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NPCA Stormwater Manual – Appendices - Niagara Peninsula ...

NPCA Stormwater Manual – Appendices - Niagara Peninsula ...

Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Policies and Criteria Niagara Region and Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority – DRAFT Q20 SWM into the landscape. Incorporate drought resistant plant material in order to reduce long term maintenance and conserve water. Site plans are to be prepared by a qualified planner, Professional Engineer, or landscape architect. For preliminary site reviews that include watercourses and other natural features, it may be beneficial to include staff from the NPCA at the preliminary development meeting. The proponent should consider creating a map of the proposed site plan that specifically identifies the features of the site that facilitate the natural processing of stormwater. Features such as watercourses, wetlands, existing vegetation, infiltration areas, slopes, swales, and natural depressional areas should be identified. The map would help the engineer, architect or planner to justify site configuration and demonstrate how the natural stormwater processing features have been maintained or enhanced. Landscape plans should utilize a diversity of native plant species from a pre-selected list (see Appendix S). Utilize species that are drought tolerant to reduce watering and future maintenance requirements. Tree survey plans be submitted to identify existing vegetation on site and determine what vegetation can be preserved. Proponents should be encourage to implement innovative landscape design by considering the natural features of the landscape and ensuring the integration of SWM features, site plan submissions to integrate SWM in parking areas through landscape features, and site plans to demonstrate how the site was configured to isolate impervious areas and infiltrate stormwater where appropriate. The following criteria were developed by the Puget Sound Action Team (2005). • Reduce front yard setbacks to reduce the length of parking lots; • Reduced road widths for more compact design; • Cluster housing units to reduce road widths; • Loop road designs; • Discourage dead ends and cul-de-sac streets; • Consider pull out parking that clusters the parking and creates the opportunity to isolate impervious areas; • Utilitize stormwater treatment techniques as traffic calming measures; • Reduce driveway widths; • Shared driveway parking; and • Limit impervious areas for driveways to two tracks and the remainder a reinforced grass or other pervious surface. Municipalities should consider SWM for parking lot expansions or redevelopment to incorporate SWM quality and quantity controls when no controls currently exist. Consider amending site plan agreements to include provisions for stormwater quality and quantity controls. 1.28 Alternative Design Standards The Town of Caledon applies the following design guidelines when assessing submissions under the alternate development criteria. These alternate development standards are only recognized in the context of Council approved Pilot Projects. The ‘net gain principle’ successful alternate development design must demonstrate a significantly different, comprehensive and ‘net gain solution’. The engineering solution should have regard for the net overall benefit

Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Policies and Criteria Niagara Region and Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority – DRAFT Q21 of the comprehensive solution. All stakeholders in the alternate design solution should agree with the net gain principle, and the overall values and objectives. 1.27.1 Enhanced Features on Public Lands The alternate plans may suggest enhancing proposed public infrastructure (e.g., parking lots, recreational lands, sidewalks, and fences). The following guidelines are applied by Town staff when evaluating a proposal: • The solution must be better than the standard solution, or else equitable trade-offs may be considered; • All solutions must meet the basic safety, durability, longevity, and functionality criteria. It is understood that there may be more than one way to meet a design objective. Development standards tend to be stipulated for simplicity and rule out alternatives; • All initial costs to provide enhanced infrastructure should be considered at the expense of the development, as a share in the risk of the project. The Town would assume the risk of replacement issues, unless stated otherwise. The Town will reserve the right to correct problems emerging with respect to specific elements of the infrastructure. The Town reserves the right to apply or preserve the standard design; and • Enhanced features tend to have higher maintenance and replacement costs. The Town will reserve the right to not to change, maintain or renovate the enhanced features. Accountability for maintenance and upkeep must be determined. Arrangements must be established to address the care and preservation of enhanced features and services, unless otherwise stated by the Town. 1.27.2 Additional Public Infrastructure Acquisition of parkland beyond the standard 5%, Blocks, Easement and Right of Way will not be compensated by the Town unless otherwise stipulated by the Town. Cash-in-lieu of parkland would be required, where applicable, unless clearly demonstrated alternative advantages are provided. Feature such as access lanes, common areas, linking pathways, and rear-yard features should be assessed for ownership before dedicating these areas for public use. 1.27.3 Irregular Right of Ways Variant widths for corridor ROW may be considered. Where all servicing requirements are met by infrastructure improvements, corridor widths may vary in pilot projects. Green space along corridors may be within the strategically widened ROW, allowing for flexible lot frontage. Consideration should be given to develop infrastructure which will encourage property owners to maintain curb line, pedestrian corridors, and other publicly utilized areas. 1.27.3 Parking Capacity Parking on the public ROW is a frequent urban problem. Pilot project need to address this issue with design concerns.

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