West Elevation East Elevation North Elevation

aias.org

West Elevation East Elevation North Elevation

Stone Sanctuary

5606-1319748085687

The river pebble was not always smooth. A rough, jagged rock, it was worn down by

the rushing waters of the river constantly eating away at it as it slowly traveled down the

river. After many years the pebble reaches a state of perfection, the water rushing past

with little resistance. The pebble no longer is caught in the current and remains static;

at ease with the environment around it. This idea inspired the Stone Sanctuary.

High pressure winds of a hurricane simply flow around the streamline massing of the

stadium, reducing the strain on the skin and frame. The ribs of the reinforced concrete

structure are exposed and prominent to emphasize the safety and security provided

within. Steel cladding adds to a feeling of solidarity and safety, while at the same time

collecting solar radiation. At night, the heat collected radiates back into space. This

change in temperature causes thousands of gallons of dew drops to form on the exterior

skin. This water is then harvested and utilized. Storm water is also harvested through

the same system on the roof. Giant rings of Kawneer 1600 Wall Systems provide natural

light to the spaces while providing adequate protection for those inside. Spaces are

defined by carving volumes out of the repetitious ribs of the pebble. The ribs also create

a variety of spaces that offer seclusion or privacy. Family can claim a spot and set

up camp, their space clearly defined by the concrete dividers. The ribs of the stadium

double as a thermal mass to regulate the temperature as well as filter the harsh sunlight

of Florida.

The panhandle of Florida makes evacuation fairly difficult for residents. Some must

travel over four times the distance of other southern residents in order to escape the

threat of a hurricane. A site between Tampa Bay and Orlando was chosen in order to

minimize evacuation travel for the maximum number of Florida residents. The stadium

is located near prominent evacuation highways, making the drive to safety convenient

for residents.

The stadium’s site is surrounded by linear mounds of green, giving the impression of

a giant zen garden. These mounds regulate traffic, provide water management for the

site, and create excellent places to tailgate. In times of crisis, these mounds provide

shelter from the wind, and act as emergency access to the stadium. A network of tunnels

within the mounds provides residents with the safest route from their cars to the

stadium. The tunnels deposit refugees safely in the lower levels of the stadium.

While the stadium is used for more festive occasions, prominent floating discs hang

from the trusses to increasing acoustical quality. In times of need, these discs serve

as emergency stations. Using the grand height of the space in the stadium, floors are

lowered and connected to various levels. These platforms will house many emergency

functions, whether they be first aid, meal distribution, or sleeping quarters. By utilizing

the otherwise wasted space over the track and field area, a dynamic atrium is created.

Stone Sanctuary is the embodiment of tranquility and security. All who enter are guaranteed

safety and peace of mind.

West Elevation

North Elevation

East Elevation


Choosing the Site

With evacuation in Florida requiring much more time than in other

states due to the pan-handle, Florida has the greatest need for a crisis

ready stadium.

ideal evacuation points

proximity to cites and highways

The site resembles a Japanese zen garden. Parking

is organized and divided by mounds of green.

These mounds double as emergency access to the

stadium. Rather than panicked hurricane refugees

running to the stadium completely exposed to

the elements, a series of tunnels within the linear

mounds of green collect people as they park. This

assures the safety of hurricane refugees by sheltering

them as well as controlling the flow of traffic

into the building.

Kawneer Hurricane Resistant curtain

panel system provide limited natural

lighting to prevent excessive solar gain.

Elevation: over 100 ft above sea level

Streamline massing allows

winds to pass, reducing strain

on structure

open space for large stadium


Crisis mode


A

A. Club Lofts

B. Lounge Area

C. Work Stations

D. Concession

E. Restrooms

F. Exhibition Space

G. Meeting Space

H. Locker Rooms

I. Training Spaces

J. Offices

K. Storage

L. First Aid

M. Central Emergency

N. Emergency Access

C

B

Heat is gathered

Heat is released at night

Dew droplets are formed

and collected


The river pebble was not always smooth. A rough, jagged rock, it was worn down by the rushing waters

of the river constantly eating away at it as it slowly traveled down the river. After many years the

pebble reaches a state of perfection, the water rushing past with little resistance. The pebble no longer

is caught in the current and remains static; at ease with the environment around it. This idea inspired

the Stone Sanctuary.

High pressure winds of a hurricane simply flow around the streamline massing of the stadium, reducing

the strain on the skin and frame. The ribs of the reinforced concrete structure are exposed and

prominent to emphasize the safety and security provided within. Steel cladding adds to a feeling of

solidarity and safety, while at the same time collecting solar radiation. At night, the heat collected

radiates back into space. This change in temperature causes thousands of gallons of dew drops to form

on the exterior skin. This water is then harvested and utilized. Storm water is also harvested through

the same system on the roof. Giant rings of Kawneer 1600 Wall Systems provide natural light to the

spaces while providing adequate protection for those inside. Spaces are defined by carving volumes out

of the repetitious ribs of the pebble. The ribs also create a variety of spaces that offer seclusion or

privacy. Family can claim a spot and set up camp, their space clearly defined by the concrete dividers.

The ribs of the stadium double as a thermal mass to regulate the temperature as well as filter the harsh

sunlight of Florida.

The panhandle of Florida makes evacuation fairly difficult for residents. Some must travel over four

times the distance of other southern residents in order to escape the threat of a hurricane. A site

between Tampa Bay and Orlando was chosen in order to minimize evacuation travel for the maximum

number of Florida residents. The stadium is located near prominent evacuation highways, making the

drive to safety convenient for residents.

The stadium’s site is surrounded by linear mounds of green, giving the impression of a giant zen garden.

These mounds regulate traffic, provide water management for the site, and create excellent places to

tailgate. In times of crisis, these mounds provide shelter from the wind, and act as emergency access to

the stadium. A network of tunnels within the mounds provides residents with the safest route from

their cars to the stadium. The tunnels deposit refugees safely in the lower levels of the stadium.

While the stadium is used for more festive occasions, prominent floating discs hang from the trusses to

increasing acoustical quality. In times of need, these discs serve as emergency stations. Using the grand

height of the space in the stadium, floors are lowered and connected to various levels. These platforms

will house many emergency functions, whether they be first aid, meal distribution, or sleeping quarters.

By utilizing the otherwise wasted space over the track and field area, a dynamic atrium is created.

Stone Sanctuary is the embodiment of tranquility and security. All who enter are guaranteed safety and

peace of mind.

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines