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3 years ago

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Left: Adam Harvey’s

Left: Adam Harvey’s “Anti-Drone” scarf is made of a metallized fabric that protects against thermal imaging. Above: Stealth wear in the “Privacy Gift Shop” at the New Museum. The OFF Pocket phone case blocks all incoming and outgoing phone signals. Photos courtesy Adam Harvey. for “sentiment analysis” of its exhibit “The Tanks: Art in Action.”) Indoor GPS systems give museums the ability to tell—to within 3 to 10 feet, depending on the system being used— where a visitor is in the building, and museums are using this ability in conjunction with apps to push location-appropriate content to visitors, tailored to the exhibit they are in. Researchers have even played with measuring the physiological reactions of visitors as they move through an exhibit. There is a long history of concerns about privacy; these are being accelerated by ever more sophisticated surveillance technologies. Tidying up your legacy is no longer as simple as burning a pile of letters. People are becoming more conscious and careful about what data they share, and with whom. One recent Pew study reports that over half of app users have uninstalled or not installed an app due to concerns about personal information, and 19 percent turn off the location-tracking feature on their cell phone. Another Pew study showed 68 percent of the public feels current laws are inadequate to protect people’s privacy online, and half of Internet users are concerned about the amount of personal information about them that is online. In particular, people are protesting the collection of data they have not voluntarily provided. Many major retailers now use Indoor Location Tracking Software that ties together data from surveillance cameras, sensors and WiFi. Shoppers aren’t always aware this is happening or happy when they find out. When Nordstrom’s, in an effort to be transparent in its operations, disclosed how it was monitoring customers, it provoked a “firestorm” of criticism and had to stop. Google decided not to install facial recognition software on its wearable heads-up display, Google Glass, due to concerns expressed by the public and a congressional committee that this feature could be used to call up personal data on anyone a Glass user encounters. With or without facial recognition, 5 Point Café in Seattle made a point 35