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City of Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan Southwest Florida Regional ...

City of Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan Southwest Florida Regional ...

5. Limit public

5. Limit public expenditures that subsidize development permitted in coastal high-hazard areas subsequent to the element‘s adoption except for restoration or enhancement of natural resources; 6. Direct population concentrations away from known or predicted coastal highhazard areas; (c) The element shall contain one or more policies for each objective and shall identify regulatory or management techniques for: 1. Limiting the specific impacts and cumulative impacts of development or redevelopment upon wetlands, water quality, water quantity, wildlife habitat, living marine resources, and beach and dune systems; 2. Restoration or enhancement of disturbed or degraded natural resources including beaches and dunes, estuaries, wetlands, and drainage systems; and programs to mitigate future disruptions or degradations; 3. General hazard mitigation including regulation of building practices, floodplains, beach and dune alteration, stormwater management, sanitary sewer and septic tanks, and land use to reduce the exposure of human life and public and private property to natural hazards; 4. Hurricane evacuation including methods to relieve deficiencies identified in the hurricane evacuation analysis, and procedures for integration into the regional or local evacuation plan; 5. Post-disaster redevelopment including policies to: distinguish between immediate repair and cleanup actions needed to protect public health and safety and long-term repair and redevelopment activities; address the removal, relocation, or structural modification of damaged infrastructure as determined appropriate by the local government but consistent with federal funding provisions and unsafe structures; limiting redevelopment in areas of repeated damage; 7. Designating coastal high-hazard areas and limiting development in these areas; 8. The relocation, mitigation or replacement, as deemed appropriate by the local government, of infrastructure presently within the coastal high-hazard area when state funding is anticipated to be needed. 10. Providing, continuing, and replacing adequate physical public access to beaches and shorelines; enforcing public access to beaches renourished at public expense; enforcing the public access requirements of the Coastal Zone Protection Act of 1985; and providing transportation or parking facilities for beach and shoreline access. Local Policies and Programs In Florida each local government is required to complete a comprehensive land use plan, which has policies that may either encourage shore retreat or protection. Normally, these policies would be in the Coastal Management Element which was discussed above in terms of state requirements. Adaptation Plan Page 210

Approaches for maintaining shorelines in the face of sea level rise include protection and retreat. Each of these approaches, or some combination of them, may be appropriate depending on the characteristics of a particular location (e.g., shore protection costs, property values, the environmental importance of habitat, the feasibility of protecting shores without harming the habitat). Note that the adaptations presented include both shoreline hardening/armoring and removing armoring to create living shorelines. These different and seemingly conflicting options are each appropriate in different situations. Protection options can include hardening the shoreline through measures such as bulkheads, seawalls, revetments, breakwaters, sills, and creating or reinforcing headlands. Shoreline protection can also be achieved through ‖softening‖ measures, which develop living shorelines through beach nourishment, planting dune grasses, marsh creation, and planting submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Planned retreat (or wetland migration) is an alternative to shoreline protection in the face of natural forces such as coastal erosion or sea level rise (Martinich 2008). With two simplifying assumptions, it is possible to estimate the value of real estate at risk from sea level rise. First, Stanton and Ackerman (2007) assumed that the value of real estate will grow uniformly in all parts of the state, in proportion to gross state product (GSP), throughout this century. Second, they assume that the fraction of the state‘s residential property at risk is proportional to the extent of sea level rise. Then, starting from the calculation of $130 billion of residential real estate, as of 2000, that would be vulnerable to 27 inches of sea level rise, it is possible to project the effects of both scenarios (business-as-usual and rapid stabilization) through 2100. The cost of inaction — that is, the annual increase in the value of residential real estate at risk of inundation — rises from $11 billion in 2025 to $56 billion in 2100, or almost 1 percent of GSP. And sea levels will continue to rise beyond 2100. No one expects coastal property owners to wait passively for these damages to occur; those who can afford to do so will undoubtedly seek to protect their properties. But all the available methods for protection against sea level rise are problematical and expensive. It is difficult to imagine any of them being used on a large enough scale to shelter all of Florida from the rising seas of the 21st century, under the worst case (Stanton and Ackerman 2007). Elevating homes and other structures is one way to reduce the risk of flooding, if not hurricaneinduced wind damage. A FEMA estimate of the cost of elevating a frame-construction house on a slab-on-grade foundation by two feet is $58 per square foot, after adjustment for inflation, with an added cost of $0.93 per square foot for each additional foot of elevation (FEMA 1998). A house with a 1,000 square foot footprint would thus cost $58,000 to elevate by two feet. It is not clear whether building elevation is applicable to multistory structures; at the least, it is sure to be more expensive and difficult (Stanton and Ackerman 2007). Another strategy for protecting real estate from climate change is to build seawalls to hold back rising waters. There are a number of ecological costs associated with building walls to hold back the sea, including accelerated beach erosion and disruption of nesting and breeding grounds for important species, such as sea turtles, and preventing the migration of displaced wetland species (NOAA 2000). In order to prevent flooding to developed areas, some parts of the coast would require the installation of new seawalls. Estimates for building or retrofitting seawalls range Adaptation Plan Page 211

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    City of Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan

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    Charlotte Harbor National Estuary P

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    Acknowledgements This project has b

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    Algal blooms ......................

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    Source: FDEP 2009..................

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    Table 32: Potential Coastal Storm S

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    ADAPTATION: Explicitly indicate in

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    Summary Conclusion ................

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    8. Availability of Insurance. The C

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    City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive P

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    The Current Climate of Southwest Fl

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    type of rainfall event that causes

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    Figure 2: The City of Punta Gorda i

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    Figure 3: USGS TOPO Map of the City

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    Figure 5: Existing Land Use of the

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    Figure 6:- The City of Punta Gorda

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    The asset inventory is a way to ass

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    CHNEP/SWFRPC team was to take the l

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    Each participant had to pick and di

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    Figure 7: The Adaptation Game board

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    would ―park‖ the label in the c

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    Description of Specific Implementat

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    2. Increasing the flexibility of vu

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    Prioritized Vulnerabilities and Ada

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    Increases in global surface tempera

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    Climate-related changes in freshwat

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    marsh may be overgrown by other spe

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    Figure 12: Wetlands and Uplands of

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    Changes to phenology of anadromous

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    Air temperature increases will affe

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    Changes in freshwater releases from

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    own pelican populations were reduce

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    irds with water depth niche partiti

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    protection and preservation activit

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    The Rapid Stabilization Case (of gr

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    Probability (%) 2025 2050 2075 2100

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    Figure 15: Sea level rise in three

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    The elevations analyzed (0.5, 1.0,

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    Figure 18: Acres of habitat or land

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    Figure 19: Acres of freshwater wetl

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    Habitat and Species Changes The Sea

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    Habitat Initial Condition Percent o

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    Figure 22: SLAMM Predictions of Hab

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    Figure 23: Habitat Structure 2000 S

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    weeds threaten to crowd out native

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    Table 7: Adaptations to Address Fis

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    Habitat protection/rete ntion Regul

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    Property, Shell Creek, Integrated H

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    Establish living shorelines Restore

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    Preserve, Charlotte Harbor and Myak

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    Do nothing Stop unchecked commercia

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    Figure 25: Seagrass coverage map fr

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    Figure 26: Baseline seagrass covera

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    Persistence maps were also created

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    Figure 30: Seagrass persistence in

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    Having determined the extent of the

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    Upon approval by the Management and

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    1993 Acres Gains/Losses (Acres) Gai

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    County;• Pansy Bayou, No Entry Zo

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    Vulnerability 2: Inadequate Water S

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    enforced except during extreme cond

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    Consider climate change in water su

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    demands Use of reclaimed water for

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    Identify alternative sources Charge

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    Require use of xeriscaping Inadequa

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    Table 14: Adaptations to Inadequate

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    where one plant is known to thrive,

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    Vulnerability 3: Flooding Hurricane

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    Figure 33: Atlantic hurricanes pass

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    Figure 34: Number of Structures in

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    Source: Charlotte County Property A

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    Figure 38: City of Punta Gorda Crit

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    Figures 40-42-35: Values for Critic

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    POTENTIAL MINIMUM COASTAL STORM SUR

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    Tropical storm effects on historic

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    Tropical storm effects on repetitiv

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    Figure 49: Potential Storm Surge Lo

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    Effects of a Category 1 storm on hi

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    Effects of a Category 1 storm on re

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    Provide rebates for installation of

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    Solve insurance problem to encourag

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    Obtain state/federal grants/loans N

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    Consider temperature when choosing

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    Implement land exchange programs Su

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    Additional insulation in buildings

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    All measures to reduce local GHG em

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    Redefine flood hazard zones Educati

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    ADAPTATION: Promote green building

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    these gases. When old units are bei

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    difficult to determine the amount o

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    does not take into account the mill

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    scientific disciplines, and should

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    effects of sea level rise on coasta

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    During these months, grass, leaves,

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    Limit development Fire Water Qualit

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    ADAPTATION: Drought preparedness pl

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    Vulnerability 10: Availability/Cost

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    of Punta Gorda. The weak tornado do

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    Figure 87: Number of Tornado Events

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    According to NOAA (2007), 60 signif

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    hurricanes. This high risk designat

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    Climate change may have a beneficia

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    Synergistic Risks Many other stress

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    $250,000 limit to NFIP, so either a

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    3) to restore oyster reefs, and 4)

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    design, building standards and land

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    Phase 1 (Monaco to Aqui Esta); Mult

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    explicit statements of how the indi

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    impeded implementation. More import

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    Adaptation Proximal Monitoring Phys

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    Explicitly indicating in the compre

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    Boyd, P.W., and S.C. Doney. 2002. M

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    Fields, P.A., J.B. Graham, R.H. Ros

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    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

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    Ogden, J.C. 1978b. Roseate spoonbil

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    Sallenger, A.H., C.W. Wright, and J

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    Comprehensive Southwest Florida/ Ch

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    Wilson, C. 1997. Hurricane Andrew

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    Please attend . . . Tuesday, June 2

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    More wind 2 Change in summer rain p

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    20) Please let us know of any other

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    Increase research & formulate actio

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    Replace shoreline armoring with liv

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    Strengthen rules that prevent the i

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    Use native plants in landscaping Re

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    Use LED standards in building Use f

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    Use pure science/proven information

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    Reduce impervious surface allowed C

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    Channel water from impervious to pe

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    Appendix IV. City of Punta Gorda Cr

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    Clinic Clinic Clinic 100 Madrid Blv

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    Hazardous Sites Hazardous Sites Haz

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    Sewer Lift Or Treatment Sewer Lift

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    Appendix V. Presentations Presentat

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    Slide 9 Slide 12 Director: Lisa B.

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    Slide 7 Slide 10 North Captiva Isla

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    Slide 19 Slide 22 Objective 2.4.2:

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    Slide 31 Slide 34 Slide 32 Slide 35

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    Agricultural water reuse Allocate a

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    consider climate change in water su

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    Develop heat-health action plans Hu

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    Growth management and land use plan

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    incorporate sea level rise into pla

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    maintain shorelines w/soft measures

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    Plan vertical accretion of wetlands

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    purchase upland development rights

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    Research possible asthma increase d

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    Values might change as to what cons

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    Adaptation Plan Page 399

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    Adaptation Plan Page 401

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    Adaptation Plan Page 403

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    Adaptation Plan Page 405

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    Adaptation Plan Page 407

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    Appendix VIII. September 3, 2009 Pu

Overview of Canal Maintenance Ordinances - City of Punta Gorda
Sewall construction and maintenance - City of Punta Gorda
Economic Conditions - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
2013 Workplan & Budget - Southwest Florida Regional Planning ...
workplan & budget - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
2007 Annual Report - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
Presented by - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
Legal & Regulatory - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
Storm Tide Atlas - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
2013 BRIEFING BOOK - Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
Mangrove Grant Proposal - Southwest Florida Regional Planning ...
View the Adaptation Plan - Model Forest Policy Program
community plan southwest - Brimbank City Council
2013 FDOT Mitigation Plan - Southwest Florida Water Management ...
2012 FDOT Mitigation Plan - Southwest Florida Water Management ...
Planning to Adapt – a regional approach - Our South West
City of Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan - Climate Adaptation ...
The City of Punta Gorda, FL
The City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan 2025 p
Joan LeBeau, Chief Planner, City of Punta Gorda
Certificate of Competency Application - City of Punta Gorda
to view the Infrastructure Element - City of Punta Gorda