Impact Report (April 2009) - England Golf Partnership

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Impact Report (April 2009) - England Golf Partnership

THE WHOLE SPORT PLAN FOR GOLF

IMPACT REPORT

APRIL 2005 - MARCH 2009


Contents

Introduction

1 Introduction

2 The Vision & The Challenges

3 Reviewing The Vision & The Challenges

4 Nine Challenges

7 The ‘Spine of Development’

8 The ‘Spine of Development’: Schools

10 The ‘Spine of Development’: Community

11 The ‘Spine of Development’: GolfMark Clubs

13 The ‘Spine of Development’: County Golf Partnerships

15 Developing Talent

16 Developing Talented Players

19 People

21 Club Based Programmes

22 Active People

23 Volunteers

24 Coaches

25 Equality and Safeguarding

27 Funding for Golf Development

28 Financial Investment

31 Summary

32 Summary Data

In June 2008, the England Golf Partnership (EGP) published an ‘Impact Report’ for the period April

2005 to March 2008. This is a supplementary report, which builds on this original document, and

provides summary information on the entire period covered by the first Whole Sport Plan.

Most of the information that was written in the Impact Report is still relevant, but where

necessary, the text has been updated to provide a complete picture of what was achieved.

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The Vision &

The Challenges

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Reviewing The Vision and The Challenges

Nine Challenges

Player Pathway

A pathway to enable all

to start playing the game

and achieve their

individual potential. The

pathway will be supported

by appropriately qualified

coaches and coach

development

programmes.

Coaching & Coach

Education

A focus for activity locally.

We will build on the

principle of 'Right Coach,

Right Place, Right Time' so

the needs of the player

pathway are supported.

Starting & Staying in Golf

Building on golf as a

‘game for life’, with its

associated ethics and

values, the growth of the

sport in schools is important

as is developing

opportunities for all adults

to play from all sections of

society.

The strategy for the period 2009/13 builds on the achievements of the first Whole Sport Plan. The

contents of the strategy were largely developed through analysis of the first plan, which was the

first step on the road to realising ‘A Vision For English Golf to 2020’.

An important part of this process has been a review of the vision for golf in England and of the 18

challenges, which were a key part of the first Whole Sport Plan. The vision is shown below and the

revised nine challenges are shown opposite.

‘A VISION FOR ENGLISH GOLF TO 2020’

Places to play

Access to short game

areas, ranges and courses

with various combinations

of holes to play will

provide facilities that are

welcoming, diverse and

appropriate for all levels

and ability of player.

Clubs

Helping & supporting clubs

who are at the core of

‘Growing the Game’.

Volunteers

Continuing to build on

and support the valuable

resource that is the

volunteer in golf.

“To allow England to become the leading golf nation in the world by providing more

opportunities for participants to start, stay and succeed in the game.”

“Giving Golf A Go”:

The opportunity for all

to experience golf.

“Once In, A Game For Life”:

Increasing the number of

regular players and

providing them with a

quality experience of golf.

“Being The Best”:

Creating a system

through which English

players optimise their

capabilities and perform

to their potential.

Partnership

Partnerships at all levels

are the bedrock of

'Growing The Game'. We

will continue to maximise

these important

development assets to

support the game, in

particular, at local level.

Governance

Maximise the resources

and expertise of the EGP

partners and continue to

build on one plan for golf

in England. Ensure the EGP

remains ‘fit-for-purpose’

and add value to investment

in golf development.

Communication and

Knowledge

Continue to reinforce the

correct perception of golf

externally. Monitor the

impact of the activities

and initiatives that are

undertaken and explore

ways of engaging with

others who share our

passion for ‘Growing

the Game’.

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The ‘Spine of

Development’

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The ‘Spine of Development’: Schools

Other golf facilities under the Community Links programme were also invited to enhance the link

by working alongside the GolfMark facility and offering further coaching and playing opportunities.

Golf successfully developed 130 School Club Links programmes during the 2005/09 period. In

addition, an inaugural Young Volunteers’ Camp was held at Loughborough University.

School Sports’ Partnerships delivering golf & schools club links

programmes by county

The EGP’s ‘Spine of Development’ extends from School Links through Community Links and

GolfMark clubs to County Golf Partnerships (CGPs). It is designed to take someone from starting

the game at any age to being regular participants and into programmes and opportunities that

will enable them to improve and to realise their potential, should they so wish.

Independent surveys carried out for the Department of Children, Families and Schools (DCFS)

show that golf was one of the fastest growing sports in the period 2004 to 2008, rising from 14%

to 38% of schools offering it as an activity in that period. This equates to 8,159 schools, of which,

1,984 are secondary schools. (DCFS: School Sport Survey 2007/08).

School Sports Partnerships (SSP) are newly established delivery routes for sport in schools locally.

Golf has maximised the opportunity and, led by the Golf Foundation, worked with 326 SSPs

around the country.

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

School Club Link

projects

rise in the number of

schools offering golf

since 2004

1,001 young volunteers and 3,000 teachers have been trained to deliver golf activity and 517

Tri-Golf and Golf Xtreme festivals have been run.

Golf delivered a junior golf programme locally in both schools and clubs as part of the Government’s

national Physical Education and School Sport for Young People (PESSYP) strategy. These

programmes were School Club Links projects. The aim was to ensure that young people could

progress from school based activity into regular club activity. In golf, a written commitment between

a School Sport Partnership and a golf club that had achieved GolfMark club accreditation or

was working towards GolfMark to be achieved within two years was a key requirement.

BB&O

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Cumbria

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

Durham

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hants (IoW & CI)

Hertfordshire

Isle of Man

Kent

Lancashire

Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

Middlesex

Norfolk

Northamptonshire

Northumberland

Nottinghamshire

Shropshire & Hereford

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Surrey

Sussex

Warwickshire

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Yorkshire

School Sports Partnerships Delivering School Club Links

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The ‘Spine of Development’: Community

The ‘Spine of Development’: GolfMark Clubs

people tried golf at

public venue events

in 2008

The evolution of the Starter Centre programme into Community Links provided a new quality

assured ‘stand alone’ programme. Its development also ensured it was more closely linked with

GolfMark so providing clubs a stepped progression to the highest level of accreditation. By March

2009 there were 138 Community Links clubs – six level 1, 84 level 2 and 48 level 3.

Golf Roots was developed to take golf to the inner cities. In 2008, the event was staged in 14 cities

with 5,930 school children participating from 155 schools. 1,150 children went on to participate

in club based coaching activities with over 7,000 people taking part at public venue events. 477

teachers, volunteers and coaches were trained through Golf Roots.

Community Links clubs by county

20

18

16

14

12

GolfMark is a mark of achievement, which recognises clubs that have attained the required

standards (based on coaching and playing, the environment of the club and safeguarding

issues) through an accreditation programme that is aligned with Sport England’s Clubmark

programme. This means that those clubs which have achieved the award compare with similar

clubs in other sports for the quality assured experience they provide for beginners

171 clubs had achieved GolfMark status by the end of March 2009 and another 531 were

registered to work towards it. 37% of all affiliated clubs are, therefore, in the GolfMark process.

Golf ranges provide an excellent introduction and practice environment for golfers. RangeMark

has been introduced to enable these facilities to achieve accredited status.

The ‘spine of development’: Total number of clubs by county

200

180

160

140

120

10

8

6

4

2

0

BB&O

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Cumbria

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

Durham

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hants (IoW & CI)

Hertfordshire

Isle of Man

Kent

Lancashire

Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

Middlesex

Norfolk

Northamptonshire

Northumberland

Nottinghamshire

Shropshire & Hereford

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Surrey

Sussex

Warwickshire

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Yorkshire

Community Links Facilities

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100

80

60

40

20

0

BB&O

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Cumbria

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

Durham

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hants (IoW & CI)

Hertfordshire

Isle of Man

Kent

Lancashire

Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

Middlesex

Norfolk

Northamptonshire

Northumberland

Nottinghamshire

Shropshire & Hereford

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Surrey

Sussex

Warwickshire

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Yorkshire

Total number of clubs

ENGLAND GOLF IMPACT REPORT | 11

clubs achieved

GolfMark


The ‘Spine of Development’: GolfMark by county

60

50

40

30

20

The ‘Spine of Development’: County

Golf Partnerships

The Impact Report summarised how County Golf Partnerships (CGP) worked. At the end of March

2009, 30 counties had formed a CGP, with a CGP in development in a further county, this meant

that 31 counties out of 34 were engaged in the CGP process.

10

0

BB&O

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Cumbria

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

Durham

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hants (IoW & CI)

Hertfordshire

Isle of Man

Kent

Lancashire

Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

Middlesex

Norfolk

Northamptonshire

Northumberland

Nottinghamshire

GolfMark clubs Clubs working towards GolfMark

Shropshire & Hereford

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Surrey

Sussex

Warwickshire

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Yorkshire

18 part-time County Development Officers (CDOs) were in place by the end of March 2009.

County Golf Partnerships

of all clubs have

achieved, or

registered for,

GolfMark

The ‘Spine of Development’: Percentage of clubs in the GolfMark process

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Worcestershire

Norfolk

Dorset

Northamptonshire

Cambridgeshire

Suffolk

Wiltshire

Isle of Man

Shropshire & Hereford

Northumberland

Somerset

Devon

Gloucestershire

Lincolnshire

BB&O

Percentage of clubs in the GolfMark process

Derbyshire

Bedfordshire

Warwickshire

Cumbria

Sussex

Staffordshire

Durham

Hertfordshire

Lancashire

Middlesex

Essex

Leicestershire

Kent

Yorkshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Hants (IoW & CI)

Surrey

Nottinghamshire

Channel Islands

Isles of Scilly

County Golf Partnerships - March 2009

CGPs in place

CGPs in development

No CGP in place or development

County Golf

Partnerships

established

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Developing

Talent

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top three finishes

by English men and

women in targeted

international events

Developing Talented Players

Clubs and County Unions and Associations continue to fulfil a vital role in the development of

talented golfers capable of progressing to international level and on to the professional ranks. This

process was augmented by the EGP’s successful application to Sport England’s Club and Coach

Programme.

This has enabled more opportunities to be provided for more players through the CGPs. In

addition, it has enabled three Regional Coaching Officers to be appointed under the auspices

of the PGA. They assist in the operation and development of the programme across the country

and with education of the coaches who are part of the programme.

During the period 2005/09, amateur male and female golfers established an enviable record of

achievement in international golf in both team and individual events.

The following examples of achievements by England amateur teams provides a flavour of the

success of the last four years:

• The men were 6th and women 7th in their respective World Team Championships, which

represents the best ever finish for both;

• The men won the European Championship in 2005/06, with the women finishing runners up in

the same year;

• The combined men’s and women’s team won and then retained the Spirit Tournament,

becoming the first country to achieve this feat. The men won their competition in 2007 and

the women theirs in 2005;

• In 2005, half of the Great Britain and Ireland Walker Cup team was English, with 4 out of 10

being English in 2007. Three English women were in the equivalent Curtis Cup team in both

2006 and 2008.

Over the four years in question, the age at which men and women turn professional has dropped

significantly. This presents challenges for the development of representative teams in the amateur

game, but on the other hand, augurs well for golfers progressing to the very top of the sport.

By way of illustration, the following are examples of achievements by English players in the professional

game, the vast majority of whom have come through golf’s talent development system:

• At least two male players in the World top 20 each year, with one in the top 10 in 2008/09;

• Two players achieved top three finishes in majors, both of whom had come through the EGU’s

talent development programmes;

• Chris Wood finished 5th in The Open as an amateur in 2008 and become the first Englishman

to win the Silver Medal as leading amateur since 1998;

• One male winner of the European Order of Merit, with another seven top 10 finishes and over

20% of all the players in the top 100 coming from England;

• One winner of the women’s European Order of Merit, with 15% of all the players in the top 100;

• 42% of the Ryder Cup places for the European team being taken by Englishmen with 17% of

the Solheim Cup places occupied by Englishwomen.

Chris Wood is the first

English amateur to

win the Silver medal

in The Open since

In individual events, English men and women achieved 16 top three finishes over the period in

amateur events categorised as ‘majors’ between 2006 and 2008. In other targeted events over

the same period, men and women achieved 38 top three finishes, showing the depth of the

talent coming through the system.

16| ENGLAND GOLF IMPACT REPORT

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People

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Club Based Programmes

Free Golf Coaching and Junior Golf Coaching have provided club based opportunities for

almost 100,000 people since 2005. In total, 42,555 people have participated in the Free Golf

Coaching programme and 54,749 have participated in Junior Golf Coaching.

The National Skills Challenge was created and introduced as part of the ‘Get Into Golf’ programme

to provide a challenging and fun way of stimulating the development of golf playing skills. The

National Skills Challenge has grown from 70 clubs participating in the first event in 2006 to 378

clubs in 2008. It has been so successful that in 2009, the EGU and EWGA were short listed for the

prestigious Sports Industry Awards in the category of ‘Best Promotion of a Sport By A Governing Body’.

National Skills Challenge

35

30

25

20

15

10

Skills Challenge

grows from 70

clubs to

people try golf

through club

coaching

programmes

Free Golf Coaching

500

400

300

200

100

0

330

193

5000

7738

4873

0

2005 2006 2007 2008 2005 2006 2007 2008

Number of clubs in JGC

Junior Golf Coaching

1000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0

593

711

486 484

922

804

2005 2006 2007 2008

20000

15000

10000

20000

18000

16000

14000

12000

10000

8000

6000

4000

2000

0

16865

Number of participants in JGC

9872

11506

13079

16686 16684

2005 2006 2007 2008

5

0

BB&O

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Cumbria

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

Durham

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hants (IoW & CI)

Hertfordshire

Isle of Man

Kent

Lancashire

Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

Middlesex

Norfolk

Northamptonshire

Northumberland

Nottinghamshire

Percentage of clubs registered for National Skills Challenge

Shropshire & Hereford

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Surrey

Sussex

Warwickshire

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Yorkshire

Number of clubs in JGC

Number of participants in JGC

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Active People

Volunteers

volunteers give

up their time to

support golf

Golf has almost 1m

people playing once

per week

Sport England has introduced the Active People survey. This measures participation in 46 sports

through a random sample of 192,000 people covering every local authority in England. The survey

is carried out by Ipsos Mori on an annual basis and it identifies a wide range of data. The main

measures of participation are based on the number of people playing sport once per week

and once per month. The results for golf showing the number of participants according to Active

People 1 (2005/06) and 2 (2007/08) are shown below. The sample for 2005/06 was larger than

2007/2008 and there is a need to identify more data over time in order to establish more reliable

trends:

ONCE PER WEEK ONCE PER MONTH

Active People 1

889,000

1,450,000

The EGU and EWGA jointly survey clubs every two years to find out a range of golf development

information. Analysis of the responses to the 2008 survey reveals almost 50,000 volunteers in golf

fulfilling around 84,000 roles in the sport.

An annual EGP Volunteer Awards Dinner and Ceremony has been established to acknowledge

and recognise the value of the work done and contribution made by volunteers. Held in conjunction

with the County Golf Development conference, this event has now been staged twice.

With the establishment of a web-site designed specifically to provide information and support for

the golf volunteer, the level of support for this most important resource for the sport is growing all

the time.

Active People 2

948,000

1,540,000

A recognition scheme for volunteers, which acknowledges their efforts and commitment has

been established. By the end of March 2009 ,136 people had registered 2,367 hours of volunteering.

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Coaches

Equality and Safeguarding

PGA qualified coaches are at the centre of much club and range based activity. The introduction

of coaching awards at Levels 1 and 2 have made appropriate qualifications accessible to non

professionals for the first time. The majority of Level 1 coaches are volunteers.

The development of coaching teams led and supervised by a level 3 PGA coach has enabled

many clubs and ranges to revolutionise their coaching offering to players of all levels.

The EGP partners achieved the Foundation Level of the Equality Standard and the Intermediate

Level of the Safeguarding Standard.

A Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosure service was established to enable golf clubs to ensure

that staff and volunteers working with children have been through the necessary screening processes.

Since 2007, the EGU and EWGA have serviced over 3,300 disclosures.

The number of qualified PGA coaches in England has risen across the period and

was 5,994 at the end of March 2009 (which represents a 43% increase). This comprised:

• Level 1 – 1,723;

• Level 2 – 515;

• Level 3 – 3,756.

As part of the process of developing golf’s United Kingdom Coaching Certificate (UKCC) aligned

courses further, the PGA is developing the Level 4 course and also enhancing the Level 1 and 2

courses as required.

All safeguarding work in England has been carried within the policy context provided by the UK

wide Children in Golf Group. Examples include the advice and support given in the ‘Guidelines

for Safeguarding Children in Golf’. A Case Management Group was established to support clubs

in managing incidents and/or complaints arising in this area.

234 ‘Safeguarding and Protecting Children’ Workshops were staged (since June 2005) for

professionals and volunteers working with children in golf.

A Disability Action Group was established to support the development of programmes to

promote the sport with this section of the community.

safeguarding and

protecting children

workshops have

been held

qualified PGA

coaches at Levels

1, 2 and 3

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Funding for Golf

Development

ENGLAND GOLF IMPACT REPORT | 27


Financial Investment

The graphs which follow summarise how funding has been allocated during the period 2005 to

2009 to support the implementation of Whole Sport Plan 1. Figures for 2004/05 are also shown so

that a comparison can be made with investment before the Whole Sport Plan was developed.

Additional allocation of funding for ‘Growing the Game’ by partners

£1,800,000

£1,600,000

£1,400,000

£1,200,000

Sport England funding for ‘Growing the Game’

£3,500,000

£3,000,000

£2,500,000

£2,000,000

£1,500,000

£1,000,000

£500,000

£0

2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

Allocation of Sport England funding for ‘Growing the Game’

£1,000,000

£800,000

£600,000

£400,000

£200,000

£0

EGU

EWGA

Golf Foundation

PGA

2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

Sport England funding invested through Partners for ‘Growing the Game’

£1,400,000

funding awarded

by Sport England for

‘Growing the Game’

£2,000,000

£1,200,000

funding

than ever before

supporting golf

development

£1,750,000

£1,500,000

£1,250,000

£1,000,000

£800,000

£600,000

£1,000,000

£750,000

£500,000

£250,000

£400,000

£200,000

£0

EGU

EWGA

Golf Foundation

PGA

Multi Partner

£0

2004/5 2005/6

2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

2004/5

2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

Delivery

Increasing participation

Player Pathway

Supporting implementation

Operating costs

28| ENGLAND GOLF IMPACT REPORT

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Summary

ENGLAND GOLF IMPACT REPORT | 31


Summary Data

The table which follows summarises the data for key areas of the Whole Sport Plan by county as

at March 2009.

County

County Golf Partnership

(In place or in development)

Total number of affiliated

clubs

School Sports Partnerships

delivering golf

PESSYP Community Links facilities GolfMark clubs

Clubs working towards

GolfMark

Number of clubs in the

GolfMark process

% of clubs in the GolfMark

process

BB&O 3 110 9 5 7 22 28 50 45% 23

Bedfordshire 3 23 6 3 3 2 6 8 37% 5

Cambridgeshire 3 29 5 3 4 0 16 16 55% 7

Cheshire 3 104 14 6 9 8 19 27 26% 22

Cornwall 3 34 4 3 3 3 6 9 26% 6

Cumbria 3 33 6 5 3 4 8 12 36% 9

Derbyshire 3 32 7 3 6 3 9 12 38% 11

Devon 3 45 8 3 1 7 14 21 47% 15

Dorset 3 33 6 2 4 4 18 22 67% 6

Durham 3 44 10 1 4 3 12 15 34% 5

Essex 3 80 15 6 11 4 21 25 31% 11

Gloucestershire 3 43 11 4 3 6 14 20 47% 14

Hants (IoW & CI) 3 88 13 1 9 3 19 22 25% 13

Hertfordshire 3 61 11 5 9 4 17 21 34% 8

Isle of Man 3 8 2 0 1 1 3 4 50% 5

Kent 3 90 7 3 4 3 24 27 30% 10

Lancashire 142 15 4 4 16 31 47 33% 26

Leicestershire 3 32 8 6 1 3 7 10 31% 1

Lincolnshire 3 56 8 2 10 5 21 26 46% 14

Middlesex 3 37 20 2 6 1 11 12 32% 6

Norfolk 3 31 8 2 3 3 18 21 68% 8

Northamptonshire 3 27 5 2 2 3 12 15 56% 6

Northumberland 3 42 5 4 8 3 17 20 48% 11

Nottinghamshire 3 36 4 2 3 2 6 8 22% 6

Shropshire & Hereford 3 36 8 5 3 3 15 18 50% 9

Somerset 3 31 6 2 0 3 12 15 48% 6

Staffordshire 52 10 3 2 3 15 18 35% 9

Suffolk 3 31 7 4 7 4 13 17 55% 11

Surrey 3 107 7 5 10 5 20 25 23% 13

Sussex 3 67 5 5 4 5 19 24 36% 12

Warwickshire 3 49 19 5 8 4 14 18 37% 14

Wiltshire 3 26 6 3 1 5 9 14 54% 8

Worcestershire 3 37 13 8 10 13 16 29 78% 14

Yorkshire 191 38 13 19 13 41 54 28% 34

Totals 31 1887 326 130 182 171 531 702 41% 378

Clubs registered for Skills

Challenge

32| ENGLAND GOLF IMPACT REPORT


Images courtesy of Leaderboard and Tom Ward

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