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Environmental Report 1998

Environmental Report 1998

Environmental Aspects – Expansion of the Melting Facility Studsvik has applied for permission to increase the capacity of the melting facility for the metal components. Dust emissions will be reduced through improved filter efficiency, in spite of an increase in melting capacity from 900 tonnes per year to 2,500 tonnes per year. The project involves building an extension of about 750 square meters. Furthermore, most of the existing premises will be rebuilt. These measures will reduce the environmental impact of the facility, improve occupational safety and health and increase production logistics at the plant. During 1998, the two melting facilities at Studsvik released about 18 kilograms of dust containing metals into the atmosphere. These emissions are far below the 450 kilogram limit which has been established for the facility. Through the improved filter efficiency, emissions will be reduced by a further 40 per cent to about 10 kilograms, in spite of the fact that the capacity of the facility will be increased to more than twice the capacity. 10 8 6 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 0.02 0.04 0.04 0.04 0.04 0.02 0.06 0.06 0.08 0.08 0.04 0.1 0.02 0.06 0.06 0.1 0.2 0.15 0.08 0.02 Studsvik -10 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 10 0.1 0.08 0.08 0.06 0.06 0.04 0.04 0.04 0.04 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 For the purpose of comparison, dust emissions from the melting furnaces are lower than emissions from one long-distance truck 1) during one year. The advanced filter system, and the fact that the facility is very small compared with commercial, full-scale melting facilities, both contribute to keeping the emissions at a very low level. As part of the environmental impact statement which was submitted along with the application to expand the melting capacity, a calculation was performed of how 10 kilograms of dust are dispersed in the area around the facility. The contribution of the melting facility to the total quantity of dust deposited in the area is insignificant. The contribution of the facility at the Aspvreten measurement station in the Nynäs nature reserve is about 0.03 milligrams per square meter and year, compared with the total deposit of 30 milligrams per square meter and year. Estimated annual deposit (mg/m 2 ) from the release of 10 kg of dust from the melting facility at Studsvik. 1) Heavy truck with trailer. Annual driving distance 20,000 kilometers, not including driving in metropolitan areas, average speed 70 km/h. (Source: Statistics Sweden, VTI and others). 12

Waste Management and Cleaning Systems High demands on waste management and cleaning systems ensure that the environmental impact of waste and emissions is minimized. Swedish Radioactive Waste Adapted to Swedish Waste Management System The Swedish radioactive waste treated at Studsvik is adapted to the Swedish radioactive waste management system, i.e. all waste packages produced are standardized for disposal in the Swedish radioactive waste repositories. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB), which is owned by the Swedish nuclear power companies, is responsible for the final disposal of the Swedish radioactive waste. To ensure a safe final disposal, extensive safety studies are conducted, which include data from Studsvik. Residual products from the incineration of foreign radioactive waste are returned to the country of origin for final disposal. Solid Waste Packed into Steel Drums and Concrete Containers Low level solid waste (ash as well as non-combustible waste) is packed into 100-liter drums which are, in turn, placed into 200-liter drums. The gap between the drums is then filled with concrete. The waste is thereby cast in concrete. Medium level waste is packed into special 80-liter double-lidded drums. The drums are placed into concrete containers, each holding 5 drums. Radioactive Effluent Cleaned through Precipitation Process Since the 1980’s, a precipitation process has been used for the cleaning of radioactive effluent. The residual sludge is then transferred to 200-liter drums and cast in concrete. Development work is currently in progress with the aim of improving water cleaning at Studsvik. Flue Gas Cleaning from the Incineration Facility The incineration facility at Studsvik was rebuilt in 1989. After rebuilding it meets stringent flue gas cleaning requirements. A new flue gas cleaning system was installed during rebuilding and the combustion process was optimized. In connection with the rebuilding, an off-gas furnace was also installed. The furnace allows heat from the incineration facility to be used for heating at Studsvik. 13

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