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NPCA Stormwater Manual – Appendices - Niagara Peninsula ...

NPCA Stormwater Manual – Appendices - Niagara Peninsula ...

Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Policies and Criteria Niagara Region and Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority – DRAFT Q16 1.17 SWM Facility Design and Landscaping Guidelines The design and aesthetic guidelines that were reviewed in the available design standards generally follow the guidelines provided in the MOE Stormwater Management Planning and Design Manual (2003). The following list identifies some of the design and aesthetic design guidelines used across the Niagara Region and the NPCA watersheds: • Identify the types of outlet control structures approved for use; • The dimensions of the access road around the perimeter of the facility and the required number of access gates; • Fencing requirements depending on the type of facility and associated grading (i.e., maximum side slopes); • Placement of inlet/outlet structures to discourage public access; • Maintenance accessories such as trash racks; • Maximum water depth under any condition; and • Landscaping requirements (i.e., seeding and sodding, and use of native vegetation). 1.17.1 Trends and Advances Many municipalities across Ontario have taken the guidelines from the MOE Stormwater Management Planning and Design Manual (2003) and adapted them for their own needs. Municipalities are implementing naturalized methods for SWM facility designs using techniques such as biomimicry. To facilitate future maintenance activities, some municipalities are requiring sediment dewatering areas for new SWM facilities. Appendices I and S provide sample aesthetic guidelines and a plant list approved by the NPCA. 1.18 Stormwater Management Best Management Practices The municipal standards provide potential BMP alternatives that should be considered when selecting the appropriate SWM technique. The following list summarizes some of the BMP approaches and specific BMP types accepted throughout the Niagara Region and the NPCA watersheds: Several municipalities recommend considering applying stormwater BMPs techniques at lot level techniques and at source control, Transport or Conveyance control, and end-of-pipe. • The policies highlight the fact that stormwater BMPs are more effective if applied at the source; • Grass swales, ponds, roof leaders to grass, rooftop storage, and underground storage; • Some policies permit temporary detention facilities within watercourses; • SWM detention through roof top storage, parking lot detention, oversized pipes, and green area detention; • Application of a BMP should be considered in subwatershed study or master plan; • Reports must contain a statement by the designer indicating that BMPs were reviewed and utilized; • Maintenance of hydrologic cycle is encouraged where soil conditions permit; • Utilize SWM facilities to enhance or maintain infiltration; • Active infiltration measures will be applicable with supporting soils information; and

Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Policies and Criteria Niagara Region and Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority – DRAFT Q17 • Endorse provincial standards for SWM. The official plan policies encourage incorporating SWM controls into the fabric of the development. Clustering of development and consideration for at source controls for residential, commercial, institutional, and parking areas. These policies encourage application of the BMPs suggested by Niagara Region’s Model Urban Design Guidelines. 1.18.1 Trends and Advances Municipalities are using the treatment train approach to SWM which, in some cases, can lead to smaller pond facilities and obtain higher performance. Section 8.0 provides an overview of the various structural and non structural BMPs currently in practice across Canada, and provides further discussion on the treatment train approach. In some municipalities the SWM reduction benefits of at source controls is often not included in the SWM design calculations for the end-of-pipe facility. The reason being is that at source controls located on private lands are left to the landowner to maintain. The use of easements and agreements between the municipality and the private owner may be the best way for ensuring the lot level or at source SWM controls will be maintained, monitored, and protected (see section on SWM facilities on private lands). Municipalities typically approve SWM ponds, oversized pipes, underground tanks, roof top storage, and hard surfaces such as parking lots. Some municipalities only permit storage in parking lots for frequent events up to the five-year level as it can hinder site access. A water balance model was developed in British Columbia with the goal of restoring the natural water balance over time. The model can be applied at the lot level, subdivision and subwatershed scale to calculate the runoff reduction for various types of BMPs. As discussed earlier, LID is a site design strategy that aims to maintain or replicate the predevelopment hydrologic conditions. BMPs such as rain gardens, bioinfiltration, bioretention, and green roofs help to capture, store and treat rainfall to simulate a predevelopment hydrologic conditions. Municipalities, such as the City of Waterloo, have implemented stormwater BMP pilot projects such as retrofitting the City Hall with a green roof. The City has also implemented a monitoring program in cooperation with community partners to measure the SWM benefits these technologies provide. 1.19 SWM Report Submission Requirements See Section 11.0 for information on SWM Report submission requirements. 1.20 Approvals See Section 12.0 for information on Approvals. 1.21 Erosion and Sediment Control Monitoring Inadequate maintenance of accumulated sediment levels within the facility can lead to loss of performance over time in wet ponds and wetlands. The Town of Richmond Hill undertook extensive monitoring that showed the long-term sediment accumulation rate of 2.0 m 3 /ha per year observed at stabilized catchments could increase by approximately ten fold during the early period of pond operation, in spite of active erosion and sediment control at the construction site. The relationship between sediment accumulation and age suggests that the first five-

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