET office at 780-425-0626.

Awardsnominations

NOMINATION

DEADLINE FOR

AWARDS TO BE

PRESENTED AT

THE ANNUAL

CONVENTION IS

MARCH 15, 2004.

FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO TECHNOLOGY

ASET Technical Excellence Awards

These awards recognize individuals or

organizations for their consistently outstanding

work. Qualities to be considered include: high

levels of technical knowledge, important

contributions to processes, consistent

professional attitude, significant contributions to

technical works, innovative technical solutions,

assistance provided to others, leadership, etc.

Nominations should include support materials

and/or documentation for review. These awards

are open to members and non-members, as

well as companies or organizations of all sizes.

A maximum of six awards may be given in any

year. Awards are presented at ASET’s

Annual Convention.

Technician/Technologist

of the Year

Awarded to an individual

member of ASET who has

demonstrated a high level of

professionalism and excellence

in making a significant

contribution to technology.

Judging criteria used by ASET’s

Awards Committee include:

level of knowledge, importance

to the organization, ability,

leadership, creativity/innovation, community

involvement, etc.. Nominations must include

corroborating and supporting material such as:

published papers, newspaper or magazine

articles, testimonials from clients, supervisors,

peers. The award is presented at ASET’s

Annual Convention. The winner’s name is

forwarded to the Canadian Council of

Technicians and Technologists in Ottawa as

Alberta’s nominee for the Annual National

Achievement Award.

Technical Employer of the Year

The Technical Employer of the Year is

awarded to an organization for its support of the

technician/technologist community in Alberta

as well as its overall achievements. Judging

criteria include support for ASET

certification/membership plus professional

development and volunteerism, promotion and

utilization of technicians and technologists

within the organization, community

involvement, safety, innovation, profitability,

growth, etc.. Private and public organizations

are eligible. Nominations must be

accompanied by corroborating and supporting

documents such as annual reports, newspaper

and magazine articles, testimonials from

community leaders, clients, employees, etc..

“As a result of our most recent employee survey,

recognition is the single most sought after

achievement of the 2,500 employees at PCL. The

Technologist of the Year award hit the bulls-eye with

respect to our company’s quest for recognition.” Scott

A. Matheson, R.E.T., G.S.C., ASET Technologist of the Year - 2003

32 January - February 2004 | ASET AWARDS


Certificate of Achievement

Awarded to deserving

organizations, members and nonmembers,

open-house winners,

competition winners, etc., to

recognize their accomplishments.

Framed certificates are presented

at appropriate times throughout

the year.

Certificate of Appreciation

Awarded to deserving

organizations, societies, members

and non-members who have

performed a service for ASET or

one of its chapters, committees,

etc., such as guest speakers,

committee members, meeting

facilitators, event sponsors or

hosts. Awards are presented at an

appropriate times throughout the

year.

Certificate of Recognition

Awarded to deserving

organizations, societies, members

and non-members who have

performed a special service for

ASET or one of its chapters,

committees, etc., such as retiring

ASET chapter, committee or

board chairs, or significant

sponsorship of ASET activities or

events. Recipients are honoured

at ASET’s Annual Convention

and are presented with a framed

certificate.

Award of Merit

Awarded to deserving members

of ASET who have dedicated a

significant amount of time to the

Society, including retiring

councillors, vice presidents and

provincial representatives to the

Canadian Council of Technicians

and Technologists. Recipients are

honoured at ASET’s Annual

Convention and are presented

with a framed certificate.

Honourary Membership

Recognizes non-members who

have given eminent service to the

practice of applied science and

engineering technology.

Nominations are reviewed by

ASET’s Awards Committee,

which makes recommendations

to the Society’s Executive

Committee for final selection.

Honourary members are exempt

from annual membership dues

and do not have voting privileges

in Society affairs. Recipients are

honoured at ASET’s Annual

Convention or another

appropriate occasion and are

presented with a framed

membership certificate.

ASET’s choice

of Colt as

Technical

Employer of the

Year is a gratifying

recognition of

Colt’s focus on our

people.” Given

that the selection

is largely based on

our staff’s support

and testimonials,

this award is

especially

rewarding.”

Larry Benke,

P.Eng.,

President, Colt

Engineering

(left), Technical

Employer of

the Year -

2003,

receiving the

award from

ASET President

Allan Yeung,

R.E.T.

Honourary Life

Membership

Recognizes members who

have given eminent and

distinguished service to the

Society, including ASET’s

founding members and retiring

presidents. Honourary Life

Members are exempt from annual

membership dues but do have

voting privileges in Society affairs.

Recipients are honoured at

ASET’s Annual Convention, and

are presented with a framed

membership certificate and

special medallion noting their

years of service.

ASET Plaque

Awarded to deserving

organizations, institutions, colleges,

companies, members and nonmembers

who have rendered

special service to ASET and its

members. Recipients are honoured

at ASET’s Annual Convention or

other appropriate event.

PRIZES!

PRIZES!

PRIZES!

The ASET Awards Committee

offers gift incentives to the

nominators of the winners of

ASET’s awards. All nominators will

receive an ASET specialty

promotional item – such as a

metal business card holder or an

ASET mug. In addition, the

nominators for the prestigious

Technician/Technologist of the

Year, Technical Employer of the

Year and Technical Excellence

award winners will receive two free

tickets to the Awards Banquet and

will be recognized at the event.

Get your nominations in today!!

“At ASET, we recognize and

appreciate the efforts of members’

who contribute to the continued

success of our awards program.

We would like to acknowledge the

contribution of the successful

nominator of the award winner by

presenting two free tickets to our

annual awards dinner.” Awards

Committee Chair Glen Horne,

C.E.T.

ASET AWARDS | January - February 2004 33


NEW & RECLASSIFIED MEMBERS

Associate - November 2003 – January 2004

ASSOCIATE TECHNICIANS

BARNARD, DALE WESLEY PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

ENERMARK INC.

HAYES, STEPHEN W. MECHANICAL/H.V.A.C. SHERWOOD PARK

ELK ISLAND CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

LITTLEJOHN, DEANNA L. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COLD LAKE

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

MCNEIL, MONTGOMERY G.B.PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENG.

CALGARY

HUSKY ENERGY INC.

MURPHY, PETER DAVID ENGINEERING DESIGN & DRAFTING EDMONTON

PANGLI, TARLOCHAN S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

LOGICAN TECHNOLOGIES INC.

PATEL, DILIP INSTRUMENTATION CALGARY

PETERSON, RICHARD J. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL CALGARY

TREELINE WELL ABANDONMENT & RECLAMATION LTD.

RITES, DANIEL CIVIL ENGINEERING SHERWOOD PARK

STRATHCONA COUNTY

SCHLEGEL, MIKE J. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL CALGARY

NEWPARK ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

STONE, SCOTT E. MECHANICAL/H.V.A.C. CALGARY

AIR CHEK INDUSTRIES

SUN, ROBIN CHUNG-WEN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

SASKATOON

WOEHR, MATTHIAS H. MECHANICAL/H.V.A.C. BROOKS

MCCONNELL GROUP OF COMPANIES INC.

ZALA, SANJAY MANILAL PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

AGAT LABORATORIES

ASSOCIATE TECHNOLOGISTS

ARELLANO, NOAH ESTOYE MINERAL RESOURCES/ENG. GRANDE PRAIRIE

HALLIBURTON ENERGY SERVICES

BAILON, MARTIN B. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

BAISA, JULIO B. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

KEETTIKKAL, THOMAS P. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

SANDHER, PAWANDEEP S. CIVIL ENGINEERING

EDMONTON

TUGADE, NAPOLEON F. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

QGEXXON

T.T. - November, 2003 – January, 2004

TECHNICIANS/TECHNOLOGISTS IN TRAINING

ALESSIO, MICHAEL J. BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION COLD LAKE

ALLERS, JUSTIN T.J. ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER SHERWOOD PARK

ANDREAS, SHAUN R. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

BARRIE, MIKE ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER SPRUCE GROVE

BARTEK, JOANNE M. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL OLDS

BECK, SHELDON T. CIVIL ENGINEERING SHERWOOD PARK

BLEZY, AARON M. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

BOLLINGER, AARON S. ENGINEERING DESIGN & DRAFTING LETHBRIDGE

BREDEMANN, CURTIS T. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENG. EDMONTON

BARBER INDUSTRIES INC.

BRISSON, LOREN D. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING SHERWOOD PARK

BROCHU, BRYAN B.B. MECHANICAL/H.V.A.C. RIVIERE QUI BARRE

BROWN, DARRELL J. ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER CALGARY

CAIN, LYNN A. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RED DEER

CARNEGIE, LLOYD J. CIVIL ENGINEERING SPRUCE GROVE

CHIN, JASON Y.W. INFORMATION COMPUTER SYSTEMS EDMONTON

COSTLEY, JO-ANN L. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL CALGARY

COURTEPATTE, GREG A. CIVIL ENGINEERING ST. ALBERT

CRAWSHAY, KIMBERLEY E. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS CALGARY

CULLING, MATTHEW J. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

CURNISKI, JONATHAN J. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING OLDS

DACYK, RYAN P. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

DAVIES, BARRY O. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CALGARY

DAYTON, WILLIAM B. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS CALGARY

DE VERA, RODELLE R. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

DJORDJEVIC, ROBERT ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

DOIDGE, CHANDRA L. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

DYCK, KAMILEE DAWN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRON. LLOYDMINSTER

FLYNN, TARA A. CIVIL ENGINEERING ST. ALBERT

FRITZ GATEHOUSE, M. A. CIVIL ENGINEERING LETHBRIDGE

FUNG, ANTHONY K.P. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

GALLACE, GINO S. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

GANDIRE, TREVOR T.G. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDMONTON

GILL, SUKHPAL SINGH MECHANICAL ENGINEERING NISKU

WESTECH VAC SYSTEMS LTD.

GRAHAM, LISA D. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

HADLAND, BRENDON A. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CALGARY

HARDCASTLE, MICHAEL PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

HATCH, KIM D. ARCHITECTURAL EDMONTON

HAYDEN, JODIE LEE PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

ENERMARK INC.

HEHR, DUSTYN C. CIVIL ENGINEERING SHERWOOD PARK

HOPKO, JAMIE WILLIAM BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRON. LLOYDMINSTER

CITY OF LLOYDMINSTER

JANZ, CONROY ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS NORTH YORK

JERKE, BLAIR TYLER PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

CAVELL ENGINERING CORPORATION

KAZANTSEVA, OLESIA V. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS EDMONTON

KEIJSER, ROBERT J. CIVIL ENGINEERING CALGARY

KELLER, SCOTT W.J. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

KISCH, JEFFREY A. ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER CALGARY

KUBITZA, IAN M. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS CALGARY

KWAN, MICHAEL ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER EDMONTON

LANGEVIN, STEPHANIE M. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL EDMONTON

EBA ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS LTD.

LAUDER, DARCY ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

L'HEUREUX, ROBIN CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

LI, WEI INFORMATION/COMPUTER NETWORKS CALGARY

LITVINCHUK, ROBERT S. INFORMATION/COMPUTER NETWORKS EDMONTON

LOWCAY, JASON P. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DAWSON CREEK

MA, LU W. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDMONTON

MAGHOO, TRAVEEN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDMONTON

MCDONALD, HUGH S. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL LETHBRIDGE

MILLS, GRANT C. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RED DEER

MISTRY, BHAVIN ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER EDMONTON

MUNRO, DUNCAN J. ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER EDMONTON

NGOIE, DIDIER K. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS EDMONTON

NGUYEN, QUAN H. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

NYBERG, NATHAN J.D. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENG. SHERWOOD PARK

OCONNELL, SHAUN P. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENG. MEDICINE HAT

OTIS, SHAUN L. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

PEDLAR, ROBIN R. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

PETERS, KELSEY T. CIVIL ENGINEERING DARWELL

PHAM, THINH T. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

RAABIS, BRAD C. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BENTLEY

RAABIS, HARTLEY J. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BENTLEY

RAJENDRA, SHAWN P. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDMONTON

REITENBACH, KELLY A. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

HINZ AUTOMATION INC.

ROSE, MICHAEL THOMAS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CALGARY

SAGHAR, ADNAN INFORMATION/COMPUTER NETWORKS CALGARY

SALER, TRAVIS T.S. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS CALGARY

SCHWENNEKER, TRAVIS M. ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER

ST. ALBERT

SLORSTAD, MATTHEW B. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

STEWART, MORGAN J. CIVIL ENGINEERING CALGARY

STRETCH, BETTI DORIS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY VERMILION

LAKELAND COLLEGE

SYDNEY, RYAN V. ELECTRONICS/COMPUTER EDMONTON

TAVAROLI, BRIAN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDMONTON

TOOKEY, COLAN M. BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION ST. ALBERT

VARGAS, LUIS H. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

WARREN, CHRISTOPHER J. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS TOFIELD

WEBER, TYLER M. CIVIL ENGINEERING TOFIELD

WIEBE, LYNDON R. CIVIL ENGINEERING FORT SASKATCHEWAN

WINTERS, WAYNE W. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS EDMONTON

WOLD, EDWIN L. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ALLIANCE

WORTS, DUSTIN D. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

YAREMCHUK, JASON N. INFORMATION/COMPUTER NETWORKS EDMONTON

YIM, ADRIAN K. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS EDMONTON

YOSUB, YULIA INFORMATION/COMPUTER NETWORKS CALGARY

ZALAMEDA, BRIAN M. ELECTRONICS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS EDMONTON

C.Tech./C.E.T./A.Sc.T./C.C.I.T. –

November 2003 – January 2004

APPLIED SCIENCE TECHNICIANS

GOOCH, TROY SCOTT BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL CALGARY

ALPINE ENVIRONMENTAL LTD.

WIELENS, OLAF HANS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/ENVIRONMENTAL CALGARY

TERROX ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT LTD.

APPLIED SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIST

MCNAMARA, KEN JAMES ARCHITECTURAL BOYLE

ALBERTA PACIFIC FOREST INDUSTRIES INC.

PALMER, TREVOR DAVID CHEMICAL SCIENCE CALGARY

BJ SERVICES CO. CANADA

VISSER, KRISTINE RINA ARCHITECTURAL SHERWOOD PARK

CADD-ABILITIES DESIGN DRAFTING LTD.

CERTIFIED ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS

BISHOP, ROBERT WILLIAM METALLURGICAL/WELDING

NISKU

PCL INDUSTRIAL

CORNEA, GRATZIELLA MECHANICAL ENGINEERING FORT MCMURRAY

FLUOR CANADA LTD.

COX, JAMES A. CIVIL ENGINEERING CALGARY

AMEC INFRASTRUCTURE

DE LA FUENTE, DAVID INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING EDMONTON

POWERCOMM INC.

GRANBERG, MICHAEL E. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING EDMONTON

SPARTAN CONTROLS LTD.

GUMBS, NIGEL A. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING EDMONTON

LAROCQUE, KATRINA E. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

PETROTECH CONSULTING SERVICES LTD.

OLANSON, AURA PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

SINCLAIR, DONALD LEWIS INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING CALGARY

EMERSON PROCESS MANAGEMENT

TRAC, DAT (DAVE) C. ENGINEERING DESIGN/PROCESS PIPING CALGARY

ATCO GAS

VUCIJAK, MILIMIR ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

GUARDIAN TELECOM INC.

YANISH, LLOYD BUILDING ENGINEERING EDMONTON

LAFARGE CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

CERTIFIED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS

ANDRUSIAK, CURTIS P. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CALGARY

ENMAX POWER CORP.

BERT, ANDREW ENGINEERING DESIGN & DRAFTING CALGARY

SNC-LAVALIN INC.

BORN, STACY R. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING EDMONTON

VECTOR ELECTRIC AND CONTROLS INC.

BUTCHER, DALLAS D. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING CALGARY

GEMINI ENGINEERING INC.

DMYTRIW, DAVID G. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

ROCKWELL AUTOMATION CANADA INC.

DOKKEN, RICHARD W. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

THERMO DESIGN ENGINEERING LTD.

EDGINGTON, SHARI L. CIVIL ENGINEERING WHITECOURT

TOWN OF WHITECOURT

HARKNESS, STUART R. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING SHERWOOD PARK

HAY, DANIEL INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING CALGARY

EMERSON PROCESS MANAGEMENT

HENKEL, BARRY CIVIL ENGINEERING YELLOWKNIFE

HO, PHAT VINH MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TORONTO

JONES, TIM A. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING EDMONTON

NORTHLAND SURVEYS

KAZUIK, SHELDON PETER CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

CALGARY

NEOCORR ENGINEERING LTD.

LANGLOIS, EDMUND A. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENG. SHERWOOD PARK

34 January - February 2004 | MEMBERS LISTS


NEW & RECLASSIFIED MEMBERS

LEE, HAROLD YUE-KONG METALLURGICAL/MATERIALS NISKU

PETRO-LINE CONSTRUCTION GROUP

LEE, WILLIAM Y. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

GE FANUC SOFTWARE

LENFESTY, LYNDA C. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA

LETOURNEAU, RYAN C. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING FORT MCMURRAY

SYNCRUDE CANADA LTD.

LY, PETER LONG ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

TRACER INDUSTRIES CANADA LTD.

MAKAR, RYAN HAROLD BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION EDMONTON

READ JONES CHRISTOFFERSEN LTD.

MCMAHON, JOHN RYAN PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

NORTHROCK RESOURCES LTD.

MURPHY, STEPHEN G. INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING CALGARY

ASSOCIATED ENGINEERING ALBERTA LTD.

NEIL, KELLY M. MINERAL RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

ENCANA CORP.

NELSON, BRIAN LEE INSTRUMENTATION MEADOW LAKE

NG, GARY T.W. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

ALTASTEEL LTD.

O'HARA, JONATHAN R. CIVIL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

BIRD CONSTRUCTION

PASQUAN, STEVEN F. CIVIL/MUNICIPAL PEACE RIVER

ALBERTA ENVIRONMENT

PETOVELLO, CHRISTINE M. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

ENCANA CORP.

RAMOS, GERALD ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CALGARY

STANTEC CONSULTING LTD.

RAY, MITCHELL ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

PCA VALENCE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES LTD.

RISPLER, TERESA L. PETROLEUM RESOURCES/ENGINEERING CALGARY

INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SERVICES

ROSENEGGER, STEPHEN F. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

CALGARY

SCHIEWE, DYLAN DWAYNE BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION

EDMONTON

PCL CONSTRUCTORS INC.

SIEBEN, JASON L. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CALGARY

KUDU INDUSTRIES INC.

SKIEBE, ROBERT ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING HOUSTON

SMITS, KEVIN ARIE ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING CALGARY

CALGARY HEALTH REGION

SNOW, AARON DOUGLAS CIVIL ENGINEERING CALGARY

JACQUES WHITFORD

ST GEORGES, NICOLAS J.H.CIVIL ENGINEERING

CALGARY

MORRISON HERSHFIELD LTD.

STENVOLD, MICHAEL W. BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION EDMONTON

VOICE CONSTRUCTION LTD.

STRUTH, DARRELL W. BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION EDMONTON

MISSION BUILDING SUPPLIES

TAN, KENAN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SPRUCE GROVE

HRC ENGINEERING

WEAVER, VAL R. GEOLOGY CALGARY

MGV ENERGY INC.

WEBER, JASON N. CIVIL ENGINEERING BARRHEAD

GOVERNMENT OF ALBERTA

WEST, GREGORY IAN CIVIL ENGINEERING CALGARY

FERGUSON CORP.

WOLF, KELLY DAWN INSTRUMENTATION EDMONTON

COLT ENGINEERING CORP.

ZIMMERMAN, BENJAMIN S.INSTRUMENTATION

EDMONTON

TRU-TEC DIVISION

R.E.T. – August, 2003 – January 2004

REGISTERED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS

BARCLAY, ROBERT BRUCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SPRUCE GROVE

DUNSTALL, GLENN INSTRUMENTATION ENG. FORT SASKATCHEWAN

SHELL CANADA LTD.

HEHN, WILLIAM CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RED DEER

NOVA CHEMICALS CORP.

HOBBS, JOSEPH ROY CIVIL ENGINEERING FORT MCMURRAY

SYNCRUDE CANADA LTD.

KOENS, KAREN METALLURGICAL/MATERIALS EDMONTON

LUDWIG & ASSOCIATES LTD.

LANE, NIGEL GEORGE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING RED DEER

NOVA CHEMICALS CORP.

MCDOUGALL, JAMES M. ENGINEERING DESIGN & DRAFTING CALGARY

BANTREL INC.

MEEK, DANIEL T. ENGINEERING SCIENCE CALGARY

TRANSCANADA PIPELINES LTD.

MUELLER, TERRY CARL METALLURGICAL/WELDING CALGARY

HANOVER MALONEY INC

ONDRIK, PAUL C. MECHANICAL/H.V.A.C. CALGARY

EARTH TECH CANADA INC.

OSCAR, DARRYL ELECTRONICS/AVIONICS EDMONTON

DUCEY AVIONICS LTD.

PALOSANU, BIANCA PETROLEUM RESOURCES/GEOLOGICAL CALGARY

DEVON CANADA CORP.

POWELL, FREDERICK C. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

VINT, DOULGAS G. CIVIL ENGINEERING RED DEER

EXH ENGINEERING SERVICES LTD.

WHITE, PERRY ALAN METALLURGICAL/MATERIALS EDMONTON

STERLING CRANE

WILTERMUTH, RANDY D. ENGINEERING DESIGN & DRAFTING EDMONTON

ARGUS MACHINE CO. LTD.

NEW ASSOCIATE TECHNOLOGIST MEMBER

MISSED ON PREVIOUS LIST

NERI, ROSENDO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EDMONTON

NEW TECHNICIANS/TECHNOLGIST IN TRAINING

MEMBER MISSED ON PREVIOUS LIST

TRAVIS, ADAM ENGINEERING DESIGN & DRAFTING CALGARY

Other Alberta professions:

Engineers.....................................................$225

Information systems (CIPS) –

Edmonton/Calgary .....................................$230

Registered architects.................................. $775

Land surveyors ................................(2003) $856

Teachers.......................................................$897

Medical laboratory technologists ...............$300

Doctors.....................................................$1,690

Licensed Practical Nurses..........................$250

Registered nurses...................................$288.90

Lawyers ................................................... $1,240

Pharmacists............................................$952.30

Professional biologists.................................$225

Other provincial associations:

Association of Engineering

Technologists & Technicians

of Newfoundland Inc. ...............................$145

Prince Edward Island

Society of Certified

Engineering Technologists.........................$100

*unconfirmed at press time

LIFE MEMBERS

ROBERT ARTHUR ALLEN, R.E.T.

ROBERT BRUCE BARCLAY, C.E.T.

THOMAS DEREK CLAUSEN, R.E.T.

BERNARD FRANZKY, C.E.T. SR.

GLENN F. HODGSON, C.E.T.

EDMUND ARTHUR LANGLOIS, C.E.T.

BRIAN THOMAS LOCHTIE, R.E.T.

GLEN W. PFEIFER, C.E.T.

RETIRED MEMBERS

GERALDINE FORGET, C.E.T.

RONALD ARTHUR HAMEL, C.E.T.

DANIEL G. HANSON, C.E.T.

DENNIS DAVID MACKENZIE, R.E.T.

AURA OLANSON, C.E.T.

FREDERICK CHARLES POWELL, R.E.T.

DONALD HENRY ZIMMER, R.E.T.

IN MEMORIUM

KEN BEST, C.E.T.

IAN MACKENZIE, C.E.T.

ARIE HUIZER, R.E.T.

KENNETH NORTH, C.E.T.

REMEMBER! ASET’S 2004 DUES ARE PAYABLE BY

FEBRUARY 15, 2004! AVOID LATE-PAYMENT PENALTIES!

MEET THE DEADLINE! PAY ON-LINE AT WWW.ASET.AB.CA

MEMBERSHIP DUES COMPARISON 2004

New Brunswick Society of

Certified Engineering Technicians

and Technologists .......................................$158

Society of Certified

Engineering Technicians and

Technologists of Nova Scotia.....................$140

l'Ordre des technologies

professionnels du Québec........................ $297

Ontario Association of

Certified Engineering

Technicians and Technologists..................$165

Certified Technicians and

Technologists Association

of Manitoba.................................................$145

Saskatchewan Applied Science

Technologists and Technicians..................$150

Applied Science

Technologists & Technicians

of British Columbia.................................. $240

Alberta Society of

Engineering Technologists

(C.E.T., C.Tech., A.Sc.T., C.C.I.T.).........$140

Alberta Society of

Engineering Technologists (R.E.T.)..........$165

MEMBERS LISTS | January - February 2004 35


Regina technologist wins CCTT

National Achievement Award

Ken Hicks, A.Sc.T. (right), accepted the 2003 National

Achievement Award from Canadian Council of Technicians and

Technologists’ President Rejean Touchette, T.P. at the Council’s

annual meeting in Quebec City late last year. Hicks is a charter

member of the Saskatchewan Applied Science Technologists

and Technicians Association and has had a 40+-year career at

Associated Engineering in Regina. Associated’s Edmonton-based

CEO Alistar Black attended the event as well. A civil engineering

technologist, Hicks graduated from the Saskatchewan Technical

Institute in 1962 and specialized in optimizing building systems.

He retired in December, 2003. Congratulations Ken!

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NAIT / Bring on

the Future

Proper academics are

still the key to ASET

certification

Certification by ASET is a multi-part process, including the

adherence to minimum requirements for both academics and work

experience. These two components are critical to certification and

are not interchangeable.

“What this means is that all applicants must meet the current

minimum academic requirements, no matter how much experience

they have. They must either have a diploma or certificate from a

recognized or accredited post secondary program, or they must have

the equivalent academic qualifications in the appropriate discipline.

Experience can not take the place of academic preparation,” ASET

Registrar Stephen Addo, R.E.T., B.Sc., explained recently.

Conversely, extra academics can not replace proven, verified work

experience, Addo added. For example, having a degree plus an

accredited technology diploma does not wave the need for two years

of acceptable work experience.

In addition, work experience must be deemed to have been

appropriate for the level of certification sought (technician or

technologist) and have been in the same, or closely related, field of

the individual’s academics. Technologist-level work experience

generally includes more application of theory, design work, analysis

and problem solving.

ASET’s certification process closely examines an applicant’s

academic background and their work experience to ensure that both

meet the minimum national standards, Addo explained. If applicants

possess a diploma or certificate from a recognized, accredited

program, further assessment of their academic qualifications is

waived. If not, their academic background will be evaluated by the

ASET Panel of Examiners, and compared to the Canadian

Technology Standard (CTS) in place.

National accreditation began in 1993 and has since become

extremely popular with technical institutes and colleges, since it

speeds the certification process for their graduates and proves that

their programs have met the strict CTS.

“If you had graduated from a Canadian technical institute or

college between 1980 and 1986 and you were to apply for certification

today, you are likely to be eligible for technologist certification if you

provide a technical report, which is one of the minimum

requirements,” Addo said. (Most technology training programs now

include Applied Research/Technical Report as required by the CTS.)

Grads from 1986-1993 are eligible, academically, for certification as

technicians or technologists if their program was recognized or

accredited as such by the Canadian Council of Technicians and

Technologists at the time.

Similarly, grads from 1993 to present, if they graduated from nonaccredited

programs, often must upgrade their academic qualifications

to meet the appropriate competency areas within their discipline.

Upgrading courses needed to ensure certification, or for

reclassification from technician to technologist, are generally

available through nationally accredited programs at Alberta technical

institutes or colleges.

To confirm accredited status or to discuss potential certification by

ASET, contact the Registrations Department at 780-425-0626, 1-800-

272-5619 or e-mail asetadmin@aset.ab.ca

36 January - February 2004 | NATIONAL NEWS


Plan to attend the…

Forty-First

Annual ASET

Convention & AGM

April 30-May 1, 2004

Sutton Place Hotel, Edmonton, Alberta

2004 CONVENTION | January - February 2004 37


REGISTRATION FORM

ASET 2004 Annual Convention and AGM

April 30 & May 1, 2004,The Sutton Place Hotel, Edmonton, Alberta AFFINITY PARTNER:

Name (as it should appear on name tag) Prof. designation (i.e. C.E.T., R.E.T., etc.) ASET#

Title

Company

Address City Province Postal Code

Telephone Fax E-mail

Guest name (as it should appear on name tag, if required)

Friday, April 30 – ‘ASET Volunteers – You’re IT!’ Volunteer Appreciation Reception - 7 – 9 pm

Casual volunteer appreciation event to launch the annual convention at Putting Edge, West Edmonton Mall. $10

Saturday, May 1 – ‘Now we’re IT!’ technical symposium - 8 am – 1:30 pm

Includes: Continental breakfast, panel of experts and Keynote luncheon. $125

Keynote Luncheon only. Speaker: Hon. Victor Doersksen, Alberta Innovation & Science (invited) $35

ASET Annual General Meeting – 1:45 pm - 3:30 pm

EVENT # REQUIRED COST EACH TOT.AL

Saturday, May 1 – ASET Awards Banquet celebration - 5:30 – 10:30 pm

Includes: traditional Moose Milk Reception, dinner and presentation of ASET’s Technician/Technologist $55

of the Year, Technical Employer of the Year and Technical Excellence Awards.

OR

Full day: Symposium & Awards Banquet package

Includes continental breakfast, the symposium, luncheon and awards banquet – a complete package $140

with a saving of $20/person. *Corporate packages available for $1,120 (Includes full day symposium

for 8 people, corporate tables at the luncheon and awards banquet, signage and supporter recognition.)

NOTE: ASET is a GST non-registrant - no GST is charged TOTAL: $

N/C

Submit this form to:

Alberta Society of Engineering Technologists

2100–10104 103 Ave NW, Edmonton AB T5J 0H8 or Fax: 780-424-5053

Enclosed is a cheque for $___________________

OR

Charge $__________ to my ■ Visa ■ Mastercard

Account No.

Cardholder name (print)

CANCELLATION POLICY

Expiry Date

Cardholder signature

Cancellations in writing to ASET up to 15 days prior to event will receive

a full refund. Cancellations less than 15 days prior to event will not be

refunded. Limited seating is available and registrations will be

considered on a first-come, first-serve basis.

ACCOMMODATION

A block of rooms has been reserved for delegates at The Sutton Place

Hotel. Conference rates are: $109/Deluxe single/double accommodation,

$144/Club single/double accommodation, $149/Executive

accommodation, $20 extra person in room. Includes free parking.

To make reservations, contact the hotel directly and be sure to request the

rates for the Alberta Society of Engineering Technologists’ Convention.

The Sutton Place Hotel

10235 101 St NW, Edmonton, AB T5J 3E9

Telephone: (780) 428-7111

Toll Free: 1-800-263-9030

Fax: (780) 441-3098

38 January - February 2004 | 2004 CONVENTION


EVENTS FOR MEMBERS

For a detailed, day-by-day listing of events of interest to

technicians and technologists, visit the ASET web site

interactive calendar at http://www.aset.ab.ca/events.html

SEMINARS/COURSES

SME Northern Lights Chapter 370 and ASM Edmonton

Chapter Event - ‘Applications and Misapplications of

Welded Stainless Steels’

February 20, 2004, 8 am – 4:30 pm

University of Alberta Campus, Edmonton, Alberta

Speaker: Dr. Hugh Roth & Dr. Barry Patchett

Contact: Matthew Webster, Tel: 780-619-0647

or e-mail: sme370@yahoo.com

Website: www.asm-edmonton.org or chapters.sme.org/370/

Safety Codes Council Courses:

‘Interpretation and Application of the Safety Codes Act’ –

4-day course

March 22, 23, 24 & 25, 2004, Edmonton, Alberta

‘Verbal Communication Skills’ course

May 26, 2004, Calgary, Alberta

‘Written Communication Skills’ – 2-day course

May 27 & 28, 2004, Calgary, Alberta

For more information, or to register, contact: the Safety Codes

Council at 1-888-413-0099

TRADE SHOWS/CONFERENCES

CERI North American Natural Gas Conference &

Calgary Energy Show 2004

March 1 – 2, 2004, Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, Alberta

For more information phone: 403-220-2380,

e-mail: conference@ceri.ca

Website: www.ceri.ca

Construction Specifications Canada, Edmonton Chapter

InfoNetMarch 4, 2004,

Sutton Place Hotel, Edmonton, Alberta

One-day session including seminars, networking, trade show

and a mock trial.

For more information contact: David Reburn, Tel.: 780-460-7967

or e-mail: reburnd@jm.com

Website: http://cscedmonton.org/contactus.html

ISA 2004 Edmonton Exhibit & Conference

April 21 & 22, 2004, Northlands Agricom Halls B & C,

Edmonton, Alberta

Website: www.isaedmontonshow.com

CIM – Mining Industry Conference

May 9 - 12, 2004, Shaw Conference Centre, Edmonton, Alberta

Contact: Serge Major by phone: 1-800-667-1246

or e-mail: smajor@cim.org

Website: www.cim2004.ca

Canadian Society for Civil Engineering 32nd Annual

Conference Professional Practice – Technical Excellence

June 2 – 5, 2004, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Full conference details can be found on the website:

www.csce2004.ca

Global Petroleum Show & Canadian International Petroleum

Conference

June 8 – 10, 2004, Calgary Stampede Park, Calgary, Alberta

Website: www.petroleumshow.com

GeoAlberta 2004

June 8 – 10, 2004, Shaw Conference Centre, Edmonton, Alberta

For more information phone: 403-292-0516

Website: www.geoalberta.com

Mining Industry Conference & Exhibition

May 9 – 12, 2004, Shaw Conference Centre, Edmonton, Alberta

Contact: David Selleck at sellnich@telusplanet.net

or Lorna Nicklin at lnick@eba.ca

Website: www.cim2004.ca

GENERAL INTEREST

Canadian Welding Association Edmonton Chapter meetings:

‘Improved Structures by Weld Joint Design’

February 18, 2004,

Faculty Club, U of A Campus, Edmonton, Alberta

‘Waiward Steel Plant Tour - New CSA W-47 / W-59’

April 20, 2004,

Meet at the Holiday Inn Conference Centre, Edmonton, Alberta

For more information phone/fax: 780-464-6898

or e-mail: cwaedmontonchapter@shaw.ca

Society of Petroleum Engineers meetings:

‘Geological Storage for Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery’,

Ian Potter, Alberta Research Council

February 10, 2004, 11:30 am,

ARC Lecture Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta

Gas Wells’, Drave Cramer, BJ Services

March 9, 2004, 11:30 am,

ARC Lecture Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta

Website: www.speca.org/membership

EVENTS FOR MEMBERS | January - February 2004 39


40 January - February 2004 | TECHNOLOGY ALBERTA

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