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New Energy - Digital Versions - Nuclear Plant Journal

Nuclear

Plant

Journal

Outage Management &

Health Physics

Monticello, USA

May-June 2010

Volume 28 No. 3

ISSN: 0892-2055


NUCLEAR FUEL SUPPLIES

REACTORS

& SERVICES

RECYCLING

RENEWABLE ENERGIES

TRANSMISSION

& DISTRIBUTION

Nobody Does It Better

Nuclear plant operators have a lot to cheer

about these days thanks to a wide range

of achievements that define AREVA’s

commitment to operational excellence.

In only its second U.S. deployment, a new Deposit Minimization

Treatment removed 2550 pounds of magnetite from three steam

generators. Plus, since 1989, a process used at 42 plants worldwide

has successfully repaired reactor-cavity liner leakage. One recent

outage set a world record for In-Service Inspection. And operators

welcomed the full application of a safety-related digital I&C protection

and integrated control system – the first and only one approved

by the NRC. Customers also enjoyed the central location of a

vast U.S. Pump and Motor Service Center.

Energy is our future, don’t waste it! - © 2010 AREVA Inc. All rights reserved. - Photography: Warren Wright

At AREVA, we listen, we learn, we innovate. So we also deliver

unsurpassed Operating Flexibility and Margin for your Power Uprate

Projects. And we focus R&D investment to solve specific challenges,

based on your feedback. The result? You can expect safety, quality,

delivery and performance. Count on AREVA.

www.us.areva-np.com

www.areva.com


NDE

FROM A TO

The World-leader in

nondestructive (NDE)

inspection solutions.

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©2010 EDF Group

Installation of feedwater tank at EDF’s Flamanville construction site of AREVA’s EPR facility (May 2010).

Your Partner for New Nuclear Energy. Today.

For those companies looking at new nuclear, UniStar Nuclear Energy provides economies of

scale and scope through coordinated and systematic development of a standardized fleet of

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For information on AREVA’s U.S. EPR TM technology, visit www.us.areva.com.

For monthly photo updates of construction progress, send your e-mail address to info@unistarnuclear.com.


Nuclear Plant Journal

May-June 2010, Volume 28 No. 3

®

Outage Management &

Health Physics Issue

28th Year of Publication

Articles & Reports

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Prerequisites for New Plants 22

By Luis Echávarri, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

Shutdown Safety, a Cornerstone at Exelon 26

By Glen Earl Chick, Exelon Nuclear

A Strong Safety Culture at Ameren 30

By Pat McKenna, AmerenUE

We Reach Out Beyond our Walls 32

By Margie Jepson, Entergy Nuclear

STAR Human Performance Process 38

By Ron McCall and Anita Church, The Shaw Group, Inc.

Industry Innovations

Exelon's Vision & Leadership 40

By Amir Shahkarami, Exelon Nuclear

New Generation Shielding 42

By Margie Jepson, Entergy Nuclear

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QingQing Zhu

Ultrasonic Cleaning of Jet Pump Fouling 46

By Robert Geier, Exelon Nuclear

Plant Profile

Safety of the Public is our Top Priority 48

By John Grubb, Xcel Energy

Departments

New Energy News 8

Utility, Industry & Corporation 13

New Products, Services & Contracts 17

New Documents 20

Meeting & Training Calendar 49

Journal Services

List of Advertisers 6

Advertiser Web Directory 44

On The Cover

In 2006, the NRC renewed Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant's operating

license for 20 years. See page 48 for a profi le.

Mailing Identification Statement

Nuclear Plant Journal (ISSN 0892-2055) is published bimonthly in February, April, June, August,

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Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 5


List of Advertisers & NPJ Rapid Response

Page Advertiser Contact Fax/Email/Website

11 Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. George Bothwell bothwellg@aecl.ca

2 AREVA NP, Inc. Donna Gaddy-Bowen (434) 832-3840

15 The Babcock & Wilcox Company Lisa Tomlin lctomlin@babcock.com

16 Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Company Arlene Corkhill (714) 528-0128

21 Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Company

Nuclear Group Arlene Corkhill (714) 528-0128

19 Day & Zimmermann Power Services David Bronczyk (215) 656-2624

12 Divesco, Inc. Susan Kay Fisher (601) 932-5698

41 E. H. Wachs Co. Sherry Gilmore ehwachs.com/pipe_tube/index.htm

52 Enertech, a business unit of

Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Company Tom Schell tschell@curtisswright.com

33 EXCEL Services Corporation Donald Hoffman (301) 984-7600

35 Fairbanks Morse Engine Kevin Lidbury kevin.lidbury@fairbanksmorse.com

23 GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Karen Ellison (910) 362-5017

17 HSB Global Standards Catherine Coseno (860) 722-5705

7 Kinectrics Inc. Cheryl Tasker (416) 207-6532

41 MHF Services Lisa Sabol lisa_sabol@mhfservices.com

25 Nuclear Logistics Inc. Craig Irish (978) 250-0245

37 ORTEC Susie Brockman info@ortec-online.com

9 Petersen Inc. Susan Chrisman (801) 732-2098

39 Reef Industries, Inc. Chris Attaway (713) 507-4242

27 Remote Ocean Systems Sandy Kennedy sandyk@rosys.com

45 Thermo Fisher Scientific, Scientific Instruments

Division CIDTEC Cameras & Imagers Tony Chapman (315) 451-9421

4 UniStar Nuclear Energy Mary Klett (410) 470-5606

31 UniTech Services Group Steve Hofstatter (413) 543-2975

43 Urenco Enrichment Company Ltd. Please e-mail enquiries@urenco.com

47 URS Art Lembo Arthur_lembo@urscorp.com

29 Westerman Nuclear Jim Christian (740) 569-4111

51 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Karen Fischetti (412) 374-3244

10 Zachry Nuclear Engineering, Inc. Lisa Apicelli (860) 446-8292

3 Zetec, Inc. Ki Choi (418) 263-3742

Advertisers’ fax numbers may be used with the form at the bottom of the page. Advertisers’ web sites are listed in

the Web Directory Listings on page 44.

Nuclear Plant Journal Rapid Response Fax Form

May-June 2010 Nuclear Plant Journal

To: _________________________ Company: __________________ Fax: ___________________

From: _______________________ Company: __________________ Fax: ___________________

Address:_____________________ City: _______________________ State: _____ Zip: _________

Phone: ______________________ E-mail: _____________________

I am interested in obtaining information on: __________________________________________________

Comments: _____________________________________________________________________________

6 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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New Energy

Agreements

At the French-Italian bilateral summit

chaired by French President Nicolas

Sarkozy and Italian Prime Minister Silvio

Berlusconi, Anne Lauvergeon, CEO of

AREVA, signed three nuclear energy

cooperation agreements with its industrial

and academic partners.

The first agreement, signed with

Giuseppe Zampini, CEO of Ansaldo

Energia, will allow AREVA and Ansaldo

to work together in Italy on the ENEL-

EDF project to build at least four EPR

reactors, and also on other projects

around the world. This AREVA-Ansaldo

partnership will notably cover cooperation

in engineering, the supply of certain

components, erection and commissioning

tests.

The second agreement, signed with

Enrico Bonatti, CEO of Techint, paves the

way for the two companies to cooperate

on future turnkey nuclear projects worldwide,

thanks to Techint’s experience and

know-how in the design and construction

of large industrial facilities.

Lastly, a training agreement

was signed with Giuseppe Forasassi,

President of CIRTEN, the inter-university

consortium for nuclear research

and technology which includes the

universities of Rome La Sapienza, Pisa,

Padua, Palermo, Polytechnic Milan and

Polytechnic Turin. Under the terms of

the agreement, AREVA will contribute

to the development of new industrial

competencies in Italy by providing

information material and conference

speakers, and allowing students to

visit its sites. The group will also offer

internships, develop research projects

and deliver professional training.

Contact: Laurence Pernot, telephone:

(301) 841-1694, email: Laurence.

pernot@areva.com.

Concrete Pour

First concrete of the second Taishan

EPR reactor to be constructed in

Guang-dong province in southern China,

has been poured by the Chinese utility

CGNPC.

Around 9000 cubic meters of

concrete, poured continuously by seven

pumps, were necessary to make the

pre-reinforced Reactor Building slab,

measuring 55 meters in diameter.

On November 26, 2007, AREVA and

CGNPC signed a series of agreements

worth an overall 8 billion to construct two

third-generation EPR reactors, as well

as supply all necessary equipment and

services, and create an engineering jointventure.

The two reactors are expected to

be commissioned in late 2013 and 2014,

respectively.

Contact: Julien Duperray, telephone:

33 1 34 96 12 15, fax: 33 1 34 96 16 54,

email: press@areva.com.

Russia

On the occasion of the meeting

between Russian Prime Minister Vladimir

Putin and Italian Prime Minister Silvio

Berlusconi in Lesmo (Milan), Fulvio

Conti, CEO and General Manager of Enel

and Boris Y. Kovalchuk, Acting Chairman

of the Management Committee of INTER

RAO UES, signed a Memorandum of

Understanding for cooperation in the

nuclear power sector, construction of

new plants and technological innovation,

energy efficiency and distribution in

Russia and the countries of Eastern

Europe.

Particularly relevant is the intention

to analyze the project of the development

of the new nuclear plant at Kaliningrad

which is the first nuclear public-private

partnership in Russia. The plant will

consist of two units of 1,170 MW each

and will employ the third-generation

VVER 1200 technology, and it is expected

to enter into operation between 2016

and 2018, with a significant proportion

of the electricity to be exported to the

nearby European markets. INTER RAO

UES will provide terms and conditions’

development for foreign investors

involvement to the Baltic NPP project and

development of technical proposals for

distribution of the NPP’s electric power

as well. Enel will study the technical,

economic and regulatory aspects of the

project in order to evaluate the conditions

and forms of its possible participation

into the initiative.

Contact: telephone: 7 495 967 05

27, fax: 7 495 967 05 26, email: press@

interrao.ru.

Italy

Ansaldo Energia and Ansaldo

Nucleare, Finmeccanica companies,

Enel and EDF signed an important

Memorandum of Understanding at the

Fifth Forum of Italian-French dialogue,

chaired by Italian Prime Minister Silvio

Berlusconi and French President Nicolas

Sarkozy, in Paris. The agreement was

reached thanks to the commitment of Pier

Francesco Guarguaglini, Chairman and

CEO of Finmeccanica, Fulvio Conti,

CEO and General Manager of Enel and

Henri Proglio, Chairman and CEO of

EDF.

The aim of the agreement is to define

areas of co-operation between Enel-EDF

and Ansaldo Energia, which holds 100%

of Ansaldo Nucleare, in developing and

building at least four of the nuclear plants

planned by Enel and EDF for Italy, using

Evolutionary Pressurised Reactor (EPR)

technology. Enel and EDF will play the

role of investors and architect engineers,

which means they will have overall

responsibility for the project and for

managing the building of the plants. In

this regard, they will draw on the wealth

of experience of Ansaldo Energia in

designing, planning and commissioning

the nuclear systems and in providing

support to licensing operations.

In addition, Ansaldo Energia will

participate in the qualification and tender

process carried out by Enel and EDF for

the supply of equipment, installation and

engineering systems.

Contact: telephone: 39 06

32473313, fax: 39 06 32657170, email:

uffi ciostampa@fi nmeccanica.com.

Poland

On March 30, 2010 while attending

the 12th International Energy Forum

(IEF) in Cancun, Mexico, Polish Deputy

(Continued on page 10)

8 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


Bet you

didn’t

know

Petersen Inc. has

been in business

for 48 years and has

booked over $750,000,000

in sales. We have aimed for

the moon and reached it! To put it

in perspective, if every one of our project

dollars equated to one mile, we would have

made over 150 round trips to the moon in the past 30

years. Not too bad for a company with over 5,800 years of

combined manufacturing experience. We must admit though,

most of our work takes place right here on Earth.

Oh yeah, with that many years of experience, it’s no wonder that

founder, Denis Petersen, welded on the Lunar excursion module.

Current projects include producing the LAW and HLW Melters

for the River Protection Project in Hanford, WA, as well as large

and small projects for D.O.E. companies like Battelle, Bechtel.

LANL, TRU Solutions and Shaw AREVA. Companies rely heavily

on our expertise to help clean up and protect the environment.

Petersen Inc. prides itself in offering solutions that some may

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Manufacturing • Fabrication • Large Precision Machining • Small Precision Machining • Field Services • Warehousing & Distribution


New Energy...

Continued from page 8

Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak and

Minister Masayuki Naoshima of the

Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and

Industry (METI) signed a memorandum

of cooperation on the peaceful uses of

nuclear energy.

According to the memorandum,

Japan will assist Poland with its nuclear

power development plans, aiming at

operating the first nuclear power plant

(NPP) in that country around 2020.

From the viewpoints of maintaining a

stable supply of energy and implementing

measures against global warming, Poland

recently resumed its consideration of

starting up a new reactor by 2020. The

country has already decided to adopt a

nuclear energy program this year, in order

to identify the NPP’s construction site.

Contact: Japan Atomic Industrial

Forum, Inc., email: information@jaif.

or.jp.

Vietnam

During his recent stay in Washington,

D.C., to attend the Nuclear Security

Summit, Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama

met Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen

Tan Dung, conveying the Japanese

government’s strong support for Vietnam’s

plan to introduce nuclear power for the

first time. He also expressed Japan’s hope

to begin negotiations with Vietnam on a

nuclear cooperation agreement between

the two countries in the near future.

Contact: Japan Atomic Industrial

Forum, Inc., email: information@jaif.

or.jp.

South Texas Project

Nuclear Innovation North America

LLC (NINA), the nuclear development

company jointly owned by NRG Energy,

Inc. and Toshiba Corporation announced

an agreement for the Building and Construction

Trades Department (BCTD) of

the AFL-CIO to provide skilled union labor

to construct the two new nuclear units

at the South Texas Project (STP).

Approximately 6,000 people will

work up to 25 million hours to build the

new units, STP 3&4, which are located

about 100 miles southwest of Houston in

Matagorda County, Texas. Construction

of the new units is expected to begin in

2012, once NINA receives its Combined

Operating License from the Nuclear

Regulatory Commission, and should last

five years with unit 3 coming online in

2016 and unit 4 in 2017.

Contact: David Knox, telephone:

(713) 795-6106.

Turkey

Russia and Turkey signed an international

agreement concerning the cooperation

in construction and operation of a

four-reactor nuclear power plant planned

for Akkuyu site in Mersin Province.

The draft agreement was approved by

a resolution by the Russian government of

May 9, 2010. According to the document,

the Russian party within three months

commencing the agreement entering into

force will start procedures to set up an

engineering company to implement the

project, including the Akkuyu N-plant

operation.

Contact: Rosatom, telephone: 7 499

949 46 50, fax: 7 499 949 27 22, email:

press@rosatom.ru.

(Continued on page 12)

Zachry—a visionary force

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10 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


The power of a leader

Operating successfully on four

continents, the CANDU reactor design

has been a world leader in producing

clean and reliable nuclear energy. The

global fleet of CANDU reactors is one

of the world’s best performing designs

with a track record of on-time, on-budget

delivery over the past seven projects.

Performance – another powerful reason

to consider CANDU technology.

For more information, visit

www.aecl.ca/Reactors.htm

Partnerships that Power the World


New Energy...

Continued from page 10

Ukraine

The Ukrainian Government approved

a draft agreement with Russia concerning

the cooperation in construction of two

power units at Khmelnitsky nuclear

power plant (NPP).

The approved agreement is a

framework deal and sets terms and

conditions of the joint work of the parties

on the project. In particular, it envisages

a Russian loan for the work, however, the

document does not define the loan amount

and allocation dates. This issue should be

subject to a separate contract, according

to Makukha.

A year ago, the Ukrainian

Government invited Russia to participate

in the construction completion of two

new reactors at Khmelnitsky NPP site.

The construction should start in 2010 and

finish before 2016 yearend. Moscow may

give Kiev a US$5-6bn loan to build the

new reactors.

Contact: Rosatom, telephone: 7 499

949 46 50, fax: 7 499 949 27 22, email:

press@rosatom.ru.

Finland

Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) is

pleased to learn about the Government’s

favorable political decision towards the

Company’s application to construct its

fourth nuclear power plant, Olkiluoto

unit 4. A favorable decision at the first

stage of the political process is extremely

significant to TVO and its shareholders.

With the favorable decision-in-principle

granted, the application can proceed to

the next stage, i.e. to deliberation in the

Parliament.

Jarmo Tanhua, President & CEO of

TVO, emphasizes the significance of the

experience gained from the Olkiluoto

3 project and says that the company

will take full advantage of the globally

acknowledged Finnish nuclear power

expertise accumulated at TVO as a result

of the construction of the new-generation

nuclear power plant unit and the operation

of the OL1 and OL2 units.

Contact: Jarmo Tanhua, telephone:

358 9 6180 2500.

AP1000

Westinghouse Electric Company

LLC announced that it has signed a

Memorandum of Understanding with

leading Polish energy provider Polska

Grupa Energetyczna (PGE) to collaborate

on delivering the AP1000 nuclear

power plant in response to Poland’s

initiatives for nuclear capacity.

Under the agreement, Westinghouse

and PGE will jointly study the feasibility

of building new nuclear reactors in Poland

based on the AP1000, the world’s

most advanced and mature Generation

III+ design, which includes innovative

features such as modular construction,

advanced passive safety systems, and a

solid portfolio of construction projects

that are currently on time and within

budget.

Contact: Scott Shaw, telephone: (412)

374-6737, email: shawsa@westinghouse.

com.


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12 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


Utility, Industry & Corporation

Utility

Engineering

Collaboration

On the occasion of the visit to China

by the President of the French Republic,

EDF’s Chairman and CEO Henri Proglio

signed two agreements with Sun Qin, the

CEO of CNNC (China National Nuclear

Corporation) and He Yu, President of

CGNPC (China Guangdong Nuclear

Power Holding Company), thereby

marking a new step in the acknowledgment

of EDF as a partner in China’s nuclear

programme.

Contact: Carole Trivi, telephone: 33

(1) 40 42 44 19.

Community Outreach

Entergy Nuclear and Entergy

Mississippi, Inc. have been named

recipients of a national award recognizing

their economic and community

development efforts in Port Gibson and

Claiborne County, Mississippi.

The 2010 Communitas Award

for Leadership in Community Service

recognizes recent targeted efforts by

Entergy to improve relations and boost

the community near Grand Gulf Nuclear

Station.

Company activities included financial

and employee support of area arts and

service organizations, launch of the

Power Path to Nuclear Energy program

in Port Gibson schools, community

meetings, the establishment of a Salvation

Army office, holiday food and toy drives,

scholarships, United Way contributions,

and the organization of an economic

engine for the county called Claiborne

Works!, among many others.

Contact: Ann Becker, email:

abecker@entergy.com.

Nuke 101

Exelon’s Braidwood Generating

Station in Illinois held its first Nuke 101

class on April 10, 2010. The course was

for teachers to learn about nuclear energy

and nuclear technology so that they can

educate their students. During the six

hours, teachers learned about the history

of nuclear power plants, did in class lab

activities and toured the nuclear power

plant. The class was ran by members of

the North American-Young Generation

Nuclear.

Contact: Neal Miller, telephone:

(815) 417-3184, email: neal.miller@

exeloncorp.com.

Industry

Uranium

A new IAEA service for promotion

of best practices and safety in the uranium

production cycle, Uranium Production

Site Appraisal Team (UPSAT) has

been introduced as the uranium production

industry continues to expand worldwide.

This service is available on request

and on a cost recovery basis to any Member

State at any facility that is operating

a uranium production cycle (UPC). UPC

covers prospecting, exploration, development,

feasibility studies, mining, processing,

remediation and decommissioning

and stewardship in relation to uranium

mineral resources.

Contact: Peter Waggitt, email:

P.Waggitt@iaea.org.

Agreement

On April 9, 2010 the Chubu Electric

Power Co., Japan concluded a cooperation

agreement with the Japan Atomic Energy

Agency (JAEA) regarding exchanges of

information on decommissioning technology.

Such cooperation will contribute

to ensuring safety in the decommissioning

of the Hamaoka-1 and -2 nuclear power

plants (NPPs), which the utility has been

working on since last fall, 2009.

JAEA has been engaged in decommissioning

its advanced thermal reactor

(ATR) Fugen since 2008. The concluded

agreement is aimed at facilitating mutual

utilization of the lessons learned through

the experiences of both parties.

Contact: Japan Atomic Industrial

Forum, Inc., email: information@jaif.

or.jp.

Corporation

Clean Energy Park

AREVA and Fresno Nuclear Energy

Group (FNEG) announced that they have

signed a memorandum of understanding

(MOU) to develop a Clean Energy Park

near Fresno, California, including nuclear

and renewable generation.

According to the MOU, AREVA

and FNEG will work together on the

site selection and initial development of

a nominal 1,600 Megawatt U.S. EPR

reactor.

Contact: Julien Duperray, telephone:

33 1 34 96 12 15, fax: 33 1 34 96 16 54,

email: press@areva.com.

I&C

A consortium comprising AREVA

and Siemens Energy will supply digital

supervision, protection and control (I&C)

systems for units 3 & 4 of the Mochovce

nuclear power plant in Slovakia. Slovenské

Elektrárne, a subsidiary of the Enel

Group, is completing the construction of

two reactors based on VVER (Pressurized

Water Cooled and Water Moderated)

technology.

The new power plant units will be

equipped with TELEPERM XS safety

I&C supplied by AREVA and SPPA-

T2000 operational I&C from Siemens.

Unit 3 is scheduled to be operational by

the end of 2012, whereas unit 4 will be

online in 2013.

Contact: Julien Duperray, telephone:

33 1 34 96 12 15, fax: 33 1 34 96 16 54,

email: press@areva.com.

Consolidation

The Babcock & Wilcox Company

(B&W) announced that it is combining

two of its business units into a single

organization to accelerate its growth in

the commercial nuclear power sector.

Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Energy, Inc.

will be formed through the combination

of B&W Nuclear Power Generation

Group, Inc. and B&W Modular Nuclear

Energy, LLC. Christofer M. Mowry,

(Continued on page 14)

Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 13


Corporation...

Continued from page 13

currently the President and CEO of B&W

Modular Nuclear Energy, has been named

President of the new organization. The

consolidation is expected to be effective

in April 2010.

Contact: Jud Simmons, telephone:

(434) 522-6462, email: hjsimmons@

babcock.com.

N-Stamp Certification

The Babcock & Wilcox Company’s

(B&W) commercial nuclear operations

have received additional American Society

of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

N-Stamp certifications. The certifications

are considered the industry standard for

quality assurance of materials, design,

construction, operation, inspection and

continuing maintenance of nuclear facilities.

B&W staff at the company’s locations

in Barberton, Ohio, and Lynchburg,

Virginia, completed the audit necessary

to earn the certifications from ASME

and the National Board of Boiler and

Pressure Vessel Inspectors in December

2009. The ASME N, NA, NPT, NS and

MO Certificates of Authorization, along

with the National Board’s NR Certificate

of Authorization, were formally received

in March 2010.

Contact: Jud Simmons, telephone:

(434) 522-6462, email: hjsimmons@

babcock.com.

New Technology

With energy companies worldwide

seeking new technologies to improve the

operational reliability of their nuclear

power plants, GE Hitachi Nuclear

Energy (GEH) announced the first U.S.

deployment of its new Marathon Ultra

control rod blade (CRB) technology.

Exelon Nuclear installed GEH’s

Marathon Ultra CRBs at its Peach Bottom

Atomic Power Plant in Pennsylvania. The

power station generates more than 2,200

megawatts of safe, low-carbon electricity,

enough to power more than 2 million

homes.

Contact: Catherine Stengel, telephone:

(678) 844-7556, email: Catherine.stengel@

ge.com.

Spent Fuel Racks

The People’s Republic of China has

ordered spent fuel racks for six of the

country’s new (domestically developed)

CPR-1000 reactor units, namely, the

Ningde NPP Units 3 & 4, Yangjiang NPP

Units 3 & 4, and Fangchenggang NPP

Units 1&2. This award brings the total

number of Chinese reactors that have

adopted Holtec’s wet storage technology

to 18.

Contact: Joy Russell, telephone: (856)

797-0900, ext 655, email: J.Russell@

holtec.com.

Technology Alliance

ROS (Remote Ocean Systems) and

Westinghouse’s BWR Services Group

announced the formation of a strategic

alliance for developing new technology

with the ultimate goal to reduce costs

and outage duration during the BWR

refueling process.

Contact: website: rosys.com.

MoU

Larsen & Toubro Limited (L&T),

India and Rolls-Royce have signed a

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)

for cooperation to effectively address the

projected need for light water reactors

(LWR) in India and internationally. LWR

technology is in use in over sixty per

cent of nuclear power plants operating

worldwide.

The two companies have agreed to

collaborate on areas including nuclear

instrumentation and controls, engineered

products and systems, reactor components,

engineering services, in-service reactor

support and waste management.

The cooperation with L&T for

instrumentation and controls will form the

first operational phase of this relationship

to bridge the gap in the existing supply

chain in support of India’s ambitious new

build program.

Contact: Ashmita Sethi, telephone:

91 11 23357118, email: Ashmita.Sethi@

Rolls-RoyceIndia.com.

Joint Venture

Toshiba Corporation and Westinghouse

Electric Company, LLC announced

the formation of a new joint venture, Advance

Uranium Asset Management Ltd.

(AUAM) that will strengthen Toshiba

Group’s capabilities in the nuclear front

end business segments and enhance the

extensive range of support services extended

to utilities around the world.

United Kingdom based AUAM will

undertake uranium related transactions in

the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The

company is 60 percent owned by Toshiba

and 40 percent by Westinghouse.

Contact: website: www.toshiba.

co.jp.

Turbine Parts

Toshiba Corporation and IHI

Corporation announced that they have

signed a memorandum of understanding

(MOU) on the formation of a joint venture

to manufacture steam turbine parts for

nuclear power plants for the domestic

and overseas markets. This move reflects

expanding global demand for new

nuclear power plants and maintenance

services for installed equipment, and

will allow the companies to promote

best use of management resources in a

collaborative framework that enhances

competitiveness.

Contact: website: www.toshiba.

co.jp.

R&T Unit

In response to the unprecedented,

growing demand for clean, secure energy

worldwide, Westinghouse Electric

Company announced a restructuring of

its Research and Technology Unit (RTU)

into three major segments: R&T Strategy,

Nuclear Energy Innovation Leadership

(NEIL) hub and R&T Operations.

Contact: Vaughn Gilbert, telephone:

(412) 374-4896, email: gilberhv@

westinghouse.com.

Transfer of Ownership

Westinghouse Electric Company

confirmed that it will commence

innovative new commercial arrangements

with the Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority (NDA) involving the longterm

lease of the Springfields nuclear

fuel manufacturing site, near Preston in

Lancashire.

The deal includes the permanent

transfer of ownership to Westinghouse of

Springfields Fuels Limited (SFL). SFL, is

the company currently operating the site

under the management of Westinghouse

Electric UK Holdings Limited.

Contact: Vaughn Gilbert, telephone:

(412) 374-4896, email: gilberhv@

westinghouse.com.


14 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


Corporation...

Continued from page 13

currently the President and CEO of B&W

Modular Nuclear Energy, has been named

President of the new organization. The

consolidation is expected to be effective

in April 2010.

Contact: Jud Simmons, telephone:

(434) 522-6462, email: hjsimmons@

babcock.com.

N-Stamp Certification

The Babcock & Wilcox Company’s

(B&W) commercial nuclear operations

have received additional American Society

of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

N-Stamp certifications. The certifications

are considered the industry standard for

quality assurance of materials, design,

construction, operation, inspection and

continuing maintenance of nuclear facilities.

B&W staff at the company’s locations

in Barberton, Ohio, and Lynchburg,

Virginia, completed the audit necessary

to earn the certifications from ASME

and the National Board of Boiler and

Pressure Vessel Inspectors in December

2009. The ASME N, NA, NPT, NS and

MO Certificates of Authorization, along

with the National Board’s NR Certificate

of Authorization, were formally received

in March 2010.

Contact: Jud Simmons, telephone:

(434) 522-6462, email: hjsimmons@

babcock.com.

New Technology

With energy companies worldwide

seeking new technologies to improve the

operational reliability of their nuclear

power plants, GE Hitachi Nuclear

Energy (GEH) announced the first U.S.

deployment of its new Marathon Ultra

control rod blade (CRB) technology.

Exelon Nuclear installed GEH’s

Marathon Ultra CRBs at its Peach Bottom

Atomic Power Plant in Pennsylvania. The

power station generates more than 2,200

megawatts of safe, low-carbon electricity,

enough to power more than 2 million

homes.

Contact: Catherine Stengel, telephone:

(678) 844-7556, email: Catherine.stengel@

ge.com.

Spent Fuel Racks

The People’s Republic of China has

ordered spent fuel racks for six of the

country’s new (domestically developed)

CPR-1000 reactor units, namely, the

Ningde NPP Units 3 & 4, Yangjiang NPP

Units 3 & 4, and Fangchenggang NPP

Units 1&2. This award brings the total

number of Chinese reactors that have

adopted Holtec’s wet storage technology

to 18.

Contact: Joy Russell, telephone: (856)

797-0900, ext 655, email: J.Russell@

holtec.com.

Technology Alliance

ROS (Remote Ocean Systems) and

Westinghouse’s BWR Services Group

announced the formation of a strategic

alliance for developing new technology

with the ultimate goal to reduce costs

and outage duration during the BWR

refueling process.

Contact: website: rosys.com.

MoU

Larsen & Toubro Limited (L&T),

India and Rolls-Royce have signed a

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)

for cooperation to effectively address the

projected need for light water reactors

(LWR) in India and internationally. LWR

technology is in use in over sixty per

cent of nuclear power plants operating

worldwide.

The two companies have agreed to

collaborate on areas including nuclear

instrumentation and controls, engineered

products and systems, reactor components,

engineering services, in-service reactor

support and waste management.

The cooperation with L&T for

instrumentation and controls will form the

first operational phase of this relationship

to bridge the gap in the existing supply

chain in support of India’s ambitious new

build program.

Contact: Ashmita Sethi, telephone:

91 11 23357118, email: Ashmita.Sethi@

Rolls-RoyceIndia.com.

Joint Venture

Toshiba Corporation and Westinghouse

Electric Company, LLC announced

the formation of a new joint venture, Advance

Uranium Asset Management Ltd.

(AUAM) that will strengthen Toshiba

Group’s capabilities in the nuclear front

end business segments and enhance the

extensive range of support services extended

to utilities around the world.

United Kingdom based AUAM will

undertake uranium related transactions in

the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The

company is 60 percent owned by Toshiba

and 40 percent by Westinghouse.

Contact: website: www.toshiba.

co.jp.

Turbine Parts

Toshiba Corporation and IHI

Corporation announced that they have

signed a memorandum of understanding

(MOU) on the formation of a joint venture

to manufacture steam turbine parts for

nuclear power plants for the domestic

and overseas markets. This move reflects

expanding global demand for new

nuclear power plants and maintenance

services for installed equipment, and

will allow the companies to promote

best use of management resources in a

collaborative framework that enhances

competitiveness.

Contact: website: www.toshiba.

co.jp.

R&T Unit

In response to the unprecedented,

growing demand for clean, secure energy

worldwide, Westinghouse Electric

Company announced a restructuring of

its Research and Technology Unit (RTU)

into three major segments: R&T Strategy,

Nuclear Energy Innovation Leadership

(NEIL) hub and R&T Operations.

Contact: Vaughn Gilbert, telephone:

(412) 374-4896, email: gilberhv@

westinghouse.com.

Transfer of Ownership

Westinghouse Electric Company

confirmed that it will commence

innovative new commercial arrangements

with the Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority (NDA) involving the longterm

lease of the Springfields nuclear

fuel manufacturing site, near Preston in

Lancashire.

The deal includes the permanent

transfer of ownership to Westinghouse of

Springfields Fuels Limited (SFL). SFL, is

the company currently operating the site

under the management of Westinghouse

Electric UK Holdings Limited.

Contact: Vaughn Gilbert, telephone:

(412) 374-4896, email: gilberhv@

westinghouse.com.


14 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


New Products, Services & Contracts

New Products

Valve Database

Dresser Consolidated ® and Dresser

Masoneilan ® announced that ValvKeep ® ,

the premier, customizable valve maintenance

and management tool for aftermarket

service, is now available in Mandarin.

ValvKeep enables customers to keep

a database of the service and repair histories

of control valves, pressure relief

valves and other equipment, regardless

of manufacturer. The ValvKeep database

includes complete valve operation and

maintenance history, valve photos illustrating

required parts and recommended

maintenance schedules. The proprietary

software is available through Dresser

Consolidated Green Tag ® Centers and

Masoneilan Authorized Repair Centers

(MARC ® ).

Contact: Piotr Pojedynek, telephone:

(281) 671-1640, email: Piotr.pojedynek@

dresser.com.

Prep Machine

Introducing the new E.H. Wachs EP

424, offering the patent-pending Speed

Prep autofeed system that allows you to

dial in your exact weld prep profile. The

EP 424 is a precision I.D. mount end prep

machine tool designed to bevel, compound

bevel, J prep, face and counterbore

pipe, fittings and valves without templates,

incline tool slides or work stoppages.

Autofeeding simultaneously in

the axial and radial planes, it’s the most

productive machine of its kind. The EP

424 with Speed Prep is available in hydraulic

or pneumatic models, and is powerful

enough to form tool from 4 to 16"

(ND100-400) up to Schedule 160, and

single point from 4 to 24" (ND100-600)

up to a 6.5" (165mm) wall thickness.

Contact: telephone: (800) 323-8185,

email: sales@ehwachs.com.

Felt Filter

Swift Filters, Inc. has announced a

new series of metal felt filter elements.

The elements employ filter media made

of thin filaments of nonwoven stainless

steel, which is ideal for high pressure,

highly corrosive, highly viscous or radioactive

applications. The metal felt

employed is highly porous (up to 85%)

providing very high flow rates of up to 20

times those of other media types as well

as exceptionally long life.

Random fiber filtration (metal felt)

can provide absolute particle retention,

longer on-stream time and high dirtholding

capacity for under 60 micron

filter elements. Its high temperature,

high pressure and corrosion resistance

combined with almost unending

(Continued on page 18)

As the world turns to nuclear energy,

turn to the world leader in nuclear certification.

The world is once again turning to nuclear

power to meet its future energy needs.You can

rely on the leadership and experience of HSB

Global Standards for all RCC-M and ASME code

inspection and certification requirements.

• The world leader in nuclear plant &

equipment inspections

• More than 500 engineers, inspectors and

auditors worldwide

• Our extensive nuclear capabilities support

your global growth

• We provide certification assistance &

training in ASME and RCC-M code

compliance

Go to www.hsbgsnuclear.com for more

information, local contacts or to request a

nuclear code training program.

NUCLEAR CERTIFICATION

Worldwide: +1 860-722-5041

Toll-free: 800-417-3437 x25041

(USA and Canada only)

Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 17


New Products...

Continued from page 17

cleanability, make it highly economical

for hostile environments.

Contact: telephone: (877) 887-

9438, fax: (440) 735-0996, email: info@

Swiftfi lters.com.

LogR Meters

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.

unveiled the new Thermo Scientific Orion

Star LogR Meters. The exclusive LogR

technology uses the resistance across

the bulb to provide a new method for

electrode analysis and determine sample

temperature. The resistance information

can be used to detect errors in the electrode,

saving analysis time and offering quick

troubleshooting of electrode issues.

Additionally, these meters allow for

temperature-compensated pH readings

without the use of a separate temperature

input.

Contact: Cindy Neely, telephone:

(978) 232-6102, email: cindy.neely@

thermofi sher.com.

Radiation Instruments

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. announced

that its Radiation Measurement

& Security Instruments business has been

awarded two U.S. patents for radiation instruments

that can help protect the public

against the risk of nuclear terrorism.

U.S. patent 7,456,405 B1 was granted

for the radiation-measuring Thermo

Scientific RadEye PRD, a small, portable,

high-sensitivity, pager-like device.

Unlike conventional radiation pagers, the

patented method incorporated in the Rad-

Eye PRD allows the setting of alarm levels

well below the typical range of natural

background radiation.

U.S. patent 7,544,927 B1 was granted

for the innovative Thermo Scientific

Lutetium-Oxide test adapter for beta

and gamma sensitive radiation detectors.

Based on specially shaped packaging of

high-density Lutetium-Oxide ceramics,

the patented test adapter overcomes the

many disadvantages of conventional

radiation check sources.

Contact: Nicole Kelly, telephone:

(440) 703-1511, email: Nicole.kelly@

thermofi sher.com.

Services

Transportation

MHF Services provides transportation

and logistics solutions for nuclear

utilities by utilizing their portfolio of

private railcars and intermodal container

equipment. MHF can handle container

and bulk material transfers for our North

American clients at permanent transload

facilities and through a network of other

short-term or temporary transload sites.

MHF also provides specialized

transport and waste-related technical

services and consulting, through a

dedicated business unit.

Contact: telephone: (724) 772-9800.

Contracts

Fuel Assemblies

AREVA has signed a contract to

supply MOX fuel assemblies for unit 3 of

the Tomari nuclear power plant (Japan),

owned and operated by Hokkaido Electric

Power Company.

Under the terms of the contract,

the fuel will be fabricated at AREVA’s

MELOX plant in southern France, using

plutonium recovered from the treatment

operations performed at the group’s La

Hague plant, thereby recycling it to be

used in Japan as MOX fuel.

Contact: Julien Duperray, telephone:

33 1 34 96 12 15, fax: 33 1 34 96 16 54,

email: press@areva.com.

Maintenance

Day & Zimmermann, a plant maintenance

and modifications contractor, has

been awarded a new five-year contract

valued at $700 million by the Tennessee

Valley Authority (TVA). Under this new

strategic alliance, Day & Zimmermann

will perform modification, outage, technical

support, and supplemental maintenance

services at TVA nuclear and fossil

generating plants and other sites located

within the Tennessee Valley region.

The scope of work will be executed

by the company’s Day & Zimmermann

NPS unit, which will focus its efforts at

the Browns Ferry, Sequoyah, and Watts

Bar Nuclear Plants operating units, as

well as the Allen, Gallatin, Johnsonville,

and Shawnee Fossil Plants. The contractor

will manage the successful execution

of plant modifications, outage and supplemental

maintenance work to include construction,

rehabilitation, repair, removal,

asbestos abatement, insulation and lagging,

protective coatings, and construction

testing of plant components.

Contact: Brian Hartz, telephone:

(717) 391-3138, email: brian.hartz@

dayzim.com.

Diesel Generators

Fairbanks Morse Engine, an EnPro

Industries company, has been awarded

a contract to supply six safety related

Fairbanks Morse Colt-Pielstick PC2.6B

Emergency Diesel Generator sets (EDGs)

to Toshiba America Nuclear Energy Corp.

(TANE) for installation at Units 3 & 4 of

the STP Nuclear Operating Company in

Matagorda County, Texas.

The EDGs will be manufactured

and tested at the Fairbanks Morse

Engine facility in Beloit, Wisconsin, in

accordance with U.S. Nuclear Regulatory

Commission (NRC) requirements for

1E safety related equipment, including

10CFR50 Appendix B, NQA-1, and IEEE

323, 344 and 387. This milestone contract

represents the first manufacture of 1Equalified

EDGs for new U.S. nuclear

construction in nearly three decades.

Each unit will have a continuous power

output of 8130 kWe.

Contact: Luke Fredrickson,

telephone: (608) 364-8054, email Luke.

Fredrickson@FairbanksMorse.com.

Fuel Supply

JSC TVEL (a part of the SC Rosatom)

and Slovenske Elektrarne, Slovenia, have

signed a long term contract concerning

supply of the Russian nuclear fuel to the

3-rd and 4-th power units of Mohovce

NPP, which is under construction.

According to the terms of the contract

concluded for the period from 2012 till

2017, two initial core charges and five

realoads for each unit will be supplied.

The upgraded fuel with uranium

of higher enrichment will be supplied

to the Slovak nuclear power units. This

enrichment gives an added value owing

to higher burnup and less make-up fuel

assemblies. The possibility of supplying

the up-to-date fuel is conditioned by an

investment resource which would be

formed due to long-term fuel supplies.

Contact: Rosatom, telephone: 7 499

949 46 50, fax: 7 499 949 27 22, email:

press@rosatom.ru.


18 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


We look at power plant maintenance

from a different angle.

We build customer-centered

solutions from the ground up

In the power value chain, the breadth of

services, experience, industry knowledge,

strategic vision, and project execution

delivered by Day & Zimmermann is

unmatched.

Our innovative solutions for nuclear,

fossil and hydroelectric power generation

facilities include plant maintenance

and modifications, major construction,

fabrication and machining, professional

staffing, as well as valve, condenser, and

radiological services.

This offering enables our suite of

Managed Maintenance Solutions SM to

truly be a one-stop shop for all of your

power generation needs.

Safety, Integrity, Diversity, Success

www.dayzim.com


New Documents

Book

Three Mile Island: A Nuclear Crisis

in Historical Perspective, by J. Samuel

Walker. This book is a scholarly history

of the Three Mile Island accident. Walker

is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s

historian and his book is the first detailed

historical analysis since the accident.

The 1979 accident at Three Mile

Island Nuclear Generating Station in

Pennsylvania was “the single most

important event in the fifty-year history

of nuclear power regulation in the United

States”, according to Walker. Many

commentators have seen the event as

a turning point for the nuclear power

industry in the United States. ISBN:

0-520-24683-7. Price: $18.95.

Contact: Berkeley University of

California Press, website: http://www.

ucpress.edu/.

EPRI

1. Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive

Waste Extended Storage Collaboration

Program: November 2009 Workshop

Proceedings. Product ID: 1020780.

Published March 2010.

The Electric Power Research Institute

(EPRI) convened a workshop of over 40

representatives of the nuclear industry,

federal government, national laboratories,

and suppliers of used-fuel dry-storage

systems to discuss the potential issues

associated with extended dry storage of

used fuel, that is, storage considerably

beyond the term of current and recently

proposed U.S. Nuclear Regulatory

Commission (NRC) regulations.

2. BWRVIP-237: BWR Vessel and

Internals Project, Report and NRC

Correspondence DVD-ROM Version

12.2009. Product ID: 1020803. Published

March, 2010.

In order to be competitive in today’s

market, it has become extremely important

to proactively manage the degradation

of power plant assets in a cost-effective

manner. Some of the more costly assets

are the components internal to the reactor

pressure vessel in a Boiling Water Reactor

(BWR). The documents contained on this

DVD provide guidelines for managing

the degradation of these components.

3. Plant Support Engineering Guideline

for System Monitoring by System

Engineers Update to TR-107668. Product

ID: 1020645. Published March, 2010.

This report has been created as a

tool to be used by system engineers for

the preparing, or updating of their system

monitoring plans based changes within the

industry since TR-107668 was developed

in 1997. It expands the guidance to include

the concept of equipment reliability

as it pertains to the scope of systems,

structures, and components that should

be monitored.

4. Steam Generator Management

Program: PWR Steam Generator Tube

Wear--Alloy 690/SS316, Alloy 690/Alloy

690. Product ID: 1020642. Published

March, 2010.

This report provides wear coefficients

for the material combination of Alloy 690

tube against stainless steel 316, and for

the material combination of Alloy 690

steam generator tubes against Alloy 690

material. Scanning electron microscope

(SEM) images of the worn surface of the

Alloy 690 tube materials and stainless

steel showed that the wear pattern is

consistent with that expected for impact

fretting wear.

5. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Comparison

Between Once-Through and Plutonium

Multi-Recycling in Fast Reactors. Product

ID: 1020660. Published March, 2010.

This report presents results from

a parametric study of equilibrium fuel

cycle costs for a closed fuel cycle with

multi-recycling of plutonium in fast

reactors (FRs) compared to an open,

once-through fuel cycle using PWRs. The

study examines the impact on fuel cycle

costs from changes in the unit costs of

uranium, advanced PUREX reprocessing

of discharged uranium dioxide (UO 2

) fuel

and fast-reactor mixed-oxide (FR-MOX)

fuel, and FR-MOX fuel fabrication.

6. Plant Support Engineering: Guidance

for the Replacement of Large Electric

Motors at Nuclear Power Plants. Product

ID: 1020625. Published March, 2010.

The purpose of this report is to prepare

a primary source of guidance for a project

manager who is coordinating a team of

plant personnel tasked with replacing a

large electric motor. The report provides

a generic process that describes interfaces

and key steps necessary to ensure that the

motor is evaluated and replaced in the

most cost-effective and efficient means

possible.

The above documents may be obtained

from EPRI Order and Conference Center,

1200 West WT Harris Blvd., Charlotte,

NC 28262; telephone: (800) 313-3774,

email: orders@epri.com.

IAEA

Publications on sale may be ordered at

www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/

publications.asp.

1. Deterministic Safety Analysis for

Nuclear Power Plants, IAEA Safety

Standards Series No. SSG-2. Price: $23,

84 pages.

NEA

1. Partnering for Long-term Management

of Radioactive Waste, ISBN: 78-92-64-

08369-1. Price: $63, 132 pages.

The above publication may be

ordered at the OECD bookshop: www.

oecd.org/scripts/publications/ bookshop/

redirect.asp.

Cost-free Documents

1. Nuclear Fuel Behaviour under

Reactivity-initiated Accident (RIA)

Conditions, ISBN: 978-92-64-99113-2.

208 pages.

2. Public Attitudes to Nuclear Power,

ISBN: 978-92-64-99111-8-8. 56 pages.

3. More than Just Concrete Realities:

THE Symbolic Dimension of Radioactive

Waste Management, ISBN: 978-92-64-

99105-7. 36 pages.

The above free publications are

available at www.nea.fr/html/pub/webpubs/.

Paper copies may be requested by sending

and email to neapub@nea.fr.

20 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


Obsolescence

is one of the

biggest headaches

facing nuclear

power plants.

PKMJ and Curtiss-Wright

Flow Control have

developed the cure:

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outages, loss of revenue and greater operating costs. EOS* combines the

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Prerequisites for New Plants

By Luis Echávarri, OECD Nuclear

Energy Agency.

1. What are the different fi nancing

models applicable to the nuclear power

plant construction in different countries

of the world?

Even though nuclear looks good economically,

I think it is clear that financially

it is problematic and difficult to resolve

for some countries, particularly developing

countries because of the high amount

of financing required. For developing

countries it is fundamental, as president

Sarkozy recommended at the Paris Conference

on access to civil nuclear energy

held on 8-9 March, that the World Bank

and some other regional development

banks finance nuclear power plant projects.

They have not done that until now

but I think it will be easier given the increasing

concerns with climate change, to

get the boards of those banks to agree that

the nuclear projects could be financed by

these institutions. So I think this is one

element.

The second element is that when a

country exports technology, the export

credit banks of that country could finance

these nuclear power projects. The third

element is that internalizing the price of

carbon credits into the cost of electricity

produced by fossil fuels would greatly

improve the competitiveness of nuclear

power. I think these could be three sources

of external financing. In addition to that

it is very important to have guarantees in

the specific country. A state could give a

final support or guarantee that the loans

are going to be honored. This is another

element that is very important.

Of course there are differences between

a small country and a large country.

For small countries, it’s even much more

difficult than for medium or big countries.

We have seen that in developing

countries like China or India, they don’t

have financing concerns so they have no

problem to do it. But in small countries, it

Responses to questions by Newal

Agnihotri, Editor; Nuclear Plant

Journal.

Luis Echávarri

Luis Echávarri was appointed Director-

General of the Nuclear Energy Agency

(NEA) of the Organisation for Economic

Co-operation and Development (OECD)

in 1997, a position he holds at the

present time.

Echávarri obtained Masters Degrees

from the Superior Technical School

of Industrial Engineering of Bilbao

University and from the Faculty

of Information Sciences of the

Complutensis University of Madrid.

He obtained a post-graduate degree

in Management from the Industrial

is fundamental to agree on a whole package

of measures to ensure the funding of

nuclear projects.

The European Bank for Reconstruction

and Development (EBRD) is what

we call a regional bank for development.

The export credit banks or national bank

belongs to the states. Conceptually they

are different. The World Bank is for developing

countries. The EXIM Bank

from the United States finances exports

from the United States. In countries like

Indonesia, they have to put pressure on

the World Bank indicating that they need

the financing for these projects if they believe

they are good for their development.

On the other hand, countries exporting

technology, can put pressure on national

banks to open the possibility of using the

financing for nuclear projects.

Organisation School of Madrid, and

is a Fellow of the College of Industrial

Engineers of Madrid.

Echávarri began his career as an

engineer in Bilbao and in 1975 joined

Westinghouse Electric in Madrid. He

went on to become Project Manager

of the Lemoniz, Sayago and Almaraz

nuclear power plants, for Westinghouse,

in Spain. In 1985, Mr. Echávarri became

Technical Director of the Spanish

Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). He

was named Commissioner of the CSN

in 1987, a position which requires the

approval of the Spanish Parliament.

In July, 1995, Mr. Echávarri became

Director-General of the Spanish Nuclear

Industry Forum, a post held until July

1997.

Echávarri represents the OECD/NEA at

the Governing Board of the International

Energy Agency (IEA) since 1997 and he

became a member of the International

Nuclear Safety Group (INSAG) of the

International Atomic Energy Agency

(IAEA) in 2003. He is also a member

of the International Nuclear Energy

Academy (INEA).

2. What is the difference between loan

guarantee and sovereign guarantee?

I think that in the case of a country

like the United States, it is very logical to

have loan guarantees because investors are

private enterprises. The loan guarantees

are not supplementary financing, it is just

to cover some risks which are not in the

hands of the investors. This is why there

are guarantees, in the case of delays. In

the case of other countries there could

be sovereign guarantees, if the state is to

cover the case where the loan could not be

paid. All of them depend on the specific

situation of the specific country.

3. How does the fi nancing of nuclear

power plants in a regulated industry differ

from those in a non-regulated industry?

(Continued on page 24)

22 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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The situation is totally different in

one case than in the other because for

non-regulated utilities, if you don’t have

the money to construct the plant, you

can’t do it. In a regulated market, you

have limitations with the profits you get

with the plant. So these are two different

philosophies, I think both are valid but it

is more difficult nowadays to construct

units in non-regulated markets because

of the risks associated to an investment

over many years. In a regulated market,

you can charge construction costs to the

consumer with certainty and visibility on

tariffs in the long run.

4. Which country has the best model of

fuel reprocessing and fi nal disposal?

Can this model be adopted by other

countries?

I don’t like to use the word model,

but the word reference. I think for spent

fuel, the world reference is Finland.

Finland has advanced significantly in

developing in its underground repository

in Olkiluoto for spent fuel and I think the

Finnish are the most advanced country.

I think this is a very clear reference.

Regarding fuel reprocessing, I think

France is the reference. They have very

good reprocessing capacities and they

are doing that for France and for other

countries. They are reducing significantly

waste volume and toxicity because they

use the spent fuel to create more fuel.

Finally they have a high-level waste

research centre (laboratory) which is

going to be in an underground repository

in France. They are very advanced trying

to select a final site and develop the

project.

5. What is the current direction

undertaken by the global nuclear power

industry to replace or to supplement

the International Uranium Enrichment

Center (IUEC) initiative or the Global

Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

programs which will help the enrichment

services’ recipient countries? How will

this program discourage “new nuclear

power countries” to enrich the fuel thus

alleviating proliferation concerns?

NEA welcomes any initiative which

gives the guarantee of fuel supply to any

country that wants to use nuclear power

and the extension of this guarantee to

enrichment or recycling is welcome. I

think these guarantees are important so

that countries can always have access to

enough fuel. What is important is to make

sure this is done in a reliable manner.

There are several initiatives. I think that

all those initiatives are very welcome but

they have to be realistic and to respond to

specific needs of each country. And I think

the idea of having a fuel bank in Vienna is

going in the right direction. This will take

some time and this is well articulated.

You mentioned GNEP in the United

States, but GNEP is now being reviewed

or revised by the Obama administration.

Logically GNEP is going to be affected by

the domestic developments in the United

States. But the concept of fuel banks, fuel

guarantees, and the international center is

on the table and I think it’s going in the

right direction.

A fuel bank is a bank where fuel

is held in reserves and it’s controlled.

An international center is more a center

where you develop the fuel, which

implies possessing the technology. The

center won’t be only for storing fuel, it

will be more for fabricating the fuel,

enrichment and fuel fabrication. An

international center is developing all the

steps necessary to manage fuel. For the

fuel bank, the IAEA gives the guarantees.

Regarding international centers, there are

proposals for several locations including,

Russia, United States, and France.

6. Nuclear Energy Agency deals with

Nuclear Safety and Regulation. How does

Nuclear Energy Agency interact with

World Association of Nuclear Operators

and with individual country’s Regulatory

Agency to ensure that there is no overlap

and to ensure that the utility, which is the

fi nal benefi ciary of the efforts has access

to good shared technical information and

guidance which it can rely on?

We are a tool of governments so our

objective is to work in the areas where

governments are responsible for. We

have good relations with WANO. They

respond to the needs of the industry, we

respond to the needs of our governments.

Regarding the IAEA, the NEA is a tool

of industrialized countries and we try

to be always in the front line of new

development which requires high level

specialists working in small groups.

We provide state-of-the-art reports

and analyses. This is according to our

agreement with the IAEA so that they

can utilize that with all their member

countries and incorporate many of our

findings in their standards. So let’s say we

are the vanguard of the IAEA in the areas

of nuclear economics, technology and

regulation. But we transfer the outcomes

of our work to IAEA to be introduced

universally.

7. Which organizations in the United

States interact with Nuclear Energy

Agency?

For the United States, the

department that we are responsible to

is the Department of State. There are

two additional institutions in the US

government we are working with: the

Nuclear Regulatory Commission, they

are possibly the agency in the world the

most engaged in our work regarding

the effective regulation of the industry.

The other is the Department of Energy

regarding anything related to technology

development, fuel cycle and economics.

So both NRC and DOE are strong pillars

and support the NEA activities.

8. Concluding remark.

Nuclear is going to be much more

important in the future because of

energy security concerns and the fight

against climate change. But two things

are paramount. One is to develop the

manufacturing capacity, which has

disappeared in some countries. We

have to revive this capacity to make

nuclear possible. And second, we have

to develop the human resources. We

need engineers, scientists and technical

people in many fields. Nuclear power

needs to attract the young generation, and

to make them available to the different

markets and projects. The human factor

is essential. Nuclear power is not about

burning uranium, it’s about science and

technology.

Contact: Serge Gas, OECD Nuclear

Energy Agency, telephone: 33 1 45 24

1010, fax: 33 1 45 24 11 10, email: serge.

gas@oecd.org.


24 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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Shutdown Safety, a Cornerstone at

Exelon

By Glen Earl Chick, Exelon Nuclear.

1. What is Exelon’s Corporate and Plant

Management strategy to organize and

supervise plant shutdown safety during a

refueling outage?

In addition to industrial safety and

radiological safety, shutdown safety is

a cornerstone at Exelon for planning

and executing a successful refueling

outage. The key strategies are to maintain

sufficient defense-in-depth of systems

important to maintain a plant’s shutdown

safety.

Planning for a refueling outage begins

a minimum of 18 months in advance and

includes a plan and schedule for which

shutdown safety systems, power supplies

and support systems will remain operable

throughout the outage. The main controls

used to ensure shutdown safety is detailed

preparation and review of the outage

schedule by Operations, Maintenance and

key stakeholders to make sure work is not

performed on systems needed to maintain

shutdown safety. An independent team,

called the Shutdown Safety Review

Board reviews the outage schedule,

contingencies and protected equipment

plans prior to the outage. This certifies

the outage schedule readiness to maintain

shutdown safety.

The Operations department maintains

overall responsibility to verify adequate

system availability is maintained through

configuration control and system statuses.

This includes approval prior to removing

systems from service for maintenance

or testing by on-shift Operation’s

supervision. The approval must include

a review of the shutdown risk profile with

the system removed from service and

validate the assumptions in the schedule

still maintain adequate shutdown

safety. Systems that can be worked per

the schedule are taken out of service,

maintenance and testing performed and

returned to service.

Responses to questions by Newal

Agnihotri, Editor; Nuclear Plant

Journal.

Glen Earl Chick

Glen Earl is the Vice President of

Outage Planning and Services at Exelon

Nuclear. He leads a service organization

that provides turnkey operation of all

fuel fl oor and under-vessel activities,

turbine and generator fl oor activities

INPO issued Significant Operating

Experience Report (SOER) 09-1 in the

fall of 2009. This document provided

guidance of industry best practices on

shutdown safety during a refueling outage.

Exelon reviewed these recommendations

and have enhanced our processes with the

following improvements:

• Exelon has implemented an

Operation’s procedure at all sites on

best practices to protect equipment

needed for shutdown safety. This

includes signage, physical barriers

and control processes to make sure

systems counted on to maintain

shutdown safety are not affected.

The status of protected equipment is

briefed at every outage meeting with

Operations, Outage Control Center

(OCC) and Work Group briefings.

This is important since there is a

significant amount of work being

performed by site personnel and

contractors.

• One of the leading industry issues

on shutdown safety performance is

loss of power caused by issues with

configuration control and switchyard

work activities. Control of utility

for station online and outage execution,

NDE support for station on-line and

outage needs and supports the Dry Cask

Fuel Storage needs for the stations. He

also oversees outage preparedness and

execution across the Exelon nuclear

fl eet of 17 reactors at 10 stations and

provides Alliance Partner Oversight

and Contract Management for Exelon’s

major Alliance Partners.

Glen Earl has over 30 years of

experience in the nuclear industry. He

joined Exelon in 2002. Prior to assuming

his current position, as Vice President,

Outage Planning and Services in April

2007, he was the Vice President, Project

Management.

Glen Earl has a Senior Reactor

Operator Certifi cation.

and contractor work in and around

the switchyard is controlled to make

sure the proper oversight is provided

on this work. This is accomplished

through interface agreements

between the site and the transmission

provider where roles, responsibilities

and controls are specified. Controls

similar to protected equipment

processes above now extend into the

switchyard boundary.

• Consistency in site and outside

contractor training. Shutdown

safety is now incorporated into

Operations training in preparation

for the refueling outages, through

crew simulation and detailed

schedule reviews. In addition, all

site and outside contractors are

given training to be able to identify

protected equipment signage and

understand the importance of why

this equipment is protected and

needed for the outage.

2. Probabilistic Risk Assessment has

sometimes shown that the possibility of

core melt is higher during the refueling

26 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


outage than during the plant normal

operation. How Exelon reduces this

vulnerability?

In order to manage site shutdown

safety during a refueling outage, all

Exelon sites use a computer program

titled, PARAGON. The function of

PARAGON is to determine overall

site shutdown safety risk using a tiered

approach. PARAGON is a software tool

that is used to assess the Risk Levels

associated with plant configurations and

outage activities during both the planning

and execution phases of the outage. The

software uses imported information from

the outage schedule or manual user input

to determine the safety status. Specific

schedule activities or hammocks are

scheduled by the Outage Schedulers to

show when systems will be unavailable

for operation and therefore, not counted

on for defense-in-depth. . PARAGON

is designed to take a download from the

scheduling software and look for these

system hammocks and determine which

systems are available or not available

to maintain site shutdown safety.

PARAGON is run and the shutdown risk

profile is validated by not only the Outage

Scheduler, but by Operation’s supervision

prior to release of work. Values for systems

important to shutdown safety, along with

amount of decay heat and time to boil

are inputs to PARAGON. A risk profile

for key safety functions (electrical power,

decay heat removal, etc.) is generated and

an overall site risk color is assigned.

The status of the overall station risk

is communicated to all site work groups,

OCCs and outside contractors on a shiftly

basis. Any changes to the outage schedule

and emergent equipment issues are run

through PARAGON first by Operations

to validate the plant shutdown safety risk

profile has not degraded. Once confirmed,

then work is allowed and schedules are

updated to maintain the overall station

shutdown safety profile.

3. What is Exelon’s Corporate and

Plant Management strategy to direct the

collection and interpretation of outage

experience into the plant improvement

plan after the refueling outage?

Exelon has utilized an effective

tiered approach to capture lessons learned

during a refueling outage. These learnings

are captured in the site’s corrective action

process and utilized as follows:

• During a refueling outage, many of the

site’s lessons learned are documented

live time in the site’s corrective action

process. This is highly encouraged,

since documenting the issue when it

arises provides the best information

and allows for taking proper action

after the outage. Also, sites perform

formal post outage critiques with all

of the site work groups, OCCs and

contractor work groups. Strengths

that need to continue and lessons

learned are captured and documented

in the corrective action process. The

Outage Management organization

will review all of these lessons

learned and make sure actions are

assigned to address resolution before

the next outage. Actions taken

can include updates to the outage

schedule, procedure revisions and

creation of site High Impact Teams

(HIT) to address complex issues.

These actions are tracked, reviewed

(Continued on page 28)

Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 27


Shutdown Safety...

Continued from page 27

and challenged at the Outage

Readiness Meeting.

• The second approach is that all sites

are required to prepare and present

their post outage critique results at a

T+30 Post Outage Review Meeting.

This meeting is lead by the site

Outage Manager and includes all site

work groups and major contractors.

The meeting is normally scheduled

for 3 hours and is attended by senior

level corporate executives and

Corporate Functional Area Managers

(CFAM). The site will report out on

it’s outage performance compared

to pre-established outage goals and

objectives. They will also report out

on overall industrial safety, human

performance, radiological safety

and shutdown safety performance.

Finally, all of the work groups will

report out on any changes made in

the outage that were effective and

any major lessons learned.

• The final approach is that Exelon

holds an annual Fleet Outage Lessons

Learned (FOLL) meeting following

the completion of each spring outage

season. This is a review of Exelon

refueling outage performance in

industrial safety, human performance,

radiological safety, shutdown safety,

outage duration and work group

effectiveness. Fleet actions are taken

on any negative trends identified,

tracked and implemented prior to the

next outage season.

outage. Specific codes are used to

identify what outage work is to be

performed, systems that are affected and

prioritization of the work. Once coded for

an outage, work packages are planned,

clearance out-of-service boundaries are

written, radiation work permits assigned,

materials ordered and labor assigned.

Completion and readiness of the all of

these tasks are tracked for all of the work

assigned through performance indicators

and reviewed at the Outage Readiness

Meetings.

The second major piece of software

used is a scheduling system. A different

system is used at the Mid Atlantic sites

(Primevera) than is used at the Midwest

sites (Project View). However, the

function of each is the same. The

scheduling software will download all

of the assigned outage tasks from the

work management system. The Outage

Management organization will take these

tasks (work order activities, clearances,

etc.) and schedule these activities in a

logical sequence taking into account

shutdown safety defense in depth, resource

availability and work logic strings. The

first downloads of work is performed at

approximately 10 months before the start

statused or removed from the schedule,

when completed.

The third major piece of software

used is the shutdown safety software,

PARAGON. This system is utilized

across all 10 Exelon sites. PARAGON

is designed to take a download from

the scheduling software above and

determine which systems are available or

not available to maintain site shutdown

safety. The function of PARAGON is to

determine overall site shutdown safety

risk using a tiered approach. Values for

systems important to shutdown safety,

along with amount of decay heat and time

to boil are inputs to PARAGON. A risk

profile for key safety functions (electrical

power, decay heat removal, etc.) is

generated and an overall site risk color

is assigned. If PARAGON determines

unsatisfactory shutdown safety, then the

schedule is revised to make sure shutdown

safety is maintained before systems are

removed from service.

5. What are the lessons learned from the

last major equipment (Turbine, Reactor

Pressure Vessel Head, Steam Generators,

or any other equipment) work done

during refueling outage?

4. What major software (describe the

functionality) is utilized to assist in

refueling outage?

Exelon uses 3 major pieces of

software to manage outage work and

schedule coordination.

The first major piece of software

used is a work management system.

A different system is used at the Mid

Atlantic sites (PIMS) than is used at the

Midwest sites (Passport). However, the

function of each is the same. The work

management system is used to identify

corrective and preventative maintenance

tasks to be performed during a refueling

A new turbine rotor that was recently installed at Quad Cities

of the outage and performed daily to

upload all new added work. This schedule

is refined until a workable product is

established at 3 months before the start

of the outage. During outage execution,

as work is performed, work activities are

Lessons learned from the major

equipment across Exelon is controlled

and managed by the following processes:

Exelon has an Outage Services

organization that is responsible for

maintenance on the reactor, steam

28 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


generators, turbines and main electrical

generators. This organization will prepare

for and perform work on these major

components during refueling outages.

For Reactor Services, this includes

all aspects of reactor disassembly,

fuel handling, invessel activities and

reactor reassembly. For PWRs, this also

includes all steam generator maintenance

and inspections. This organization will

perform similar work at all of the Exelon

sites. Common procedures are utilized

across the fleet to implement lessons

learned and capture best practices.

Operational experience is shared and

implemented at all of the outage sites.

Reactor Services has implemented a

common fuel handling verification

process to eliminate human performance

events.

For Turbine Services, this includes

all aspects of main turbine and

generator disassembly, maintenance and

reassembly. Similar to Reactor Services,

the same organization will perform

similar work at all of the Exelon sites.

Common procedures are utilized across

the fleet to implement lessons learned

and capture best practices. Operational

experience is shared and implemented at

all of the outage sites. Turbine Services

has implemented common maintenance

practices for main generator hydrogen

seals and eliminated issues with excessive

hydrogen leakage and unit down time.

Exelon has recently implemented

major equipment upgrades as part of

the fleet long term asset management

plan. Actions include main generator

rewind projects, upgrades to digital

EHC, upgrades to digital recirc systems

and replacement of main turbine rotors

and casings. Lessons learned from these

projects are shared across the fleet through

the implementation organization. The

same organization has performed and will

plan on performing the main generator

rewinds and turbine replacements.

Templates have been established to gap

site outage schedules for these projects

and lessons learned are carried from site

to site by this implementation team.

Defense-In-Depth: For the purpose of

managing risk during shutdown, Defensein-Depth

is the concept of providing

systems, structures, and components to

ensure backup of Key Safety Functions

using redundant, alternate, or diverse

methods. INPO 06-008, Guidelines for

the Conduct of Outages at Nuclear Power

Plants, provides additional guidance and

philosophy.

Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Is the

model used to validate impact of system

unavailability on shutdown risk and

ultimately core damage. This is the basis

for which a site’s PARAGON software

model is written and validated to match.

The PRA uses the defense-in-depth model

above to make sure there is adequate

safety system back-up to maintain a site’s

overall shutdown safety risk profi le and

maximize the margin for core damage

frequency.

Contact: Glen Earl Chick, Exelon

Nuclear, 4300 Winfi eld Road, Warrenville,

IL 60555; telephone: (630) 657-4600 and

David E. Waldman, Exelon Nuclear, 200

Exelon Way, Kennett Square, PA 19348;

telephone: (610) 765-5317, email: david.

waldman@exeloncorp.com.

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Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 29


A Strong Safety Culture at Ameren

By Pat McKenna, AmerenUE.

1. What is AmerenUE’s Corporate and

Plant Management strategy to organize

and supervise plant shutdown safety

during a refueling outage?

Procedures provide the requirements

to ensure plant shutdown safety during a

refueling outage. Numerous reviews of

the outage schedule during development

are one strategy implemented by those

scheduling activities. A multi-discipline

dedicated team provides an hour by hour

review of the schedule upon completion of

scheduling and review by site personnel. A

written report is developed and approved

by the Operations Department which

identifies and optimizes safety margins

and system availability throughout the

outage. This includes an independent

review by a Senior Reactor Operator

who was not part of the outage schedule

development. Another independent

safety review of the outage schedule

is performed by the Nuclear Oversight

Group (Quality Assurance). Outage

Control Center personnel are trained on

shutdown safety to ensure proper review

and supervision of activities affecting

shutdown safety in a refueling outage.

Additional oversight is provided when

the activity is an Infrequently Performed

Task or Evolution, High Risk Evolution

or results in a decrease in Defense in

Depth. The entire site is made aware of

risk level by a color-coded indication

system. Green, yellow, orange, and red

are the colors for lowest to highest level

of increased risk to shutdown safety.

2. What is AmerenUE’s Corporate and

Plant Management strategy to direct the

collection and interpretation of outage

experience into the plant improvement

plan after the refueling outage?

A corrective action document is

assigned to all supervisory personnel

to document and critique items during

Responses to questions by Newal

Agnihotri, Editor; Nuclear Plant

Journal.

performance of work in the refueling

outage. A critique is performed by all

site departments at the end of the outage

to capture additional critique items.

These critique items are evaluated for

implementation prior to the next refueling

outage. The items selected are tracked

in a corrective action document with

appropriate due dates.

3. Maintenance may not be directed

independently by the resources but by

the needs, this policy may pay largely in

generation revenue if correctly optimized.

How does AmerenUE approach this

philosophy and what are their priorities?

When additional work is essential,

it is necessary to evaluate the available

maintenance resources and budget. If

possible, work equivalent in resources

and budget should be removed in order

to maintain resources and budget the

same. If we are unable to accomplish

that, then additional resources will have

to be identified and used to perform the

work. The resulting budget overrun may

be covered by the daily on-line budget.

If that is not possible, then it will be

necessary to approach our corporate

office for additional funding.

4. Probabilistic Risk Assessment has

sometimes shown that the possibility of

core melt is higher during the refueling

outage than during the plant normal

operation. How AmerenUE reduces this

vulnerability?

As mentioned previously, strict

adherence to procedures and schedule,

Pat McKenna

Pat McKenna brings more than three

decades of nuclear experience in his

role as Outage Manager at AmerenUE’s

Callaway Nuclear Plant. Pat began

his career in the U.S. Navy on a

nuclear submarine, before moving on

to Callaway where he’s worked as an

Equipment Operator, Senior Reactor

Operator, Training Instructor, Control

Room Supervisor, Shift Manager and

Assistant Manager of Operations.

and multiple independent safety reviews

of that schedule, work to reduce

vulnerability. AmerenUE also uses the

Defense in Depth concept. Defense in

Depth is taking the minimum amount

of equipment, systems, or trains that

must work to ensure a safety function

is maintained and ensuring at least one

additional piece of equipment, system, or

During Refuel 14 (Fall 2005) Ameren

replaced all four steam generators and

all four turbine rotors

train is available to provide an equivalent

function. Even though you only need

one way to fulfill an important function,

having two or three ways is always better.

There are a lot of different functions that

need to be maintained during outages,

30 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


so we group them into six critical

categories: Reactivity Control; Core

Heat Removal; Containment Integrity;

Coolant Inventory; Power Availability;

and Spent Fuel Pool Heat Removal. In

the assessment of outage risk, we review

the schedule and perform the work so that

we always have multiple ways to ensure

these critical functions are met. We also

make sure that the entire site is aware of

the status of each function. We score each

function based on the level of redundancy

it has and then use the score to determine

the colors mentioned previously. Keeping

a close eye on Defense in Depth and

communicating our level of risk keeps

us out of high risk situations and helps to

raise awareness and focus during times

when our risk is slightly elevated.

5. How does AmerenUE ensure safety

of its plant during refueling outage

considering Three Mile Island and

Chernobyl experience?

AmerenUE requires all personnel

to receive training on the causes of these

events. Additionally, as stated above, we

continually underscore the observance of

all procedures, following the schedule and

maintaining Defense in Depth to ensure

safety. In addition, we train our personnel

on human performance tools and use the

Principles for a Strong Nuclear Safety

Culture published by the Institute of

Nuclear Power Operations.

6. What planning is done to ensure that

there are no equipment interferences,

which may delay the work progress?

When developing the schedule for

the refueling outage, shutdown safety

and Defense in Depth, are considered as

part of the requirements for the schedule.

Prior to issuing the scheduled shutdown

safety is reviewed to ensure there is no

unnecessary risk due to outage equipment

configurations that could challenge

Defense in Depth. This continues for all

schedule revisions developed prior to the

refueling outage, as well as, during the

outage with additional personnel assigned

around the clock to perform the reviews.

7. What major software is utilized to

assist in refueling outage?

Primavera, P3, is used for both

daily and outage scheduling. Primavera

interfaces with our work management

and clearance software ensuring that the

latest status of activities are accurate in

the schedule.

8. What are the lessons learned from the

last major equipment (Turbine, Reactor

Pressure Vessel Head, or any other

equipment) work done during refueling

outage?

Project management is the key

to success. The use of a good project

management process resulted in

successful completion of major projects,

which has been carried into smaller

equipment projects leading to successful

implementation. Project Managers

are part of the organization making

preparations for refueling outages,

having been assigned specific projects

for the refueling outage. Personnel

involved in refueling outage development

have been PMI (Project Management

Institute) certified. The benefits from

this are numerous with these individuals

driving improvement in areas such as

work planning, risk assessment, and

contingency planning. This improvement

is realized because they are demanding

project management processes be used to

provide them with better information and

input into the schedule.

9. How does AmerenUE handle the

challenge of organizing a refueling outage

without lost time or work confl ict?

At AmerenUE, we emphasize that all

personnel have an outage job. We have

a philosophy of splitting the work into

manageable pieces and that preparation

of just four hours a week for one year is

equivalent to five weeks of continuous

work time. We have proceduralized

milestones that are due two years prior

to a refueling outage. Spreading the

preparation time over a long period

allows a significant amount of time to

be put into refueling outage preparation

without incurring a huge impact of lost

time and work conflict.

Contact: John Bassford, AmerenUE,

Callaway Plant, PO Box 620, CA-460,

Fulton, MO 65251; telephone: (314) 974-

8945, email: jbassford@ameren.com.

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Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 31


We Reach Out Beyond our Walls

By Margie Jepson, Entergy Nuclear.

Maintenance Initiatives

There is an obvious dichotomy to

maintenance: There is a push to have

more wrench-time in the field; and,

simultaneously, there is the “no margin for

error” responsibility of safety, regulation

and process completion that slow getting

the work done. Managing that balance is

a challenge that Entergy is taking on.

Entergy has a strategic cost initiative

that focuses on the maintenance areas.

Entergy is systematically assessing

practices which contribute to low

productivity and identifies ways to

improve overall maintenance performance

site-by-site.

Piloted at the Entergy site of River

Bend in Louisiana, this assessment effort

has been to nearly all of the Entergy fleet

sites to date. The areas of concentration

are:

• Work management process improvements

• Behavioral and accountability issues

• Productivity improvements in overall,

including long-term resource needs

The C-suite is directly engaged in

looking at the barriers to productivity as

Entergy managers and supervisors work

on the identified improvements from

a fleet perspective. When completed,

Entergy management notes that it will

have a compelling case for significant

advances in maintenance performance.

Other initiatives impacting maintenance

and outage performance at Entergy

is the outage execution plan and supplemental

work force performance plan. The

safe, reliable operation of plants is supported

by consistently strong refuel outage

performance across the Entergy fleet.

Therefore, the stated goals of these specific

Entergy plans are to have safe and

efficient outage performance; to improve

indicators that comprise INPO indexes;

and to routinely meet budget commitments.

Across the industry, supplemental

worker errors adversely impact

operations, plant capability and overall

reliability due to increased re-work.

Performance gaps cause cost overruns;

supplemental supervisor oversight can be

inconsistent; and key suppliers are asked

to close performance gaps.

An ongoing supplemental work force

improvement team is chartered at Entergy

to identify specific gaps in supplemental

worker performance and initiate specific

actions with owners and due dates to

close the gaps. Actions include points

such as use of best practices, process

and procedure improvements, critique

feedback sessions, advisory boards,

accountability meetings and others

totaling over 100 items.

Equipment Reliability

In a perfect world, millions of

components at a plant would be fixed

or replaced immediately for flawless

operation. In the complex nuclear power

industry, Entergy and its peers have

embraced Preventative Maintenance

Optimization (PMO) with vigor in

recent years. In fact, Entergy has refined

its approach to focus on high-critical

components.

Entergy systematically took a hard

look at plant components and classified

~15,000 components per plant as highcritical

components. This effort, taking

place over the last two years, has sharpened

Entergy’s PMO process overall.

“Focusing on high-critical components

has been very productive for our

fleet,” says Tim Trask, director of plant

reliability and chief engineer for Entergy

Nuclear. “In the past we have seen every

component maintenance issue as “critical”

and the reality is that you can’t prioritize

everything at the same level. Our

recent improvement in force-loss rate can

be attributed to proactively looking at prioritization

with an emphasis on nuclear

safety and operational excellence.”

Entergy has used Electric Power

Research Institute templates for

preventative maintenance as a basis for

Entergy templates. In looking at industry

best practices, Entergy also turned

internally to take lessons-learned and

feed that experience back to templates to

be used in the future.

Entergy has identified three tactics

that are important to their PM approach.

One that is nearly used daily is the

Entergy fleet challenge calls. Through a

posted message on the internal Web site,

a request can be made for a call to address

any issue. With employees from across

the fleet on the call, compiled data and

issues are reviewed; expertise is tapped

into; and ideas are shared and validated.

Last year approximately 200 calls took

place.

“It is a part of our culture as a fleet.

We reach out beyond our walls and trust

in the experience to get issues resolved

and questions answered. Whether about

a valve or an electrical issue, the fleet

challenge calls are a valuable tool for our

equipment reliability,” states Trask.

Another effective approach has been

an equipment reliability clock re-set.

Similar to occupational safety clocks

that measure days of safe operation,

Entergy initiated an equipment reliability

clock re-set to squarely put more focus

on understanding root causes of critical

components, corrective actions and

setting goals for reliability optimization.

A third tool has made a positive

impact on planning and budgeting

at Entergy. Normally a plant health

committee looks at technical replacement

projects, big purchases and other large

engineering projects and schedules them

for the year and beyond. Following this

(Continued on page 34)

32 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


We Reach...

Continued from page 32

technical review, management has looked

at the elements from a cost or budget

perspective. Often budget availability will

change the timing and purchases so then

the projects and schedules get returned

and re-worked.

Entergy now uses the site integrated

planning database (SIPD). This database

combines the technical project with the

budget. As the project moves, the budget

moves with it. The finance department

uses the same database as the engineering

managers. It has changed the planning

process into an integrated, reality-based

schedule.

The SIPD tool has been used for

several years at local sites and became

Web-based for fleet access in 2010. It

also enables the organization to better

look ahead so that, in the future, Entergy

would use SIPD for long-range planning

to gain economies of scales for purchases

happening across the fleet.

“Our goal is to really focus on the

most important component and reliability

issues. Tools like SIPD help me get

more intelligence to the C-suite. And, of

course, our ultimate goal is to have wellrun

plants everyday,” Trask concluded.

Obsolescence & Inventory

Entergy has an internal proactive

obsolescence process that is looking

ahead to anticipate and identify obsolete

items in its fleet. Glenn Griffin, manager

of materials control for Entergy Nuclear

states, “Instead of being in a reactive

mode, we are forward-looking using this

process to identify obsolete items before

they are in demand.”

Information and inventory sharing

across the industry is central to the solution

for finding obsolete and hard-to-find

parts. Being able to see existing inventory

in the RAPID system, an automated

online product connecting supply chain

managers with available inventory across

the country, is a service of Curtiss Wright.

It is one solution Entergy uses with

success. Entergy Nuclear also relies on

the support of third-party suppliers that

have expertise in locating and qualifying

hard to find and obsolete parts.

Another service is the Proactive

Obsolescence Management System.

Obsolete parts, the newly produced

replacement part and suppliers are

connected in this system. The advantage

is that the replacement part has been

technically reviewed or previously

approved and, in some cases, already

used as a replacement. The technical

legwork has been done upfront for these

current parts making evaluation of the

proposed substitution for obsolete items

more expedient.

Entergy supply chain managers

concur that inventories are continuing

to creep up in size at Entergy as well as

in peer organizations across the country

for two primary reasons. Squeezing

as much maintenance work into every

possible window of time means having

all the “pieces and parts” available for

maintenance projects. The focus is on

saving time and dose and avoiding the

inefficiencies that ordering lead-times

bring to maintenance projects. Secondly,

with the aging of our 104 nuclear power

facilities, more and more replacement

parts are in need.

Materials, purchasing and contracts

management at Entergy is looking to

minimize risk and gain efficiencies with

inventory sharing across the Entergy fleet,

all within the regulatory requirements

overseeing regulated and unregulated

plants. Lastly, inventory growth can be

effectively managed with better integration

of the work management process and

materials planning processes, through

full utilization of the supplier network,

and through effective implementation of

supply chain management fundamentals.

Entergy is always working to improve in

this area.

Maintenance and PRA

As Entergy performs maintenance

and improves plant design, probabilistic

risk assessment is a key input to decisions

and used to validate how changes impact

risk.

“Daily, in five minutes or less, our

PRA monitoring tool can quantify a fullplant

risk model for a particular plant

evolution. This tool is used to manage risk

while scheduling and working on multiple

systems,” says engineering supervisor

Deepak Rao. “Helping the plants manage

their risk profile is what we do.”

While Entergy has not adopted

risk-informed technical specifications

at present, risk-informed in-service

inspection is applied to systems and

components that may impact plant safety.

PRA models have been used recently to

substantially reduce the number of such

inspections, reducing radiation exposure

and outage costs without impacting

safety.

(Continued on page 36)

34 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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We Reach...

Continued from page 34

Regulatory Guide 1.200, “An Approach

for Determining the Technical Adequacy

of Probabilistic Risk Assessment

Results for Risk-Informed Activities,”

revision one was issued in 2004 and revision

two in March 2009. These revisions

have raised the bar substantially for PRA

applications. Entergy has been working

in implementation phases on meeting this

regulatory guideline. Rao notes that as his

team works on compliance with the regulation

guidelines as they roll out, Entergy

is bringing additional rigor to the overall

PRA function.

Transferring Knowledge

Knowledge management at Entergy

is the process and set of actions that

helps ensure that years of accumulated

wisdom do not leave the organization

once an employee retires or moves on.

Entergy Nuclear began implementing

its Knowledge Management Process in

March 2010.

“The process consists of identifying,

evaluating, storing and transferring

knowledge created by people in locations

across the fleet,” explains Bishop

Blackwell, lead of work force planning.

The steps begin with a knowledge audit

that determines what knowledge exists,

where it resides and assesses knowledge

critical to the continued success of

Entergy. This is followed by the collection

and documentation of knowledge

for future use. Finally, knowledge is

transferred in training and mentoring or

in other strategies implemented across

the Entergy fleet.

“Entergy understands the critical

importance of knowledge management,”

continues Blackwell. “Resources at

Entergy are committed to quality training

at all levels and successful knowledge

transfer. Our industry is facing large

turnovers of talent and experience.

Now is the time to capture and record

institutional knowledge as we recruit toptalent

from across the country to backfill

an aging work force.”

Professionalism and

Commitment

Under President and CEO John

Herron, Entergy Nuclear is revitalizing

its commitment to excellence and

professionalism through several training

programs. One such program, the

Developing Leaders Workshop, is built

around foundational behavioral platforms

focusing on a greater sense of personal

responsibility that ultimately leads to the

top-industry performance.

A distinction of this initiative is that

employees are taught by senior executives

using material the executives themselves

developed. Yes, Herron himself, the

executive vice presidents and other top

managers teach and emphasize behaviors

geared towards building trust within the

organization, having the highest personal

integrity and demonstrating individual

commitment.

Similar concepts are built into

a second training effort called the

Supervisory Interactive Skills course

that gives the new supervisor skills to

build trust within the organization by

communicating effectively, coaching

and managing teams skillfully and

learning Entergy tools for continuous

improvement.

“At Entergy, continuous improvement

is not another corporate program. It is

the way we do business and has become

the heart and soul of our daily culture,”

states the CEO. The Entergy Continuous

Improvement focus is on fleet performance

being at the highest levels in the industry.

And, CEO Herron laid out that fleet

challenge in 2010 employee meetings –

“to be the very best.”

Entergy is working toward that

goal with 2010 fleet-wide initiatives

on equipment reliability; outages with

a special focus on shutdown safety

risks; collective radiation exposure; and

industrial safety and human performance

targeting a goal of zero recordable

accidents and events.

“Being professional in character,

spirit and methods is the hallmark of

a well-performing organization,” says

Herron. Entergy works hard to live up to

its collective expectations of excellence

in all phases of operation.

Contact: Margie Jepson, Entergy

Nuclear; 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson,

MS 39213; telephone 601-368-5460;

email: mjepson@entergy.com.

36 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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STAR Human Performance Process

By Ron McCall and Anita Church, The

Shaw Group, Inc.

1. What is Shaw’s Corporate and Plant

Management strategy to organize and

supervise plant shutdown safety during a

refueling outage?

McCall: Shaw provides a continuum

of support and planning between refueling

outages, rather than acting as a labor

broker to only provide outage staffing.

We maintain an experienced, mobile

core team of professionals who join

site teams during refueling outages to

provide consistent project execution and

subject matter expertise. Our consistent

site presence improves safety and

work performance because employees

become more knowledgeable about site

expectations and work requirements.

We manage our own work and

our safety managers make sure all

personal protective equipment and safety

resources are in place before we ramp

up outage staffing. Our teams conduct

work readiness and gap assessments

and provide safety conscious work

environment (SCWE) training and

orientation. We have developed standards

of training for employees new to nuclear

work and complete supervisory oral

board challenges to insure all safety and

work standards are fully understood.

2. What is Shaw’s Corporate and

Plant Management strategy to direct the

collection and interpretation of outage

experience into the plant improvement

plan after the refueling outage?

McCall: We participate in each

customer’s post-outage review and

lessons learned process. We also capture

our own lessons learned in one internal

database and transmit best practices from

one site to all our project teams through

regular supervisory meetings. As we

complete major projects that affect the

industry, such as replacing transformers,

Responses to questions by Newal

Agnihotri, Editor; Nuclear Plant

Journal.

Ron McCall

Ron McCall is president of the

Maintenance Division of Shaw’s Power

Group, which provides engineering,

procurement, construction, technology,

maintenance and operations services. He

is responsible for all aspects of global

maintenance operations.

McCall holds a Bachelor of Science

degree from McNeese State University

and completed post-graduate

business administration coursework

at Pepperdine University. He recently

served as chairman of the Louisiana

Association of Business and Industry

Executive Board. He also has served as

chairman and a member of the board

of directors for Bank One, Associated

Builders & Contractors, United Way and

the Chamber of Commerce.

we can enhance our skills from one job to

the next with continuous improvements.

3. Some organizations rotate the outage

managers; whereas other organizations

keep the same managers for different

refueling outages. What is Shaw’s policy

in managing refueling outage?

Church: Shaw establishes a

leadership team at every site to manage

Anita Church

Anita Church is the site manager for

Shaw’s maintenance and modifi cation

services at Limerick Nuclear Generating

Station. She is responsible for Shaw’s

online and outage support operations at

the Exelon site.

Church has 26 years of experience in the

nuclear power industry, joining Shaw

in 2005. She has experience performing

outage work at seven nuclear reactors in

the U.S.

Church holds a liberal arts degree

from Cayuga Community College in

Auburn, New York and has attended

Dale Carnegie Training and various

Leadership classes. She also completed

a plant certifi cation at Nine Mile

Point Unit 2. In 2003, she developed a

newsletter for on-line nuclear work week

managers, circulated to more than 300

members in the U.S. and Canada.

outages and online maintenance work, as

well as rotates a team of subject matter

experts from site to site to provide

support. It provides opportunities for all

teams to incorporate best practices from

other sites, which establishes a high level

of standardized performance.

As part of the Exelon fleet, I tend to

work more with management teams from

other Exelon plants. We rotate within the

38 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


fleet to provide support for continuity. I

usually assist one other Exelon nuclear

plant outage each year in the mid Atlantic

area as the night site manager. My work

controls superintendent also assumes the

role of night supervisor at another Exelon

location. In turn, other team leads come to

Limerick to assist us during our outage.

4. Probabilistic Risk Assessment has

sometimes shown that the possibility of

core melt is higher during the refueling

outage than during the plant normal

operation. How does Shaw reduce this

vulnerability?

Church: While much of our work

does not involve core activity, we

engage operations whenever it does. We

have specific tasks and operational risk

assessment (ORA) activities, usually

related to building scaffolds around

sensitive pieces of equipment. Our

tasks are set prior to starting a job and

we include additional oversight using

craft workers and spotters to make sure

we have positive or total control of all

equipment.

5. How does Shaw ensure safety of

the plants during refueling outage

considering Three Mile Island and

Chernobyl experiences?

Church: We always focus on

keeping our people safe which keeps the

plant safe. We use all the tools we have

available to us, including procedures

and work orders. We bring everyone

together before each shift to talk, stretch

and review safety information. Everyone

participates in pre-job briefs and reviews

and records job hazards as a team. We

empower every employee with the ability

to stop a work process if they have safety

concerns, to verify or check the work so

no one proceeds with uncertainty.

We also work with our supervisors to

make sure they understand the Stop, Think,

Act, Review (STAR) human performance

process. Supervisors participate in oral

board challenges and meet one-on-one

with managers to review expectations. We

provide continuous supervisor training.

Other plants and companies may have

different priorities and we want to make

sure everyone has the same information

about Shaw and Exelon expectations.

We spend a lot of time teaching about

radiation dose allocations and the reason

doses are different, depending on what

jobs are scheduled and where they are

located. We have rewards and incentive

for employees who successfully complete

their work with radiation doses lower than

the expected dose for that area.

Our safety observation program is

set up to be tailored to three phases of

the outage. The three phases are: (1) the

initial phase, when workers are new to

the site and possibly to the industry; (2)

the intermediate phase, when workers

become familiar to the job and systems

open for work; and (3) the final phase,

when workers are nearing the end of the

job. We adjust our safety observations to

add safeguards and address situational

issues that may arise during each phase

of outage work.

6. How does Shaw handle the challenge

of organizing a refueling outage without

lost time or work confl ict?

Church: Our outage performance

is disciplined. We organize multiple

outages twice every year, working with

a total of 36 reactors. We have a lot of

experience and solid relationships with

craft unions, plus we maintain a bench of

field non-manual employees who focus

on supporting outage operations.

Identifying and staffing field nonmanual

positions early are key elements

of successful performance. We bring in

leaders first to set up the plan for all craft

hires. The subject matter experts then lay

out the processes for their discipline. We

ramp up scaffold builders first and fast

since that is the first piece of work that

tends to take place during an outage.

We get a lot of returning craft as well

as new employees, and we blend teams

to balance work experience. We have

good quality people who we can transfer

from one outage to the next. Some craft

workers may work several outages a year,

depending on schedules.

Another important element is to

always review work coming up, not just

the work performed during the current

outage. We keep some staff for online

work that roll right into the next outage,

which increases their knowledge and

familiarization with plant procedures and

processes.

Contact: Gentry Brann, The Shaw

Group, Inc, 4171 Essen Lane, Baton

Rouge, LA 70809; telephone: (225) 987-

7372, fax: (225) 213-1331, email: gentry.

brann@shawgrp.com.


www.

NuclearPlant

Journal.com

Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 39


Exelon's Vision & Leadership

By Amir Shahkarami, Exelon Nuclear.

Summary

Exelon Nuclear Leadership and

Participation in Industry Organizations

has contributed to Exelon's improved

fleet performance/safety as well as overall

industry improvement and resolution of

challenging technical issues.

With 20% of the United States

nuclear operating fleet, it is critical to

Exelon Nuclear’s success to develop/

maintain leadership and influence in the

industry, to collaboratively work with

industry counterparts to solve the broad

technical issues confronting the industry

and to stay abreast of those emerging

technologies that can improve safety and

performance.

Details

Exelon’s Management Model, Industry

Leadership Plan and Industry

Participation Process Control provides

the Vision, Strategy, Plan and

Process for Nuclear Power Industry

Leadership.

EPRI Participation

• Exelon has over 100 Primary Advisors

and in most cases Alternative

Advisors on:

• Board of Directors

• Research Advisory Council

Nuclear Power Council (NPC)

• NPC Executive Committee

• Action Plan Working Groups

Nuclear Energy Institute’s (NEI Top

Industry Practice (TIP) Award’s

highlight the nuclear industry’s most

innovative techniques and ideas. They

promote the sharing of innovation and

the best practices, and consequently

improve the commercial prospects and

competitive position of the industry as a

whole.

This TIP Award Entry won NEI's 2009

Vision & Leadership Award.

The team members who participated

included: William Naughton, Senior Staff

Engineer, Exelon; Ted Schiffl ey, Exelon

Senior Staff Engineer, Exelon.

Amir Shahkarami

Shahkarami is the Senior Vice President

at Exelon and the Site Vice President at

Braidwood Nuclear Station. Shahkarami

joined Exelon Nuclear in 2002 as

Engineering Director of the Dresden

Nuclear Station. He was promoted

to the Engineering VP, and later to

Senior VP of engineering and Technical

Services where he was responsible

for the conduct of fuel (procurement,

design, and back-end), engineering,

project management, license renewal,

industry organizations (BWROG,

PWROG, EPRI), innovation, and

the international exchange program

(KHNP, TEPCO, EDF). He was the

company’s chief engineer responsible

to provide governance and oversight to

the corporate and Exelon’s seventeen

(17) nuclear units located in Illinois,

Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.

• Streering Committees, Task Forces,

Committees and Subcommittees

• Exelon continuously holds either

Chair or Vice-Chair positions on

over 30% of the key committees reporting

directly to the Nuclear Power

Council.

Owners Group Participation

• Exelon has developed and maintained a

significant leadership role within both

the PWROG and BWROG in the past

few years that currently includes the

Vice Chair for BWROG and PWROG

Executive Oversight Committee.

• PWR Owners Group – Exelon participates

on all subcommittees and

Shahkarami received his Bachelor

and Master of Engineering degrees

from Tulane University during 1977-

1981, MBA from Mississippi College

in 1994, and completed PhD studies

in nuclear engineering at Louisiana

State University in 2001. He completed

the Harvard Advanced Management

Program (AMP) in 2008. He is a

registered Professional Engineer.

Shahkarami is a member of the Electric

Power Research Institute (EPRI)

Nuclear Power Council, the Executive

Committee, and has chaired ERAPWG.

He is the chairman of the NEI digital

I&C working group that has reported

the progress to the NRC commissioners

twice a year. Amir is the 3 time winner

of NEI's Top Industry Practice (TIP)

Award. Amir was named the 2008

Business Leaders of Color by Chicago

United . He also serves on the Tulane

University, Texas A&M, and Illinois

Institute of Technology engineering

advisory boards. Amir has been a

member of the American Nuclear Society

since 1992 and currently serves on

their Board of Directors. He received

the 2009 ANS utility leadership award.

He received his 2010 WANO Nuclear

Excellence Award. Amir serves on

the board of directors of Will County

Center for Economic Development and

Chamber of Commerce.

working groups and has developed

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

for Membership, Participation, Product

Implementations and Leadership

with action plans.

• BWR Owners Group – Exelon participates

on all subcommittees and

working groups and has developed

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

for Membership, Participation, Product

Implementations and Leadership

with action plans.

Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Participation

• Exelon holds the Chairman position

on NEI Board of Directors, and Key

40 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


positions on NSIAC (Nuclear Strategic

Issues Advisory Committee)

and Executive Task Forces such as

New Plant (NPOC) and Nuclear Fuel

Supply. Exelon also participates on

Working Groups such as Security,

Emergency Planning, Communication,

License Renewal, Government

Affairs, Environmental and numerous

working level task forces. Over

50 Exelon employees are engaged

in NEI initiatives and NEI has given

strong positive feedback on the level

of participation and leadership that

Exelon provides.

Institute for Nuclear Power Operators

(INPO) Participation

• Exelon Senior Management holds

positions on the following INPO

advisory boards and councils, Board

of Directors, Executive Advisor

Board, National Nuclear Accrediting

Board, Executive Point of Contact,

INPO Academy Council, INPO

Analysis Review Board, INPO

Administrative Point of Contact and

INPO Communication Council.

• Exelon maintains on average 10

loaned employees to INPO

Safety

Exelon has provided key personnel

and technical support to help numerous

Industry Safety issues. Three examples

are listed below:

• Key personnel and technical support

for the development of the INPO

Guideline 07-004, Zero Fuel Defects

by 2010.

• Key personnel for the BWROG

and NEI Task Force for Sump

Performance.

• Based on best practices identified

from Exelon’s INPO loanees, we

brought sonar technology (from

Cooper Station) to Quad Cities to

help map silting in front of intake

structure.

Cost Savings

Four recent Industry Group

resolutions where Exelon has led the

effort have saved Exelon over $20.2

Million and the Industry countless more.

Innovation

For a problem to become an Industry

Issue means that no good solution has

been previously developed to address the

problem. Each time the Industry develops

a solution to difficult problems facing

Nuclear Power Utilities is an Innovation.

The innovative approach that Exelon

takes is to address Industry Group

Leadership and Involvement in the

Management Model, Procedurally and

with Key Performance Indicators to make

sure Exelon is on track to do our part.

Productivity/Efficiency

Compared to other industries such as

the Pharmaceutical Industry, which has

very little sharing of information due to

competitive advantage, the Nuclear Power

Industry openly shares information and

works on solutions to difficult problems

together.

Solving an issue or problem that has

implications for the entire US fleet is a

tremendous efficiency gain for the entire

Industry and not an approach taken by

most Industries.

Contact: Keith Moser, Exelon

Generation, 4300 Winfi eld Road,

Warrenville, IL 60555; email: keith.

moser@exeloncorp.com.





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Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 41


New Generation Shielding

By Margie Jepson, Entergy Nuclear.

Entergy is unrelenting in identifying

opportunities to create and deploy

cutting edge technologies that achieve

breakthrough improvements for its fleet.

Entergy is the second largest nuclear

power fleet in the U.S. that owns, operates

or manages 12 reactors at 10 sites

nationwide. An example of Entergy’s

innovative approach is the Arkansas

Nuclear One facility in Russellville where

the radiation protection team has designed

shielding that is achieving higher levels

of safety and worker efficiency.

Summary

No one else in this industry or others

have created a tungsten shield like this.

In looking beyond conventional materials

such as lead, steel and water for more

effective materials to use in shielding

applications, tungsten has been identified

for a number of years as a viable radiation

shielding option. Possessing superior

shielding factors, ANO worked together

with a manufacturer to create a new

tungsten shielding application and has

utilized it effectively and economically in

piping and surface applications.

After the initial success of surface

shielding with this new generation

application, a second innovation, the

tungsten vest, was also designed and is

being utilized with great success. Both

of these applications have leveraged the

shielding strength of tungsten in flexible,

lightweight and surprisingly effective

ways.

Defining the shield

The Entergy ANO tungsten radiation

shielding is a flexible heat-resistant

shielding made of tungsten and iron metal

powder immersed in a silicone polymer.

Due to the ability to place the maximum

amount of weight between the source and

the worker, the new generation tungsten

shielding has proven to be up to twice

as effective as lead in lowering exposure

rates to the worker with many other

advantages.

This tungsten radiation shielding

employs a new method of attaching

shielding using imbedded magnets. As a

polymer material, this shielding becomes

form fitting with ease and with significant

benefits such as:

• The new generation tungsten

shielding can be cut to allow for a

“field fit” that works exceptionally

well around obstructions. Whether

using scissors to cut little pieces

– such as the tungsten (duct)

tape that can plug small areas, or

custom cutting with knives to cover

significant areas next to the reactor

wall, this shielding offers versatility

that is unequaled.

• The shielding is low in profile and

therefore can be used in areas where

there are tight spacing or clearance

issues.

• The unique ability to secure

shielding in this easy-to-wraparound-attachment

avoids the need

for ty-wrap plastic binding or other

inefficient means of attachment and

therefore foreign material exclusion

is enhanced.

• Use of this shielding on floor surfaces

provides additional safety measures

eliminating uneven surfaces and

lessens the physical stress of standing

for long periods on steel surfaces.

• This shielding technology lessens

exposure by significantly reducing

the time required to install.

“We call it the ‘snap-on-snap-off’

shield because of how easily it attaches

in the field. Compared to lead blankets,

the attachment is simple and efficient and

is overall a more effective shield,” notes

Bacquet.

The flexible and customizable

system allows for the shielding of

difficult-to-shield projects that includes

pipe diameters from three-quarter inches

and larger. The shielding can be ordered

in custom sizes and thicknesses such as

sheets or as convenient as a roll of duct

tape. Most of all, the flexibility in the

field is a superior characteristic that is

unmatched by other shielding materials.

Savings and Success

Designed in custom shapes, this

shielding has the ability to field-fit

providing for attenuation of radiation

protection totaling from five to10 person-

Rem/year more than provided by the

equivalent weight of traditional lead

blankets.

ANO took a giant step forward

in shielding technology using New

Generation Shielding in several first

time applications. In a recent outage,

eight shield sites were installed utilizing

approximately 5800 lbs. of the new

tungsten shielding material. This was a

big part of the reason for the radiation

exposure being 12 Rem below the outage

exposure stretch goal.

When over 4000 pounds of the 1"

thick shielding was installed for a control

rod element assembly motor tubes project,

dose rates were reduced from 800 mRem/

hr contact and 250 mRem/hr at 30 cm to

250 mRem contact and 120 mRem/hr at

30 cm. Dose performance for the RVCH

lift rig project was outstanding, with an

actual dose of 8.1 Rem compared to an

estimated 21 Rem. The shielding has been

used for multiple applications at both

ANO Unit 1 and ANO Unit 2 including

decay heat system piping, core flood

system piping, RCP bleed-off piping, gas

collection header piping and pressurizer

spray piping.

“The New Generation Shielding isn’t

magic – just good science. It is certainly

a far better tool than we’ve been using

for the last 25 years,” stated Dan Stoltz,

ALARA coordinator.

Additionally, the tungsten shielding

weighs 25 to 50 percent less than lead

while removing the accompanying toxicity

hazard and mixed waste processing costs.

It benefits workers in the area of industrial

safety because it is easier to handle than

lead and lessens exposure time.

Monetary savings realized as a result

of using the new generation tungsten

shielding have totaled more than $300,000

in critical path time savings, outage labor

hours saved in installation of shielding

(Continued on page 44)

42 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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New Generation...

Continued from page 42

and in non-outage shielding installation

labor.

“We couldn’t have made a better

investment than with the tungsten

material for this flexible shielding,” adds

Stoltz. New applications have already

been implemented by the team for the

auxiliary building for both ANO Unit

One and Unit Two.

Tungsten Vest

Employing new technology is not

a simple task. It is not just applying

new materials or equipment. It is about

a new way of thinking for the industry.

Entergy’s ANO radiation protection team

took tungsten shielding a step further and

invented an application of technology

not done before: the personal shielding

tungsten vest.

The industry ALARA practice has

always been to shield the source. But,

when you can’t shield the source, shielding

the person becomes an imperative.

Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.

www.aecl.ca

AREVA NP, Inc.

www.us.areva-np.com

The Babcock & Wilcox

Company

www.babcock.com

Curtiss-Wright Flow Control

Company

www.cwfc.com

Day & Zimmermann Power

Services

www.dayzim.com

Divesco, Inc.

www.divesco.com

E. H. Wachs Co.

www.ehwachs.com

Enertech, a business unit of

Curtiss-Wright Flow Control

Company

enertech.cwfc.com

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission

has defined Effective Dose Equivalent

(EDE) measurements for parts of the body.

As EDE is common place in the medical

field, the health care industry has used

materials like breast shields for radiation

treatments for cancer patients achieving

75 percent shielding results. Applied to

the nuclear industry, a fabricated tungsten

vest provides better radiation protection

than a lead application as it is more

effective for stopping gamma rays.

The EDE defines the percent of

radiological damage potential to body by

body part areas:

• The thorax and abdomen- 88 percent

• The head- 10 percent

• All other- 2 percent

By shielding the thorax and abdomen

area with a tungsten vest, significant dose

reductions overall are achieved with the

tungsten vest.

Entergy was granted approval by the

NRC to use an Electric Power Research

Institute two-badge method for estimating

effective dose equivalent at their sites

based upon their experience and expertise

extending from calculations made relative

to the medical field.

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Fairbanks Morse Engine

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GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy

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HSB Global Standards

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Kinectrics Inc.

www.kinectrics.com

MHF Services

www.mhfservices.com

Nuclear Logistics Inc.

www.nuclearlogistics.com

ORTEC

www.ORTEC-online.com

Petersen Inc.

www.peterseninc.com

Reef Industries, Inc.

www.reefindustries.com

Remote Ocean Systems

www.rosys.com

A First for the Industry

It was on the heat exchanger project

that employees were outfitted with the

tungsten vests for the first time in the

industry. The project entailed building

and installing a permanent shield

comprised of a steel plate, one inch thick,

around the heat exchanger. The project

was scheduled for 10 days, 24 hours per

day, with seven to 10 employees assigned

to the project during the 2009 outage,

not on the critical path timeline. Welders

and fitters on scaffolds, up on rigging

or some within inches of the exchanger

were exposed to approximately 200 - 600

mRem/hour.

Outfitting workers with the vest was

an innovative approach to save dose. The

employee productivity was not hampered

by the light-weight vest and fewer

employees were utilized overall since

staff would have been used for shielding

purposes – maintaining shielding as the

welders and fitters worked.

Measurements confirmed pre-project

estimations regarding dose savings:

exposure to the welders was reduced by 39

percent. The total exposure avoided was

(Continued on page 47)

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Westerman Nuclear

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Westinghouse Electric

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Zachry Nuclear Engineering,

Inc.

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Zetec, Inc.

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44 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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Ultrasonic Cleaning of Jet Pump

Fouling

By Robert Geier, Exelon Nuclear.

Background

With the development of the BWR/3

through BWR/6, GE included jet pumps

in the boiling water reactor design as a

means to improve safety by ensuring

water would remain in reactor vessel

up to 2/3 of the core height in the event

of a recirculation piping loss of coolant

accident.

To perform this important safety

function, millions of pounds of water

flow through the jet pumps each hour

from the recirculation loops to the bottom

of the reactor in the lower plenum. As

one would expect, this large amount of

flow does make jet pumps susceptible

to vibration issues. Surprisingly, this

large amount of flow also causes another

problem with jet pumps experiencing

crud build up (fouling) due to electric

static discharge. The most susceptible

areas for jet pump fouling are the inlet

mixers especially the inlet nozzles.

Jet pump fouling causes a number of

problematic issues.

First the reduction in core flow results

in an economic penalty. For every 1% in

reduced core flow as a result of jet pump

fouling an extra fuel bundle is loaded into

the core to compensate for the power loss.

In addition at the end of the operating

cycle the unit starts to coast down earlier

and as a result produces less power.

Second the jet pump fouling increases

the pressure delta across the slip joint

and results in increased vibration. This

in-turn, causes additional degradation to

main wedge, restrainer bracket and riser

brace.

Third the increased vibration

degradation on the main wedge and

restrainer bracket releases cobalt from the

surface hardfacing into the recirculation

system causing contamination and

increased radiation exposure.

A number of BWR operators have

found jet pump fouling so problematic

that they have performed jet pump

cleaning operations. In 2001, Peach

Bottom unit 3 was one of the units to

Robert Geier

Geier is the BWR Internals Program

Manager at Exelon Nuclear. He manages

engineering activities involving the

inspection, maintenance and repair of

have jet pumps cleaned with traditional

methods. During this operation all the

fuel was removed from the core and each

jet pump inlet mixer was de-tensioned

and moved to the spent fuel pool area to

have ultrahigh pressure cleaning applied.

The increase in critical path outage time

was over 6 days and Exelon’s all in costs

were over $20 million. While the ultra

high pressure cleaning was effective not

all the flow was restored as the tenacious

fouled oxide layer defied removal in some

areas.

Innovative Solution

Exelon BWR Rx Internal Program

Manager has an after hours hobby of

buying and refurbishing rare antique

clocks. One of the key tools in the

restoration effort is an ultrasonic cleaning

bath that removed very tenacious oxide

layer that have built up over hundreds of

years on the clock mechanisms.

Coupling the successful antique

clock ultrasonic cleaning with what is

happening in the industry with ultrasonic

cleaning of PWR fuel assemblies, the

Exelon Program Manager started to think

about applying this technology to clean

BWR jet pumps.

the internal components of the twelve

Exelon boiling water reactors. Geier

joined Exelon (ComEd) in 1977 and was

engaged in welding activities during

construction at Braidwood and LaSalle.

Later at Dresden, he was the Mechanical

Maintenance Superintendent and

then held (Continued a Senior Reactor on page Operators 47)

license as a Shift Supervisor in the

Operations Department. In his current

role he has been involved with the

invention and development of reactor

internals inspection and maintenance

technologies.

Geier received Bachelor’s Of Science

degrees in Welding Engineering from

Millikin University and Mechanical

Engineering from Illinois Institute of

Technology in 1985.

With Exelon senior management buy

in, a development phase was conducted

where the best practices and lessons

learned from PWR fuel assembly

cleaning was applied to concept tooling,

ultrasonic probes and system to clean

BWR jet pumps. While the conceptual

design looked good on paper, proof is

what is needed to develop the confidence

that this new cleaning device will

work. Fortunately, LaSalle Station had

previously replaced jet pump inlet mixers

due to vibration damage. These jet

pumps were stored in the fuel pool and

had considerable fouling to validate that

the ultrasonic cleaning technique. The

ultrasonic jet pump cleaning prototype

worked extremely well at dislodging the

tenacious oxide layers on the jet pumps

inlet mixer.

With a successful demonstration

under their belt the team went on to apply

this technique to Peach Bottom 3 during

the recent September, 2009 refueling

outage. Even though Peach Bottom 3

had cleaned jet pumps in 2001, up to 2%

of core flow losses had occurred on the

worst fouled jet pumps.

After incorporating lessons learned

from the LaSalle demonstration and

46 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


edesigning the tools for a BWR/4 style

jet pump, the team went about cleaning

6 of the worst fouled jet pump. This

operation took absolutely no critical path

schedule as the team was able to deploy

the tooling during fuel moves off of the

360 degree work platform. The jet pump

cleaning tool worked great and over 10

HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air)

filters of crud were removed from the 6

jet pumps.

But the real proof came after the

outage when the core flow from the 6 jet

pumps cleaned showed that the entire 2%

loss due to fouling had been restored.

Safety Considerations

Jet pumps ensure that water will remain

in the reactor after a loss of coolant

accident and are important to safety.

Jet pump fouling increases the pressure

or drive flow and as a result increase vibration

loads. This increased vibration

results in damage to critical jet pump

components including the main wedge

and restrainer bracket. The wear on the

restrainer bracket and main wedge results

in cobalt being released from the Stellite

hard surfacing.

The radiation exposure reduction

from reduced cobalt source term is equal

to 10 REM per operating cycle.

Cost-Savings

Using ultrasonic to cleaning jet

pumps eliminates 6 days plus of critical

path schedule Impact and at an average of

$1.5 million per day of outage extension

from lost power production that is $9

million in generation.

Compared to traditional cleaning

methods ultrasonic’s cost is approximately

$6 million less to deploy.

Every 1% of recovered core flow

results in $400k in reduced fuel costs per

cycle and $300k in reduced house loads.

House loads are the electrical power used

to run equipment in the plant to generate

power; the cost of making electricity.

Depending on the level of crud

build up, utilizing ultrasonic’s to clean

jet pumps is worth over $16 Million per

application.

Contact: Keith Moser, Exelon

Generation, 4300 Winfi eld Road,

Warrenville, IL 60555; email: keith.

moser@exeloncorp.com.


New Generation...

Continued from page 44

642 person-mRem. With vest shielding,

radiation-avoided was 400 person-mRem

for carpenters and shielding crew.

“This solution for shielding is really

revolutionary. When I talked to colleagues

around the country, they thought it was a

crazy idea. The more I talked to my peers,

the more they liked the idea and agreed

with the science of this dose savings,”

said Stoltz.

“The vest was a natural extension

of the tungsten shields we developed.

I wanted a vest to shield a person when

we couldn’t effectively shield a source

of radiation,” said team leader, Bacquet.

“Other Entergy plants have since utilized

the shields and we continue to find more

and new uses here at ANO. We are proud

to have developed such a tremendous

innovation in shielding for our industry

and to be the first to use it.”

Contact: Margie Jepson, Entergy

Nuclear; 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson,

MS 39213; telephone 601-368-5460;

email mjepson@entergy.com.

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Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 47


Safety of the Public is our Top Priority

By John Grubb, Xcel Energy.

Xcel Energy’s Monticello Nuclear

Generating Plant has earned a reputation

of superior performance in the

community and among its industry peers

during 39 years of operation.

Northern States Power (NSP), which

merged with New Century Energies

to form Xcel Energy in 2000, began

construction of the Monticello plant

in the mid-1960s. Total cost of initial

construction was $119 million.

The boiling water reactor unit

conducted its first nuclear chain reaction

at 9:49 p.m. December 10, 1970, marking

the transition from licensing, construction

and testing to formal start-up and plant

operations. On June 30, 1971, the plant

hooked up to NSP’s grid and began

serving its customers.

Doug Antony, who later became

plant manager and president of generation

for NSP, recalls the thrill of first- time

generation. “In the early stages of

operational testing we relied on General

Electric and Bechtel start-up engineers,”

he said. “We knew the plant was going to

be ours – but the only place we practiced

start-up was on the simulator. It was quite

exciting to go critical the first time.”

Antony notes the biggest differences

then and now revolve around security

and sharing industry knowledge. “We

have always made safety the top priority

for our main stakeholders – the general

public,” he said. “Security was nothing

like it is now – we had one man and a

guard shack.

“The other big difference is the

respect for INPO and the industry. INPO

was just starting up – we were not as

accepting of outside advice. Fortunately,

we grew to respect and learn from the

industry.”

A determining factor in NSP’s

decision to build a nuclear plant was

the lower cost of uranium fuel. Another

was dependability. Monticello has a

track record of generating safe, reliable

and economical electricity with a record

online run of 637 consecutive days in

2005-2007. As of this writing, Monticello

John Grubb

Mr. Grubb has been at Monticello for

20-plus years, serving in several key

capacities leading up to the important

position of ensuring the plant operates

safely and economically as plant

manager. Prior to his current role,

Grubb served as director of engineering,

business support manager, operations

manager, system engineering manger

and design engineering manager. Grubb

holds an electrical engineering degree

from North Dakota State University.

He has completed and mentored

development and managerial courses

at INPO and serves on the advisory

committee of the Boiling Water Reactor

Owners Group.

had a current online run of more than 350

days from its late spring start-up from the

2009 refueling.

Monticello has generated more than

155 million mega-watt-hours of electricity

with a lifetime capacity factor exceeding

80 percent since that initial start-up.

There are 190,000 pounds of

uranium loaded into 484 fuel assemblies,

which is the equivalent to the energy in 7

million tons of coal. The plant is refueled

approximately every 24 months.

Monticello’s boiling-water reactor

generates 600 megawatts of electricity,

enough to serve more than a half-million

households and about 10 percent of

the electricity used by Xcel Energy’s

Tim O’Connor

Mr. O’Connor was appointed Monticello

site vice president in May 2007 with

25 years of extensive nuclear energy

experience in BWR and PWR plants.

Tim is responsible for the overall

management of Monticello site activities.

He joined Monticello from Constellation

Energy Group’s Nine Mile Point station

in New York, where he served as site vice

president from 2004-2007.

After receiving a mechanical

engineering degree at Marquette

University in Milwaukee, O’Connor

joined LaSalle Nuclear Station as a

fi eld engineer in 1982. Since then he has

served in a variety of positions at several

stations.

customers in the Upper Midwest.

Combined with the production at Prairie

Island Nuclear Generating Plant near

Red Wing, Minn., nuclear power makes

up nearly 30 percent of the power

Xcel Energy supplies its customers in

Minnesota and neighboring states.

The Monticello plant is located on a

2,150-acre site about 50 miles northwest

of Minneapolis-St. Paul. The plant

received a 40-year operating license

from the federal Nuclear Regulatory

Commission in 1970.

In 2006, the NRC renewed the plant’s

license for 20 years, which will allow

operations until 2030. Approximately

(Continued on page 50)

48 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


Meeting & Training Calendar

1. International Forum ATOMEXPO

2010, June 7-9, 2010, Moscow,

Russia. Contact: Rosatom, telephone:

7 495 645 23 27, fax: 7 495 66 33 820,

email: atomexpo@rosatom.info.

2. Nuclear Power Uprate Conference,

June 21-22, 2010, Washington, D.C.

Contact: Nuclear Energy Insider,

Dean Murphy, telephone: (800) 814-

3569, ext. 7204, email: dmurphy@

eyeforenergy.com.

3. 6 th Annual World Nuclear University

(WNU) Summer Institute, July 3-14,

2010, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Contact: World Nuclear Association,

telephone: 44 207 451 1520, fax:

44 207 839 1501, email: wna@info.

world-nuclear.org.

4. 51 st Annual Meeting of the Institute

of Nuclear Materials Management

INMM, July 11-15, 2010, Baltimore,

Maryland. Contact: telephone: (847)

480-9573, fax: (847) 480-9282, email:

inmm@inmm.org.

5. 29 th Steam Generator Nondestructive

Evaluation Workshop, July 12-14,

2010, Vail Cascade Resort and Spa,

Vail, Colorado. Contact: EPRI, Brent

Lancaster, telephone: (704) 595-2517,

email: blancaster@epri.com.

6. International Youth Nuclear Congress

IYNC, July 12-18, 2010, Cape Town,

South Africa. Contact: email: mosa.

rasweswe@iync.org, website: www.

iync.org/iync-2010.html.75.

ASME 2010 Power Conference, July

13-15, 2010, Palmer House Hilton,

Chicago, Illinois. Contact: Vince

Dilworth, telephone: (925) 244-1360,

email: Dilworthv@asme.org.

7. Mitigating System Performance Index

(MSPI) Workshop, July 14-16, 2010,

San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter,

San Antonio, Texas. Contact: Nuclear

Energy Institute, Linda Wells,

telephone: (202) 739-8039, email:

ljw@nei.org.

8. EUCI Course on Nuclear Power

Fundamentals, July 15-16, 2010,

Chicago Illinois. Contact: telephone:

(303) 770-880, fax: (303) 741-0849.

9. 31 st International Nuclear Air Cleaning

Conference, July 19-21, 2010,

Charlotte, North Carolina. Contact:

Ronald Bellamy, International

Society for Nuclear Air Treatment

Technologies, telephone: (610) 337-

5200, email: rrb2@nrc.gov.

10. Health Physics Forum, July 25-28,

2010, Sheraton Sand Key, Clearwater,

Florida. Contact: Nuclear Energy

Institute, Linda Wells, telephone:

(202) 739-8039, email: ljw@nei.org.

11. Nuclear Fuel Supply Forum, July

27, 2010, Willard InterContinenal,

Washington, D.C. Contact: Nuclear

Energy Institute, Linda Wells,

telephone: (202) 739-8039, email:

ljw@nei.org.

12. Utility Working Conference and

Vendor Technology Expo, August

8-11, 2010, Amelia Island Plantation,

Amelia Island, Florida. Contact:

American Nuclear Society, website:

www.ans.org.

13. Nuclear Information Records

Management Association

Conference NIRMA 2010, August 15-

20, 2010, Summerlin, NV. Contact:

telephone: (505) 248-7555, email:

SteveAdams@nara.gov.

14. EPRI Boiling Water Reactor Water

Chemistry Workshop, August 18-19,

2010, Oak Brook Terrace, Illinois.

Contact: Nicole Lynch, telephone:

(650) 855-2060, email: nlynch@epri.

com.

15. U.S. Women in Nuclear, July 18-

21, 2010, Westin Seattle, Seattle,

Washington. Contact: Nuclear

Energy Institute, Linda Wells,

telephone: (202) 739-8039, email:

ljw@nei.org.

16. Summer School on Nuclear Reactors:

Goals and Challenges for the Gen-II

to Gen-III Transition, August 25-

Septmeber 3, 2010, Aix-en-Provence,

France. Contact: FJOH Summer

School, email: fjoh@cea.fr.

17. 2010 American Nuclear Society

Topical Meeting and Decommissioning,

Decontamination, & Reutilization

and Technology Expo, August

29-September 2, 2010, Idaho Falls,

Idaho. Contact: Teri Ehresman, telephone:

(208) 526-7785, email: Teri.

Ehresman@inl.gov.

18. 35 th Annual World Nuclear

Association Symposium, September

15-17, 2010, London, United

Kingdom. Contact: telephone: 44

20 7451 1520, email: info@worldnuclear.org.

19. China International Nuclear Power

Industry Expo, September 19-21,

2010, China International Exhibition

Center, Beijing, China. Contact:

Winder Wang, telephone: 86 10

85863866, fax: 86 10 85863866,

email: winderwang@163.com.

20. 2010 LWR Fuel Performance

Meeting/TopFuel, September 26-

29, 2010, Hyatt Regency Grand

Cypress, Orlando, Florida. Contact:

Lynne Schreiber, American Nuclear

Society, email: fuel@fuel.ans.org.

21. International Conference on Nuclear

Power for the People, September 26-

29, 2010, Nesebar, Bulgaria. Contact:

Bulgarian Nuclear Society, fax: 359

2 974 39 55, email: manolova@inrne.

bas.bg.

22. The 13 th International Conference

on Environmental Remediation and

Radioactive Waste Management.

October 3-7, 2010, Tsukuba, Japan.

Contact: John Bendo, ASME, email:

bendoj@asme.org.

23.Nuclear Plant Chemistry Conference,

2010, October 3-7, 2010, Hotel Le

Concorde, Quebec City, Quebec,

Canada. Contact: Elizabeth Muckle-

Jeffs, Canadian Nuclear Society,

telephone: (800) 868-8776, fax: (613)

732-3386.

24.17 th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference,

October 24-30, 2010, Hilton Cancun

Golf and Spa Resort, Cancun, Mexico.

Contact: Pacific Nuclear Council,

email: info@pbnc2010.org.mx.

25. 2010 ANS Winter Meeting and

Nuclear Technology Expo, November

7-11, 2010, Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas,

Nevada. Contact: website: www.ans.

org.


Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com 49


Safety of...

Continued from page 48

500 people are employed full-time at the

plant, which is owned and operated by

Northern States Power Co.-Minnesota,

an Xcel Energy company. The plant is

highly reliable with a five-year average

capacity factor of 90.9 percent from

2005-2009.

Extended Power Uprate

Our plan to increase the generating

capacity (power uprate) at the plant by

71 megawatts has been approved by the

Minnesota Public Utilities Commission

and awaits action by the federal Nuclear

Regulatory Commission. The project

is expected to be completed in 2011.

Monticello expects a workforce of more

than 2,000 to complete the following

projects and other outage tasks in 2011:

Replacement of:

• Main transformer

• Normal and auxiliary power

transformers

• Condensate demineralizer system

and controls

• Steam dryer

• Feed water pumps and motor

• 6 high pressure feed water heaters

• Main generator exciter

• Stator water cooling heat exchanger

• Condensate pump impeller and

motor

Among other tasks:

• Installation of a new 13.8 Kv

electrical distribution system

• Main generator rewind

• Reactor water cleanup flow

enhancement

Meanwhile, in connection with

proposals for a regional transmission

system upgrade in Minnesota, new

substation equipment and several new

power source connections – including a

row of 345-kilovolt breakers -- will be

installed at the plant substation.

CapX2020

Monticello is a key connection point

for CapX2020, a joint initiative of 11

transmission utilities in Minnesota and the

surrounding region to expand the electric

transmission grid to ensure continued

reliable and affordable service.

Planning studies show that customer

demand for electricity will increase 4,000

to 6,000 megawatts (MW) by 2020. The

new transmission lines will be built in

phases designed to meet this increasing

demand as well as to support renewable

energy expansion.

Work began this spring on the

Monticello’s new substation equipment

that will allow one of the new lines to tie

in to the station.

Dry Fuel Storage

The federal Nuclear Regulatory

Commission has licensed the storage

facility and the NUHOMS design. The

state has authorized 30 canisters to

accommodate plant operations through

2030, when the plant’s renewed license

expires. Ten containers now are filled

and loaded in the dry storage facility; 10

are scheduled to be loaded in 2013 and

another 10 in approximately 2016.

Strengths

The station was proud to develop

a dynamic set of learning tools for

supplemental personnel prior to the 2009

refueling outage that resulted in reduction

of OSHA recordable injuries from seven

in 2007 to one in 2009 and significant

human performance events.

Highlights

• Monticello developed a detailed and

user friendly documentation package

for important air operative valve

parameters and results to improve

efficiency.

• Methods used in development of

interns and knowledge transfer

for new hires in engineering have

resulted in the hiring and retention of

quality engineers.

• Management implemented a program

to develop staff who demonstrate

leadership potential and are interested

in progressing to supervisory roles.

Risk Management

Our personnel pride themselves

in performance and safety. Employees

demonstrate intolerance for equipment

issues and events. We constantly strive to

improve in all areas.

Monticello has been praised recently

by industry organizations for identifying

risk in job planning and at the jobsite and

taking the appropriate actions to mitigate,

reduce or eliminate risk. The station

identified risk management principles

and behaviors as part of its Target Zero

campaign of operating with no accidents,

no events in operational decision making

and to avoid and reduce risk.

The station’s Nuclear Oversight

Department noted implementation of

the principles resulted in improved plant

performance, “most notably reflected

in the essentially event free operations

during the 2009 refueling outage.

Additionally, online events have been

reduced and problems are being identified

before work execution.”

Risk principles have been

internalized through various departments

of the station. Personnel who identify risk

prevention situations are rewarded and

recognized in the site’s newsletter.

Here are the site’s risk management

principles:

• Nothing is routine.

• Take the time to challenge

uncertainty.

• Risk significant activities will be

made visible.

• Risk activities will be planned,

challenged and controlled.

• No risk option – the first choice.

• Prioritization to minimize operational


challenges.

And, behaviors:

Stop/engage when we hear

justifications or the word, “routine.”

• Methodical fact-based decision

making.

• Risk activities are clearly identified

with clear owners.

• Verify commitments in detail / follow

through and validate the specifics

Contact: Patrick Thompson, Xcel

Energy, 2807 West County Road 75,

Monticello, MN 55362-9637; telephone:

(763) 295-1282, fax: (763) 295-1421, email:

Patrick.thompson@xenuclear.com.

50 www.NuclearPlantJournal.com Nuclear Plant Journal, May-June 2010


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Placement of the containment vessel

bottom head at Sanmen, Unit 1.

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with the first scheduled to come online as planned in 2013.

In the United States, the AP1000 has been selected as the

technology of choice for more than half of the new plants

announced, including the only six for which engineering,

procurement and construction contracts have been signed.

Westinghouse nuclear technology will help provide future

generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity.

Check us out at www.westinghousenuclear.com


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