INTERVIEW WITH ARTIST MARI JAE - Vyu Magazine

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INTERVIEW WITH ARTIST MARI JAE - Vyu Magazine

MAGAZINE

ISSUE 19 DESIGN POETRY

PHOTOGRAPHY ART MUSIC

INTERVIEW WITH

ARTIST MARI JAE

Recently, Vyü Magazine caught up with the artist

Mari Jae and had a chance to interview her.

Vyü: How long

have you been

in Lowell?

Mari Jae: Less than

6 months.

What brought you

here?

We moved to

Massachusetts for my

husband’s job. We

picked Lowell

because of its proximity

to Boston. We

were looking for

a “big city” feeling

rather than a suburban,

“subdivision”

community. Plus, we

heard about the revitalization

of Lowell,

and we wanted to

become a part of it.

I’m doing what I can

to contribute through

my art. I’m inspired

by the vitality of

Lowell—the movement

of cars, the

activities, and the

general hustle and

bustle. I feed off this

energy for my paintings,

so I could never

live in the country.

I’m a city girl, and I

found Lowell—we’re

compatible!

The Ladder and the Lamp

Speaking of

places to live, I

understand that

you’ve spent some

time in France.

Did you go to

France to study

art? Was it an

individual trip,

or part of a

program?

(continued on page 2)


Do you have advice for artists who

are struggling?

Well, I consider myself as still “struggling.”

There’s no measure for success but persistence

has always worked for me.

Creating, communicating, and following

through are all equally important—and

keys to succeeding in this business. Or, so

I’ve found so far. I am a full time artist

and I don’t take that for granted. It’s

been exciting and surprising that so many

people have connected with my work. I

paint passionately and with purpose, so

it’s exhilarating when that comes across to

the viewer.

To see more examples of Mari’s work visit

www.marijae.com and email her at

info@marijae.com

(Mari Jae continued from front)

Actually, I participated in two separate

exchange programs to France: one to

Paris and one to Aix-en-Provence.

Officially, I was there to study Art History

and French. Unofficially, I was there to

paint. It was the beginning of the evolution

of my current style. After living in

France, I stopped listening to my professors

and started painting with globs of

paint, using big brush strokes and lots of

bold color. I don’t even own tubes of

brown or black paint. It’s absolutely all

about color for me! When I went to

France, my eyes were opened. My

paintings came alive, and I was finally

recognized for doing what I loved. As a

result, I had a solo show there and I’ve

never looked back.

In addition to your paintings, your

shows feature cards. How long have

you been making cards?

…and the Kitchen Sink

I started producing cards as accessories to

my paintings about two years ago. I

would sell these cards at my openings to

anyone who loved my work but couldn’t

afford an actual painting. They became

so popular, that I turned them into a business

about a year ago. I now have several

different collections including blank

note cards, invitations, and greeting cards.

I’m interested in your trip to New

York City. Do you go to New York

each year at the same time?

This year was my first year in New York

but I do plan to make it an annual event

for my business. It was fabulous! I got a

ton of interest, quite a few card orders,

and sold a couple of paintings as well. It

was a financial investment, but so far, it’s

been exceptionally profitable.

What do you think about the artistic

migration to Lowell? Do you feel the

city needs something, compared to

other artist communities?

From what I understand, Lowell has come

a long way already, but I want what every

artist wants: More—More galleries, more

buyers, more opportunities, more interest.

Right now, Lowell is the best kept secret in

the state. Once we’re discovered, forget

it, there will be no looking back for the

city or for the local artists. I can’t wait until

that happens!

Brandy

Atlas, With the Weight of the World on his Shoulders


CONTRIBUTORS:

James Dyment

Publisher

Jeannie Judge

Editor

Norma Beaulieu

Promotion

Ren Sitoy

Graphic Design

Vyü Magazine, June 2005

Name and Logo Copyright ©1999

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ALL SHARKS

You are gray and wholesome, real

in your teeth and simple idea.

Old thing,

you clock time in your flat-dial eyes.

The sand drifts and the foam greens, then blushes.

You move forward in your confidence of no bones,

holding all bones close — yours, mine,

and those of the fish, the man, the elephant,

the Earth.

You are the measurement

of an eclipsed hour of water and ice.

You move and still want,

hour after hour,

teaching the need that is want.

Meg Smith

EXHIBIT

REVIEW:

AYER LOFTS

ART GALLERY

SUMMER SOLSTICE

SHOW, Opening

reception, Sunday June

5th was a good turn

out with a nice variety

of art types. Shown

here (clockwise) Eleni

Zohdi, Polar Fleece

Hat and Jacket with

Alpaca trim and

pearl/rhinestone

buttons; Steve

Syverson, Centered;

Pam Dixon, Filloshee

Triptych; and Ted

Lavish, Jeannie

Contemplating her

Martini

AYER LOFTS ART GALLERY

172 Middle Street, Lowell, MA

June 6 to August 30 - SUMMER SOLSTICE

SHOW - Residents and members show a

variety of art. Paintings, sculpture, pottery,

are just some of the things to see at the

gallery. Hours are Saturday and Sunday

from 1 to 4 PM and Thursday evenings

from 6 to 9 PM. 978.970.2100

BRUSH ART GALLERY AND

STUDIOS

256 Market St., Lowell, MA 978.459.7819

IMAGINE, Featuring 14 Resident Artists,

July 3 to September 11, 2005, Meet the

Artists Reception: July 29, 2005

6 to 8 PM. www.thebrush.org

MUSIC LISTINGS

Sun June 19, 6 PM, The Pocket Big

Band, Chit-Chat Lounge,

103 Washington St., Haverhill, MA

978-374-9710

Sat June 25, 7 PM, Paul Combs/

Don Hemwall Duo, La Boniche,

143 Merrimack St., Lowell MA

978-458-9473

Sun June 26, 6 PM, The Pocket Big

Band, Chit-Chat Lounge,

103 Washington St., Haverhill, MA

978-374-9710

Fri Jul 1, 7 PM, Chelmsford Community

Band and Jazz Ensemble Independence

Day Concert, Chelmsford Common,

Chelmsford, MA

Tue Jul 5, 7 PM, Chelmsford Community

Band Jazz Ensemble Chelmsford Common,

Chelmsford, MA


I’D LIKE AN ORDER OF

“SMALL FRIES”

It started out of creative desperation. After moving from the East

Coast (New York City, Boston, and Atlanta, respectively) to Tacoma, WA,

graphic designer Renetta Sitoy found herself unemployed and admittedly,

depressed. Having never sewn in her life but hoping to release some stored-up

creativity, Renetta set out to find a sewing maching and teach herself how to

make clothing. She indeed found a sewing machine—an old 1950's model

from the local thrift store for a mere $12.00—but never quite got around to the clothing

part of the plan. Instead, she drew a simple pattern of a monster-like creature, nicknamed

it a "Small Fry," and has since started a small one-woman business that in addition

to the creatures offers handmade

cards, felt bracelets, and smallets

(small wallets). Adorned with striking

color combinations, each item is

individually handmade by Renetta,

who notes that whimsy, color, and

a fondness for doodling kooky

characters all contribute to her bold

designs.

Her inspiration? "Baked goods, Peeps,

dogs, cats, and an obsessive-compulsive

need to constantly be busy in the hopes

of warding off evil," she says slyly.

In May 2005, The Making of a Small Fry aired

on Home and Garden Television Network’s (HGTV) Crafters Coast-to-Coast. Renetta

received an MFA Fellowship from the San Francisco Art Institute, where she will study

Design + Technology this fall. More information at: http://www.smallfrycrafts.com

Above Left: Handmade rubber stamp images;

Above Right: Not-So Diminutive, Lil Guy and Less Diminutive Guys hang out.

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