Views
3 years ago

1kLPuWX

1kLPuWX

experiences are a hot

experiences are a hot thing: Ultraviolet, in Shanghai, combines food with moving images projected on the walls of the dining room, music and aromas (other than that of the food— the scent of the ocean for a lobster course, for example). In Barcelona, Ferran Adria’s 41 Degrees “plunges guests into an art installation…exploring how combined sensory stimuli create powerful, emotional and memorable ties between consumers and restaurants.” Hotels are expanding their sensory experiences, from the Nordic Light, with rooms featuring individually programmable lights chosen to create calm, relaxation, romance or whatever mood guests desire, to the 21c Museum Hotels inviting guests to “bed down with art,” including video, sound, light, digital and text installations. The digital revolution was, at first, aural and then largely visual. But we are rapidly developing digital technologies that channel the other senses as well. Digital scent technologies are especially promising. The Smelling Screen makes specific objects on an LCD screen release particular odors at pre-set intervals. The Ophone, currently in development, takes smells mobile, enabling users to “text” any of 320 different scents, creating personalized aromas that are produced by a cylinder synched to a smartphone via Bluetooth. Inventors are even tackling the fleeting nature of scent: an analog camera dubbed the Madeleine captures smells, which can then be sent off for analysis, supporting the creation of “bespoke memory capsules.” Smell isn’t the only sense making a new leap into the digital realm, either: researchers at the National University of Singapore are working on a “digital lollipop” that can simulate taste. Haptic technology explores the realm of digital touch. AIREAL uses puffs of air to create tactile sensations in midair, corresponding to a user’s body gestures in front of a screen (playing goalie, if you go to “block” that digital soccer ball, you actually feel it hitting your hand!) Another gizmo uses electro-vibrations to simulate the feel of textured surfaces as rendered on a touchscreen via digital data—letting you feel what you are looking at on your screen. MIT Media Lab’s inFORM allows users to “reach through” a computer screen to manipulate a real object in a remote location. Researchers at UC San Diego are even working on devices that would digitally record touch in much the same way we record sound. Their work was initiated in response to a request from the UCSD School of Medicine’s neonatology group, which wanted to record the sensations of a mother holding her baby in order to “play it back” to premature infants confined to incubators. We don’t need haptics or “scent texts” to create multisensory experiences—sometimes it’s enough to create immersive experiences that co-opt the sensory landscape where they take place. This is the case with “immersive film” such as The Alter Bahnhof Video Walk (2012) designed for an old train station in Kassel, Germany, which creates an immersive “physical cinema” environment. Participants check out an iPod and headphones, and cue up an alternate reality app that overlays events playing out on Left: Epic reenactment of Rembrandt’s “Night Watch” staged in a shopping center to celebrate the reopening of the Rijksmuseum in 2013. Courtesy ING. 19

2014_trendswatch_lores-with-tracking-chip
TRENDSWATCH 2013 Back to the Future
TRENDSWATCH 2013 Back to the Future
TRENDSWATCH 2013 Back to the Future
2012_trends_watch_final
OVUM_2015_Research_Agenda_IT
TRENDSWATCH 2013 Back to the Future
2015_trendswatch_pdf_fnl_3EAAFDB042FEF931B479B9566