Appendix - North Kesteven District Council

n.kesteven.gov.uk

Appendix - North Kesteven District Council

North Kesteven District Council

Housing Strategy

2005 - 2008


Contact Details

Website Address

www.n-kesteven.gov.uk

General Email Address

info@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Councillor S D Ogden

cllr_stewart_ogden@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Section Managers

Philip Roberts

Head of Communities

01529 414155 Ext 2210

philip_roberts@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Michael Gadd

Property Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2511

michael_gadd@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Tracy Aldrich

Housing Needs Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2679

tracy_Aldrich@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Andrew Cotton

Housing Tenancy Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2627

andrew_cotton@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Ellen Clee

Assistant Tenancy Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2455

ellen_clee@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Fiona Jones

Support and Strategy Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2620

fiona_jones@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Debbie Locker

Housing Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2686

debbie_locker@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Sean Johnson

Housing Grants Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2242

sean_johnson@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Russell Shortland

Design and Maintenance Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2542

russell_shortland@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Ian Spreadborough

Principal Quantity Surveyor

01529 414155 Ext 2545

ian_spreadborough@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Kay Daynes

IT Admin Manager

01529 414155 Ext 2288

kay_daynes@n-kesteven.gov.uk

1 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Forward

FORWARD by

Councillor Ogden member

of the Executive Board

North Kesteven District Council has a clear view on its priorities across all service areas. This is certainly true of

our Housing Strategy which describes our housing policies across all tenures

of stock.

We have experienced a huge growth in population which has changed the nature of our housing markets and has

led to a sizeable demand for new affordable housing. We are rising to the challenge this presents and are looking

forward to a fruitful relationship with our partners to bring new affordable homes to the District.

We will continue with our long-term policy of investing in the Council’s properties to make sure that the decent

homes targets are achieved.

We are also working towards the improvement of homes occupied by vulnerable people in the private sector which

is a new policy but one which we are investing new resources.

I am happy to endorse this Housing Strategy

Councillor Ogden

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 2


Index

CONTACT DETAILS 1

FORWARD by Councillor S D Ogden 2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4

Introduction 4

The Strategic Framework 4

Needs Analysis 4

Resources 6

Setting Priorities 6

A – THE DISTRICT CONTEXT 8

B – THE STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK 9

Introduction 9

The Authority’s Objectives 9

Local Strategic Partnership 10

Stock Options Appraisal 11

Sustainable Communities 12

Best Value 13

Wider Context – other influential factors 14

Capital Funding 41

Enabling Role 43

H – DEVELOPMENT OF HOUSING STRATEGY 45

Review of Progress against Previous Priorities 45

Ongoing Survey Work 46

Review of the Strategy 46

Action Plan for the Review of the Strategy 47

APPENDICES

Appendix A – Priority Areas 48

Appendix B – Strategic Framework 63

Appendix C – List of Consultees 64

Appendix D – Options 72

Appendix E – Summary of HRA Expenditure 76

Appendix F – Best Value Performance Indicators 79

C – THE CHALLENGES FACING THE DISTRICT15

Background 15

Housing Challenges

- The demand for housing 16

Housing Challenges

- The Condition of the District’s 21

Housing Stock

D – STRATEGIC PRIORITIES 24

Development of this Strategy 24

Affordable Housing 27

Older People 28

Energy Use 28

Private Sector Improvement 29

Properties to meet People’s Special Needs 31

Homelessness 32

E – SUPPORTING MINORITY GROUPS 35

Youth Issues 35

Teenage Parents 35

Adults with Physical Disabilities 35

Adults with Learning Disabilities 35

Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) Residents 36

Domestic Violence 36

Supporting People 36

Gypsies/Travellers 37

F – PARTNERSHIP WORKING 38

G – RESOURCES 40

Revenue Funding 41

3 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Executive Summary

Introduction

The Council’s Housing Strategy provides a summary of the Council’s policies concerning all tenures of housing

stock within the North Kesteven District Council for the period 2005-8. The strategy includes reference to the

Council’s own housing stock and discusses some of the options relating to its management. The detailed policies

relating to the management of the Council’s stock are contained within the Housing Revenue Account (HRA)

Business Plan.

The Strategic Framework

This strategy has been developed from the priorities set out in a number of documents. These include:

• The Regional and Sub-Regional

Housing Strategies

• The Local Strategic Partnership

Community Strategy

• The Council’s Improvement Plan

(Best Value Performance Plan)

entitled “Performance Matters”.

The strategy also takes into account partnerships developed with other agencies including Local Councils and

Housing Associations (or registered Social Landlords (RSL’s)). The Strategy draws upon the national agenda of

housing issues including government policies on homelessness and the development of decent homes in the

private sector.

Needs Analysis

The Council’s Stock

Overall, the condition of the Council’s housing

stock is good and the Government’s decent

homes standard will be achieved by 2010. This

was ascertained through an appraisal of Council finances and expenditure requirements over the next 30 years.

The process concluded that the Council could afford to retain its stock.

Private Sector Stock

The Council has undertaken a Private Sector Stock Condition Survey which indicates that only 1.3% of premises

are currently unfit. However, a new housing health and safety rating system will be introduced and it is expected

that approximately

3% of premises will have serious hazards. It is also known that 31% of private sector dwellings fail the decent

homes standard.

The Council has adopted a private sector housing renewal strategy and during 2005/06 work will be undertaken on

amending this strategy to work towards meeting the government’s targets on ensuring that at least 70% of

vulnerable households live in a decent home by 2010.

The Council is also concerned about the effects of fuel poverty and is working on establishing an affordable

warmth policy. This will link to plans to trial the use of renewable heating systems in the Council’s own stock

which, if successful, can be promoted within the private sector.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 4


Executive Summary

The Demand for Homes

The Council has undertaken a housing needs survey which has indicated high levels of housing need within the district.

• For the period 2004 - 2009 – 462 affordable houses a year would be required

• Between 2010 – 2014 – 333 houses would be needed

As a response, the Council is pursuing three policy initiatives:

• Planning policies which will require that 35% of properties on all new development sites over a new threshold

(to be agreed) be affordable. Developers would be expected to work with RSL’s to enable this housing to be

developed.

• Pursuing rural exception sites in areas of housing need within the district. Survey work has commenced with a

pilot area of local councils in the north west of the district to establish the extent of local housing needs.

• Thedevelopment of areas of council land for affordable housing through RSL’s.

Homelessness

The patterns of homelessness over the last three years have shown a general increase in the numbers to whom

the Council owes a full duty to provide accommodation, which is linked to the increase in housing needs.

The Council has consistently maintained low levels of bed and breakfast usage and supports all homelessness

applicants in temporary accommodation through a floating support service. Homelessness prevention policies are

being developed and a mediation service has already been introduced to reduce the number of homelessness

cases caused by family break ups.

The Council is conscious that additional temporary accommodation is required and further work is being

undertaken on the potential for developing specialist temporary accommodation.

Special Needs Groups

Overall 11% of households within the district are likely to have one or more members from a special needs group.

(Frail, elderly, physical disability, learning disability, mental health problems, vulnerable young people, those with

sight or hearing loss). Additional work is being undertaken to identify and understand the needs of Black and

Ethnic Minority Groups (BME).

The District has high levels of older people, higher than the average for the East Midlands.

The Council has pursued a number of relevant schemes:

• Commissioned an older persons survey with other statutory agencies to anticipate the accommodation and

other support needs of older people in the future.

• Produced a young persons homelessness strategy with other District Council’s and Statutory Agencies in

Lincolnshire.

• Provided disabled facilities grants and disabled adaptations to those identified as having a need through Social

Services.

• Developed special temporary accommodation for people with physical disabilities in partnership with Social

Services and a private sector developer.

• Taken the lead role in co-ordinating an equalities project on behalf of District Councils in Lincolnshire.

• Looked at re-design options for supported bed-sit accommodation to make it more suitable to the needs of older

people.

5 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Executive Summary

Resources

Housing Revenue Account (HRA)

A stock options appraisal was undertaken in 2005 and identified that the HRA would continue to remain viable over

the next 30 years. Details are shown in the HRA Business Plan although the strategy has a basic outline of

current expenditure.

Capital Funding

Overall, levels of capital funding are sufficient to cover all expected expenditure in the medium to long term. Under

the stock options appraisal the Council is estimated to have a shortfall of £1.195million in capital resources from

2013/14 to 2026/27; thereafter this figure increases to £15.4m by 2034. However, this is based on undertaking all

possible work to the stock identified from a stock condition survey and given the time scales involved the Council

will be able to develop solutions. The government has developed new bidding guidance for delivering decent

homes for vulnerable households in the private sector and the Council is currently exploring options to attract

additional funding in this policy area.

Setting Priorities

The strategy contains six priority areas together with a number of actions which are summarised

as follows:

Priority Area 1 – Affordable Housing

Actions:

• Develop and apply a policy requiring affordable housing contributions on all developments over an agreed

threshold size.

• Undertake local needs surveys on smaller settlements to test the demand for exception sites.

• Complete a feasibility study and in partnership with RSL’s, develop sites on under used

Council land.

Priority Area 2 – Meeting the Needs of Older People

Actions:

• Complete crossing cutting multi-service review of older person’s needs.

• Develop partnerships for improvement of sheltered schemes containing bed-sit properties.

Priority Area 3 – Energy Use

Actions:

• Develop an affordable warmth policy in partnership with a range of statutory agencies.

• Develop a partnership for introducing alternative heating systems involving renewable energy sources and

develop marketing in the private sector.

Priority Area 4 – Private Sector Improvement

Actions:

• Develop a methodology for identification and location of vulnerable people living in non-decent homes in the

private sector.

• Review private sector renewal policies to meet non decent homes targets.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 6


Executive Summary

Priority Area 5 – Properties to Meet People’s Special Needs

Actions:

• Adoption of a design standard for modernisation schemes which would reduce the work required to adapt

fixtures and fittings.

• Develop a methodology to identify vulnerable residents and scale of adaptation required to their homes.

Priority Area 6 – Homelessness

Actions:

• Document and develop the homelessness prevention role.

• Investigate the feasibility of providing additional, purpose designed, temporary accommodation.

7 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


A The District Context

North Kesteven is a predominantly rural area in the centre of the County of Lincolnshire. It covers an area of

92,000 hectares or 356 square miles with a high area of agricultural land. The residents live in around 100 mainly

small communities. Major concentrations are in Sleaford, with a population of 14,500, North Hykeham with at least

11,600 residents and 13 larger villages providing a range of services with populations of over 3,000. The district is

one of the most sparsely populated in the country.

The population grew by 17.5% between 1991 and 2001 making the district the fastest growing in the East

Midlands and the fourth fastest in England and Wales. The population has continued to grow and is now just over

100,000. This rate of growth has come about as a result of high house building rates and consequent in migration

to the District. The fast rate of growth and the time lag in providing services such as health and education have

placed significant pressure on existing service provision. It seems likely that the population growth will continue

over the next 10 years, albeit at a slower rate than has been experienced in recent years, due to planning

restrictions on new house building.

In broad terms the age profile of the district is similar to the national average, with 17.7% (national average -

18.3%) of the population under 15 and 63.6% (65.8%) aged 16 to retirement age. 18.3% (16%) are of retirement

age and over. However, 45% of the population is aged 45+, compared to 40.1% nationally and the proportion of

people in the 15 – 29 age group is 14.9% (18.8%). 99% of the population is white, compared to the national

average of 91%.

Average house prices in 2004 ranged to £163,186 for detached houses to £89,127 for flats, with the overall

average £137,095. This compares with the average in 1999 of £60,000. Price levels in Lincolnshire are only

higher in South Kesteven and the average price is above the East Midlands average.

There are approximately 42,000 households which are divided between the following tenure groups:

Owner occupied 80%

Council 9%

Registered Social Landlord 1%

Private rented 10%

100%

The health of the population in North Kesteven is very good when compared with other districts in Lincolnshire.

Life expectancy for children born today for men is 77 years and women, 80.7 years.

North Kesteven is among the lowest crime areas in the country. The objective of the North Kesteven community

Safety Partnership is to reduce crime by 12.5% from 2003-2004 to 2007-2008 focussing on the most typical crimes

recorded.

The District is characterised by very low unemployment, being only around 1%. It is ranked overall 262 out of 354

districts in England in the Indices of Deprivation 2004, with 1 being the most deprived.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 8


B The Strategic Framework

Introduction

This section of the Strategy provides an overview of the main factors which have influenced the direction of

strategic housing functions. These factors are both external and internal and take into account national and

regional priorities.

The Authority’s Objectives

The Council’s overall vision is “To work in partnership with others towards ensuring that it is a District of 100

flourishing communities.”

This is supported by three Strategic Objectives:

• A good quality of life for all residents

• A thriving and prosperous economy

• A clean green and safe environment

The Council will meet these objectives by focussing: on six corporate priorities:

• Working with partners to deliver affordable, housing and endeavour to provide decent homes for vulnerable

people

• Provide high quality support to business and promote economic development and tourism

• Minimise waste to reduce the demand for landfill

• Promote and maintain clean streets and open spaces

• Implement planning policy that supports the Council’s vision and strategic objectives

• Tackle the causes and impact of anti social behaviour

The priorities have been developed through extensive consultation work with a range of service providers, the

Local Strategic Partnership and surveys of local residents.

The Vision, Objectives and Priorities are all contained within the Councils Best Value Performance Plan (BVPP)

entitled ‘Performance Matters’.

For each of the priorities a Priority Development Plan (PDP) has been established which sets out the overall

strategies to be pursued to ensure that the Council meets these objectives. The PDPs are then used to create

Service Development Plans (SDPs) which are set up for each service operated by the Council. SDPs detail levels

of performance against performance indicators, results of consultation and benchmarking as well as the detailed

actions to be carried out in support of PDPs. A SDP has been set up for Housing and Property Services which

covers all housing related strategies to be pursued in each year.

Details of the SDP can be found on the Council’s website www.n-kesteven.gov.uk.

Appendix B covers the Strategic Plan for North Kesteven from the most strategic level, the Local Strategic

Partnership Community Strategy, through PDPs and SDPs to action plans for individual members of staff,

determined at annual Employee Development Interviews (EDIs).

This Strategy is influenced by other strategic documents including:

• the Capital Strategy - which sets out the capital resources for investment in private sector housing.*

* copies can be found on the Council’s website

• the Asset Management Plan * - which provides the framework for the control of all capital improvement projects

9 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


B Strategic Framework

including the bidding process for funds for private sector and homelessness initiatives.

• The Housing Revenue Account (HRA) Business Plan - which identifies how the decent homes standard will be

delivered taking into account the results of the stock options appraisal.*

• The Community Safety Strategy – which has influenced the development of security measures for Council

properties, and domestic violence services*

• The Home Energy Conservation Strategy – which provides targets for a reduction in energy usage.*

The Council makes use of a number of cross service working groups which are also influential in developing

housing strategies. The following are noteworthy:

• The Asset Management Group – which looks at capital priorities and investment.

• The Affordable Housing Group – which provides the overall coordination for increasing the numbers of

affordable housing units.

• The Older Persons Strategy Group – which coordinates all Council’s services provided for older people.

The Council has also received a Continuous Performance Assessment (CPA) score of ‘Good’ following a rigorous

assessment of the Councils overall performance by the Audit Commission. The assessment was that the Council

was the top end of the good rating bordering on excellent and an Improvement Plan has been prepared to ensure

that the Council will achieve ‘Excellent’ status. The Improvement Plan informs all aspects of the Council’s work and

is incorporated into the ‘Performance Matters’ document.*

Local Strategic Partnership

The Council works effectively with the Local Strategic Partnership (LSP) which comprises all the strategic agencies

within the District. The LSP has published the Community Strategy 2002/3 – 2012/13 which sets out a vision for

the District based on the three strategic objectives of:

• Creating and enhancing 100 flourishing communities that are fair, thriving and inclusive, allowing equal full

access to opportunities and services;

• Properly protect the environment and enhance it for all those who live and work in it and for those who

visit it; and

• Build a strong, competitive and innovative economy with a balance of business, jobs and homes through which the

local economy can flourish.

The Community Strategy was developed through extensive consultation which was integrated with consultation on

the Council’s corporate priorities and the Housing Strategy. In this way the Housing Strategy has been developed

to respond to the challenges identified by the revised Community Strategy.

The Community Strategy is being revised in 2005 and a copy of the most up to date document can be found on

the Council’s website.

The LSP is also one of the key consultative bodies on strategic housing issues and has been consulted on this

document.

*copies can be found on the Council’s website

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 10


B The Strategic Framework

Stock Options Appraisal

During 2004/5 the Stock Options Appraisal process was completed. The HRA Business Plan covers the details of

the Council’s management of its housing stock following the stock options appraisal. A summary of the outcome is

included here.

The revised guidance on achieving the Decent Homes Standard (DHS) ensured that a full Options Appraisal was

pursued. Hacas Chapman Hendy were appointed to examine the financial and stock condition aspects to establish

whether the DHS was achievable by 2010.* Tenants representatives appointed Aldbourne Associates as the

“Tenants’ Friend” to help make sure that tenants had all of the relevant information and were involved in the appraisal.

A stock conditions survey was undertaken in 2004 as a means of assessing how far away the Council were from

achieving the DHS. There were effectively four principal options open to the Council:

• To continue to retain direct control of the stock;

• To adopt an Arms Length Management Organisation (ALMO) while the ownership of the stock remains

with the Council;

• To pursue large scale voluntary transfer (LSVT); and

• To pursue a Private Finance Initiative to address repair and maintenance issues.

The overall conclusion of this process can be summarised as follows:

• The Council could sustain the stock in the long term. In capital funding terms from 2013/14 to 2026/27 there

would be a shortfall of only £1.2 rising to £15.3m after 30 years.

• The HRA is projected to remain viable for 30 years.

• Tenants are strongly supportive of the Council retaining the stock (98% of those expressing an opinion wanted

to stay with the Council).

• A stock transfer would be an option but it would be strongly opposed by tenants and on the basis of the study,

would only generate a possible receipt of £3.6million, building less than 40 houses.

As a result of these findings the Council agreed to:

• To retain the stock.

• Prepare a report each year to review whether:

- any significant changes had taken place in the assumptions underpinning the calculations which would

suggest that the Council’s ability to retain the stock in the long term would be jeopardised.

- any other factors relevant to the condition of the stock or the aspirations of tenants had arisen which would

require expenditure not identified at the time of the stock options appraisal.

- there are issues related to the performance of the service or to changes in government policy that would suggest

that alternative ways of providing the service are appropriate.

*HACAS Chapman Hendy Report available on the Council’s website www.n-kesteven.gov.uk

Current Government guidance suggests that the Council should take steps to separate their landlord and strategic

housing functions. At present these two elements of the service are closely connected. Alternative structures to

identify how separation could be achieved have been considered but would increase the cost of the service overall,

since additional staff would be required.

11 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


B Strategic Framework

The Council has an established corporate working group to support the implementation of the Council's Housing

Strategy, with separate groups monitoring the achievement of the Priority Development Plan for affordable housing

and decent homes for vulnerable people. The working group includes tenants representatives and member

representatives. In order to support progress with the Priority Development Plan the Council has appointed a

dedicated officer to lead this work and support other aspects of housing strategy development.

Sustainable Communities

The Government is committed to thriving, vibrant, sustainable communities. The Sustainable Communities Plan will

reach every part of the country. Providing homes for key workers, regenerating towns and cities and providing

parks for families and children. The Plan is about people helping them to live where they want with pride in their

community.

The Regional Housing Board has prepared a Regional Housing Strategy 2004 -10 (available at GOEM website

www.goem.gov.uk) to deliver national housing priorities within the regional context. North Kesteven is within the

Eastern Sub Region of the East Midlands. The authorities comprising this region have joined together to develop a

Sub Regional Action Plan which links directly with the policies of the Regional Strategy.

Both Regional and Sub Regional Action Plan (available through Housing and Property Services) have influenced

this document and the table below provides a few examples showing the links between the various strategic

documents. More detail on the linkages between strategies is shown in the Action Plan to this document.

Regional Housing Strategy

Policy 1 - Increase the quantity and

improve the delivery of appropriate

high quality affordable housing

Policy 9 – Tackling the causes of

homelessness

Policy – 5

Renewing and revitalising the

private sector

Eastern Sub Regional

Action Plan

LA housing authorities ensure that

planning policies contain initiatives

that secure delivery

of affordable housing.

Implement County

homelessness strategy

Develop common approach to

address Housing Act requirements.

Housing Strategy

Housing Strategy Priority Area 1

– Affordable Housing

One of the key priorities of the

Strategy is to increase the numbers

of affordable housing. The Council

is developing planning policies

which are designed to do this in line

with the objectives determined

through the Sustainable

Communities Plan.

Housing Strategy Priority

Area 5 – Homelessness

The Housing Strategy focuses on

the need to prevent homelessness

through an expanded advice role.

Housing Strategy Priority Area 4 –

Private Sector Housing

The Housing Strategy adopts the

improvement of private sector

housing as one of the key priorities.

This is linked also to government

targets relating to reducing the

number of vulnerable people in non

decent homes.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 12


B The Strategic Framework

During 2005 the East Midlands Regional Assembly commissioned DTZ Pieda Consulting to undertake a Housing

Markets Assessment (HMA) of the East Midlands to inform the development of the East Midlands Regional Spatial

Strategy. The Spatial Strategy provides the framework for meeting the region’s development needs including the

provision of housing. The HMA will be used to identify the boundaries of housing markets across the sub region

which will then impact on the need for development of new housing across the sub region and the priority for

investment across the East Midlands Region.

The Council contributes to the regional housing agenda in a number of ways:

• Member representative at Regional

Housing Board.

• Officer representative at Lincolnshire Sub Regional Housing Group to assist in

developing the sub regional strategy.

• Officer representative at Lincolnshire Housing Forum (Countywide strategic housing forum overseeing the work

of the Sub Regional Housing Group).

• Lead authority in establishing countywide discussion group on developing a coordinated approach to the

response to the HMA initiative and draft Regional Spatial Strategy. (This led to a joint report being submitted to

the East Midlands Regional Assembly who oversee the Regional Spatial Strategy on behalf of all Lincolnshire

Districts).

• Responding as individual authority to consultation events such as HMAs, Regional Investment Strategy and

Regional Spatial Strategy.

• Developing partnerships with other authorities in pursuit of Lincolnshire solutions to challenges such as Choice

Based Lettings (CBL).

Best Value

The Council recognises the importance of continuing to assess its services through the mechanism of the Best

Value Review. The Council has identified a timetable of reviews to 2009. Two reviews focus on the Organisational

Capacity and Procurement will provide for the opportunity for the service to create links with other housing

providers in the county.

In 2004/5 the Council completed a Fundamental Performance Review of Housing and Property Services which

took into account the findings of the stock options appraisal process.

The Review put forward an Action Plan which has been included in the Housing and Property SDP. The key

elements arising from the Review were:

• Changes to the Housing Officer Services to move away from door to door rent collection towards focussing on

the support needs of tenants;

• Alterations to the Private Sector Renewal policies to reflect national issues such the need for an affordable

warmth policy, the decent homes agenda and the establishment of a County Home Improvement Agency; and

• A comprehensive exercise to ascertain the future needs of older people of the District to enable joint planning

between all relevant agencies and organisations supporting older people.

A copy of the review can be found on the Council’s website, www.n-kesteven.gov.uk

13 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


B Strategic Framework

Wider Context – other influential factors

Housing is one of the key areas of national policy development and there are a number of issues which impact

directly on the District’s housing strategies:

Supporting People – In 2003/4 the Government introduced a new way of funding support services through a

countywide Supporting People Commissioning Body. Funding for services such as the support coordinator service

for elderly people in grouped and sheltered properties is no longer met through rent income to the Council but is

funded separately. The Supporting People regime is part way through the process of ensuring that equitable

services are provided throughout the County. This might result in tendering of services which could increase value

for money. (Discussed in more detail under section E of the Strategy)

Homelessness – The national agenda on homelessness has changed considerably with a focus now being less

the on the provision of temporary accommodation and more on tackling the causes and reducing levels of

homelessness. The Council has worked in partnership with other local authorities to develop a County Homeless

Strategy which has provided a joint focus on initiatives and led to the development of joint schemes such as

providing new emergency accommodation. The Council is currently changing its homelessness role to provide

more prevention advice. (Section D of the strategy)

Energy Efficiency – One of the key action points for 2005/6 is the development of an affordable warmth policy for

the District. This would involve partnership working with other agencies to reduce the numbers living in fuel poverty

i.e. spending high proportions of their income on fuel costs. This Strategy adopts Energy Use as one of the main

priorities. Other outcomes will be achievement of decent homes targets for both the public and private sector as

well as meeting Home Energy Conservation Act targets. (Section D of the strategy)

Decent homes (Public) – One of the key points of the stock options process was an assessment of whether the

Council would achieve the Government’s decent homes standard by the target date of 2010. The standard itself

will change with the introduction of the new Health and Fitness Safety Rating. This cross references with the HRA

Business Plan where meeting the decent homes is discussed. (Section C of the HRA Business Plan)

Decent Homes (Private) – The Council is aware that 31% of private properties in the District currently fail the

decent homes standard and this is becoming one of the major features of government and regional housing policy.

One of the priority areas of this Strategy therefore relates to Private Sector Improvement. The sections set out here

are intended to achieve the Government’s decent homes targets (Discussed in Section D of the Strategy)

BME Communities – The authority is developing approaches to identify the extent of hard to reach communities

with the District and is pursuing themed responses across all services and other agencies to ensure that

appropriate provision is made available. The main outcome is intended to be the involvement by BME communities

in service planning. (Discussed in Section F of the Strategy)

Regional Planning – The Regional Spatial Strategy is setting the agenda for planning policies which are key to

the development of affordable housing. It is hoped that this will provide opportunities for the development of

affordable housing in the District. (Discussed in Section G

of the Strategy)

Low Demand – The District does not suffer from a low demand problem. In the past there have been some

Council properties which have been difficult to let in the more remote rural areas however this is generally no

longer the case and therefore is not one of the Council’s main priorities. There are some sheltered bedsits which

are unpopular and require investment which are referred to in Priority Area 2 – Older People.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 14


C The Challenges Facing the District

Background

The District is an extensive area with low population density, characterised by large villages with only two towns,

Sleaford and North Hykeham.

The population grew by 17.5% between 1991 and 2001, making the District the fastest growing in the east

Midlands and the fourth fastest growing in England. Unemployment is very low (1%) and economic activity is high

(80.9%), and there has been a steady growth in employment, with currently 42,963 persons in employment that

are resident in the District.(2001 census).

However the rapid rise in population has not been led by employment growth.

The 2001 Census shows high levels of in migration which have been triggered by differences between house

prices in the area and those in the south east of England. The areas good environment, low crime rates have

encouraged this trend.

The population of the District reflects this change with a weight towards older age groups (65+). The proportion of

the population aged 55+ is also higher than the average in the East Midlands region. Older population research

undertaken by the PCT show that the area has a very good health record.

A significant proportion of residents travel outside the area to work and while the local employment base is stable,

the range of employment opportunities is limited. As a consequence the area is challenged by low wages with some

evidence of young people moving out of the area. While the Council is concerned to encourage new employment

which will broaden the range of opportunity, it is likely that the area will remain a low wage area. There is also a

concern that while the level of basic qualification is comparable with that of other areas, the proportion of the

population with NVQ2 qualifications is lower than might be expected.

Analysis of census data, the Index of Multiple Deprivation and Health Equity audits does suggest that within this

overall picture some parts of the District are doing less well. (The eastern area of the District and some wards

within Sleaford and areas to the south of Sleaford.)

Recent increases in energy costs are likely to have a particular impact on the District because of its low wage economy,

and the reliance on private transport for work and shopping and the absence of a gas network in much of the District.

Regular surveys of residents suggest a high level of satisfaction with the quality of life within the District, and while

a range of areas where improvements would be welcomed have been identified, none of these are seen as

significant by a larger proportion of residents.

In overall terms the District faces six key challenges:

• Maintaining and improving access to services for the District's dispersed communities

• Being alert to the demands for services which the balance towards older age groups will require

• Developing employment opportunities to try to help offer a wider range of opportunity to young people and to

contributing towards a rise in overall income

• Promoting higher levels of qualifications

• Helping residents cope with accessing housing, maintaining their homes and making the best use of energy for

heating in the context of low wage incomes which represent the housing challenges.

15 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


C The Challenges Facing the District

The rest of this section deals with the housing challenges.

Housing Challenges – The demand for housing

Housing Needs Study

The District has seen a dramatic growth in new houses in the last ten years with over 7,000 houses built. At the

same time house prices have also increased dramatically; so much so that average house prices have moved

beyond the reach residents on an average local income. This situation has raised increasing local concern about

the barriers that local people face in being able to acquire their own home.

In order to better understand this problem the Council worked jointly with the City of Lincoln to commission Fordham

Associates to undertake a Housing Needs Assessment for the District (available on the Council’s website www.nkesteven.gov.uk.

The study was undertaken in 2004 and was signed off in early 2005. The methodology used in the

study follows the guidance produced by the Government on Local Housing Needs Assessments.

The core of the process was based on a survey which identifies the aspirations of residents and relates this to their

available income. The survey was undertaken with a mix of direct interviews (506) and postal surveys (1379).

This achieved a response rate of 27.6% a level sufficient to allow reliable analysis.

Analysis was also undertaken of the housing market to identify the current cost of housing. This suggested that

minimum prices for property ranged from £67,000 for 1 bedroom houses to £149,000 for 4 bedroom houses.

Open market rentals ranged from £362 for 2 bedroom houses to £532 for 4 bedroom houses.

Average prices are detailed below:

Land Registry average prices and sales (1st quarter 2004)

Dwelling type North Kesteven East Midlands

Average Price % of sales Average Price % of sales

Detached £163,186 55.5% £195,630 31.1%

Semi-detached £108,994 29.1% £113,277 34.6%

Terraced £97,441 13.0% £91,872 28.7%

Flat/ maisonette £89,127 2.5% £101,514 5.6%

All dwellings £137,095 100.0% £132,112 100.0%

The following financial information according to tenure is also available

Tenure

Financial information by tenure

Average weekly net

household income

Average savings

Average equity

Owner-occupied (nm) £334 £6,432 £144,976

Owner-occupied (wm) £517 £3,843 £96,694

Council £226 £930 -

RSL £228 £1,180 -

Private rented £321 £1,653 -

ALL HOUSEHOLDS £401 £4,255 £118,444

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 16


C The Challenges Facing the District

The study used the Government definition of Housing Needs as ‘a household which does not have a house or is

living in housing which is inadequate or unsuitable, and who are unlikely

to be able to meet their needs without some assistance’.

The test of whether or not a household can afford to find their own housing is based on the principle

that they would have to spend more than 25% of their net income on mortgage or rent payments. Only 9% of

those in housing need could afford shared ownership housing at around the cost of the minimum priced market

housing.

The Housing Needs Assessment concluded that:

• For the period 2004-2009, 462 affordable houses a year would be required; and

• That between 2010 and 2014, 333 houses would be needed.

The position for the first five years can be demonstrated from the following analysis.

BACKLOG OF EXISTING

NEED

NEW ARISING NEED

Existing

h’holds

76

Potential

h’holds

371

Homeless

h’holds

0

New

h’holds

110

Existing

h’holds

254

Inmigrants

312

447

h’holds

20% quota to progressively

reduce backlog

89

h’holds

676

h’holds

GROSS AFFORDABLE HOUSING

REQUIREMENT

765 UNITS

SUPPLY OF

AFFORDABLE UNITS

303 UNITS

NET AFFORDABLE HOUSING REQUIREMENT

462 UNITS (PER ANNUM) - SURPLUS

17 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


C The Challenges Facing the District

Taking into account annual build rates over the last three years 90% of new build would need to be affordable.

However, this assessment is misleading since a considerable proportion of land available for development already

has planning permission so the application of a higher affordable housing contribution is not possible on most

sites. The following analysis shows the position with local plan targets compared with other Councils in 2003.

Structure

Plan

Requirement

Structure

Plan Period

Completions in

Structure Plan

Period

Extant

Permissions

(Totals)

Existing Local

Plan Allocations/

Identified Sites

North Kesteven 800 2001-2021 1773 (2001-3)

West Lindsey 7000 2001-2021 728 (2001-3)

Lincoln 8100 2001-2021 452 (2001-3)

5939

(March 2003

2301

(March 2003

1516

(March 2003

275

(March 2003)

3737

(March 2003)

2483

(March 2003

The Housing Needs Assessment also undertook a balancing housing markets assessment to examine the likely

affects on sectors of the housing market. This supported that there would be a shortfall in affordable housing but

also demonstrated that there would be a shortfall per annum of 187 units annually for owner occupied properties.

% Population

Change

1982-2002

% Population

Change

1991-2001

Projected

% Population

Change 1996-

2021

Net inflow per

1000 persons 12

months to June

2003

Total population

000s

2003

North Kesteven 22.4 17.4 22.3 17.1 99

Boston 7.7 3.9 1.3 11.6 57.2

East Lindsey 25.7 10.6 6.4 16.8 134.3

Lincoln 11.9 0.9 6.7 1.3 86

West Lindsey 5.7 3.7 6.5 20 82.8

East Midlands 9.5 3.4 9.2 5 4252.3

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 18


C The Challenges Facing the District

Homelessness in North Kesteven

The pattern of homelessness over the last three years is as follows:

Homelessness Decisions 01.04.02 to 31.03.03 01.04.03 to 31.03.04 01.04.04 to 31.03.05

In priority need and

unintentionally homeless

80

(45%)

112

(50%)

102

(46%)

In priority need but

intentionally homeless

15

(9%)

17

(8%)

16

(7%)

Homeless, but not in priority

need

58

(33%)

72

(32%)

89

(39%)

Eligible, but not

homeless

23

(13%)

22

(10%)

18

(8%)

Ineligible households

0

(0%)

1

(0%)

1

(0%)

Total Decisions

01.04.02 to 31.03.05

176 224 226

The Council also undertook some research and identified local issues and homelessness trends.

These appear to mirror the national picture and include a higher proportion of homelessness due to: exclusion by

parents, family or friends; relationship breakdown that includes a high incidence of domestic violence and

termination of assured short hold tenancies.

The level of homelessness requiring provision of temporary accommodation has increased significantly over the

period since 2002. North Kesteven District Council has consistently maintained low levels of bed and breakfast

usage, which is only used in emergencies. The Council developed the allocation policy and points system to give

priority to the homeless or those in urgent need of re housing. It provides settled housing solutions, utilising the

Council’s own housing stock on a non secure tenancy basis with a floating support package, or by way of

nomination to our partner RSL’s. However, because of the increase in the use of the Council’s own stock for

temporary accommodation it has become more difficult to allocate to applicants on the Council’s housing register.

As such new solutions to dealing with homelessness are required.

19 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


C The Challenges Facing the District

Special Needs

As well as an assessment of the overall need for affordable housing, the recent housing needs assessment

enabled assessments of those with special housing needs:

• In overall terms around 11% of households were likely to have one or more members from a special need group

(frail elderly, physical disability, learning disability, mental health problems, vulnerable young people, those with

sight or hearing loss).

• Those with physical disability (2914 households) and the frail elderly (1197 households) were the most significant.

• There is a high proportion of households with a member with special needs in the eastern and north east areas

and south of Sleaford.

• Around 750 special needs households found their existing accommodation unsuitable.

• The most significant problems faced were:

- wheelchair access

- difficulty with taps

- need for shower units

- need for handrail inside and outside the house

• Whilst just under one third of the frail elderly and just over one quarter of those with physical disability live in the

Council’s stock; the majority of those with special needs live in owner occupied housing.

• The frail elderly are likely to live alone or with one other person.

• The survey shows that special needs households have an average net weekly income of £298 compared to

£414 for households without anyone with special needs.

• Around 710 households with special needs found difficulty in maintaining their homes (260 in the Council’s own

stock and 450 in the private sector.)

• Over 35% of all households contain an older person (ie over 65 for men and 60 for women)

• Around 25% of all households in the District comprise only older residents (60+)

• 10.9% of households are approaching pensionable age.

• Older person households are almost all single or two person households.

• 390 older persons households have difficulty maintaining their homes.

The District has a higher proportion of older people than the East Midlands average. Given the age range of the

District the proportion of older people is likely to increase significantly. With this in mind the Council has for some

time been focusing on supporting the needs of older people and is pursuing a number of initiatives.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 20


C The Challenges Facing the District

Housing Challenges – The Condition of the District’s Housing Stock

The Council’s own stock

There are 3,850 houses in the Council’s housing stock (April 2005), with 55 Right to Buy disposals in 2004/05.

Whilst most of the stock is concentrated in the larger communities (62% in communities with a population of 2,500

or above), the Council does have houses in 69 of the District’s 76 parishes.

Only 35% of stock dates from before 1945, with nearly 50% being built between 1954-1964 and only 15% being

built since 1974.

Over 29% of the Council’s stock is made up of system built houses.

A Condition Standard

The Government has established a decent homes standard which all social housing properties (including Council

housing) properties must achieve by 2010.

The Decent Homes Standard is defined as;

A. Meeting the current minimum standard for housing.

B. Being in a reasonable state of repair; A property is classed as being in a reasonable state of repair unless:

• One or more of the key building components (walls, windows and gas boilers) are old and, because of

their condition need replacing or major repair; or

• Two or more of the other building components are old and, because of their condition, need replacing or

major repair.

C. Having reasonably modern services and facilities; A property should not lack three or more of the following:

• A reasonably modern kitchen (20 years old or less)

• A kitchen with adequate space and layout.

• A reasonably modern bathroom (30 years old or less)

• An appropriately located bathroom and w.c.

• Adequate insulation against external noise (where it is a problem)

• Adequate size and layout of common areas for blocks of flats.

(A home lacking two or less of the above is still classed as decent.)

D. Providing a reasonable degree of warmth:

• Properties with electric or solid fuel heating systems should have cavity wall insulation and loft insulation

of 200mm.

• Properties with gas central heating should have loft insulation of 50mm or cavity wall insulation.

Following discussions with tenant representatives as part of the Stock Options Appraisal, in order to meet

the tenants aspirations, the Council has adopted the following standards in addition to the Governments

Decent Homes Standard.

• The Whole House Approach; where possible if work is identified as being required over a two to three

year period it will all be carried out at the same time.

• Tenants Choice; most improvements are subject to ‘Tenants Choice’ with respect to layout, heatingchoice,

style and colour of fittings etc.

• All windows will be double glazed by 2009 (except if planning restrictions apply)

21 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


C The Challenges Facing the District

• Kitchens and bathrooms include additional elements e.g. new electric points, non-slip flooring, bespoke

design and decoration.

• Properties with gas central heating will have at least 200mm loft insulation and cavity wall insulation

(if technically possible). All Cornish type properties will be externally insulated by 2010.

The Council maintains a stock condition database which will be transferred to specially designed software.

A rolling survey has been designed to keep stock condition information up-to-date so that each property is

regularly assessed at least every four years.

Achieving the Decent Home Standard for the Council’s Stock

Since the year 2000 there have been 1434 properties brought up to the decent homes standard. This is a

combination of properties originally identified as non decent as well as the ‘newly arising needs’ (i.e properties that

fall into non-decent as each year passes.)

At April 2005 there were 714 properties currently non decent.

Proportion which are below the current statutory minimum standard for housing 8

Number not in a reasonable state of repair 35

Number without modern amenities 351

Proportion that do not provide a reasonable degree of thermal comfort 320

There are estimated to be 720 properties that will become non decent by 2010.

At the time of the stock options appraisal (2004/5) it was estimated that in order to bring all the stock up to the

decent homes standard, an investment of £6.5m million would be needed. This included an assessment of newly

arising non decent homes up to 2010 and is affordable within estimated capital funding available for the Council’s

housing stock of £22.4m up to 2009/10. As such this is not considered to be a priority for the Housing Strategy

although it will remain a priority for the HRA Business Plan (available on the Council’s web site

www.n-kesteven.gov.uk.)

Private Sector Housing Stock

The Council has undertaken a survey of the private sector housing stock in 2003. This has shown the stock is

generally in good condition. Only 480 out of 37,100 (1.3%) of premises were unfit in accordance with the current

Housing Fitness Standard. Once the Housing Health and Safety Rating System is introduced it is estimated that

there will be 1,240 (3%) of premises with serious hazards, the main ones being excessive cold and falls on the

level. In addition it is estimated that there are 3,190 (9%) households in fuel poverty and 11,550 (31%) private

sector dwellings that fail the decent homes standard.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 22


C The Challenges Facing the District

It is estimated that 32.3% of vulnerable households (2038) occupy non-decent dwellings. This figure is only an

estimate and the Council is developing a methodology to contact vulnerable people in decent homes and then direct

appropriate resources to meet this need. Recent additional analysis of the private sector stock survey has identified

the location of vulnerable people at ward level which will help develop the targeting approach.

The Council is conscious that the Government has established a target of 70% of vulnerable people living in a

decent home by 2010 and 75% by 2020 and as such this is an area that has become a corporate priority.

Energy Efficiency

The Government, through the Home Energy Conservation Act, has introduced a target of a 30% improvement in

energy efficiency between 1st April 1996 and 31st March 2011. By March 2005 a 20% improvement had been

achieved for the District. This progress has been achieved through:

Improved publicity including holding regular roadshows;

By directing private sector renewal grants to heating and insulation initiatives; and

Through the Council’s investment programme to improve its own stock.

Partnership working with the Lincolnshire Energy Efficiency Advice Centre.

By maximizing the take-up of grants and discounts for heating and insulation initiatives.

The energy profile of the Council’s own stock has improved as energy efficiency measures have been completed.

In the last two years (2004/05 and 2005/06) a 100% grant has been obtained from utility companies for the

installation of cavity wall and loft insulation.

The current home energy rating (Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) of the stock is 49 against a district

average of 61. It is a priority to benchmark the rating as part of the implementation of the Codeman Stock

Condition software.

The Council is concerned about the increasing fuel costs and the effects that these can have on those on low

incomes and those, who because of the rural nature of the District, cannot be connected to mains gas supplies.

These concerns also apply to both the private and social sector.

23 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


D Strategic Priorities

An analysis of this information has identified a series of strategic housing priorities which have formed the basis of

consultation on this strategy. These priorities are:

Priority Area

Affordable Housing

Meeting the needs of

older people

The Evidence

Housing needs study has demonstrated a significant need for additional affordable

housing

The proportion of elderly people in the District is high compared with other parts of the

Eastern region. Evidence shows that as age increases so does dependency on

services and the District needs to make appropriate provision for this sector of the

population.

Energy use

Rising fuel costs are detrimentally affecting many residents particularly those in rural

areas. The private sector stock condition survey shows that most failures against the

decent homes standard relate to thermal comfort.

Private Sector

Improvement

Properties to meet

peoples special needs

Decent homes targets recently established which will require a clear focus of service

delivery to achieve.

11% of households are likely to have one or more members from a special need

group (frail elderly, physical disability, learning disability, mental health problems,

vulnerable young people, those with sight or hearing loss). Those with physical

disability (2914 households) are the most significant.

Homelessness

The number of homelessness acceptances has increased by 25% in the two years up

to April 2005. The government has established performance indicators relating to the

promotion of advice to help prevent homelessness occurring.

Development of this strategy

The Strategy has been prepared through a working group approach to ensure that all relevant aspects of service

provision are included. In addition the Council has set up a number of separate task and finish working groups

(which include members and tenants’ representatives) which have examined issues ,such as private sector

renewal policies, in more detail. The results of these have been incorporated into this document.

The priority areas referred to above were developed into a consultation document which included evidence,

research information and proposed action points. An extensive consultation exercise was then undertaken

which included.

• Special meeting of the Tenant Liaison Panel (tenants’ consultative meeting)

• Special meeting with local Parish Council’s

• Meeting of the LSP

• Written draft to Viewpoint Citizens Panel members (a large consultation group numbering over 500)

• Written draft to Tenants Panel members (a consultation group of tenants numbering over 60)

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 24


D Strategic Priorities

• Meeting of the Viewpoint Citizens Panel (a consultation panel of some of the Panel members)

• An on-line survey for any local resident to complete (together with publicity)

• A written survey included with At Home, the tenants newsletter.

• Written draft to other stakeholders (list attached as Appendix C) with request for comments, including:

• Registered Social Landlords

• Local statutory Agencies

• Local relevant charitable organisations/ interest groups such as the CAB

• Private sector organisations such as Estate Agents

• Private sector landlords

• Other local housing authorities

The consultation provided overwhelming support for the strategic priorities. An analysis of the written Viewpoint

Citizens Panel members demonstrated over 90% support from those responding. The on line survey only produced

a limited number of respondents who overwhelmingly supported the proposed priorities.

A total of 58 responses were received from tenants. Again the priorities were supported by at least 90% of those

making returns. The lowest level of response was at 90% and related to private sector improvement.

27 responses were received from other stakeholders and again the suggested priorities were endorsed by over

95% of those responding.

The main priority that attracted the most feedback related to affordable housing. There was general agreement that

numbers of new affordable housing should be increased but concerns about how this would be achieved, its

location and cost.

In addition to seeking views on the priorities consultees were asked for other comments they would like the

Council to take into account. The table overleaf provides a summary of the key responses across all the

consultation exercises.

25 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


D Strategic Priorities

Consultation responses

Reference in Housing Strategy

Affordable housing

Affordable housing to be supplied in perpetuity, not just

the short term.

Comment supported and added into Section D – An

Interim Policy Statement

Affordable housing must be linked to local wage levels.

Comment supported and added into Section D – An

Interim Policy Statement

Affordable housing must be linked to sustainable

communities and areas that can support growth.

Comment supported and added into Section D – An

Interim Policy Statement

Growth in housing must take into account infrastructure

needs.

Comment supported and added into Section D – An

Interim Policy Statement

Older people

Work with the private sector to encourage more

housing for older people which meets their needs.

Comment supported and added into Action Plan –

Priority Area 2 – New action included in 2007/8

Energy use

Develop partnerships with local farmers to help

encourage use of crops for fuel (bio mass.)

Comment supported and added into Action Plan –

Priority Area 3 – New action included in 2007/8

Private sector improvement

Services should be directed at vulnerable people, but

some concern as how vulnerability is defined.

Comment supported and definition now provided in

Section D – Private Sector Stock – General conditions

Priorities to meet peoples special needs

Concerns as to how standards of accommodation can

be improved.

Comment supported and added into Action Plan –

Priority Area 3 – Action included in 2006/7

Homelessness

Young homeless people are vulnerable and should be

a priority

Comment supported and added into Section E – Youth

issues

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 26


D Strategic Priorities

On the basis of the consultation the Council decided to pursue the six suggested priorities. These are now

discussed in more detail below in relation to how the services are delivered.

In Appendix A the priorities are listed together with the Action Plan for service improvement.

All the priorities are considered important in terms of meeting housing needs in the District and as such they have

not been ranked. All with the exception of the Homelessness Priority relate to the Council’s corporate priority to

deliver affordable housing and provide decent homes for vulnerable people.

Appendix D provides a description of the main options that relate to each of the priorities and other options that

were considered in developing the Strategy. The actions were considered through the development of individual

policies and also as part of this strategy. Decisions on the options chosen for inclusion in this Strategy were made

by members of the Council. The risks identified represent the risks to the success of the priority areas of not

pursuing the favoured option.

Affordable Housing

An interim policy statement

In order to increase the number of affordable housing a supplementary planning document will be produced to

explore in more detail the policies that can be applied to promote the supply of affordable housing (this is proposed

in the Local Development Scheme). In the meantime the Council have adopted a policy statement, the basis of

which is as follows:

• 35% of properties on all new development sites over five properties in size to be affordable. Developers would

be expected to work with local Registered Social Landlords to enable the housing to be developed.

• If developers believe this will undermine the economic viability of a site they must submit a valuation which

demonstrates this. Variations to the policy will only be made when a strongly evidenced case can be made.

• Whilst the Council would be happy to see the provision of shared ownership schemes close attention will be given

to its pricing taking into patterns of housing need and ensuring that the home remains affordable in perpetuity.

The interim policy will be based on the principle of ensuring affordable housing in perpetuity. It is likely that a large

part of the affordable housing to be developed will be provided through shared ownership but in deciding on the

appropriate mix of affordable properties on the site regard will be given to the finding of the housing needs study

on affordability.

The Council is also mindful of the need to link new development to the sustainability of communities. The policy

therefore will therefore allow infrastructure/community facilities to be taken into account where a proven need

exists. This could impact on the number of properties and the size of the affordable housing contribution that

developers will be required to provide.

Rural Exceptions Sites

The Housing Needs survey demonstrated that the demand for affordable housing is widespread across the District

and arises within rural communities as well as urban areas. This has given rise to an initiative to work with local

councils to develop local needs surveys which justify the use of rural exception sites. Rural exceptions sites allow

the development of new affordable housing in communities when such development would normally be contrary to

planning policies. The affordable housing would be allocated to people from the community where development

has taken place.

Pilot surveys involving Council’s in the north west of the District will commence in 2005.

27 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


D Strategic Priorities

Other opportunities

Initial survey work suggests that there could be limited opportunities on the Council’s own sites for some new

development on little used amenity spaces. A full survey of possible sites has therefore been undertaken and

options to develop the sites are being reviewed. These include:

the possibility of direct development by the Council;

development by RSLs with the land as a capital contribution to the scheme; and

possible partnerships with private sector developers to provide shared ownership or discounted rent houses.

Although at an early stage this strategy could yield an additional 300 units of affordable housing in the District up

until 2009.

(Contact Head of Housing and Property Services).

Older people

The Council already makes use of a disabled adaptations scheme which provides adaptations for those living in

Council properties. Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) are also provided for private sector stock.

The issues regarding the condition of elderly persons accommodation is of particular concern and the Council is

currently working on the development of affordable warmth policies as well as the introduction of a Home

Improvement Agency which are discussed below under Energy Use and Private Sector Improvement.

The Council is pursuing a comprehensive survey of the needs of older people in partnership with a number of

service providers including health and social services. This will enable joint planning between all the service

providers to better meet the needs of older people in the future. This will link with feasibility studies being

undertaken to improve those Council owned sheltered schemes which still provide bedsit accommodation. Funding

for this initiative is also being pursued through partnership with other agencies.

The Council also remains concerned over the ability of older and vulnerable people to manage decorating and

gardening services and will be piloting an initiative within its own stock which again, could potentially be rolled out

into the private sector. At the same time the authority would like to explore the feasibility of rolling out a quality

assured repairs service for vulnerable and older residents in the private sector. This could form part of Home

Improvement Agency Work described under Private Sector below.

(Contact Housing, Support and Strategy Manager)

Energy Use

Renewable energy solutions

The Council is mindful of its strategic role and will progress a series of pilot installations of renewable energy

sources in some of its own properties which are not located on mains gas supplies. A discussion report has

already been prepared which provides an analysis of the opportunities available and some of the initial pilot

properties have been selected. The results of this will be used to develop a wider strategy to inform other sectors

of the Housing Market including Registered Social Landlords and the private sector.

Fuel poverty and energy efficiency

The Council is working with the Local Strategic Partnership Health Action Group to develop an affordable warmth

(or fuel poverty) strategy. It is important that the Council ensures eligible

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 28


D Strategic Priorities

residents take up the Government’s new Warm Front II grants. It is intended that direct referrals to the managing

agents, EAGA Partnership Ltd will be made in due course. The Council will also consider direct grant assistance

for work where alternative grants to remove people from fuel poverty are not available.

For energy efficiency more generally, partnership working with the Lincolnshire Energy Efficiency Advice Centre

continues to form the focus of the Council’s activity. Consideration of a dedicated Energy Officer will continue,

potentially on a shared basis with a neighbouring authority. The Council is also supporting a private sector

insulation discount scheme, the HEAT Lincolnshire project run by Enact Energy Management with Energy

Efficiency Commitment Scheme funding from London Energy.

The Government, through the Home Energy Conservation Act, has introduced a target of a 30% improvement in

energy efficiency between 1st April 1996 and 31st March 2011. By March 2005 a 20% improvement had been

achieved for the District. This progress has been achieved through:

• Improved publicity including holding regular roadshows;

• By directing private sector renewal grants to heating and insulation initiatives; and

• Through the Council’s investment programme to improve its own stock.

• Partnership working with the Lincolnshire Energy Efficiency Advice Centre.

• By maximizing the take-up of grants and discounts for heating and insulation initiatives.

(Contact Property Services Manager)

Private Sector Improvement

Private sector housing renewal strategy

Following the introduction of the Regulatory Reform (Housing Assistance) Order 2002 the Council adopted a new

strategy in 2003. The six priorities of this strategy remain unchanged:

Provision of mandatory disabled facilities grants;

Dealing with unfit and non decent dwellings;

Helping those on low income improve their homes;

Reducing fuel poverty;

Dealing with empty homes; and

Proactively working with private sector landlords.

The strategy was reviewed in early 2005 and a number of minor amendments made to it. It was felt that because

issues around excess cold and fuel poverty overlap many of the ‘standards’ by which dwellings are to be

assessed, tackling these should form the main focus of the strategy in the future.

This strategy will again be reviewed taking into account the need to achieve decent homes targets in respect of

vulnerable people. The Government has made guaranteed allocations of £53,000 in 2006/7 and £26,000 in 2007/8

to assist in meeting the decent homes target. The Government has also published guidance on bidding for

additional/discretional funding and the Council will be working with other local authorities on developing initiatives

to respond to this agenda which will lead to bid submissions. The initiatives being developed will need to be

reflected in the amended renewal strategy.

It is expected that as the condition of the majority of private sector is good that this investment will still need to

focus on measures relating to thermal comfort which is the biggest area of failure under the standard. The

consultation exercise for this Strategy highlighted concern over the definition of vulnerability. Under the decent

homes initiative this has been defined as anyone in receipt of a means tested and disability benefits and the

Council will need to pursue publicity initiatives as part of its response which will refer to this definition in order to

target assistance.

29 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


D Strategic Priorities

Helping those on low income improve their homes

The Council offers housing renewal grants of up to £5,000 to people who are aged 60 or over, disabled or

households with children under 16 who are also receiving a means tested benefit (e.g. Income Support, Guarantee

Pension Credit, Council Tax Benefit) subject to other qualifying criteria. The appropriateness of this eligibility will

continue to be reviewed.

If more substantial works are needed the Council will consider whether to provide direct financial assistance in the

form of ‘interest free’ inflation linked loans for each case on its merits. It is likely this would be where renovation of

the premises in question appears to be the most appropriate way of meeting the household’s housing need and no

third party funding (e.g. equity release) can be identified.

It is anticipated that in due course grants will be awarded to remove, or reduce to an acceptable level, serious

hazards under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System which will be one of the key issues to be developed

under the Decent Homes initiative.

Funding is currently £100,000 subject to bidding for additional funds as covered above.

Home Improvement Agency

The Council has for some time been working with the Supporting People Commissioning Body on the development

of a Lincolnshire Home Improvement Agency service. If this should progress, the Council would then work in

partnership with this body to develop joint disabled facilities grants delivery mechanisms, handyperson services,

approved builders lists and access to third party funding for adaptation and repair work (e.g. the Houseproud

scheme). Failing this, the Council would look to develop these issues in-house.

Empty homes

The Council will continue to monitor the need for intervention with empty homes. Strategies for dealing with longterm

empty homes as appropriate will be developed.

The house condition survey estimated there to be 750 empty dwellings (2.1% compared to 3.2% for all England)

with 300 having been empty for more than 6 months. During 2005/6 the Council will research the reasons that

properties are empty (including a survey of the owners) and use this information to develop a detailed empty

homes strategy.

Through this strategy the Council will concentrate on those that have been empty the longest, those causing

concern to the public and those where it is felt their re-use would contribute to one of the Council’s strategic

priorities. Primarily the Council’s involvement will be to encourage owners to bring the properties back into use by

their own means. Giving advice and assistance to landlords will be the main focus of this. Nomination of tenants

from the Council’s housing register will be offered.

Many of the individual mechanisms for achieving the strategic priorities contained in this Strategy contribute

towards the success of delivering an empty property strategy. Promoting partnerships with Registered Social

Landlords and Town and Parish Councils; establishing a landlords’ forum; and investigating the feasibility of a

private sector accreditation scheme are amongst them. Other options available that might be considered involve

working in partnership with Registered Social Landlords on purchase and repair or temporary social housing

schemes. The use of new powers to make empty dwelling management orders will be considered. It is felt

unlikely that extreme measures such as enforced sale procedures or compulsory purchase orders will be

necessary, but these options cannot be ruled out.

The Council’s own stock has seen a dramatic decrease in the average time that properties are vacant between

lettings following a full review of the process. Performance has improved from over 45 days in 2003/4 to 22 days

during 2005/6.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 30


D Strategic Priorities

Enforcement action

Formal enforcement action is seen as a last resort. However, where the Council does identify a rented single

occupancy dwelling, or a house in multiple occupation that fails to meet appropriate ‘standards’ it will enforce the

relevant provisions of the 1985 and 1996 Housing Acts and in due course the Housing Act 2004.

(Contact Housing Grants Manager)

Properties to meet peoples special needs

Disabled adaptations to properties

The delivery of mandatory disabled facilities grants (DFGs) remains important in terms of ensuring that local

people have access to suitable accommodation. Grants are awarded to occupiers of private properties, subject to

means tested to enable adaptations to be undertaken. Some funding is received from the Government towards to

the costs of these grants. Due to increased demand during 2004/5, the budget is under review in 2005/6.

The Council also adapts its own properties without using the DFG process and has created a separate budget for

this process.

The following tables show the numbers of DFGs and disabled adaptations completed in recent years.

DFGs

No. completed

Expenditure

(£ thousand)

Grant

(£ thousand)

2002/3 42 132 79

2003/4 51 225 135

2004/5 40 228 137

Disabled adaptations No. completed Expenditure (£ thousand)

2002/3 111 188

2003/4 101 148

2004/5 129 348

It is hoped that in partnership with Lincolnshire Social Services, the Primary Care Trusts and the Strategic Health

Authority a new policy for delivering adaptations (including disabled facilities grants as part of this) can be

developed in tandem with the Home Improvement Agency. In addition the Council is looking at whether to

harmonise the disabled adaptations procedure for Council tenants with that of disabled facilities grants.

The Council will look to adopt policies for modernisation schemes for its properties which involve the redesign of

fixtures and fittings to make them easier to adapt as the needs of residents change. This could then be promoted

through new private sector developments and with RSLs and could feature within the planning policies. If

successful the policy could reduce the current pressure on DFG and disabled adaptation expenditure.

In addition, although the Council already looks to adapt properties to meet individual need, it will explore whether

better use can be made of already adapted dwellings for the needs of individuals arising in the future. This will

involve changes to the allocations process to enable a better fit between the needs of the applicants and

adaptations available in the properties.

(Contact Housing Grants Manager)

31 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


D Strategic Priorities

Homelessness

Background

The Homelessness Act 2002 required all local authorities to develop a strategic approach to tackle homelessness

issues within their area and develop a shift in emphasis from crisis intervention towards a preventative approach.

Additionally, each authority was required to carry out a review of their current homeless service, to undertake

consultation with other public and voluntary bodies and to produce a local strategy with action plan, based upon

the findings.

To achieve this effectively, it became apparent that, due to the various geographical boundaries for partner

agencies, there was a need to develop a County Homelessness Strategy. By taking a Lincolnshire approach

consistent service delivery could be delivered across the county through cross boundary working and effective

links between countywide agencies and District authorities.

The Council also recognised that it needed to develop a countywide approach to develop solutions for people with

more complex needs, requiring accommodation and support. These diverse groups include: people with mental

health problems or substance abuse, Care leavers, ex offenders, ex service personnel, gypsies and travellers or

those who have chaotic lifestyles. Each district produced an individual local homelessness strategy with associate

action plan that were included in the Lincolnshire Homelessness Strategy, published in June 2003.

A full review of the Lincolnshire Strategy will be undertaken in early 2006, for publication April 2006. This review will

form the basis for consultation for the new homelessness strategy, which is anticipated, will be launched July 2007.

In response, an action plan has been developed to deliver appropriate solutions to local problems, to tackle

disadvantage and create sustainable communities. The Council aims to offer choice from a range of housing

options to prevent homelessness occurring in the first instance and have developed procedures and built in

checks, throughout the whole housing needs process, to ensure delivery of early intervention and appropriate,

effective solutions.

To date, efforts have delivered a steady but significant reduction in the number of homelessness decision during

2004/05. However, the Council will continue to develop its preventative strategy by:

• Identifying and responding to the wider causes or symptoms of homelessness;

• Ongoing development of our range of available options to achieve long-term solutions;

• Increasing access to alternative housing options;

• Continuing to provide appropriate housing related support to promote independent living, community

sustainment, and to prevent repeat homelessness, using floating support and the tenancy management

initiatives.

Homelessness prevention strategies used by the authority include:

Early intervention measures

• Promotion of the service to ensure access to hard to reach groups and to encourage all to seek help early on.

• Working with young people, using written information, drama within schools and a coordinated corporate

response to the needs of young people and subsequent service delivery.

• Offering a mediation service, particularly to young people and parents to help repair family and relationship

breakdown.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 32


D Strategic Priorities

• Employing a dedicated money advice worker and advisory service.

• Delivery of robust housing management procedures and early intervention measures to tackle rent arrears or

anti-social behaviour.

• Delivering additional security measures and support via our Sanctuary scheme to help victims of domestic

violence to feel safe to remain within their own home.

• Working with partner agencies to ensure victims of violence or domestic abuse are supported and have access

to appropriate advice and legal assistance.

Tenure sustainment

• A housing support service accessible by all persons accommodated by this authority, as homeless. The service

aims are to provide a holistic approach to their support need to aid integration into a new community, to help

counter social isolation and assist individuals to work

through their issues or access other essential services.

• Developing skills with officers to allow negotiation with lenders or housing providers to enable people to remain

in their current home.

Access to other housing sectors

• Developed a Transfer Incentive Scheme to help free up under occupied accommodation, through financial

assistance to tenants.

• Forging links with private sector landlords and managing agents to: increase access to the private sector

housing market for the more vulnerable or marginalized groups.

• Developing private sector leasing arrangements to increase the supply of accommodation for homeless.

• Developing a Landlords Forum and Voluntary Accreditation scheme to improve links between the authority and

landlords to offer appropriate advice and to help resolve disputes.

• Developing a lower demand strategy. The Council is considering options for remodelling or change of use for

some properties or schemes for use by the homeless.

Partnership working

• Developed county protocol with district authorities, probation and prison service to ensure the housing and

support needs for prisoners are assessed prior to their release.

• M.A.P.P.P. – (multi-agency forum) for a coordinated approach for dealing with monitoring of offending and to

address support & housing needs.

• Working with Social Services – developed a county protocol for determining the housing and support needs for

young people by way of a joint assessment and for the referral of intentionally homeless families.

• Benchmarking of housing advice and homelessness services with other district authorities within the county.

33 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


D Strategic Priorities

Although prevention of homelessness is one of the key issues for the authority there is a clear need to provide

additional temporary accommodation. This is partially addressed through the private sector leasing arrangement

which will provide up 10 units each year for use by the authority in partnership with a local lettings agency.

At the same time the Council will be pursuing the feasibility of developing purpose designed temporary

accommodation possibly using existing Council premises for conversion.

Allocation of properties

The Council currently uses a traditional points based approach to determining priorities of applicants to the

Housing Register. This is being reviewed in 2005/6 to ensure that the existing policies are directed towards

meeting housing need in the District.

There are currently 2,350 applications on the Housing Register.

The Government has introduced a target for authorities to have introduced choice based lettings (CBL) as an

alternative means of allocating properties by 2010. CBL involves advertising vacancies amongst people in housing

need and seeking expressions of interest which can then be prioritised. Bidding rounds have been established to

assist local authorities with infrastructure costs to meet the target and the Council will be working with a number of

local Districts towards submitting a joint bid in 2006/7.

(Contact Housing Services Manager)

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 34


E Supporting Minority Groups

This section of the Strategy provides a description of how the Council in partnership with other organisations is

supporting various minority groups which have been identified.

Youth Issues

There are increasing concerns over the increasing difficulty young people experience accessing suitable housing

within the district. This is largely due a lack of affordable housing or a requirement for a guarantor for the under

18s. The lack of move on accommodation resulting in bed blocking has also been identified by accommodation

and support providers such as Foyer, L.E.A.P, Nacro, as another key concern.

A youth strategy group has been established to develop a 5 year strategy (2005 – 2008) along with a robust action

plan, to improve the integration of services to young people, to prevent homelessness occurring and wherever

possible, to ensure there is provision of a range of good quality supported accommodation, for use in emergencies

such as Nightstop or Supported Lodgings and for move on purposes.

Teenage parents

In response to the National Teenage Pregnancy Strategy, the Lincolnshire Teenage Pregnancy unit launched the

County Strategy and action plan during 2004, to deliver local and national priorities (available through the Housing

Services Manager). This includes:

Developing the Housing Advisory group with a representative from each district authority.

Identifying existing accommodation & support providers and good practise.

Working with district authorities to identify teenage parents, under 18’s, who need support and accommodation via

the annual needs assessment.

Ensuring provision of accommodation and support, including move on, is included in local Supporting People,

Housing and Homelessness Strategies.

The Council’s representative has actively participated in the Housing Advisory group to deliver the actions and we

have identified 4 applicants, aged 17 years who are registered for assistance with this authority for

accommodation, in the future.

Adults with physical disabilities

In addition to the disabled adaptation and DFG issues the Council has also ensured, through asset management

planning, that all of its buildings are accessible in accordance with current performance indicator standards. This

standard is in the process of changing and additional survey work will now be required.

In addition, the Council is currently working with Social Services and a Private Sector Developer to construct two

properties which will be leased to the Council on long leases. The properties will be allocated by social services

who will provide short to medium term care for people with physical disabilities. The tenancies will be managed by

the Council.

The Council has taken part in joint planning with social services on a new Lincolnshire Physical Disability strategy.

This will develop plans for additional purpose built accommodation in local authority areas.

Adults With Learning Disabilities

The Council works with Social Services to provide placements within Council accommodation. The Council values

such arrangements which can provide very positive opportunities for adults with learning disabilities who may

previously have been accommodated in inappropriate residential or other specialist housing.

35 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


E Supporting Minority Groups

Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) Residents

In the North Kesteven District 97% of the population are White British. Only 3% of the population who make up the

black and minority ethnic (BME) population in North Kesteven compared with the national average of 13%.

North Kesteven District Council has an equalities policy to provide a fair and unbiased service no matter what a

person’s colour, race, religion, sex, age or disability.

The duty to promote race equality issues was placed on local authorities with effect from December 2000. The

requirement comes from the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000, and requires that timetabled and realistic

plans to meet the duty be put into place. The general duties are:

• Eliminating unlawful racial discrimination;

• Promoting equality of opportunity: and

• Promoting good race relations between people of different racial groups.

The Council is working towards the adoption of Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) good practice standards for

social landlords on tackling racial harassment which will improve the monitoring and coordination of services not

just within the Council but also between agencies on BME issues. The monitoring role will help the Council to

ascertain the extent to which BME groups are receiving Council services which will in turn enable services to

evolve to ensure that they can be accessed by all groups within the District.

The Council has also taking on the coordinating role for an equalities project on behalf of District Council’s in

Lincolnshire. The aim of the project is to harmonise good practice across the County and ensure that service

provision accurately reflects the needs of all local minority groups.

The Lincolnshire Regional Housing Sub Group intends to develop survey work to identify the needs of minority

groupings which can then be to develop joint strategies between Districts in the County to meet these needs. The

funding for this will be sought from the Regional Housing Board through the 2006-8 bidding round.

Domestic Violence

In response to the introduction of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, and research that concluded that almost 25%

of personal crime was attributed to domestic abuse, the North Kesteven Community Safety Partnership included

Domestic Violence as one of their strategic priorities.

The partnership also committed funding to develop and introduce local initiatives for victims including an advice

and support service, delivered by Victim Support and introduced in Sleaford during January 2003. This was

subsequently rolled out to North Hykeham during 2004 along with a floating Domestic Violence service, accessible

throughout the whole of the district, delivered by Victim Support and funded by Supporting People.

Funding has also been committed to pilot a Sanctuary scheme, to employ a Domestic Violence Strategic

Coordinator and to consult with victims, statutory and voluntary agencies to develop a three year Domestic

Violence strategy, in fulfilment of the Best Value Performance Indicator 225.

Supporting People

The Government introduced from April 2003 a Supporting People Programme to bring together existing funding

sources into a County-wide budget administered by a Local Commissioning Body. This enables strategic and

funding decisions to be made at the County level.

The Council is represented on the Commissioning Body and has taken an active role in developing the supporting

people procedures for the County.

Supporting People now provides funding for a number of eligible service users who benefit from support delivered

by the:

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 36


E Supporting Minority Groups

Sheltered Housing Service – there are 14 council owned housing schemes across the District where

accommodation and individual support services are available to help residents to live more independent lives.

Lifeline service – currently providing outreach support backed by specialist communication equipment and a 24

hour monitoring service to around 1900 service users, made up of owner occupiers, NKDC tenants and tenants of

other landlords.

Floating Support Service – providing care and support to previously homeless applicants who have been

allocated temporary accommodation. This service assists people with resettlement and is primarily aimed at

vulnerable adults and families.

Gypsies/Travellers

The Council is under a duty to undertake survey work of travellers and gypsies needs over by 2007 and is

currently in partnership with other Lincolnshire Districts to pursue this. The intention is to incorporate this work into

the survey of the needs of minority groups which is the subject of a bid for Regional Housing Board funding.

Information from the survey will then establish a platform for meeting these needs on a county wide basis rather

than at District levels. Separate provision at District level is unlikely to recognise the wider needs of the travelling

community.

Analysis of existing ODPM information of gypsy/travellers caravan sites indicates that whilst Lincolnshire overall

has seen a slight rise in families staying on unauthorised sites this is not been the case in the District. According to

counts undertaken in July 2002 and July 2004, numbers of families staying on unauthorised sites has decreased

from 9 to 6. It is acknowledged that these counts only provide a snapshot of information within a relatively small

geographic area. The survey to be undertaken will consider more detailed needs and lead to improved service

planning.

37 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


F Partnership Working

This Strategy has contained many examples of partnership working. This section provides a summary of the key

areas.

Tenant Participation

The Council has established an effective tenants participation framework which has recently been reviewed to

meet the requirements of tenants’ groups. The HRA Business Plan provides details on tenant participation but, in

brief, the framework is based on:

• Tenant representation at Overview and Scrutiny Committees and Working Groups.

• Joint member/tenant Tenant Liaison Panel

• Housing Quality Practice Group (detailed consultation on policies, and other written documents)

• Area informal tenant forums (to be introduced from 2005).

Other examples of partnership working

The Council has employed partnerships in a number of effective ways to deliver housing services. The following

are recent examples:

• Partnership with Lincolnshire Social Services to fund and deliver a new extra care service for older people at

Eslaforde Gardens, Sleaford. This provided accommodation for older people with 24 hour care through social

services and replaced an existing sheltered housing scheme.

• Joint development of a Housing Needs Survey with Lincoln City Council to take into account overlapping

housing markets. This has lead to discussion on the joint development of housing schemes, particularly linked

towards meeting special needs.

• Older persons survey being undertaken in 2005 in conjunction with a range of service providers including heath

and social services. The survey has yet to report but will form the bedrock for planning to meet the needs of the

high and increasing numbers of older people in the District. The aim is to provide joined up services between a

range of providers including social services and the health services.

• Development of partnership contracts for repairs and servicing of appliances to Council properties which

commenced in April 2004. This has increased performance on turnaround times for repairs works and has also

increased the number of repairs undertaken through appointment.

• Joint development of County Homeless Strategy with other local authorities. The Strategy has lead to joint

initiatives such as the development of emergency night stop accommodation.

• Joint development of County Youth Homeless Strategy with other local authorities and agencies. The Strategy

has also led to joint initiatives such as an education initiatives for local schools aimed at advising young people

on how to avoid homelessness.

• Developed surgeries and a floating support service for victims of domestic abuse, in partnership with Victim

Support.

• Developed of a Sanctuary Scheme to assist victims of domestic abuse to remain within their own home and to

feel safe, in partnership with the Police and Victim Support.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 38


F Partnership Working

• Agreed emergency access arrangements for young people aged 16-17, at the Sleaford Foyer, with Leicester

Housing Association.

• Developed a County Joint Assessment Protocol for young people aged 16-17 with Social Services and the other

County district authorities, to assess their bespoke housing and support needs.

• Development of a homelessness mediation service with Relate as part of the homelessness prevention initiative

to resolve family disputes which might otherwise have created a homelessness case.

• Development of a lifetime homes project in partnership with social services and a private sector developer

which has created two units of accommodation for physically disabled people.

• Introduction of a private sector leasing scheme with properties sourced by local private sector lettings agency

but funded and managed by the Council to provide more units of temporary accommodation.

• The use of estate audits in partnership with local community to improve the physical appearance of estate areas

within the District and provide a focus for capital investment.

• Development of new affordable housing in partnership with RSLs and private sector developers.

The Council has also taken a lead role in establishing discussions with other authorities on the potential for

developing cross boundary housing services. Although at an early stage the Council is working to establish joint

solutions to choice based lettings schemes, maintenance contracts and non decent homes in the private sector.

The Council considers that there is potential for efficiency savings by widening the scope of traditional service

provision and the discussions may also involve other strategic services in the longer term.

39 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


G Resources

Revenue Funding

Housing Revenue Account

The Management of the Council’s housing stock is operated through a separate account, known as the Housing

Revenue Account. This meets all the day-to-day costs of operating the service and receives the rent income, either

paid directly by tenants or through housing benefit.

The Government has introduced a formula approach for the setting of rents, known as ‘Rent Restructuring’, where

the rent is set in relation to a market rent for the stock adjusted to take account of local wages. This formula aims

to see all rents for public sector housing, whether provided by Registered Social Landlords or Councils, based on

the same principle.

A ten year period has been allowed for this transition. In the District overall, rent income is not dramatically

affected by these changes, but overall rents are expected to increase by an average of 3% a year as a result of

this formula.

Currently in the year 2005/6, the HRA has an annual spend of £9.8m (2005/6). Rent income generates around

£9.77m and the HRA holds balances approaching of approximately £0.5m.

The HRA Business Plan provides a summary of HRA income and expenditure from 2005/6 to 2007/8. An analysis

of operating expenditure undertaken by the Council’s consultants through the stock options appraisal demonstrates

that over the next 30 years the HRA will continue to remain in surplus without savings having to be made to the

current level of service. The HRA Business Plan also details a table showing income and expenditure of the HRA

over 30 years.

The HRA spends approximately £2.35m on repairs and maintenance and contributes £0.8m towards the capital

programme. Again, based on the consultant’s projections, the viability of this is not affected over the next 30 years.

A brief summary of the HRA programme for 2006/7 is as follows:

• Total expenditure - £10,034,900

• Repairs and maintenance expenditure (included in above): £2,442,900

• Rental income: £9,959,200

• Total income: £10,020,000

• Estimated working balance at end of year: £570,000

A summary of the position over the years 2003 – 2008 is shown overleaf in table E.

General Fund Services

The Council’s General Fund provides funding for some of the key services listed in this Strategy. The following shows a

breakdown of funding between 2003-2008.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 40


G Resources

Expenditure 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8

Housing strategy 70,700 67,000 51,500 54,200 55,500

Enabling role 37,241 39,800 44,700 41,000 42,200

Housing advice 30,327 34,300 36,200 37,700 38,500

Homelessness 57,078 53,900 84,300 88,300 124,900

Housing benefits (costs) 713,700 811,700 886,800 918,600 944,400

Housing benefits (transfer

payments)

12,466,000 12,075,000 12,558,000 13,060,300 13,582,800

Bids for revenue additional funding are submitted according to an annual timetable and are scored against criteria

based around the Council’s corporate priorities. The Council considers possible savings for future years at the

same time and the Executive Board will make a decision on the bids based on the criteria taking into account the

likelihood of a match with corporate priorities and the funding available.

Capital funding

In terms of capital works the Council is supported through the Major Repairs Allowance (MRA), the contribution

from the Revenue Account, and the proportion of the income from the sale of Council assets that the Council is

allowed by Central Government to use. In addition the calculations undertaken through the stock options appraisal

process make allowance for revenue contributions to capital. The capital investment resulting from these

allocations will ensure that the Council will achieve the decent homes standard by 2010.

The following table provides a summary of the capital programme taken from the Council’s Capital Strategy 2003

–2008. The budget profile does not identify how individual capital projects are funded and works on the basis of all

items being funded from one pot.

41 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


G Resources

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08

Housing

Housing stock improvements 3,090,000 2,945,000 2,945,000

Private sector grants 328,000 328,000 328,000

Professional fees 304,100 316,300 326,100

Total 3,722,100 3,589,300 3,599,100

Sources of finance

Revenue Contributions 890,000 800,000 800,000

Capital receipts 639,900 740,900 757,500

Grants/Contributions 272,000 137,000 137,000

Major Repairs Allowance 1,920,200 1,911,400 1,904,600

Borrowing 0 0 0

Total 3,722,100 3,589,300 3,599,100

The major area of capital expenditure relates to the Council’s own stock. The stock options appraisal demonstrated

that in order to maintain properties and undertake all necessary improvements £37.384m would be required up to

the year 2013/14. This compares with the estimated capital resources likely to be made available of £36.639m

based the estimated sources of finance shown above. It is estimated that there will be a shortfall of £1.195m in the

capital resources required to meet all improvements by 2013/14 which increases to £15.4m by 2035.

The stock options appraisal consultants concluded that the resources available will enable the decent homes

standard to be reached as well as other improvements agreed through consultation with tenants. The Council is

therefore well placed to continue to manage the stock within the Governments requirements. The consultant also

found that the timescale surrounding the future deficit would allow the Council the opportunity to make alternative

funding arrangements. For example, the calculations currently used do not take into account the potential for

additional borrowing which could be supported.

One of the major assumptions underpinning this analysis relates to the expected numbers of right to buy

properties. The consultants forecasts estimated 75 sales per annum, the usable receipts from which would

contribute towards the funding of the capital programme. The Council will be undertaking an annual assessment of

the extent to which the proceeds of sales can contribute towards expenditure and the need for remedial action.

The Council’s Asset Management Group (AMG) has established a criteria for determining the relative merits of bids

for new capital programme funding. The criteria is largely based upon how well bids link with the Council’s

corporate priorities. Bids are submitted in accordance with an annual timetable and are ranked against the criteria.

Bids are approved through the AMG before being submitted for consideration by the Executive Board which takes

into account the resources likely to be available to the Council.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 42


G Resources

Enabling role

As a result of the operation of the Council’s previous affordable housing policy the contributions from developers of

existing sites are available to assist with the development of new affordable housing.

A total of £150,000 is available for distribution, £90,000 of which will be allocated to a development in North

Hykeham. The remaining amount will be used to supplement new schemes possibly on the Council’s own land.

A total of £500,000 is anticipated as existing sites hit trigger points which in turn could fund approximately 10 of

affordable houses.

The Council is in discussion regarding the potential for development at several locations throughout the District

using the revised planning policies which will also require Housing Association Grant funding. These sites will be

largely delivered through partnership working with Longhurst and Nottinghamshire Community Housing

Associations (NCHA). Both associations have a long history of working within the District and have excellent

development and management records as demonstrated by Housing Corporation assessments of performance.

Both associations have priority developer status within the East Midlands Region.

The Council is currently working with both associations on the bids for the 2003-8 Housing Corporation bidding

programme.

The bids currently being drafted would provide a total of 235 number of units requiring approximately £8m in

Housing Corporation funding.

Potential Development Sites

Scheme location

Anticipated number of units

Level of Housing Association

Grant funding

Ruskington (1) 28 1,517,125

NKDC sites * 24 1,238,995

Witham St Hughs 21 977,300

North Hykeham 10 552,024

Billinghay * 10 695,000

Ruskington (2) * 4 335,000

Ruskington (3) * 5 390,000

Sleaford (1) 25 245,000

Sleaford (2) 36 645,000

Rauceby 36 360,000

North Hykeham 36 1,080,000

Total 235 8,035,444

43 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


G Resources

This programme is based on the assumption that Housing Corporation funding will be available.

The Council is exploring the potential for the development on a number of sites already within ownership. Details

are yet to be clarified but up to 300 properties are thought possible on sites identified to date. Some of these sites

are included as the bids for the 2006-8 bidding round and these are marked with an asterix in the above table. The

Council will look to transfer the sites at nil cost in order to maximise the numbers of affordable housing.

The Development Plan

Under the planning processes set in place by the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 the Council has

adopted a Local Development Scheme, (available on the Council’s web site www.n-kesteven.gov.uk) which sets

out the process for preparing the Local Development Framework (the replacement for the Local Plan). This

assumes that the Local Plan, which is awaiting production of the Inspector’s Report will become adopted planning

policy. The Plan has been prepared in the context of current national policy guidance, regional policy guidance and

the emerging Lincolnshire County Structure Plan. The Housing requirements set out in the Structure Plan, and

which formed the basis for the Local Plan, for the period from 2001 to 2021 would represent a dramatic reduction

in new house build rates experienced in past years.

Effectively current planning permissions meet the districts housing requirements up to 2021 . This poses an

important constraint for the strategy since there will only be very limited opportunity to grant new planning provision

which can contribute to the need for affordable housing. The Regional Spatial Strategy (available on EMRA

website www.emra.gov.uk) is under the process of being reviewed and will, through proposed Housing Market

Assessments provide an opportunity to explore whether additional housing provision is justified.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 44


H Development of Housing Strategy

Review of progress against previous priorities

The Housing Strategy was last reviewed in 2003. The following table shows progress against the priorities which

relate to the Housing Strategy.

Priorities

Increase the supply of affordable housing in larger

centres.

Increase awareness of energy efficiency and the

performance measures that home owners across all

sectors can take to improve energy efficiency.

Progress

New priority area 1 – Affordable Housing. Housing

Needs survey completed. Bids to be submitted for

Housing Corporation funding form 2006-8 programme.

New affordable housing planning policies being

established.

New priority area 3 – Energy Use. By March 2005 a

20% improvement in energy efficiency had been

achieved since monitoring started in 1996.

Implement a comprehensive private sector housing

renewal policy covering all tenures with a service

delivery mechanism to meet the Council’s and the

Government’s strategic priorities.

New priority area 4 – Private Sector Improvement.

Strategy adopted. Reviewed in 2005.

Consolidate and develop partnerships to increase the

effectiveness of housing advice to young people, and

to increase access to suitable affordable housing.

Develop partnerships with other agencies to offer better

services for those with acute housing and support

needs.

Help private sector landlords to develop the support

they can give to their tenants.

Help better identify the hazards that may be posed by

radon gas across all housing tenures and where

problems are identified aim to secure a reduction in the

level of gas to below recommended safe limits.

To promote access to housing advice as part of the

Council’s Local Access Strategy.

To work with others to develop services that protect

and support people who suffer, or who are at risk from,

domestic violence.

Ensure that housing supply and services provide for

the needs of older residents.

New priority area 6 – Homelessness. County youth

homelessness strategy developed.

New priority area 6 – Homelessness. County

homelessness strategy developed. Mediation service

established.

Limited progress achieved. Intention to develop a

landlord forum to develop this initiative. Decent homes

agenda to take priority.

Statutory responsibilities undertaken. Testing provided

to all residents requiring the service.

New priority area 6 – Homelessness. To be developed

through development of the homelessness prevention

service.

Domestic violence service introduced with a umber of

initiatives including a floating support service.

New priority area 2 – Older People. Older persons

survey established in partnership with other statutory

organisations.

45 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


H Development of Housing Strategy

Ongoing Survey Work

The Council is mindful to ensure that the quality of its services meets customer expectations. For this reason a

vigorous programme of surveys is undertaken each year to assess customer opinion. These include:

• Homelessness applicants

• Housing applicants

• Tenants accessing the Floating support service

• New tenants

• Post repairs

• Post capital improvements

• Disabled adaptations

• DFG clients

The results of this consultation are considered by the Housing Quality Practice Group which reports to the Tenant

Liaison Panel.

In addition considerable consultation is also carried out through the following:

• Tenants’ choices for improvements to their homes

• Estate audits which assess whether improvements are required at an estate level

• Development of stock options appraisal process

• Development of Anti-Social Behaviour Strategies

Consultation/survey results are key influences on the development of housing policies. There are many examples

of these influences and the following are representative:

• Homelessness Survey – undertaken in 2004/05 indicated that significant proportion of customers did not know

where to get housing advice from. This led to a specific action to develop and document the housing advice

role with particular links to homelessness prevention initiatives.

• Capital Works – surveys to measure tenant satisfaction led to the Council improving information provided to

tenants and also introduced the option of bath or shower during refurbishments.

• New Tenant Survey – due to concerns over condition of properties for new tenants a review of the void

procedure and standard was introduced which led to a higher quality of repairs standard.

• Responsive Repairs – as a result of satisfaction surveys more information is now provided to tenants if a

repair is likely to be delayed.

• Stock Options Appraisal – consultation indicated that tenants often felt that the Council did not respond to

enquiries adequately which has led to an action to improve customer care standards. Review of Strategy

Priorities

Review of the Strategy

The Housing Strategy will be subject to three year major review with a smaller annual review based around

achievement of the action plan

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 46


H Development of Housing Strategy

The priorities contain individual action plans which are consistent with the SDP and the HRA Business Plan.

Progress against the action plan is monitored internally on a bi-monthly basis through the Housing and Property

Services Section Heads meeting.

A more formal review takes place annually by reference to the Local Community Overview and Scrutiny Panel. The

review process allows the Council to consider whether resources are needed to improve performance or to meet

new challenges. Funding bids can then be referred into the annual

budget planning cycle. The action plan also forms the basis of personal targets agreed at EDIs.

Scheme reviews take place on capital schemes through the Asset Management Group. The success of projects

included within the Strategy are evaluated through the annual review process which includes the report to the

Local Community Overview and Scrutiny Panel.

The Council has also established targets against all statutory performance indicators which are supplemented by

the addition of various management indicators. These indicators are monitored on a monthly basis through the

Housing and Property Services Section Head meetings and are also referred to Members at the Local Community

Overview and Scrutiny Panel on a quarterly basis. Where performance does not appear to be meeting targets,

action plans are drawn up to ensure that remedial action is taken. Appendix F demonstrates performance against

Best Value Performance Indicators 2003 – 2005 and targets up to 2007/08.

Action Plan for review of the strategy

Action

Review of performance against the action plan

Timescale

Each year - October

Consultation day for key stakeholders February 2008

Redrafting of revised priorities for approval by

Executive Board

March 2008

Consultation with wider stakeholders on priorities April – June 2008

Detailed consultation on redrafted strategy August – September 2008

Approval by full Council October 2008

COM6782RT

47 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

PRIORITY AREA 1 – Affordable Housing

LINK TO OTHER STRATEGIES:

Policy 1 and 2 – East Midlands Regional Housing Strategy

Action Plan – Eastern Sub Region

Corporate Priority – work with partners to deliver affordable housing and endeavour to provide decent homes for vulnerable people.

EVIDENCE:

The Council worked jointly with the City of Lincoln to commission Fordham Associates to undertake a housing needs assessment for both districts. The study

was completed and published in early 2005 and the main conclusions were:

1. For the period 2004-09 – 462 affordable houses a year would be required.

2. Between 2010-2014 – 333 affordable houses per annum would be required.

3. That if this demand was related to the building rates anticipated in the Local Plan all houses built over the next five years would need to be affordable.

PROGRESS TO DATE:

In response to these findings, the Council has reviewed:

1. The opportunities offered by ‘planning gain’ linked to the grant of planning applications;

2. The opportunity to promote exception sites; and

3. Opportunities to utilise land in its ownership.

Extensive consultation has been undertaken involving Local Councils, stakeholder organisations, developers and land agents to seek views on these options

as well as inviting other suggestions.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 48


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

1. Undertake local needs surveys in smaller

settlements to test the demand for exception

sites. (Villages in the north west of the district

have been identified as a pilot.)

2. Develop and apply a policy requiring affordable

housing contributions on all developments over

an agreed threshold size.

3. Link the policy to a methodology to determine

affordable housing contributions based on a

target percentage supported by an economic

appraisal of the site.

4. Complete a feasibility study and in partnership

with RSL’s identify developable sites on under

used Council land.

5. Work with RSL partners to secure bids for 235

number of additional units in the 2005-8 Housing

Corporation bidding round.

Establish local needs survey for north west of the

district by February 2006

Complete consultation on threshold sizes by

January 2006.

Implementation of full policy by March 2006

Bids for Housing Corporation funding round 2006-

08 to include up 6 sites releasing 45 number of

affordable houses.

Approval for development of sites for 2006 financial

year

Survey to be distributed using parish councils. Cost

of analysis to be met by RSL partner.

Policy to be prepared using existing staffing

resources.

Policy to be prepared using existing staffing

resources.

£30,000 of capital funding to resource feasibility to

be identified.

Bids for Housing Corporation funding totalling £8m

49 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

6. Explore the feasibility of whether innovative

designs can make houses available to be

purchased at lower cost.

Complete a feasibility study on potential for new

design options on under used Council land using

RSL partners by April 2007

Within existing staffing resources existing

7. Develop a long-term programme for

identification of sites to deliver affordable

housing and estimate contribution towards

meeting affordable housing needs.

8. Survey of all Council properties to identify

potential for development using large garden

areas for supply of additional development land.

9. Survey of low demand properties to identify

strategy for their future use including:

De-designation, Conversion, Demolition and

Sale.

Development of rolling programme with effect from

January 2006 taking into account 2003-8 bid sites

Survey to completed by April 2008

Survey to be completed by April 2008 providing a

list of options and costings

Bids for Housing Corporation funding totalling £8m

Within existing staffing resources.

Within staffing resources existing

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 50


Appendix A

PRIORITY AREA 2 – Meeting the needs of older people

LINK TO OTHER STRATEGIES:

Policy 4 – East Midlands Regional Housing Strategy

Action Plan – Eastern Sub Region

Corporate Priority – work with partners to deliver affordable housing and endeavour to provide decent homes for vulnerable people.

EVIDENCE:

Available survey information suggests that older residents in both public and both private sector find difficulties in managing their homes and gardens, as they

would wish. Information also suggests that a proportion of older residents already find their homes do not meet their needs. Further survey work is being

undertaken in order to better understand the scale and nature of these difficulties and to anticipate how the situation may change as the expectations of older

people also change.

The Authority is currently exploring ways which enable residents to manage their existing homes. In this respect, work is currently being undertaken to develop

a decoration and garden maintenance service.

Linked to the development of affordable homes the authority will also consider whether new homes can be developed which suit their changing needs in

locations where residents can access more easily other relevant services.

PROGRESS TO DATE:

Older persons working party established to look at cross cutting issues across services. Best Value report on Housing and Property Services identified as a

potential weakness. Support Coordinator function restructured to offer seven days a week support to vulnerable elderly tenants.

51 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

1. Complete crosscutting multi service review of

older person’s needs.

2. Develop partnerships for the improvement of

Eslaforde Gardens, Sleaford, Ringmoor House,

Billinghay and Northfield House, Ruskington to

meet the needs of tenants.

3. Explore the feasibility with other agencies of

establishing a quality assured responsive repairs

service for vulnerable and older residents in the

private sector.

4. Pilot the extension of the Council’s Supported

Housing Service for older residents of the

District.

5. Develop partnership scheme for supporting older

people living in unsuitable accommodation to

relocate to more suitable homes.

Completion of the survey by February 2006.

Analysis of information April 2006. Preparation of

older persons strategy by September 2006.

Establishment of funding strategy for improvements

by December 2006.

Development of service in partnership with other

agencies by April 2007.

Prepare proposal for consideration by supporting

people team by April 2007

Prepare report for consideration by Executive

Board by April 2007

Cost of survey

Identified cost of all improvements approximately

£2.5m

Estimated £30,000 - to be funded through

customer contributions to the service.

Cost of pilot for two members of staff - £35,000

from Supporting People

Estimated cost - £20,000

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 52


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

6. Introduce a pilot decoration and garden

maintenance service for older and vulnerable

residents in the Council’s own stock and

establish the feasibility of extending the pilot to

include a trial in the private sector.

7. Improve connectivity between services and

initiatives so that all front line officers can

provide signposting towards a more

comprehensive service.

8. Based on findings of older persons survey, work

with private sector developers to provide

additional homes for older people.

Prepare report to Local Community Overview and

Scrutiny Working Group – December 2005

Development of Housing Services procedure

providing information on how tenants can access all

relevant older persons services by April 2007.

Undertake survey of local developers to establish

potential for enabling new low cost accommodation

for older people by Apr1l 2008.

Estimated cost £35,000 – potential for reducing

through customer contributions.

Through existing staff resources.

Through existing staff resources.

53 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

PRIORITY AREA 3 – Energy use

LINK TO OTHER STRATEGIES:

Policy 9 – East Midlands Regional Housing Strategy

Action Plan – Eastern Sub Region

Corporate Priority – work with partners to deliver affordable housing and endeavour to provide decent homes for vulnerable people.

EVIDENCE:

It is not known how many vulnerable households occupy non-decent dwellings; however, the ODPM probability indicator suggests 1,409. The Council intends

to develop a methodology for identifying and tackling this issue, making use of Regional Investment Strategy funding made available.

Through the economic development function the Council works with a number of partners with a long-term aim of maximising high employment and finding

ways to raise average wage levels. Because of the rural nature of the district a considerable proportion of the population does not receive a supply of mains

gas and other sources of heat such as oil, solid fuel or electric heating can be relatively expensive to use. For those on average local incomes high fuel costs

impact on disposable income and also make it difficult for some people to keep warm. This is a particular concern for older and vulnerable residents of the

district. it is estimated that there are 3,190 (9%) households in fuel poverty.

The Council intends to work on the development of an affordable warmth policy in combination with other agencies and the voluntary sector. This policy will

reduce the impact of high energy costs particularly on those on low incomes. The Council also intends to consider longer term solutions to reduce energy

costs by focusing on demand and exploring renewable sources of energy.

PROGRESS TO DATE:

In 2004/05 950 Council homes benefited directly for insulation works. Current HRA stock SAP rating is 49 compared with national average of 61.(Top quartile

65)

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 54


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

1. Introduce and develop an affordable warmth

policy in partnership with a range of statutory

agencies and the voluntary sector. This will

include:

• Increasing awareness of energy conservation

measures.

• Providing publicity and support on how to

access grant aid for insulation and more

efficient heating solutions.

• Providing specific guidance on use of solid

fuel.

• Providing advice on access to welfare

benefits.

• Develop a partnership for introducing

alternative heating systems involving

renewable energy sources and using the

Council’s own stock as a pilot.

Holding of first partnership meeting by April 2006.

Policy to be prepared for December 2006.

Prepare seminar on alternative energy sources by

April 2006.

Identify pilot heating schemes for Council properties

by April 2006.

Affordable warmth policies to be implemented using

existing staffing resources. Initiatives to be funded

using existing grant fund streams and the Council’s

budget (£1000,000) for private sector repair.

Alternative heating systems to be developed using

existing capital and revenue funding and grant

funding available through Clearskies.

55 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

2. Improve 700 Council properties each year

through additional insulation.

• Target private sector renewal through energy

saving measures.

• Develop new SAP targets using Codeman

software.

• Improve energy advice and options provided

to new tenants.

• Investigate feasibility of sponsoring and

promoting fuel bulk purchase schemes.

• Investigate feasibility of working with local

farmers to provide opportunities for the

growing crops for fuel (bio mass).

Achievement of insulation programme.

Redraft private sector renewal policies by April

2006.

Codeman to be installed by December 2006.

Preparation of advice leaflet by December 2007.

Prepare a feasibility report by April 2007.

Prepare a feasibility report by April 2008.

External funding of £200,000

Current budget £100,000. Supplementary funding

available form ODPM to achieve decent homes

targets - £50,000

Introduction of Codeman - £35,000 – HRA

Approx £500 for existing publications budget

To be self financing

To be self financing

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 56


Appendix A

PRIORITY AREA 4 – Private Sector Improvement

LINK TO OTHER STRATEGIES:

Policy 5 – East Midlands Regional Housing Strategy

Action Plan – Eastern Sub Region

Corporate Priority – work with partners to deliver affordable housing and endeavour to provide decent homes for vulnerable people.

EVIDENCE:

The Council has undertaken a survey of private sector housing in 2003. This has shown that the stock is generally in good condition with only 1.3% of

properties (480) unfit in accordance with the current housing fitness standard. The new housing health and safety rating system is shortly to be introduced and

it is estimated that this will identify 3% of premises with serious hazards, the main ones being excessive cold and falls on the level. From the survey

information it is also estimated that 31% of private sector dwellings will fail the decent homes standard. The main failures relate to inadequate levels of

insulation and heating.

A Home Improvement Agency is being set up within the County and the authority will play a part in this. The agency will be used to make private sector

renewal grants more accessible and will target vulnerable groups. Whilst the number of non-decent homes in the private sector has been estimated, the

Council does not have sufficient information to link this need to individual properties or to have any view of the extent to which vulnerable residents would need

or want financial or organisational support to adapt their homes. The Council is also concerned that the nature of demand would change over time and that it

cannot anticipate whether action taken now would in fact meet government aspirations.

PROGRESS TO DATE:

Private Sector Renewal Policies reviewed in 2004/05. 38 no. of renovation grants undertaken in 2004/05.

57 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

1. Develop methodology for identification and

location of vulnerable people living in nondecent

homes in the private sector.

2. Review the private sector renewal policies

based on achievement of decent homes targets

based on energy use.

3. Work with County Home Improvement Agency to

establish joint ways of working and effective

targeting of vulnerable groups.

4. Establish in house resource to contribute to

County Home Improvement Agency. (HIA)

5. Establish monitoring/publicity to identify when

vulnerable tenants in private sector properties

require assistance.

6. Develop a landlord accreditation service and

landlord forum to improve communication on

private sector initiatives.

Establish rolling county wide survey of private

sector condition by December 2007

New policy in place by April 2006

Join HIA by September 2006

New post to be established by April 2006

New policy in place by August 2006

First landlord forum by April 2007

£10,000 per annum

Current budget £100,000. Supplementary funding

available from ODPM to achieve decent homes

targets - £50,000 guaranteed allocation for 2006/7

with opportunities for supplementary funding.

See below

£35,000 capital funding

Current budget £100,000. Supplementary funding

available from ODPM to achieve decent homes

targets - £50,000 guaranteed allocation for 2006/7

with opportunities for supplementary funding.

Within existing staffing resources

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 58


Appendix A

PRIORITY AREA 5 – Properties to meet people’s needs

LINK TO OTHER STRATEGIES:

Policy 5 – East Midlands Regional Housing Strategy

Action Plan – Eastern Sub Region

Corporate Priority – work with partners to deliver affordable housing and endeavour to provide decent homes for vulnerable people.

EVIDENCE:

The Council currently deals with referrals from Social Services for the adaptation of both the Council’s stock (disabled adaptations) and private sector stock

(disabled facilities grants) to meet special/disability needs.

Approximately 30% of tenant’s households have special needs. A significant proportion (26%) of all disabled people in the District live in the Council’s

properties. The Council will therefore look to adopt policies for modernisation schemes which involve the redesign of fixtures and fittings to make them easier to

adapt as the needs of residents change. In developing a new standard of modernisation the Council could promote that standard to new private sector

developments.

In addition, although the Council already looks to adapt properties to meet individual need, it will explore whether better use can be made of already adapted

dwellings for the needs of individuals arising in the future.

PROGRESS TO DATE:

40 disabled facilities grants and 121 disabled adaptations undertaken in 2004/5.

59 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

1. Adoption of a design standard for modernisation

schemes which would reduce the work required

to adapt fixtures and fittings to meet

special/disability needs.

2. Develop a register of adapted properties and

target allocations policies to meet the needs of

disabled applicants on the housing register.

3. Develop a methodology to identify vulnerable

residents and the scale of adaptation required to

their homes.

4. Introduce a minimum voids standard for

properties to be used by vulnerable people.

5. Work with social services to increase the

number of purpose designed properties for

people with physical disabilities.

Adoption of a policy by December 2008

Develop register by April 2006

Develop publicity of new private sector policies by

April 2006.

Review of voids standard to take place by

December 2006

Identification of potential RSL development

schemes by April 2007

Not yet costed – dependant upon design standard

Within existing staff resources

Current budget £100,000. Supplementary funding

available form ODPM to achieve decent homes

targets - £50,000

Existing budget - £150,000

Potential bids for Housing Corporation funding -

£500,000

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 60


Appendix A

PRIORITY AREA 6 – Homelessness

LINK TO OTHER STRATEGIES:

Policy 3, 4, 9 & 10 – East Midlands Regional Housing Strategy

Action Plan – Eastern Sub Region

Corporate Priority – Not a direct link to a corporate priority but included as a priority in this strategy and endorsed by the Council given rises in

homelessness and its importance nationally.

EVIDENCE:

The Council has continued to maintain low levels of bed and breakfast usage which is only required in emergencies. The allocation policy has been developed

to give priority for homelessness and a floating support package developed using supporting people funding has been introduced to ensure that previously

homeless applicants are given support and assistance on their resettlement.

The numbers of homeless people assisted over the last five or six years is higher than the authority has previously dealt with. Trends appear to mirror the

national picture and the Council has undertaken a detailed analysis of the statistics to understand the main causes. The Council is currently developing a

homelessness prevention approach based on this analysis and centred on early intervention methods, tenancy sustainment and access to other housing

sectors.

PROGRESS TO DATE:

Considerable partnership working to provide joint protocols and information sharing with Social Services on assisting vulnerable people. Introduction of

Floating Support Scheme to assist previously homeless applicants.

61 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix A

ACTIONS MILESTONES RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS

1. To review the success of the mediation service

introduced as an early intervention measure.

2. Document and develop the homelessness

prevention role.

3. Expand the floating support service to improve

coverage amongst vulnerable applicants for

homelessness services.

4. Investigate feasibility of providing additional

purpose designed temporary accommodation.

5. Identify opportunities for partnership working

with other local authorities to secure strategic

homelessness services.

6. Work towards Community Legal Service

Accreditation for the Housing Advice Service.

To be reviewed by July 2006

Procedures to be developed by April 2006

Awaiting outcome of supporting people bid –

December 2005

To be considered alongside feasibility study for

Northfield House - April 2006

To be reviewed as part of the review of the County

Homelessness Strategy by September 2006

Achieve accreditation by April 2008

£6,000 ODPM funding

Within existing staff resources

Additional £60,000 sought from supporting people

funding

Potential RSL partnership which could require use

of Housing Corporation Grant and Supporting

People Revenue funding - £1m

Within existing staff resources

Within existing staff resources

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 62


Appendix B

Partner agencies’ plans and

strategies

S T R A T E G I C

C O N T E X T

Community Strategy

Working towards 100 flourishing communities

Public

consultation

KEY

type of strategy

updated annually

sub-strategy

Corporate Plans and Strategies

Aim, Role, Principles,

Strategic Objectives,

Corporate Priorities

Medium Term Financial

Strategy

Annual Budget

The Way Forward

Performance Matters

Accessible Services Policy

Information Strategy

Marketing Strategy

Communications Strategy

Consultation Strategy

Procurement Strategy

Risk Management Strategy

E-government strategy

• Implementing Electronic

Government Statement

Emergency Plan

Equality Scheme

Strategies to promote a

prosperous economy

Economic Development Strategy

Treasury Management Strategy

Capital Strategy

Asset Management Plan

Local Business Partnership

Fundamental Performance Review Action Plans

Comprehensive Performance Assessment Action Plan

Strategies to ensure good quality of life

Housing Strategy

• Housing Investment

Programme

• Home Energy

Conservation Act

Strategy

Service Delivery Plans

• Private Sector Housing

Support Policy

Community Safety Strategy

Cultural Strategy

• Arts Strategy

• Sports Strategy

Staff Employee Development Interview Action Plans

Member Training Programme

Strategies to provide

environmental services and

public protection

Local Plan

Local Agenda 21 Plan

Contaminated Land Strategy

Lincolnshire Municipal Waste

Management Strategy

• Waste Management Plan

Flood Action Strategy

63 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix C

List of Consultees

Lincolnshire County Council

Boston Borough Council

East Lindsay District Council

City of Lincoln Council

South Holland District Council

South Kesteven District Council

West Lindsey District Council

Newark and Sherwood District Council

Nottinghamshire County Council

Swineshead Parish Council

Bicker Parish Council

Amber Hill Parish Council

Holland Fen with Brothertoft Parish Council

Longhurst Housing Association Limited

Ramblers’ Association

The Lincolnshire Badger Group

The Society for the Protection of Ancient

Buildings

Central Trains

The Gypsy Council

The Health and Safety Executive

Help the Aged

Housing Corporation

Axiom Housing Association Limited

De Montfort Housing Society Limited

Home Group Limited

Housing 21

Powergen Retail Limited

Lincolnshire Rural Housing Association Limited

The British Horse Society

North British Housing Limited

Nottingham Community Housing Association

Limited

Raglan Housing Association Limited

Teetotal Homes

East Midlands Housing Association Limited

Transco Limited, East Midlands LDZ

Atlantic Electric and Gas

Civil Aviation Authority

EDF Energy

West Division, Lincolnshire Police

London Energy Ltd

Npower

Leicester Housing Association Limited

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 64


Appendix C

RAF Digby

The Coal Authority

English Partnerships

Commission for Racial Equality

Commission for Racial Equality

The Crown Estate

Disability Rights Commission

Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee

CPRE - Lincolnshire

Friends of the Earth

Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust

Lincolnshire Bird Club

Farming and Rural Conservation Society

Country Land and Business Association

The British Trust for Conservation Volunteers

RAF Waddington

Age Concern Kesteven

British Chemical Distributors and Traders

Association

British Geological Survey

Sleaford Navigation Trust

Association of Inland Navigation Authorities

Confederation of British Industries

Business Link Lincolnshire & Rutland Ltd

IoD East Midlands

Church Commissioners for England - Lincoln

East Midlands Churches Forum

The Community Council of Lincolnshire

Lloyds TSB Group

World Wildlife Fund

Sleaford Development Group

West Lincolnshire PCT

Lincolnshire Fieldpaths Association

National Playing Fields Association

Sports Council East Midlands Region

Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Land Use & Rural Economy

Sainsbury’s Energy

Newark Internal Drainage Board

South West Lincolnshire PCT

22 Charing Cross Road

The Witham First Drainage Board

Heritage Service

65 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix C

Archaological Services

The Victorian Society

The Georgian Group

Equal Opportunities Commission

Lincolnshire Fire and Rescue Headquarters

Lincolnshire Police

Lincolnshire Ambulance NHS Trust

Freight Transport Association

EBICo Limited

Good Energy Ltd

Scottish Power

Seeboard Energy

SWEB

UK Power Ltd

Ecotricity

Green Energy UK PLC

ZEST4

National Grid Transco Ltd

Learning and Skills Council

Conesxions Lincs and Rutland

Police Architectural Liaison Officer

Road Haulage Association

Sleaford and District Civic Trust

Royal Mail Group Plc.

Gypsy Traveller Law Reform Coallition

Heckington Almshouse Charity

Heckington Village Trust

Black Sluice Internal Drainage Board

The RSPB

Forestry Commission

National Farmers Union East Midlands

East Restorations

National Playing Fields Association

Business Development, Job Centre Plus

Station Services Squadron

The Bat Conservation Trust

Sport England

British Waterways

The Woodland Trust

House Builders Federation

Network Rail

Disability Lincs Ltd

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 66


Appendix C

Sleaford Chamber of Commerce

The Advice Centre

RAF Cranwell

RAF Digby

Upper Witham Drainage Board

British Gas - Myia Barnes

Benton & Co

Black Sluice Internal Drainage Board

British Waterways

Beazer Homes Ltd

Council for British Archaeology

Civic Trust

Secretary to Civic Trust

The Countryside Agency

Customs & Excise

Commission for Architecture of the Built

Environment

Civil Aviation Authority

CPRE

Commission for Social Care Inspection

Department of Culture, Media & Sport

Department of Environment, Transport & the

Regions

Department of National Heritage

DEFRA

David Wilson Homes

English Nature

English Heritage

Environment Agency

Engineered Communication Solutions Ltd

English Golf Union

English Partnerships

(Land Reclamation & QS Services)

English Historic Towns Forum

East Midlands Electricity

East Midlands Development Agency

FRCA

Georgian Group

Government Office for the East Midlands

The Garden History Society

Health & Safety Executive

Heritage Lincs

Highways Agency

Historic Buildings & Monuments Commission

67 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix C

Highways Consultants

Heckington Village Trust

Hull District Land Registry

Harmston Residents Association

The North Kesteven Centre

Inland Revenue

Lincs Police

Lincolnshire Trust for Nature Conservation

Lincolnshire Fieldpaths Association

Lincolnshire Garden Trust

Lincolnshire Society of Architects

Lincolnshire Family Health Services Authority

Lincolnshire Health Nursing Home Dept

West Lincolnshire PCT

South West Lincolnshire PCT

Lincolnshire Mills Group

Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Lapwings Consultant

Lincolnshire County Council

LHBC

Landscope (Agricultural Consultant)

Ministry of Defence

NCFC (Nursing Homes)

National Playing Fields Association

Newark Internal Drainage Board

National RIBA Clients

National Grid Company plc

National Care Standards Commission

Network Rail

NCFC

National Insurance

Open Spaces Society - see Lincs Fieldpaths

Assoc.

Local Government Ombudsman

Enforcement Appeal Forms

PGS Atlantic Power (Oil Pipelines)

Planning Inspectorate

HM Railway Inspectorate

Railtrack Mining Engineer

The Ramblers Association

Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments

of England – merged with English Heritage

Raw Design

Royal Fine Art Commission

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 68


Appendix C

The Royal Town Planning Institute

Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

(SPAB)

Sleaford and Distirct Chamber of Commerce

Severn Trent Water

Sleaford and District Civic Trust

Sports Council East Midlands Region

Sleaford Police Station

Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick and Co.Ltd.

Sustrans

Symbrosis Consulting

Stewart Squires

Traffic Commissioners

Eastern Traffic Area

Total Pipelines (Finaline)

Viking Way Projects Officer

Woodland Trust

Chairman of Aunsby & Dembleby Parish Council

Chairman of Eagle & Swinethorpe Parish Council

Chairman of Osbournby Parish Council

Chairman of Threekingham Parish Council

Clerk to Anwick Parish Council

Clerk to Asgarby & Howell Parish Council

Clerk to Ashby de la Launde & Bloxholm

Clerk to Aswarby & Swarby Parish Council

Clerk to Aubourn & Haddington Parish Council

Clerk to Bassingham Parish Council

Clerk to Beckingham Parish Council

Clerk to Billinghay Parish Council

Clerk to Blankney Parish Council

Clerk to Boothby Graffoe Parish Council

69 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix C

Clerk to Bracebridge Heath Parish Council

Clerk to Branston & Mere Parish Council

Clerk to Brant Broughton & Stragglethorpe Parish

Council

Clerk to Brauncewell Parish Council

Clerk to Burton Pedwardine Parish Council

Clerk to Canwick Parish Council

Clerk to Carlton le Moorland Parish Council

Clerk to Coleby Parish Council

Clerk to Cranwell & Byard’s Leap Parish Council

Clerk to Culverthorpe & Kelby PC

Clerk to Digby Parish Council

Clerk to Doddington & Whisby PC

Clerk to Dogdyke Parish Council

Clerk to Dorrington Parish Council

Clerk to Dunston Parish Council

Clerk to Ewerby & Evedon PC

Clerk to Great Hale Parish Council

Clerk to Harmston Parish Council

Clerk to Heckington Parish Council

Clerk to Heighington Parish Council

Clerk to Helpringham Parish Council

Clerk to Kirkby la Thorpe Parish Council

Clerk to Leadenham Parish Council

Clerk to Leasingham & Roxholm Parish Council

Clerk to Little Hale Parish Council

Clerk to Martin Parish Council

Clerk to Metheringham Parish Council

Clerk to Navenby Parish Council

Clerk to Newton, Haceby & Walcot Parish

Council

Clerk to Nocton Parish Council

Clerk to North Hykeham Town Council

Clerk to North Kyme Parish Council

Clerk to North Scarle Parish Council

Clerk to Norton Disney Parish Council

Clerk to Potterhanworth Parish Council

Clerk to Rauceby Parish Council

Clerk to Rowston Parish Council

Clerk to Ruskington Parish Council

Clerk to Scopwick Parish Council

Clerk to Scredington Parish Council

Clerk to Silk Willoughby Parish Council

Clerk to Skellingthorpe Parish Council

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 70


Appendix C

Clerk to Sleaford Town Council

Clerk to South Hykeham Parish Council

Clerk to Wilsford Parish Council

Clerk to Witham St Hughs Parish Council

Clerk to South Kyme Parish Council

Clerk to Stapleford Parish Council

Clerk to Swaton Parish Council

Clerk to Swinderby Parish Council

Clerk to Thorpe on the Hill Parish Council

Clerk to Thurlby Parish Council

Clerk to Timberland Parish Council

Clerk to Waddington Parish Council

Clerk to Walcott Parish Council

Clerk to Washingborough Parish Council

Clerk to Welbourn Parish Council

Clerk to Wellingore Parish Council

71 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix D

Options Considered in the Development of the Strategy

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Priority Area 1 – Affordable Housing

Development of planning policies to

require affordable housing to be

developed on new sites or do not

pursue change.

Very little progress would be made

towards housing needs survey target

of 462 properties per annum.

Housing Corporation Grant required –

approximately £8m for 2003-8 bidding

round.

Planning policies in the process of

being amended.

Transfer of spare housing land for nil

consideration to enable additional

affordable housing or sale at market

value.

Authority would not be maximising

development potential of own land to

increase availability of affordable

housing. Sites could yield up to 300

units.

Approximately 50 sites under

consideration as yet not valued.

Analysis being undertaken to decide

which sites could be transferred to

supply affordable housing.

Develop an evaluation based

approach to calculate % of affordable

housing required on each site instead

of developing a % target for all sites.

Testing on sample sites determined

that this would not be effective in

providing affordable housing.

Cost of independent consultants.

Option not pursued except where

strong reasons for making exception

to target %.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 72


Appendix D

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Priority Area 2 – Older People

Provide focus on older people or

general priority covering all special

needs groups.

Older people make up larger

proportion of community than average

for East Midlands. Will increase

considerably in near future. Without

priority real risk that inadequate

planning will result in under resourced

services.

Not yet determined.

Priority focussing on older persons

needs.

Development of policies without use

of additional survey.

Housing needs survey does not

provide information on aspirations.

Aim is to anticipate future housing

needs.

Cost of survey .

Option not pursued

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Priority Area 3 – Energy Use

Continue with existing policies on

replacement heating systems or

investment in renewable sources of

heating.

Rural areas suffer with continued

energy price increases, particularly

affecting those on low incomes. Do

nothing more option would conflict

with decent homes objectives and

affordable warmth policy to be

developed.

Additional cost to HRA for own stock

not yet quantified. Current budget for

DFG and private sector repair

£338,000.

New action to investigate renewable

sources of energy.

73 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix D

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Priority Area 4 – Private Sector Improvement

Develop methodology for identification

and location of vulnerable people

living in non-decent homes in the

private sector instead of relying upon

existing information.

Existing information will not provide

level of detail to allow initiatives to be

targeted at individuals.

Subject of a bid for funding between

Lincs districts.

New methodology to be developed.

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Priority Area 5 – Properties to meet people’s special needs

Adoption of a design standard for

modernisation schemes against

undertaking adaptations on demand.

DFG expenditure has been growing in

recent years. This option would

reduce adaptation work being carried

out.

DFG expenditure - £228,000

Design standard to be pursued.

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Priority Area 6 – Homelessness

Continue to use own stock as only

resource for temporary

accommodation instead of

considering potential for conversion of

existing stock for purpose designed

resource.

Allocations process being slowed with

the potential result that more

homelessness occurs.

Potential conversion of existing

building - £1m – to be funded through

possible transfer to RSL partner.

Temporary accommodation

alternatives to be pursued.

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 74


Appendix D

OPTIONS RISK ISSUES RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OPTION TO BE PURSUED

Other Option Areas

Retention of the Council’s housing

stock.

Tenants expressed an opinion against

stock transfer. Risk that the authority

will not have resources to maintain

services if variables such right to buy

applications should change.

Stock options demonstrated that

resources are available to meet

decent homes standards and tenants

expectations on service delivery.

Retention pursued with an annual

appraisal of stock options variables.

Adoption of decent homes for the

Councils stock as a Housing Strategy

priority.

Funding available to meet the decent

homes standard by 2010. Not as

significant as other emerging

priorities.

£6.5m needed to meet the decent

homes standard by 2010.

Not pursued.

Formal separation of management

and strategic roles within the Council

or continuation of existing structure.

The Council is of a small size and a

firm split would not be practical at this

stage. Additional resources are being

considered to increase the strategic

resources available.

Additional funding of £25,000 being

sought.

Structure to be retained but additional

resources sought to develop the

strategic role.

75 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix E

ACTUAL

2003/04

£

ACTUALS

2004/05

£

ESTIMATE

2005/06

£

ESTIMATE

2006/07

£

ESTIMATE

2007/08

£

Expenditure

Repairs and Maintenance

Supervision and Management

Group Dwellings - Facility Costs

Supporting People

General Community Facilities

Communal Areas

Maintenance of Open Spaces

Community Initiatives

Tenabts Participation

Rents, Rates, Taxes and Other Charges

Rent Debates

Housing Subsidy Payable

Provision for Bad or Doubtful Debts

Interest Repayments

Debt Management Expenses

Revenue Contributions to Capital

HRA Set Aside (contribution to MRP)

2,247,992

1,187,003

170,903

-20,461

99,819

23,054

116,458

10,092

78,192

18.026

4,927,250

0

29,600

1,123,310

34,042

1,000,000

284,532

2,298,804

1,514,733

116,547

5,589

95,843

15,663

118,061

6,488

91,117

15, 859

0

3,312,524

57,900

1,061,847

39,562

800,000

150,000

2,384,700

1,345,100

148,800

0

105,600

33,600

130,300

18,100

95,300

20,000

0

3,512,800

0

1056,000

39,300

800,000

150,000

2,479,200

1,312,000

150,000

0

107,000

33,700

136,600

10,600

98,400

20,000

0

3,787,100

0

971,000

40,600

800,000

125,000

2,579,400

1,346,200

151,100

0

107,100

33,800

139,800

1,900

100,800

20,000

0

3,978,500

0

944,100

41,800

800,000

100,000

Total Expenditure 11,329,812 9,700,539 9,839,600 10,071,200 10,344,500

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 76


Appendix E

ACTUAL

2003/04

£

ACTUALS

2004/05

£

ESTIMATE

2005/06

£

ESTIMATE

2006/07

£

ESTIMATE

2007/08

£

Income

Gross Rental Income

HRA Subsidy

Amortised Premiums and Discounts

Investment Income/Mortgage Interest

-9329,519

-1,877,770

-4,724

-55,459

-9,617,262

0

-10,807

-57,334

-9,712,500

0

-10,800

-53,000

-9,959,200

0

-10,800

-50,000

-10,190,200

0

-10,800

-50,000

Total Income -11,267,472 -9,685,403 -9,776,300 -10,020,000 -10,251,000

Net Cost of Services 62,339 15,133 63,300 51,200 93,500

77 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix E

ACTUAL

2003/04

£

ACTUALS

2004/05

£

ESTIMATE

2005/06

£

ESTIMATE

2006/07

£

ESTIMATE

2007/08

£

Appropriations

Major Repairs Allowance

Depreciation - Dwellings

Depreciation - Non Dwellings

FRS17 Adjustment

Transfer to/(from) Major Repairs Res

-1,988,057

2,075,724

4,334

0

-92,001

-1982,300

1,991,856

4,500

-18,414

-14,056

-1920,200

2,033,900

4,300

-113,700

-1,911,400

2,002,000

4,300

-90,600

-1,904,600

1,976,700

4,300

-72,100

0 -18,414 4,300 4,300 4,300

Net Operating (Surplus) / Deficit 62,339 -3,281 67,600 55,500 97,800

Working Balance at Beginning of Year

(Surplus) / Deficit for the Year

Working Balance at End of Year

-716,195

62,339

-653,856

-653,856

-3,281

-657,137

-638,156

67,600

-570,556

-570,556

55,500

-515,056

-515,056

97,800

-417,256

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 78


Appendix F

Community Overview and Scrutiny

Panel Outturn for 2004/05 and

Future Year’s Targets

Performance for

2003/04

Performance for

2004/05

Activity Quartile Activity Quartile

Direction of Travel

2003/04 - 2004/05

Perf

Improv’nt

Quartile

Movement

Top

Quartile

Value for

2003/04

Target for

2005/06

Target for

2006/07

Target for

2007/08

Housing Services

Key Priority Indicators

BVPI 212

BVPI 184a

Average relet time (days) (Former BV 68)

redesignated BVPI 2005/06.

% of LA homes non decent at 1/4/02;

1/4/03; 1/4/05.

45 days 3rd 32.04 days 2nd Yes 29 days 27 days 25 days 24 days

21.30% 2nd 19% Best Yes 21% 17% 14% 11%

BVPI 184b

% change in non decent LA homes

between 1/4/02; 1/4/03; 1/4/04; 1/4/05

21.30% 2nd 10% 3rd No 23.80% 12% 16% 22%

BVPI 211a

BVPI211b

BVPI 213

BVPI 214

The proportion of planned repairs and

maintenance expenditure on HRA

dwellings compared to responsive

maintenance expenditure on HRA

dwellings.

The proportion of expenditure on

emergency and urgent repairs to HRA

dwellings compared to non-urgent repairs

expenditure to HRA dwellings.

Number of households who considered

themselves homeless, who approached

the local housing authority’s housing

advice service, and for whom housing

advice casework intervention resolved

their situation.

Proportion of households accepted as

statutorily homeless, who were accepted

as statutorily homeless by the same

authority within the last two years.

New Indicator 2005/06 Not Set Not Set Not Set

New Indicator 2005/06 Not Set Not Set Not Set

New Indicator 2005/06 5% 5% 5%

New Indicator 2005/06 0 0 0

79 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix F

Performance for

2003/04

Performance for

2004/05

Activity Quartile Activity Quartile

Direction of Travel

2003/04 - 2004/05

Perf

Improv’nt

Quartile

Movement

Top

Quartile

Value for

2003/04

Target for

2005/06

Target for

2006/07

Target for

2007/08

BVPI 62

% of unfit Private sector dwellings made

fit/demolished as a result of LA action.

3.75% 2nd 2.81% 2nd No 4.0% Indicator Deleted

BVPI 63

Average SAP rating of local authority

owned dwellings.

48 Worst 49% Worst Yes 63 50 50 50

BVPI 64

No. of Private sector vacant dwellings

returned to occupation or demolished in

year as a result of direct LA Action.

0 Worst 0% No Comp

No

Change

18 Not Set Not Set Not Set

BVPI 66a

The proportion of planned repairs and

maintenance expenditure on HRA dwellings

compared to responsive maintenance

expenditure on HRA dwellings.

95.30% Worst 99.55% Best Yes 98.70% 99% 99% 99%

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 80


Appendix F

Performance for

2003/04

Performance for

2004/05

Activity Quartile Activity Quartile

Direction of Travel

2003/04 - 2004/05

Perf

Improv’nt

Quartile

Movement

Top

Quartile

Value for

2003/04

Target for

2005/06

Target for

2006/07

Target for

2007/08

BVPI 66b

BVPI 66c

BVPI 66d

HIP

HIP

The number of local authority tenants with

more than seven weeks of (gross) rent

arrears as a percentage of the total

number of council tenants.

Percentage of local authority tenants in

arrears who have have Notices Seeking

Pocession served.

Percentage of local authority tenants

evicted as a result of rent arrears.

% of urgent repairs completed in Gov’t

time limits (Former BV 72)

Average time (days) taken to complete

non-urgent repairs (Former BV73)

New Indicator 2005/06 4.5% 4.25% 4%

New Indicator 2005/06 Not Set Not Set Not Set

New Indicator 2005/06 Not Set Not Set Not Set

96% Best 99.40% Best Yes 96% Management Indicator

17 days 2nd 9.26 days Best Yes 12 days Management Indicator

BVPI 74

BVPI 75

Satisfaction of tenants of council housing

with the overall service provided by their

landlord: with results further broken down

by i) black and minority ethnic and ii) nonblack

and minority ethnic tenants.

Satisfaction of tenants of council housing

with opportunities for participation in

management and decision making in

relation to housing services provide by

their landlord: with results further broken

down by i) black and minority ethnic and

ii) non-black and minority ethnic tenants.

86.20% Best 86.20% Best N/A N/A 86% 88% 88% 88%

70.40% Best 70.40% Best N/A N/A 70% 72% 72% 72%

81 Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008


Appendix F

Performance for

2003/04

Performance for

2004/05

Activity Quartile Activity Quartile

Direction of Travel

2003/04 - 2004/05

Perf

Improv’nt

Quartile

Movement

Top

Quartile

Value for

2003/04

Target for

2005/06

Target for

2006/07

Target for

2007/08

BVPI 164

BVPI 183a

BVPI 183b

BVPI 185

BVPI 202

BVPI 203

CRE code of practice in housing and

good practice standards on tacling

harassment.

Average weeks spent by homeless

households in B&B accommodation.

Average weeks spent by homeless

households in hostel accommodation

% of responsive repairs where

appointment made and kept

The number of people sleeping rough on

a single night within the area of the local

authority.

The percentage change in the average

number of families, which include

dependent children or a pregnant woman,

placed in temporary accommodation

under the homelessness legislation

compared with the average from the

previous year.

No No Comp No No Comp N/A N/A N/A Yes Yes Yes

1 Week Best 0 weeks Best Yes 1 Week 1 Week 1 Week 1 Week

10 Weeks 3rd 0 weeks Best Yes 0 Weeks 0 Weeks 0 Weeks 0 Weeks

Not Collected 88.54% Best Yes N/A 57% Management Indicator

N/A N/A 0 No Comp No Comp No Comp N/A 0 0 0

N/A N/A 11% No Comp No Comp No Comp N/A 5% 5% 5%

Housing Strategy 2005 - 2008 82

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