Strategic Plan - North Island College

nic.bc.ca

Strategic Plan - North Island College

PARTICIPATION, PARTNERSHIP & PATHWAYS

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


“Imagination gives potential

its first tangible and

observable form.

We imagine what we

would like to be and this

image gives us a target

to move towards.”

Author unknown

How to contact us: www.nic.bc.ca | 1-800-715-0914 | 2300 Ryan Road, Courtenay, BC V9N 8N6


Table of Contents

3 Message from the President

5 Vision for the Future & Mission

6 Values

9 Process Overview

10 College Overview

12 Summary of Environmental Scan/Community Feedback

18 Strategic Directions

21 Strategic Direction #1: Responsive Curriculum

22 Strategic Direction #2: Student Success

25 Strategic Direction #3: Active Community Partner

26 Strategic Direction #4: Strategic Partnerships

29 Strategic Direction #5: Raising Awareness

30 Strategic Direction #6: Employee Engagement

32 Making it Happen

33 Acknowledgements

Appendices (available online at nic.bc.ca/strategicplan)

• Environmental Scan

• Operational Plans

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN

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Message from the President

The story of the North Island is one of innovation and change, challenge and success. For 35 years, North Island

College has grown and adapted to serve the educational needs of the people and communities of the North

Island region.

North Island College, as a public, post secondary institution, offers programs and courses that serve the diverse needs

of citizens of the North Island and beyond. We strive to develop the knowledge and skills required to strengthen our

communities and to foster leadership and growth. We work with our community partners to create opportunities for

rewarding careers for our students, to fulfill dreams, and to facilitate positive change.

Our vision of North Island College as a premier community and destination college, that inspires and prepares students

for success in a rapidly changing world is ambitious and future-focused. We want to expose not only students from

our region, but also those from elsewhere in Canada and from throughout the world to the excellence and spectacular

learning environment that is North Island College. Our vision will only be realized through the collective efforts of our

employees and in collaboration with our educational and community partners.

This Strategic Plan is enabled by the talent and commitment of North Island College employees, and our collective

commitment to live our values and deliver the highest standards of quality. As a public institution dedicated to

accessibility, student success, relevance and responsiveness, we will continue to build upon the direction of the

Strategic Plan, with our operational and academic planning, and our public accountability.

Thank you to all those involved in the development of North Island College’s 2011-2015 Strategic Plan. I trust you will

find your voice and comments contained within this Plan, that you will embrace the directions and goals outlined

within the Plan and that you will work with us to make our vision for the future a reality.

While approval of the Plan may be the culmination of an extensive and inclusive process, my commitment to you is

that North Island College will continue to listen, consult and respond to the future needs of the North Island region.

Dr. Jan Lindsay

President

North Island College

September 22, 2010

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Vision for the Future

North Island College holds a vision of being a premier community and destination college, in a spectacular

west-coast environment, that inspires and prepares students for success in a rapidly changing world.

North Island College will fulfill its vision by being:

a vibrant community of learners – embracing their goals and shaping their worlds;

a gateway to education, work and life;

a central force in improving the cultural and socio-economic well-being of the communities we serve;

and,

a respectful steward of our unique natural setting.

Together we will create a workplace that inspires personal growth and delivers results to our students,

partners and citizens.

Mission

North Island College is committed to meeting the education and training needs of adults within its service region

by: providing high quality, affordable higher education and skills training, collaborating with our partners to create

pathways to learning, and empowering individuals to achieve their full potential.

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Values

At North Island College, while our organizational roles differ, our values frame everything we do and express our

commitment to our students, communities, residents of our region and ourselves.

Student Success – We empower students to become self-reliant, lifelong learners capable of integrating what

they learn with how they live and work.

Access – We ensure access to learning opportunities, regardless of geographic, technological, financial, social,

educational or historic barriers.

Accountability – Our individual and organizational performance fosters public trust and community confidence.

Quality – We are committed to continuous improvement and achieving the highest quality possible.

Relevance and Responsiveness – We provide learning opportunities that are relevant to the lives and work of

our students and delivered in a creative, flexible, timely and collaborative manner.

Positive Organizational Culture – Ours is an organizational culture that operates in an open and honest

manner, is based on mutual trust and respect, values creativity and responsible risk taking, encourages innovative,

strategic thinking and affirms excellence.

Social and Environmental Responsibility – We are actively engaged in the economic and social development

of our communities and are active stewards of the unique natural environment in which we reside.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Process Overview

In December 2009, the North Island College Board of Governors initiated a strategic planning process to guide the

college’s development to the year 2015. The college evaluated the existing landscape, explored new opportunities,

and ultimately clarified the institution’s vision and direction for the coming years, using a very inclusive information

gathering process.

To guide the process, a Steering Committee comprised of the senior leadership team was established, as was a

Strategic Planning Advisory Committee, comprised of volunteer representatives from across all college programs,

service areas, campuses, and centres.

Extensive surveying was conducted with the following populations and the results were used to inform the

planning process:

High school students in Districts #70, 71, 72 and 85 in grades 10, 11 and 12;

NIC employees; and

Current NIC students.

Preliminary employee meetings were held at each of the campuses in early February 2010, followed shortly

thereafter by a college-wide employee visioning day on February 18th, which provided over 150 employees with the

opportunity to come together to share ideas and develop a collective vision for the future of North Island College.

Environmental scanning was also initiated, to pull together demographic, economic and social trend information for

the North Island region and the specific communities we serve. To complement the environmental scanning process,

community stakeholder meetings were held, to gather anecdotal information to provide insight into community

needs, and assist in determining how best North Island College could serve our communities and fulfill our mandate.

A Community Stakeholder Meeting was held on March 17, 2010 and attracted over 70 participants from throughout

the college’s region, including elected officials, service providers, business leaders, and community agencies/

organizations. A second meeting was held in Port Hardy on April 7, 2010.

The college community was informed and consulted at every milestone. Drafts of the vision statement were

circulated regularly, as were drafts of the preliminary strategic directions. Comments and feedback were

encouraged, and were incorporated into later drafts.

The Strategic Plan was finalized and approved by the North Island College Board of Governors on September 22,

2010. The ongoing process of engagement, review and adjustment will continue, enabling us to work together to

build upon our previous successes and tackle all new challenges.

The 2011-2015 Strategic Plan is posted on our web page at www.nic.bc.ca/strategicplan.

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN 9


College Overview

North Island College’s primary service area encompasses the geographic region covered by School Districts 49, 70,

71, 72, 84, and 85, which includes northern Vancouver Island and the BC mainland coast from Desolation Sound to

Klemtu. North Island College serves a population of approximately 150,000, within a geographic region of 80,000

square kilometres.

Founded in 1975, North Island College is a publicly funded, board-governed post-secondary institution formally

mandated by the Province of British Columbia to provide comprehensive:

courses of study at the first and second year levels of a baccalaureate degree program,

courses of study for an applied baccalaureate degree program

post-secondary education or training,

adult basic education, and

continuing education.

In support of its mandate, North Island College offers the following credentials:

Certificates

Diplomas (2-year)

Associate Degrees (2-year)

Applied Baccalaureate Degrees (4-year)

Collaborative Baccalaureate Degrees (4-year)

Post Degree Diplomas (1-year)

North Island College also serves the community by providing contract training, professional and personal

development, and international education.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


• Klemtu

Bella Coola centre

Port Hardy campus

Campbell River

campus

Cortes Island

centre

Gold River

centre

Comox Valley

campus

North Island College

Campuses & Centres

Ucluelet

centre

Port Alberni

campus

11


Summary of Environmental Scan / Community Feedback

What Population Growth Can We Expect?

The total population for the North Island College region has steadily increased from 2006 to 2010 and is projected

to continue to increase by approximately 0.8% annually from 2010 to 2016.

Population Projections (2006–2016) for North Island College Catchment Area

165,000

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

163756

160,000

159851

160941

162341

158391

155,000

153513

154791

155955

157127

150,000

149698

151092

145,000

140,000

Source: BC Stats. PEOPLE 34

While the population is growing, it is also aging. The population of traditional post-secondary participants (18-24

years of age) is nearing its peak in 2012, after which it is projected to decline.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


How is the Occupational and Economic Structure Changing?

There has been a significant shift in the distribution of occupational structures in the North Island region since

2001, from a traditional resource based structure to one that utilizes and supports a professional and advanced skills

labour force. Between 2001 and 2006 a fundamental shift occurred away from the Intermediate and Lesser Skilled

Occupations toward the three areas of Management, Professional Occupations and Technical & Skilled Trades. For

example, in 2006, the distribution of management-related occupations for the North Island region exceeded the

BC average (18.3% compared to 10.5%), whereas in 2001, the North Island region was below the provincial average

(8.9% compared to 10.8%).

Comparitive Distribution of Occupations by Percentage: North Island vs. British Columbia / 2006 vs. 2001

2006 2001 2006 2001

52.2%

46.0%

47.0%

36.1%

29.7%

27.7%

18.3%

23.8%

29.1%

26.8%

8.9%

11.3%

14.4%

10.5%

10.8%

15.4%

NORTH ISLAND

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Management

Professional Occupations

Technical & Skilled Trades

Intermediate and Lesser Skilled Occupations

(See table on next page for more detail)

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How is the Occupational and Economic Structure Changing? (continued)

The transformation of this region into a knowledge based economy is further reflected by a dramatic decrease in

intermediate and lesser skilled occupations on the North Island. In 2006, the distribution fell well below the BC

average (29.7% compared to 46.0%), whereas in 2001, the North Island region was above the BC average (52.2%

compared to the BC average of 47.0%).

OCCUPATION 2006 2001

North IslANd BrItIsh ColumBIA North IslANd BrItIsh ColumBIA

Management 18.3 10.5 8.9 10.8

Professional occupations in:

Business & Finance 2.8 2.5 1.3 2.5

Natural & Applied Science 3.5 1.5 1.7 3.2

Health 5.6 3.4 2.2 2.6

Social Sciences 3.4 2.9 1.5 2.1

Teachers 6.8 2.7 3.6 3.7

Art & Culture 1.7 1.3 0.9 1.4

Total (Professional occupations) 23.8 14.4 11.3 15.4

Technical Trades & High Skilled in:

Finance & Insurance Admin 3.1 2.2 1.5 1.5

Techs in Sciences 6.9 3.7 3.6 2.9

Techs in Health 2.4 2.2 1.4 1.3

Paraprofs in Social Sciences, Educ. 4.8 1.5 2.5 2.2

Techs in Art, Culture & Rec. 3.7 2.0 1.6 1.9

Skilled Sales & Service 8.4 4.7 3.8 4.6

Trades, Transport & Equip Operators 7.0 12.8 13.2 12.3

Total (Technical Trades & High skilled) 36.1 29.1 27.7 26.8

Intermediate & Lesser Skills Occupations 29.7 46.0 52.2 47.0

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


What Enrollment Trends are we Seeing?

1,797

1,634

1,476

1,503

1,427

1,378

1,203

1,094

1,016

989

Student Headcount in Credit Programs by Campus

(As at Winter Stable Enrollment Date)

798

708

682

616

691

Fall & Winter Semesters

2009/10

2008/09

2007/08

2006/07

2005/06

301

220

336

412

375

165

162

130

104

140

COMOX VALLEY

CAMPBELL RIVER

PORT ALBERNI

PORT HARDY

CENTRES

The North Island College Full Time Student (FTE) utilization rate increased dramatically in 2009/2010 to an overall

85.1% utilization rate. This is a 12.3% increase over the previous year. This upward trend is also demonstrated by

student headcounts, where the number of students attending credit courses during the Fall and Winter semesters

of the 2009/10 academic year increased 13.0% from the previous year.

2,178

1,870

1,922

1,852

1,903

Student Headcount in Credit Programs by Division

(Fall Winter 2005/06 to Fall/Winter 2009/2010)

Fall & Winter Semesters

Academic

986

780

801

767

814

Developmental,

Aboriginal & IE

720

696

579

596

542

Health, Human

Services & ABT

432

345

320

353

382

Trades, Technical

& Tourism

2009/10

2008/09

2007/08

2006/07

2005/06

182

240

219

164

114

Apprenticeships

While growth was experienced across all program areas in 2009/10, growth was strongest in the academic and

developmental areas, and declined slightly in apprenticeships.

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN 15


What are the Current and Future Workforce Demands?

While three-quarters of projected total job openings in the future are expected to require some post-secondary

or university education, 36.6% of 18 year olds in the NIC region did not graduate from high school in 2007/08,

compared to the provincial average of 26.2%. Furthermore, 16.6% of 25-54 year olds in the NIC region have not

completed secondary school, compared to the BC average of 11.1%. The average family income for the NIC region

is $67,432, well below the BC average of $80,511 and 1.2% of 19-24 year olds that are employable in the NIC region

receive income assistance, compared to the BC average of 0.8%. The North Island College region has the fourth

highest unemployment rate in the province.

Labour force participation data indicates that 11.6% of those employed within the NIC region work in the primary

goods sector, compared to 4.4% for BC overall. Similarly, the participation rate for the manufactured goods sector

exceeds the provincial average (7.8% versus 7.6%).

20,610

4,430

3,200

4,720

3,480

21,670

11,240

6,080

6,960

1,990

14,170

4,890

3,420

5,030

3,660

11,760

6,350

7,240

2,070

14,270

2008 2013 (estimated)

Health

Processing, Manufacturing & Utilities

Primary Industry

Natural & Applied Sciences & Related

Sales & Service

Business, Finance & Administration

Social Sciences, Eduction, Govt. Service & Religion

Management

Arts, Culture, Recreation & Sports

Trades, Transport, Equipment Operators & related

Over the next four years, health occupations are projected to experience the largest average annual percentage

change, while occupations in sales, service, business and finance are expected to increase by over 1500 positions.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Key Trends and Pressures

Community Stakeholder meetings and the data gathered for the Environmental Scan revealed the following

key trends:

A significant demographic shift is occurring as the region’s population ages, the baby boom generation

retires, with fewer members of the younger generation available to fill employment vacancies.

Strong employment demand exists in the health care sector.

There exists a need for responsive programming and flexible access to education.

There exists a need for increased collaboration and partnerships between NIC and other secondary and

post-secondary institutions, to respond adequately to our region’s educational requirements. North Island

College should take a leadership role in this regard.

Our learners are a diverse population.

There exists a need to focus more extensively on reaching out to First Nations, which may mean offering

programming in aboriginal communities.

There exists increasing competition within the post-secondary system resulting from increasing market

penetration by private and other public post-secondary institutions.

Our communities expressed a strong desire for North Island College to engage the community, in the

broader sense, more effectively and extensively.

There exists a need to market NIC and the importance of education more effectively.

The expansion of technology into education, commerce and service delivery will continue.

There exists a need for North Island College to partner with existing organizations, business and

community to address all of the above .

There exists an eagerness for North Island College to act as a bridge between business, organizational and

community sectors, to take on the role of community builder.

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN 17


Strategic Directions

North Island College has identified six over-arching Strategic Directions that are fundamental to the College

achieving its vision:

developing responsive curriculum and services

supporting student success

increasing participation through active community partnership

expanding opportunities through regional and international partnership

promoting awareness of the value of education

enhancing employee engagement.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


202020

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Strategic Direction #1 – Responsive Curriculum

North Island College will develop dynamic and responsive curriculum and educational services to

attract, engage and retain a diverse range of students to be successful in a rapidly changing world.

Specifically we will:

Establish a Program Development and a President’s Strategic Activity Fund to support curriculum,

program and services development

Increase connections at the program level with community agencies, employers, articulation and

professional bodies to advise on program relevancy

Internationalize curriculum and increase international programs to expand the global awareness

of our students

Create Centres of Excellence aligned with North Island College strengths that promote regional interests

and economic activity

Establish a schedule of base and rotational program offerings for each campus that serves

regional community needs.

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Strategic Direction #2 – Student Success

North Island College will improve our ability to support the diverse needs of our students and their

engagement in learning.

Specifically we will:

Increase access to post-secondary education through flexible delivery of services and programs

Expand services specifically designed to promote the success of aboriginal students

Implement strategic enrolment and retention strategies

Work with our students and community partners to enhance campus life at each of our campuses

Work with community partners to improve transport to and between campuses

Assess the feasibility of on-campus and off-campus student housing options and proceed as appropriate.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN 23


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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Strategic Direction #3 – Active Community Partner

North Island College will work with our communities as an active partner to increase opportunities

for involvement and participation, and for proactively sharing resources for mutual benefit.

Specifically we will:

Increase our connection to community by expanding use of service learning, internship, employment

resource centres, and practicum training

Enhance financial sustainability through careful stewardship of our resources and expansion of

revenue generation activities that support our educational goals

Increase our fundraising capacity to support student bursaries, scholarships and capital projects

Seek to involve a broader base of community members in college activities

Work with our communities to promote awareness of the beauty of our natural setting and support

implementation of environmentally sustainable practices.

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Strategic Direction #4 – Strategic Partnerships

North Island College will strengthen and expand partnership opportunities with aboriginal, business

communities and educational organizations regionally and internationally to deliver outstanding results.

Specifically we will:

Partner with Aboriginal communities to address their local education and training needs through

programming that recognizes their history and culture

Increase degree and diploma opportunities through expansion of partnerships with Vancouver Island and

Emily Carr Universities and development of new partnerships with other universities or institutes

Increase partnership agreements with international universities and colleges to support student and

employee exchange and development of joint curriculum and research projects

Work with community partners to expand applied research that enhances development and growth of

our communities.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Strategic Direction #5 – Raising Awareness

Working with our communities North Island College will explore new and innovative ways to effectively

promote post secondary education throughout our region.

Specifically we will:

Collaborate with regional organizations to promote North Island College and the region as a quality

education and outdoor lifestyle destination

Engage North Island College students and alumni to connect with our community and to participate in

North Island College promotional activities

Work with community partners to develop a comprehensive educational campaign, inclusive of social

media technology, to raise awareness in the North Island region of the value of post secondary education

Work with community partners to promote pathways from secondary school to college, further education,

training and employment

Work with ElderCollege to inspire and support lifelong learning.

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Strategic Direction #6 – Employee Engagement

North Island College will strengthen and develop employee skills and enhance employee engagement.

Specifically we will:

Integrate the College’s values into all aspects of hiring, performance management and

professional development

Increase employee involvement in decision making through open sharing of information and use

of inclusive consultation processes

Expand training offerings for employees through an institutional model that links training to skill

development, career paths and college strategic directions

Use a comprehensive performance management approach to provide timely and useful feedback

to employees

Enhance recruitment and orientation of employees through improved communication and use

of technology.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Making it Happen

Successful implementation of the Strategic Plan will ultimately be determined by our ability to secure the necessary

financial and human resources and to sustain the focus, effort and energy required to bring the Plan to life. Many

steps have already been taken to bring together resources and to align our efforts with the vision and strategic

directions outlined in the Strategic Plan.

As soon as the College’s vision and strategic directions were determined, all divisions and departments were

asked to embark on the development of tactical plans spanning the 2011 to 2015 timeframe and more specific

operational plans for the first year implementation activities. A very high level of involvement and collaboration

occurred throughout and across the divisions and departments as the tactical and operational plans were

developed. These plans are now complete and posted on the College website at www.nic.bc.ca/strategicplan.

Both a President’s Strategic Activity Fund and a New Program Development Fund have been developed and the

criteria for application have been communicated throughout the college. These funds will provide support for

development of innovative, interdisciplinary or community linked initiatives and the development of new programs.

Throughout the four year timeframe of the Strategic Plan the development of the college’s annual budget will be

guided by the tactical and operational plans of the College divisions and departments. The operational plans will

be updated annually and the outcomes achieved will be reported to the College Board.

A Strategic Plan is a living, breathing document, subject to review and change as new developments occur in the

surrounding environment. While we must not lose sight of our major goals we must also remain flexible and ready

to respond to new opportunities as they arise. To this end, we will continue to involve employees, students, and

community partners in ongoing consultations on the strategic direction of North Island College, for it is only in

staying connected to the needs and wants of our communities that we can respond effectively.

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NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN


Acknowledgements

North Island College wishes to acknowledge all members of the college community and the external community for their

involvement in the strategic planning process and contribution to the development of the Strategic Plan.

In particular, North Island College wishes to acknowledge the following for their contributions during the development

of the 2011-2015 Strategic Plan:

Members of the Strategic Planning Advisory Committee:

Laurie Bird

Treena Nadon

Norma Pelletier

Kevin Walters

Duane Riddoch

Jeff Wharton

Richard Stride

David Kruyt

Jane Vadheim

Bill Lucas

Cheryl O’Connell

Karen McComber

Garry McLeod

Members of the Strategic Planning Steering Committee:

Jan Lindsay, President

Arlene Herman, Vice President, Education

Carol Baert, Vice President, Finance and Facilities

Lisa Domae, Vice President, Student and Educational Services and Planning

Mark Herringer, Executive Director, International Education

Jennifer Holden, Director, Human Resources and Organizational Development

Susan Auchterlonie, Director, College and Community Relations

Sue Bate, Executive Assistant to the President

Members of the Board of Governors

Judith Round, Chair

Bruce Calder, Vice Chair

Violet Mundy

Cathy Reyno

Eric Buelow

Michael Schnurr

Chris Castro

Don Sharpe

Patricia Corbett-Labatt

Betty Tate

Allyson Hamilton

Scott Kenny

David Kruyt

Jan Lindsay, President

How to contact us: www.nic.bc.ca | 1-800-715-0914 | 2300 Ryan Road, Courtenay, BC V9N 8N6

NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE 2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN

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1-800-715-0914 | nic.bc.ca

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