OFFICIAL MAP AND GUIDE - Liverpool World Heritage

liverpoolworldheritage.com

OFFICIAL MAP AND GUIDE - Liverpool World Heritage

OFFICIAL MAP AND GUIDE


Whilst on your visit around Liverpool World Heritage City, look out for the details

that tell the story of Liverpool’s maritime and mercantile heritage, such as those

shown below.

Detail of doors in St.George’s Hall,

William Brown Street

Day, George’s Dock Ventilation Tower,

Pier Head

Lifting gear, Albert Dock

Clock face on Victoria Clock Tower,

Salisbury Dock, Stanley Dock

The Duke of Wellington on his memorial,

William Brown Street

Drinking Fountain inside the Dock Wall,

Prince’s Dock, Stanley Dock

News Room War Memorial, Exchange Flags,

Castle Street

One of the many Cat-heads found in the

Rope Walks area, Lower Duke Street


Welcome to Liverpool, World Heritage City.

Liverpool was inscribed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2004 because

it is the “supreme example of a commercial port at the time of Britain’s greatest

global influence”. The status recognises Liverpool’s Outstanding Universal Value

and the impact it has made upon mankind as a whole.

Liverpool City Council and its partners are committed to conserving the Site’s

cultural heritage whilst also encouraging the city to grow and expand. They seek

to achieve a careful balance between conservation and regeneration, creating

modern heritage and ensuring that “The future is built upon the past.”

The Site consists of six distinctive historic areas:

The Pier Head was the point of departure of millions of migrants from Europe to America

and elsewhere in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Its origins date back to the 18th century,

when the city also played a big part in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. These two movements

of people had a major impact on the global population today.

The conservation areas of Albert Dock, and Stanley Dock include monumental warehouses

and historic docks. The vast scale of the warehouses and the variety of commodities that

were stored in them and shipped throughout the world, demonstrate the might of Liverpool’s

commercial power. These areas also offer powerful evidence of innovation in dock construction.

The original “Old Dock” was opened in 1715 and marked the rise of the city as a port.

Part of it can be seen still as an excavation below the Liverpool ONE retail development.

The historic commercial district, centred on Castle Street overlays Liverpool’s seven medieval

streets. It is still home to many banks, shipping-line headquarters, marine insurance companies,

produce exchanges and warehouses, as well as the city’s Georgian Town Hall. Liverpool is a city

built on trade and this is the area where business was historically conducted. There is a marked

absence of medieval structures on these original streets and the quality of these Victorian

temples to commerce reflects the prestige and wealth of businesses at the time.

William Brown Street is the heart of the city’s historic cultural quarter and was endowed

in the 19th century by the city’s Corporation and mercantile classes. Lime Street Station was

an early addition to the world’s first passenger railway line, and became the city’s major gateway

for arrivals on land. Its frontage has recently been restored and a stunning new piazza in front

of the station has opened up views of the magnificent St.George’s Hall.

Lower Duke Street is part of the Rope Walks area, which developed to serve the historic

docks during the 18th century. It is an area of early merchant’s houses and warehouses, laid

out on long straight streets, formerly used for the making of rope. It is now home to a thriving

independent and creative sector.


PIER HEAD

The Pier Head is the main focal point of Liverpool’s waterfront, especially for passengers arriving

on the River Mersey and is the most recognisable image of the city. The three palatial Edwardian

buildings, the Port of Liverpool Building (1907), the Royal Liver Building (1911), and the Cunard

Building (1916) were all built within the 18th century George’s Dock to face out assertively

across the river and the Atlantic. A fourth striking building is George’s Dock Tunnel Ventilation

Building and Offices (1934) by Herbert Rowse, with its art deco exterior inspired by Egypt.

The Pier Head is also home to many monuments, mostly to commemorate the lives of

those lost at sea, such as Goscombe John’s Memorial to All Heroes of Marine Engine Rooms

(originally commissioned following the sinking of The Titanic in 1912).

The Pier Head is on land entirely reclaimed from the river and has undergone many changes

during its lifetime. Today it is once again a focus of much activity with an award-winning

landscaping design, major events, the new Museum of Liverpool, terminal for the Mersey

Ferry (also home to The Beatles Story), a cruise liner facility and canal link.

1. Liver Building, 1908-11 - Grade I Listed 2..Cunard Building, 1913-16 - Grade 11* Listed Detail,Celestial Globe,Merchant Navy Memorial,

1952 - Grade 11 Listed

3. Port of Liverpool Building, completed

1907 - Grade 11* Listed

4. George’s Dock Tunnel Ventilation Building

and Offices, 1931-34 - Grade 11 Listed

5. Memorial to Heroes of the Marine Engine Room

(Titanic Memorial), Circa 1916 - Grade 11 Listed


Albert dock

The Albert Dock was opened by Prince Albert in 1846. The warehouses are amongst the

earliest examples of fire-proof construction, built of incombustible materials which made

them less liable to catch fire. The warehouses constitute the largest collection of Grade1 listed

buildings in England. They are now home to shops, restaurants, bars, hotels, Tate Liverpool,

The Beatles Story, the Merseyside Maritime Museum and apartments. Tall ships still visit

occasionally and give a reminder of how the dock would have been in its heyday.

This area also includes other historic docks, such as Wapping Dock (and its warehouse),

Dukes Dock, and Canning Graving Dock. It is also home to the Old Dock (1715), the world’s

first commercial enclosed wet dock and the foundation of Liverpool’s trading power.

Mann Island, with its dramatic ensemble of contemporary structures, is also in this area.

6. Albert Dock Warehouses, opened 1846/47 - Grade 1 Listed

7. Albert Dock Traffic Office, 1846/47 - Grade 1 Listed

Canning Half-Tide Dock, 1844 - Grade 11 Listed, Great Western Railway Warehouse, 1850, Museum of Liverpool, 2011,

and Mann Island Development, 2011


stanley dock

The Stanley Dock Conservation Area encompasses two areas of redundant historic docks

which are linked by the Dock Wall (1821-1848). It also includes the flight of canal locks (1848)

which provided the first direct link between the dock system and the Leeds and Liverpool

Canal (1816).

These docks have always been closed to the public but dramatic views into them can be seen

from the bridge between Prince’s Dock and Prince’s Half-tide Dock and the recently restored

rolling bridge between Stanley Dock and Collingwood Dock. Redevelopment proposals for

this huge site west of the dock wall provide the opportunity to make this fascinating and

highly authentic dockland area accessible to the public.

A “Heritage” Market is held every Sunday in one of the Stanley Dock Warehouses and

provides one of the few opportunities at present to explore the interior of this unaltered

warehouse ensemble which can also be seen from the train on Merseyrail’s Northern Line.

8. Stanley Dock Warehouses, 1855 and 1901

- Grade 11 and Grade 11* Listed

9. Leeds and Liverpool Canal Locks, Circa 1848 - Grade 11 Listed

10. The Dock Wall, 1821-1848 - Grade 11 Listed


castle street

The historic commercial district is still the heart of Liverpool’s modern business district, although

changes in shipping and trading practices have resulted in many of them changing from their

original uses. Many of the grand commercial buildings have now been converted to new uses

such as the Adelphi Bank on Castle Street with its striking copper “onion dome”, now a coffee

shop, and The Albany on Old Hall Street, with its prophetic inscription “Time and tide tarry

for no man” in the courtyard, now apartments.

A wide range of architectural styles are in evidence; the early cast iron-framed Oriel Chambers

on Water Street, the steel framed Royal Insurance Building on North John Street and the

American-influenced classicism of India Buildings.

Throughout the area are high quality sculptures, both free-standing, such as the Nelson Memorial

in Exchange Flags and integral to buildings, as on Martin’s Bank Building, Water Street, with its

reliefs depicting Liverpool’s early trade links with Africa.

11. Liverpool Town Hall, 1754, 1792 and 1820 - Grade 1Listed Detail, Frieze from Liverpool Town Hall

12. India Buildings, 1924-31 - Grade 11 Listed 13. Martins Building, 1927-32 - Grade 11 Listed 14. Oriel Chambers, 1864 - Grade 1 Listed


William

Brown Street

William Brown Street was created in the mid-19th century as the Victorian cultural forum of

the city, and demonstrates the city’s aspirations to emulate the culture of ancient Athens and

Rome. It is the first sight that greets passengers arriving in Liverpool into Lime Street Station.

The newly restored frontage and public concourse outside the Station leads to Harvey Lonsdale

Elmes’ monumental St.George’s Hall (1840-55), which is a masterpiece of neo-classical design.

Its exterior overtly resembles a Greek temple, whilst the interior is more Roman influenced.

It has been comprehensively restored and is open to the public.

The popular attractions of World Museum Liverpool (1860 and 1901), the Walker Art Gallery

(1877) and the Central Library (1879 and currently closed for restoration) make this a major

destination in the city. St.John’s Gardens, with its collection of statues of eminent Victorian

Liverpudlians is the largest green space in the city centre and a pleasant place to escape the

bustle of the city. From here can be seen Herbert Rowse’s entrance portal to the Mersey

Road Tunnel (1934).

16. World Museum of Liverpool and Central Library,

1857-60 - Grade 11* Listed

15. St.George’s Hall, 1840-55 - Grade I Listed

17. The Walker Art Gallery, opened 1877 - Grade 11* Listed


lower

duke street

Lower Duke Street is an area of early merchants’ houses and warehouses, built on land

which was only connected to the medieval core of the town when the tidal Pool of Liverpool

was infilled at the beginning of the 18th century. The Queen Anne-style Bluecoat Arts Centre

(1718) in School Lane is the oldest building in Liverpool city centre, the former Royal Institution,

Colquitt Street was originally built as the house of the merchant Thomas Parr and is a fine

example of a merchant’s town house with an adjacent warehouse.

With the closure of the historic docks to the west towards the end of the 20th century,

almost all of the warehouses became redundant and many became derelict, but sustained

programmes of action by public agencies and private business is transforming the area.

It is now a centre for independent shops, bars, restaurants, hotels, and creative industries

who are attracted to its unique mercantile character.

19. The Bridewell, 1861 - Grade 11 Listed

18. The Bluecoat, opened 1718 - Grade I Listed

20. The Royal Institution, 1799 - Grade 11 Listed


REGENT RD

GREAT HOWARD ST

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Significant buildings in

the World Heritage Site

Liver Building

Cunard Building

Port of Liverpool Building

George’s Dock Tunnel Ventilation

Memorial to Heroes of the

Marine Engine Room

Albert Dock

Albert Dock Traffic Office

Stanley Dock Warehouses

Leeds and Liverpool Canal Locks

The Dock Wall

Liverpool Town Hall

India Buildings

Martins Building

Oriel Chambers 8

St.George’s Hall

World Museum of Liverpool

and Central Library

The Walker Art Gallery

The Bluecoat

The Bridewell

The Royal Institution

TRAFALGAR

DOCK

BRAMLEY MORE

DOCK

NELSON

DOCK

SALISBURY

DOCK

Victoria Clock Tower

WEST

WATERLOO

DOCK

COLLINGWOOD

DOCK

EAST

WATERLOO

DOCK

PRINCE’S

HALF TIDE

DOCK

10

10

WATERLOO RD

10

stanley dock

- detail

WATERLOO RD

WALTER ST

8

STANLEY

DOCK

Heritage Market

9

OIL ST

LEEDS ST

LOVE LANE

For more information on Liverpool’s

World Heritage Site go to

www.liverpoolworldheritage.com

Tourist Information 0151 233 2008

or www.visitliverpool.com

PRINCE’S

DOCK

KING EDWARD ST

OLD HALL STREET

10

NEW QUAY

Drinking Fountain

St. Nicholas

Church

All information correct at the time of going to press.

5

ST NICHOLAS PL

Tower Building


To Stanley Dock

for sites

8 9 10

PALL MALL

KING EDWARD ST

PRINCE’S

DOCK

OLD HALL STREET

TITHEBARN ST

KEY

Tourist Information Centre

Merseyrail

National Rail

Bus Station

Ferry

Cruise Liner Terminal

Parking

Parking - Disabled

Toilets - Disabled

Toilets

ALBERT DOCK Area

10

Drinking Fountain

5

NEW QUAY

ST NICHOLAS PL

1

Celestial Globe

Liver Building

2

St. Nicholas

Church

Cunard

Building

3

Tower Building

THE GOREE

MANN ISLAND

Museum of Liverpool

CHAPEL ST

COVENT GARDEN

RUMFORD ST

14

Port of

Liverpool Building

WATER ST

DRURY LANE

4

13

12

CANNING

HALF TIDE

DOCK

News Room

War Memorial

FENWICK ST

11

BRUNSWICK ST

Liverpool

Town Hall

CASTLE ST

JAMES ST

STRAND

CANNING

DOCK

MOORFIELD

7

DA

N

CO

Vict

Monu

RIVER MERSEY

CASTLE STREET area

LOWER DUKE STREET area

6

ALBERT DOCK

SALTH

PIER HEAD area

STANLEY DOCK area

WILLIAM BROWN STREET area

© Crown copyright and database rights 2011 Ordnance Survey 100018351


VERNON ST

S

LE ST

ORTH JOHN ST

OK ST

oria

ment

LORD ST

SALTHOUSE

DOCK

USE QUAY

HATTON GARDEN

CHEAPSIDE

Hilton Hotel

Municipal Building

STANLEY ST

SIR THOMAS ST

VICTORIA ST

MATHEW ST

SOUTH JOHN ST

WAPPING

GOWER ST

TRUEMAN ST

CROSSHALL ST

The Met Quarter

CANNING PLACE

CHURCHILL WAY

LIVER ST

CHURCHILL WAY

QUEENSWAY

TUNNEL ENTRANCE

VICTORIA ST

WHITECHAPEL

WILLIAMSON ST

HANOVER ST HANOVER ST

ARGYLE ST

HUNTER ST

World Museum of

Liverpool and Central Library

OLD

HAYMARKET

ROE ST

WILLIAMSON

SQUARE

CHURCH ST

SCHOOL LANE

PARADISE ST

COLLEGE LANE

Rope Walks

Swedish Church

TARLETON ST

GRADWELL ST

FORREST ST

PARK LANE

ST. JOHN’S

GARDENS St.George’s Hall

ST. JOHNS LANE

BASNETT ST

16

RICHMOND ST

YORK ST

Central

Library

WILLIAM BROWN ST

18

HOOD ST

PARKER ST

The Bluecoat

WOLSTENHOLME

SQUARE

DUKE ST

ST. GEORGES PLACE

SEEL ST

HENRY ST

UPPER FREDERICK ST

The Walker

Art Gallery

15

BOLD ST

WOOD ST

FLEET ST

GREAT CHARLOTTE ST

ELLIOT ST

17

The Duke of

Wellington Memorial

RANELAGH ST

RENSHAW ST

PARR ST PARR ST

SLATER ST

KENT ST

DUKE ST

LONDON RD

Lime Street Station

SKELHORNE ST

WOOD ST

FLEET ST

SEEL ST

LORD NELSON ST

COPPERAS HILL

BOLD ST

NORTON ST

RENSHAW ST

BACK COLQUITT ST

COPPERAS HILL

BROWNLOW HILL

MOUNT PLEASANT

19 20

CORNWALLIS ST

COLQUITT ST

SEYMOUR ST

ST. VINCENT ST

BERRY ST

Chinese Arch

RUSSELL ST

HARDMAN ST

KNIGHT ST

ROSCOE ST ROSCOE ST

UPPER DUKE ST

RODNEY ST

WAPPING

BASIN

NELSON ST

ST. JAMES ST

WAPPING

DOCK


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