Annual Report 2006-2007 - Sweetser

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Annual Report 2006-2007 - Sweetser

Your First Call for a Better Tomorrow

2007 ANNUAL REPORT

July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007


2007-2008 Board of Directors

Chair: William J. Zafirson, Saco

Vice Chair: Roberta M. Wright, Falmouth

Secretary: Cindy A. Boyt, Scarborough

Treasurer: Robert E. Convery, Scarborough

Assistant Treasurer: Stephen P. Lubelczyk, Gorham

Claudia L. Adams, Brunswick

Donald J. Ballute, Hollis

Joann H. Beaudoin, Wells

John S. Beliveau, Falmouth

Richard B. Dalbeck, Cape Elizabeth

Dennis Eagleson, Kennebunk

Christopher T. Emmett, Far Mills, N.J.

Steven J. Fennell, Saco

Keith B. Gosselin, Biddeford

Samuel G. Henderson III, Portland

Jerry Mansfield, Saco

Katharine P. Meeker, Falmouth

Edmond R. Pelta, Harpswell

Carlton D. Pendleton, Saco

Gregory R. Prince, Gorham

Meredith L. Richardson, Kittery

Melissa R. Richter, Cumberland Center

Patricia A. Small, Scarborough

Joan V. Smith, Phippsburg

Carol G. Thorne, South Portland

David M. Tourangeau, Falmouth

President’s Council

Carlton D. Pendleton

President and Chief Executive Officer

Michael R. Abbatiello

Senior Vice President for Operations

Cynthia P.B. Fagan

Vice President for Administration

Message from our Board and Leadership

A Year of Progress

We are pleased to share our 2007 Sweetser

annual report. We are very appreciative of the

many supporters statewide who are dedicated to

assisting Sweetser with its mission.

Huge systemic change directed by the

Department of Health and Human Services and

a tight financial State budget have made the year

a very interesting one for our board, our staff

and our consumers. Because of leadership from

a very talented group of community leaders on

our Board of Directors, coupled with dedicated

and talented staff, we have accomplished much

over the past year.

Carlton D. Pendleton

President & CEO

William J. Zafirson

Chair, Board of Directors

We are, collectively, most proud that Sweetser was awarded the

Avatar International Award for Social Service Agencies for exceeding

customer expectations. This prestigious award couldn’t have come

at a better time. Any and all affirmations of our work are greatly

appreciated. Our staff is very dedicated to our mission, and we

thank them for that. This award shows our consumers are pleased

with our efforts.

Maine people who have come to count on our organization will

always be able to count on assistance from Sweetser. We will look a

little different as a result of the changes, but we look a lot different

now than when we started our commitment to Maine citizens 179

years ago!

Matt L. Mulligan

Vice President for Health Information Services

Paul P. Peterson

Vice President for Child, Adult and Family Services

Debra D. Taylor

Vice President for Finance

Rowena Tessmann

Vice President for Outpatient & Medical Services

Philip E. Trudeau

Vice President for Human Resources

A student sits tall for an outing with classmates during Ruel Ricker

Day activities.

2


FY2007 Accomplishments

Sweetser was one of four agencies chosen from more

than 100 to win a grant from the National Council for

Community Behavioral Healthcare to support a pilot

program to standardize access to care.

• We provided behavioral healthcare for 11,262 adults and

23,787 children, for a total of 35,049 individuals.

Sweetser completed its 32nd consecutive accreditation

cycle with the National Council on Accreditation.

• The School at Sweetser in Saco served 200 students

during the 2006-2007 school year. In June, a record

16 students graduated, and six went on to pursue higher

education — some with scholarship money.

Sweetser was presented the National Award for

Exceeding Customer Expectations from Avatar

International, an independent evaluator of client

satisfaction outcomes.

Sweetser’s two special events, the Sold on Kids Benefit

Auction and the Prime Motor Golf Tournament,

generated more than $150,000 dollars.

• As Lewiston-based Richardson Hollow closed its doors,

Sweetser agreed to step in and continue services for that

agency’s 1,000 clients.

Sweetser’s dedicated volunteers contributed more than

39,842 working hours.

Sweetser was awarded three state contracts to provide

High Fidelity Wraparound Services for children and

families in northern York, Brunswick/Sagadahoc, and

Knox/Waldo Counties.

• The Governor’s Office and the Maine Commission

for Community Service presented Sweetser’s volunteer

services manager, Linda Danielson, with Maine’s

Excellence in Volunteer Administration Award.

• With assistance from the JTG Foundation, consumers at

Sweetser’s Learning and Recovery Center created a new

transportation program to help low-income, mid-coast

residents access services.

Sweetser was awarded a state contract to provide homebased

Family Reunification Services for DHHS children

and families in Knox, Waldo, Lincoln and Sagadahoc

Counties.

• The Sweetser Training Institute held 90 training

programs for mental health professionals.

Volunteer Profile:

Russell Turner, Mentor

Five years ago, Russell Turner read an article about Sweetser in the local newspaper.

Turner, who is father to a teenage son, put down the paper and picked up the phone.

“I had some extra time, and thought I might use my first-hand knowledge to help

another boy around my son’s age,” he said.

Even though his son is now grown, Turner still mentors Sweetser teenagers. Over

the years, he has introduced his mentees to outdoor activities such as snowboarding,

ocean fishing, tubing, kayaking, and golfing.

Keeping in touch with the youth of today is one of the most rewarding benefits of

being a mentor, he said. Turner believes that non-conforming teenagers still need

and want a connection with an accepting adult. Showing up as a positive role

model for teenagers can ease their entry into adulthood, he said.

Russell poses with his young protégée,

Robert Railton.

“The simplest things – baking cookies or going on a hike – can bring something new into a young person’s life.”

Turner describes himself as a “snowboarding fanatic.” When not on the slopes, he may be biking, hiking, jogging or kayaking.

He recently returned from Guatemala, where he took part in local cultural activities and learned some Spanish.

“Turner is a great mentor and a terrific role model,” said Linda Danielson, Volunteer Services Manager at Sweetser.

“He introduced mentees to opportunities they might not have had otherwise, and involved them in community service

projects. We are fortunate to have such a wonderful volunteer.”

Interested in becoming a mentor? Email volunteer@sweetser.org or call 207.373.3006

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Donor Profile:

A Lifetime of Giving

Irvin Foster’s first donation to Sweetser arrived in the mail in 1953. Since that time,

this 83-year-old friend has never missed a year of giving to the organization. Not one.

Sweetser has always had a good reputation, and I have a soft spot to help young people in

need. When I received that first appeal in the mail, I knew it was the right place to give to.”

Growing up in Aroostook County as an orphan, and having two sisters who were

adopted by the Home for Little Wanderers, Foster holds a strong appreciation for the

work of Sweetser. His generous gifts have helped to sustain this work for more than

half a century.

Even geographical distance did not diminish Foster’s benevolence toward Sweetser.

In 1980, he and his wife, Rosamond, moved to the Gulf Coast of Florida. Still, the

Fosters continue to believe in Sweetser’s work and financially support our organization

each year.

Irvin ‘Cut’ Foster barbeques dinner in

Engelwood, Florida with his greatgranddaughter,

Taryn Lyons.

Development Director Todd Henry describes the impact of Foster’s support, “We are accustomed to recognizing donors

for the size of their gifts to Sweetser, but just as important—if not more so—are those who give consistently to our annual

fund. These donors provide the foundation for our efforts, year in and year out. And no one has given more consistently

than Irvin Foster.”

In the fall of 2007, Foster was elected to the Cornelius Sweetser Heritage Society in recognition of his extraordinary

commitment to the organization.

Thank you, Irvin Foster, for your 54 years of annual giving to Sweetser.

Contributions Enhance Sweetser Programs

Some 2,900 benefactors contributed $3.1 million to Sweetser in our Development efforts last year

Donations came from well-intended individuals, corporations, charitable foundations, state and

federal grant makers, special events and estate bequests.

Highest-level gifts came through the following sources: Maine Department of Health and Human

Services, the JTG Foundation, Governors Training Initiative, Adams Trust, United Ways of Midcoast

Maine and York County and Maine Community Foundation. Other very supportive foundations are

listed in the donation section located in this publication.

Todd E. Henry

Director of

Development

Bequests and planned gifts continue to play an important role in building our endowment and

supporting Sweetser programs. Trusts and bequests, established by local supporters, generated more

than $420,000 between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007.

In addition, Sweetser’s two annual flagship fundraising events bring about bountiful contributions. The Sold on Kids Benefit

Auction, presented by Key Bank, raised $95,000. Auctioneer Bill Zafirson and emcee Lee Goldberg entertained more than

350 guests and sponsors. The Sweetser/Prime Motor Group Golf Classic, in June, generated a record-breaking $60,000.

This is one of the most popular golf fundraisers in Maine, and Ira Rosenberg continues to raise the bar!

We are grateful to our many friends and supporters who invest their philanthropic dollars to help Sweetser provide valuable

behavioral and mental health services throughout Maine. Thank you for your continued support.

4


Client Profile:

The Keimach Family - Student and Family Support

Ryan White Keimach is 20 and lives with a mental illness.

He attended Sweetser’s Saco School during the second half of his junior year and

then most of his senior year. Keimach dropped out of school in April, just weeks

before graduation. His mother, Tammy, attended the ceremony and talked about

the impact that Ryan’s experience at Sweetser had on her family.

With her two young daughters by her side, Tammy spoke ardently about her family’s

background as each member dealt with Ryan’s bi-polar disorder.

At home with the Keimach family. From left,

Tammy, Ryan, Kayla and Jill.

Before being referred to Sweetser, Ryan attended public school. Throughout these years, his mother said she worried that

Ryan might need to be physically restrained or removed from a class—a tension which affected her family. “Mental illness

is not limited to the individual,” she said. “It affects and consumes those around the person. It has been, by far, the biggest

challenge of our lives.”

Once Ryan was at Sweetser, however, life changed for the Keimach family. “For the first time, Ryan was comfortable and safe,”

she explained. “They nurtured Ryan’s strengths and showed a level of patience and genuine concern that I had not seen before.

Ryan would come home and talk about school and the friends he made,” she said. “My son was enjoying school for the first time

in his life.”

Though Ryan continued to struggle with his mental illness, Sweetser never gave up on him. “The Sweetser team worked

so intimately with our family that I sometimes wonder if we would have survived the last couple of years without them,”

Tammy told the audience.

“There are still difficulties ahead for Ryan, but because of Sweetser, we now have hope,” she concluded. “Life is still tough for

Ryan and for us. We know we will face many more challenges. But the impact Sweetser has had on us will surely help to get

us through them.”

Employee Profile:

Careyleah MacLeod, LCSW

In the summer of 2005, Careyleah MacLeod, LCSW, stepped onto the ferry that would take her to

Vinalhaven, an island located 15 miles off the coast of Rockland. A family on the island needed her

help, and MacLeod was happy to accommodate. The air temperature that day was 72 degrees, the

sea was calm, and the sky was clear blue. “I could get used to this,” she said. Within months of that

ferry ride, MacLeod’s island caseload grew. “Word gets around,” said Yvonne Thomas, guidance

councilor at Vinalhaven School. “Careyleah is clear and strong. She helps people.”

Careyleah MacLeod

To make best use of her time, MacLeod moved into her office at the medical center and slept on a

pull-out couch. When her caseload grew, she rented a tiny summer place near the beach. With her

truckload of clothes, books, knitting and cookware, she settled in. “It took me only a month to fall

in love with life here,” she said.

In addition to the challenge of living on an island with a year-round population of only 1,400 residents, adapting to a limited

winter ferry schedule and shortened business hours at the local market, she faced the daily challenge of setting boundaries in a

small community. “I saw two adult sisters for more than four months before either one of them knew that I was also meeting

the other one,” MacLeod said.

When the school needed someone to oversee the community garden, MacLeod volunteered. “A community garden would be

a great way to engage kids over the summer,” she said.

“MacLoed has made a difference in the lives of many island families,” said Amy Ackroyd, Clinical Supervisor for DHHS

Clinical Case Management and Wraparound Maine. “She’s come to call this island home.”

5


PROGRAM & FINANCIAL

INFORMATION FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007, JULY 1, 2006 – JUNE 30, 2007

REVENUE

Net Program Service Revenue $ 52,532,467

Contributions $ 3,070,681

Income on Investments $ 1,017,811

Miscellaneous Revenue $ 1,874,737

Total Revenue $ 58,495,696

REVENUE SOURCES

MaineCare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69%

State of Maine* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12%

Local School Districts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5%

Fundraising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5%

Private Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3%

Income on Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2%

Self-Pay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1%

Miscellaneous** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3%

* From the Departments of Health and Human Services,

Education and Corrections.

** Includes Medicare and other revenues.

EXPENDITURES by operation area

Residential Services $ 15,402,938

Child and Family

Community Services $ 12,238,928

Outpatient Services $ 9,792,447

Educational Services $ 7,209,215

Crisis Services $ 6,930,855

Adult Community-based Services $ 5,072,389

Other $ 1,362,777

Total Expenses $ 58,009,549

CLIENTS SERVED BY PROGRAM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Adults Children TOTAL

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(22+) (0-21)

Outpatient Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,491 2,497 9,988

Child and Family

Community Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,827 3,737 7,564

Crisis Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,916 1,744 4,660

Adult Community-based Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .805 15 820

Residential Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 336 336

Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 419 419

CLIENTS SERVED BY COUNTY

COUNTY Adults Children TOTAL

Cumberland 2,927 3,558 6,485

York 1,441 4,082 5,523

Sagadahoc 1,865 974 2,839

Lincoln 1,061 615 1,676

Knox 205 606 811

Androscoggin 387 377 764

Waldo 62 528 590

Kennebec 1,057 373 1,430

Penobscot 894 492 1,386

Oxford 93 121 214

Somerset 193 89 282

Aroostook 18 29 47

Franklin 236 59 295

Piscataquis 23 15 38

Washington 42 14 56

Hancock 60 77 137

Other/out of state 17 6 23

Unknown 681 510 1,191

Total Served in FY07 11,262 12,525 23,787


You guys changed my life. I will always

remember my time at Sweetser. I lived in

Portland Cottage in Saco and Bob Gauthier

was the best male role model I have ever had.

— Mike B.


6


Our Network of Care

Sweetser is your first call for a better tomorrow. As

Maine’s most comprehensive mental health network,

Sweetser promises to do whatever it takes to connect

adults and children to the mental health treatment and

related support that they need and deserve. Nationally

recognized and accredited, Sweetser has nearly 200 years

of experience caring for adults and children who are living

with mental illness, behavioral disorders or substance

abuse problems. Sweetser is a nonprofit organization

with more than 1,000 employees serving approximately

20,000 adults and children throughout Maine.

Sweetser PromiseLine Services: When you, or

someone you love, is struggling with a behavioral or

emotional issue, call the Sweetser PromiseLine. No

matter what questions you have or challenges you face,

the PromiseLine staff will do what it takes to connect

you to the services you need. Call 1.800.434.3000.

Adult Community-based Services provide a range

of community-based treatment and support services

focused on assisting our clients in their journey toward

wellness and recovery.

Child and Family Community Services

provide family-centered, strength-based

treatment and support services aimed

at the individual needs of each

child and the members of

his or her family.

More Information

For more information about our services,

training opportunities, making a donation,

volunteering, or working at Sweetser,

visit www.sweetser.org or call

1.800.434.3000.

Crisis Services provide immediate community-based

response to a child, family or adult experiencing an

acute emotional or behavioral crisis event.

Residential Services provide an intensive, therapeutic

group living option for children or adolescents experiencing

a severe emotional disturbance.

Educational Services provide special education and

therapeutic services for students unable to function

safely in a public school setting.

Outpatient Services provide individual, family or

group therapy and/or mediation management for

children, adults or families struggling with a mental

health or substance abuse issue.

Rangeley

Hampden

Calais

Alexander

Bradford Orono

Perry

Eddington Bangor Carmel

Machias

Parkman

Winterport

Hermon

Sullivan

Madison

Bucksport

Castine

Newport

Ellsworth Blue Hill

West Farmington

Verona

Pittsfield

Montville

Mexico

Thorndike

Monroe

Plymouth

Lamoine Belfast★

Wilton Farmington Winslow Norridgewock Southwest Harbor

Waterville Northeast Harbor Glen Cove

Livermore Falls

Augusta

Lincolnville

Rockland

Bethel

Norway Hallowell

Thomaston

Lovell

South Paris

Damariscotta

Gardiner

St. George

Bridgton

Bath Woolwich Bristol

Fryeburg Lewiston Phippsburg

Bowdoinham

Auburn

Brunswick

Lisbon Falls Harpswell

Raymond

Topsham

Westbrook Portland

Buxton

South Portland

Cape Elizabeth

Sanford Scarborough

Saco★

Biddeford

Alfred

N Berwick

Kennebunk

Eliot

Kittery Point

Presque Isle

Linneus

Sweetser Office Locations

Yellow = Sweetser Offices

White = Sweetser affiliates

★ = The Schools at Sweetser


I still can’t believe that I graduated! Thanks for all the help and support that I needed to

survive in life. Without you, I would not be able to stay calm in situations like I do now.

Sweetser is one true family!”

— C.J. G.

7


Our Mission

Sweetser’s mission is to provide quality treatment,

support and hope to children, adults and families

through a network of mental health, behavioral

health and educational services.

Sweetser Locations

Bangor

Wabanaki - 191 Exchange Street

Belfast

36 Sweetser Drive

Bridgton

130 South High Street

Brunswick

329 Bath Road, Suite One

Damariscotta

18 Belvedere Road

Hallowell

52 Water Street

Lewiston

23 Ventura Street

646 Main Street

Plymouth

1430 Moosehead Trail

Rockland

17 Walnut Street

Saco

50 Moody Street

43 Industrial Park Road

Sanford-Springvale

863 Main Street

Waterville

3 Michael Lane

Wilton

347 Depot Street

Climbing new heights at Sweetser


I was the first kid to enter the

Portland Cottage Offender

Program (in 1992) when I was 12.

The staff there saved my life. I

could never verbalize the gratitude

I have for everyone there who

helped me become the kind,

honest and sincere man I am

today.


— Dale J.

Call our

Sweetser

PromiseLine

1.800.434.3000

www.sweetser.org

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