Click the Speaker button to replay the audio. Click the Speaker ...

ugisd.org

Click the Speaker button to replay the audio. Click the Speaker ...

Desert plant

Click the Speaker button

to replay the audio.


The Jumanos and the Tiguas

• The Jumanos traded agricultural

products, such as corn, for animal skins

and meat, in addition to paint pigments,

turquoise, and bows and arrows. ⇓

• The tattooed stripes on the Jumanos’

faces clearly identified them as peaceful

traders. ⇓

• Other Jumanos were farmers and lived

a more settled life along the Rio Grande

from today’s El Paso to the Big Bend

National Park.

(pages 90–91)

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.


The Jumanos and the Tiguas (cont.)

• Jumano houses were large adobe

structures with flat roofs. ⇓

• The Tiguas were a Puebloan people who

moved to Ysleta, near present-day El

Paso, in about 1680. ⇓

• Texas recently recognized the Tigua

people as Texas Native Americans and

established a reservation for them.

• They were displaced by the Apaches, and

fled to Mexico.

(pages 90–91)

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.


The Plains Culture

• Spaniards reintroduced horses to the

Americas, changing the way of life on the

plains. ⇓

• Soon after the late 1600s, most people

of the plains culture had horses, an

advantage that helped make them

outstanding hunters as well as dangerous

warriors. ⇓

• By the late 1800s, white hunters has

slaughtered millions of buffalo, ending the

traditional way of life for plains people,

who depended on buffalo for food.

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.

(page 92)


The Tonkawas

• Most Tonkawas lived along the

southeastern edge of the Edwards

Plateau, near present-day Austin. ⇓

• Although the Tonkawas depended on

buffalo for food and shelter, few herds

roamed through their Edwards Plateau

hunting grounds. ⇓

• The Tonkawas, who were in conflict for

food with other native peoples, were

forced to seek different food, such as

deer, rabbits, and other game.

(page 92)

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.


The Apaches

• Ancestors of the Apaches may have

migrated from northwestern Canada and

Alaska along the Rocky Mountains, and by

1700 several groups had entered Texas. ⇓

• The Mescalero Apaches made their

homes in the mountains from New

Mexico through West Texas and into

northern Mexico. ⇓

• The Lipan Apaches lived in the Hill

Country and north to the Red River.

(page 93)

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.


The Apaches (cont.)

• The Spanish from the south and the

Comanches from the north warred with the

Lipans, forcing them to leave Central Texas

and move westward to the mountains.

(page 93)


The Comanches

• The Comanches lived on the prairies,

plateaus, and plains of western Texas

from the early 1700s to the late 1800s.

Their territory covered parts of Mexico,

Texas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, and

New Mexico. ⇓

• The Comanches were divided into many

groups, each one having its own leaders

and elder decision makers. ⇓

• Comanche life centered on hunting and

war.

(pages 93–94)

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.


The Comanches (cont.)

• Comanches fought fiercely to keep

control of their territory, called

Comanchería, when Apaches, Wichitas,

Tonkawas, and white settlers threatened

from all sides.

(pages 93–94)


The Kiowas

• The Kiowas were the Comanches’ allies

and shared the plains of Texas with them. ⇓

• The Kiowas, like other nomadic Plains

people, lived in tepees that were made of

hide and easy to move. ⇓

• The Kiowas prized tradition and ceremony,

and they kept alive the stories of their

travels. They painted pictures on buffalo

hides to record important events.

(page 95)

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the information.


The Kiowas (cont.)

• Like the Apaches and Comanches, the

Kiowas fought to maintain their way of life

but were forced onto reservations by 1867.

(page 95)


Checking for Understanding

Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate

term in the right column.

__ B 1.

__ C 2.

__ A 3.

building material made

of sun-dried earth and

straw

a shelter made of

tanned hides fastened

to a framework of poles

dealers or agents acting

as go-betweens for the

producers of goods and

the retailers or

consumers

A. middlemen

B. adobe

C. tepee

Click the mouse button or press the

Space Bar to display the answers.

Similar magazines