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Matthews-Mint Hill - Carolina Weekly Newspapers

Matthews-Mint Hill - Carolina Weekly Newspapers

Community Going geeky

Community Going geeky More than 3,500 technology junkies overwhelmed Central Piedmont Community College’s Levine Campus, 2800 Campus Ridge Road, in Matthews last week for the sixth annual THE Geek Festival. The event showcased regional and national businesses for their innovations and included talks and demonstrations on geospatial technology, simulation and gaming, 3-D modeling and animation, green technologies and sustainability, e-learning, digital media and social networking. (Right) CPCC welding student Scott Mundorf. (Far right) Terry McMicking’s jewelry made from recycled computer chips and other “techno junk.” REMARKABLE HEART CARE JUST GOT CLOSER Now with two locations to serve the Union County area Since 1994, Mid Carolina Cardiology (MCC) has served residents of the Union County area at its Matthews office on the campus of Presbyterian Hospital Matthews. While our commitment to Matthews remains unchanged, we’re part of the community just like our patients, so we understand the needs of the growing population.That’s why we’ve opened a new office in Monroe. MCC Monroe is supported by a team of cardiologists who have a long-standing commitment to the people of Union County. MCC is nationally known for its quality care and groundbreaking research. Now thanks to two great locations, residents of the Union County area can rest assured that remarkable heart and vascular care is right around the corner, regardless of where they live, work and play. Matthews Monroe Photos courtesy of Central Piedmont Community College Sportsplex (continued from page 1) committee last week. It would be the 18-month-old company’s first publicprivate partnership, said Shipley, who has 11 years of experience in sports marketing. “Our business model is to complement the vision that the town and the county have had there,” Shipley said. “The growth of amateur sports is still tremendous despite the economy. It’s a very strong positive in a very negative environment we’re living in. I’d love to see the project progress because not only is it a great opportunity for our business, but it’s a great opportunity for the county and the town.” Shipley said the proposal meets the county’s green-space requirement to build on less than 50 percent of the site and that he’s “very committed” to preserving wooded areas. Calling the deal “very speculative,” Lee Jones, Mecklenburg County park and recreation division director of capital planning and alliance development, fears the deal wouldn’t “serve the taxpayers well.” “If we’re developing a sportsplex, why would we sell a portion when we’ve already determined we’ll need it?” Jones said. “There would be no reason to go in this direction unless we can’t complete the master plan, and I believe we can.” Jones said he’s hopeful commissioners will vote to sell the bonds by July 2010. Matthews Town Manager Hazen Blodgett said the land’s terrain would make it “very difficult” for National Amateur Sports to build the project as proposed. But the town is willing to explore a public-private partnership, he said. “The question is could this private group develop it quicker in the public sector?” he said. Blodgett and Assistant Town Manager Jamie Justice met with Shipley this week to hear the proposal and will meet again to “educate” the company on the town’s small-area plan, which calls for “transit-friendly” entertainment and mixed-use developments adjacent to the sportsplex. q Library (continued from page 10) Leigh H.Younce, MD, FACC Martin B. Cutrone, MD, FACC Gary S. Niess, MD, FACC Robert W. Price, MD, FACC 704-264-3500 1450 Matthews Township Pkwy., Suite 380 Matthews, NC 28105 Lokesh Tejwani, MD, FACC Christopher G. Stephenson, MD, FACC David N. Smith, MD Martin J. Kreshon, Jr., MD, FACC 704-226-0500 1640 E. Roosevelt Blvd. Monroe, NC 28112 James W. Roberts, MD The Mint Hill branch saw a 13 percent increase in the number of people spending time there in fiscal year 2007-08, according to library records. The branch had 201,792 visits in 2007-08, compared with 175,968 in 2006-07. The visitors checked out about 11 percent more materials, too. The branch had 338,043 items out in 2007-08, compared with 300,726 the previous year. q Page 12 • Nov. 20-26, 2009 • Matthews-Mint Hill Weekly www.matthewsminthillweekly.com

Community More input needed as Ezell Park plans proceed, commissioners say by Kara Lopp kara@matthewsminthillweekly.com Plans for a county-run park in Mint Hill are moving forward, but some town commissioners are concerned the majority of residents are being left behind. Commissioner Tina Ross said Nov. 12 that she’s concerned only those who live close to the planned park off Well Road are being notified of meetings, so park planners are getting a biased opinion of what residents want on the 95-acre property. Mayor Ted Biggers agreed and said town officials would contact parks staff to ensure all residents’ views are heard. “I don’t think it’s fair to plan a regional park and not invite people from the region to attend,” Ross said. “I feel like we’re getting a one-sided view of what we want.” Ezell Park, to be bordered by Matthews-Mint Hill, Mintwood and Well roads, is expected to cost about $3.6 million, paid for by 2008 park and recreation bonds. Additional phases will be developed as money is available. Construction can’t start until Mecklenburg County commissioners sell the bonds, a move that’s been delayed by the recession. Park planners have released three proposed plans, labeled “active,” “passive” and “farm park.” The active plan calls for eight tennis courts, three baseball fields, two lighted soccer fields, a 5,000- to 7,000-square-foot community center, five-acre dog park and 18-hole disc golf course. The passive plan includes an open meadow sized for baseball or soccer, four sand volleyball courts, a putting green, half basketball court, indoor pavilion, community garden and half-mile bike path. The farm park would include a working farm with a petting zoo, community gardens, farmers market and grasslands (more on page 14) Elevation (continued from page 9) “As with any great leader, there comes a moment of realization,” Brey said. From there, eight families from Shelby, including the Breys and Furticks, sold their homes, quit their jobs, and moved to Charlotte to make their vision a reality. “We literally stepped out in faith because we wanted to leave a mark on this earth, to make our lives count for something, to make choices that would have eternal consequences,” Brey said. He added that Elevation partners with various community outreach groups, including Crisis Assistance Ministry Uptown and Safe Journey, a place for pregnant high school drop-outs to finish school. “We donate 10 percent of our finances to these outreach groups, but we do limit the number to have greater impact on the ones we do help,” he said. Barbara Urch is the volunteer coordinator at the Matthews campus’ Ekidz program for children up to fifth grade. “We do God’s will here,” she said. “It’s not about the building or the pastor. It’s about God. We believe he can do anything and performs miracles even today. We believe that he is alive and ready to use us to reach those far from him.” Urch also trains volunteers at the Matthews campus. “We are volunteer-driven,” Brey said. “They want to be a part of something much bigger than themselves. They are the world’s best, more than greeters or children’s workers. They demonstrate amazing, sacrificial love and giving. They are the heartbeat of the church.” Furtick recently announced that in the future, he wants the church to grow in Charlotte and beyond. “No matter where you have come from or what you’ve been through in life, I believe your best is yet to come,” Furtick said. “Elevation is a revolutionary move of God and we welcome everyone to be a part.” q For more information, visit www. elevationchurch.org. When nearly 2,000 kids drop out of school every year, we fail too. educate Connecting at-risk students to the resources and relationships they need to be successful in school. collaborate Developing partnerships with every sector of the community to support our schools. graduate Making every effort to ensure that each child in our community graduates from high school – empowering them for a lifetime of success. 601 E. 5th Street, Suite 300, Charlotte NC 28202 t. 704.335.0601 f. 704.335.0697 Find out how you can help kids stay in school. Visit www.cischarlotte.org. CHARLOTTE MERCHANTS FOUNDATION www.matthewsminthillweekly.com Matthews-Mint Hill Weekly • Nov. 20-26, 2009 • Page 13

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Matthews-Mint Hill - Carolina Weekly Newspapers
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Matthews-Mint Hill - Carolina Weekly Newspapers
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