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NPCA Stormwater Manual – Appendices - Niagara Peninsula ...

NPCA Stormwater Manual – Appendices - Niagara Peninsula ...

Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Policies and Criteria Niagara Region and Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority – DRAFT Q2 Some municipalities require additional extended detention for erosion/stream morphology and attenuation control to comply with council approved subwatershed plans. In the absence of a subwatershed study and Master Drainage Plan, the minimum control is 40m 3 /ha as per the MOE. Municipalities that have conducted geomorphic or stream erosion studies and have identified downstream erosion problems site specific requirements for erosion control will be required. Refer to Section 6.0 for further discussion and proposed policy direction relating to erosion targets. 1.3 Hydrogeological Sensitive areas The NPCA Groundwater Study was initiated to characterize the groundwater resources within the NPCA watersheds. The study identified groundwater vulnerable areas and potential risks to groundwater contamination from existing and future land uses. Information from this study has been incorporated into Section 6.0 which offers policy direction relating to hydrogeological sensitive areas. 1.3.1 Trends and Advances Other municipalities are also initiating water resources protection strategies to protect and preserve water supplies. These studies are important when planning SWM and considering potential threats to groundwater, especially when infiltrating surface water. Municipalities are using the information and recommendations from these studies to make management decisions such as where to target salt reduction programs for roads located within hydrogeologic sensitive areas. This has also lead municipalities to explore road design standards that reduce the need for salt. The information has further assisted with developing policies and by-laws related to snow disposal to avoid such activities in areas vulnerable to groundwater contamination. Municipalities such as the City of Guelph that rely entirely on groundwater as their drinking water source have specific policies to encourage groundwater recharge in SWM design. The policies do require that the potential impacts on water quality and quantity be assessed for any proposed SWM techniques on the regional aquifer or municipal water sources. Refer to Section 6.3 for further discussion and proposed policy direction relating to Hydrogeological Sensitive areas. 1.4 Hydrologic and Hydraulic Analysis Refer to Section 7.0 for further discussion and proposed policy direction relating to hydrologic and hydraulic analysis. 1.5 Minor and Major System The minor system varies across the Niagara Region and the NPCA watersheds, ranging from 2, 5 and in some cases 10-year for some commercial areas at the discretion of the engineer. The major storm event for all design standards reviewed is the 100-year storm.

Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Policies and Criteria Niagara Region and Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority – DRAFT Q3 The MTO manual indicates that local municipalities set the minor system criteria. Municipalities should standardize the minor system criteria within NPCA. The major system is set by provincial criteria, administered by the NPCA, namely regulatory protection of property and buildings. Section 7.0 provides further discussion on hydrologic analysis and the design of the major and minor drainage system. 1.6 Spill Management The general, policies pertaining to Spill Management Plans for municipalities in the Niagara Region and the NPCA watersheds are required for all industrial and commercial lands that process, store, or refine liquid. 1.6.1 Trends and Advances Municipalities are taking advantage of opportunities when planning capital projects such as road reconstruction and storm sewer replacement to implement BMPs in the minor system. Coordinating stormwater improvements in conjunction with road reconstruction is a cost effective way to install controls such as oil and grit separators. Some municipalities incorporate oil and grit separators into storm sewer systems installing at the last catch basin to treat road runoff. The installation of oil and grit separators is also useful for controlling potential spills. The NPCA Groundwater Study provides details on spill management and contingency planning. The report also provides records of MOE report spills and the type and location where they occurred. See Section 6.2.4 regarding consideration of spill potential in development plans. 1.7 Foundation Drains Many municipalities are concerned about foundation drains connected to the storm sewer system. The practice in the past has led to foundation damage and basement flooding from hydraulic pressure when the storm sewer becomes surcharged. Minor systems are designed to accommodate flow from storm events of 2 to 10-year return periods. When these flows are exceeded, surface water will naturally find a flow route in the major system. During these major system events, water is restricted by the inlet or pipe capacity from entering the storm sewer. However, the hydraulic pressure in the storm sewer is often at the level of the surface, resulting in the same hydraulic pressure in the foundation drain. To prevent this occurrence, typical policies regarding foundation drains have been adopted including: • Single residential to be directed to grade if soils are conducive; • Row or town homes may be connected to the storm sewer; • Foundation drains may be connected to foundation drain collectors (third pipe or FDC), storm sewer or discharged to ground; • For new development, the foundation drains must be pumped to the sewer and not by gravity; • Connect to storm sewer but must provide good reason; • Use third pipe approach; • Provide hydraulic analysis to support connection to the storm sewer; • Connections to storm drains are expressly prohibited; and • Sump pumps are to be discharged to grade “in a manner that would not cause erosion or inconvenience to neighbours”.

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