Advisory Board Handbook - College of Public Affairs & Community ...

pacs.unt.edu

Advisory Board Handbook - College of Public Affairs & Community ...

“A small group of

thoughtful people

could change the

world. Indeed, it's

the only thing that

ever has.”

Margaret Mead

PACS IMPACT

The promise to make a difference

one community at a time.

PACS Advisory Board

College of Public Affairs &

Community Service


College of Public Affairs and Community Service

University of North Texas

Denton, Texas

About the College

The College of Public Affairs and Community Service is an applied professional college offering

ten undergraduate programs, eight master’s programs, and three Ph.D. programs. The college

has 2,000 students seeking degrees from PACS, attracts an average of 2.5 million dollars per

year in external research and community service program monies from foundations and local,

state, and federal sources. Alumni of the College of Public Affairs and Community Service

currently serve the community in such careers as: contingency planners for natural

catastrophes; managers of health service delivery for the elderly; city managers; rehabilitation

counselors; social workers; research directors; clinic workers/directors for autistic children;

addictions counselors; policy analysts; health planning analysts; police officers/chiefs; FBI

agents; and long-term care facility administrators.

The PACS Mission

To improve local, state, national, and international communities.

The PACS Vision

PACS will be a national leader in preparing researchers and practitioners in the discovery and

application of evidence-based solutions to pressing social issues.


The College of Public Affairs &

Community Service

UNT Sociology professor, Dr Hiram Friedsam, realized a need and opportunity for applied research

and professional training in working with aging populations. His vision gave rise to the

Department of Applied Gerontology in 1968. The School of Community Service was created in

1977 when Gerontology and three other departments joined to create a school. Since that time

many others have followed, creating a unique, eclectic and entrepreneurial entity at the

University of North Texas and that impacts local and global communities. More than 40 years

after its inception, the College of Public Affairs and Community Service (PACS) is the 4th largest

at the University of North Texas. Grounded in theory and brought to life through community

outreach, the College of Public Affairs and Community Service is comprised of eight departments

that IMPACT the community through service and applied research. PACS predominantly

contributes to public and non-profit organizations, though threads of our work and many of our

graduates join the for-profit sector as well. Put simply, the work of PACS faculty, students, and

alumni impact the community in very real and profound ways.

We appreciate you joining us on a mission to make real differences that affect communities’

ability to protect their citizens, respond to emergencies, mobilize volunteers and serve the most

vulnerable of populations. It is the work WITH communities and response to their needs that sets

apart the work of our college. Try to imagine Texas communities without PACS graduates. Then

challenge yourself to be a part of building on a record of success as we pave an exciting future

for our college.

Public Administration Applied Economics Criminal Justice

Public Affairs

Gerontology Rehab/Social Work/Addictions Behavior Analysis

Social Science Services

Sociology

Anthropology

Issues of Social Concern

Grounded Theory


PACS Values

Relevant and Practical

• Develop new knowledge and apply it in ways that inform students, scholars, and the public.

• Advocate public policy that is informed by research and successful application.

• Develop need-based educational programs.

• Promote the belief that the value of basic knowledge increases through practical application.

• Focus on the public sector.

Humanistic

• Ensure that students are grounded in basic knowledge and develop caring attitudes.

• Develop knowledgeable and involved citizens.

• Prepare students for leadership roles in public and non-profit organizations.

• Encourage civic engagement for all our graduates.

• Prepare students for leadership roles in public and non-profit.

International

• Encourage international experiences as important vehicles for both personal and global understanding.

• Conduct and share research in collaboration with countries throughout the world.

• Provide a vehicle for international faculty and student exchanges.

Service Oriented

• Develop applied programs that provide direct service to the Metroplex and its residents.

• Promote holistic knowledge acquisition beginning with local involvement.

• Place strong emphasis on service-learning by placing students in community-based assignments and

internships.

• Provide access to lifelong learning through professional continuing education programs.

Interdisciplinary and Innovative

• Stress the interdependence of research, teaching, and human assistance projects.

• Prosper on a model of entrepreneurship, innovation, and experimentation.

• Prepare students to understand that learning requires discovery, application, and interdisciplinary

perspectives.

Partnerships

• Develop and maintain mutually beneficial partnerships with community-based organizations and governments

• Foster knowledge translation that informs practice and improves services.

• Research to practice, service to science.


Being a part of the PACS Advisory Board is being committed to...

Advising the College of Public Affairs and Community Service and supporting its

faculty and students in education and research that impacts communities.

Asking questions that help the college strive for and achieve excellence.

Seeking resources that will further the mission of the College of Public Affairs and

Community Service.

Raising awareness of programs and projects in local/state/national communities.

Investing in PACS programs and students.

Impacting our local and global communities.


Who is a part of the PACS Advisory Board

Donors to UNT/PACS

Alumni

Department champions

Parents of current or former students

Professionals in represented fields

Social change agents

Those affected personally by a social issue addressed by PACS programs (i.e. violent

crime, autism, child abuse, addictions, aging parents, etc.)


Advisory Board Requirements

Be a Circle of Impact Member.

($1,000 Annual Commitment)

Attend Advisory Board meetings and events.

Support programs and events.

Bring others into the Circle of Impact.

Assist in Donor visits and introductions.

Serve as an Advocate of PACS and UNT.


Advisory Board Agreement

I, ___________________________, agree to become a Circle of Impact Member where I will

contribute annually and bring others into the Circle of Impact. In addition, I plan to attend

Advisory Board meetings and events as well as support programs and PACS events. As a

member of the PACS Advisory Board, I will assist in Donor visits and introductions but most

importantly, I will serve as an advocate of PACS and UNT.

___________________________

Printed Name

______________________________

Date

___________________________

Signature

______________________________

Date


The University of North Texas

Mission

The University of North Texas is a recognized student-centered public research university

where we harness the power of ideas through a culture of learning based on diverse

viewpoints, interdisciplinary endeavors, creativity and disciplined excellence.

This is accomplished through a broad and balanced array of programs where well-prepared

students and dedicated scholars and artists collaborate with our local and global

communities in the creation, integration, application and dissemination of knowledge. In

this way, UNT creates an enriched and sustainable future for our students, state, nation and

world.

Approved by Board of Regents May 12, 2006

Vision

The University of North Texas will be recognized for its educational, intellectual, research,

public service and cultural achievements. UNT will be a diverse and inclusive institution

creating the knowledge and innovations that will shape our future, while cultivating

excellence in the next generation of scholars and leaders for the global community.

Approved by Board of Regents May 12, 2006


The University of North Texas Goals

Strategic Goal 1—

Excellence in Student-Centered Education

UNT will provide a stimulating, supportive, and rigorous

educational experience to a diverse student body, preparing

students for leadership in a changing world.

UNT

Strategic

Goal #1

Strategies:

1.1 Assure a rigorous curriculum grounded in the respect for the contributions of various nationalities,

cultures, backgrounds, abilities, and viewpoints, designed specifically to develop students’

appreciation of diversity and capacity for in-depth/critical thinking and life-long learning;

1.2 Transform instruction in large-enrollment undergraduate classes to improve student learning

outcomes;

1.3 Identify and provide strategic support only to those current and potential graduate and other

academic programs that demonstrate high quality, high demand, and/or centrality to the university

mission and vision;

1.4 Challenge learners through increased involvement in peer and mentor relationships, service

learning, and other diverse learning opportunities, including engagement in partnerships with

businesses, educational settings, social agencies, and creative venues in the North Texas region and

beyond;

1.5 Improve student engagement, satisfaction, and success by promoting communication, civility,

leadership, clarification of values and identity issues, recreational/wellness activities, and active

student involvement in the life of the university;

1.6 Provide communications, services, and programs designed to effectively transition new freshman

and transfer students to campus;

1.7 Increase student involvement in interdisciplinary, international, and multicultural activities inside

and outside the classroom;


UNT

Strategic

Goal #1

continued


Continued Strategic Goal 1…

1.8 Support student-athletes’ academic development and achievements to realize retention

and graduation rates at or above those of UNT’s NCAA counterparts;

1.9 Develop and implement comprehensive and integrated enrollment management and

financial aid plans designed to increase the quality and diversity of the student body;

1.10 Increase retention and facilitate timely graduation through enhanced advising, progress

tracking programs, and facilitative educational cost structures;

1.11 Enhance career development opportunities for students and alumni, increase

opportunities for student-alumni networking, and expand partnerships with outside

employers;

1.12 Provide training and development opportunities to enable faculty to excel in teaching

and mentoring students, including the establishment of a Center for Teaching, Learning, and

Assessment

Performance Measures

Student enrollment by level and ethnicity

Key graduation and retention rates, including rates for student-athletes

Percent of lower division courses taught by tenure/tenure-track faculty

Student/faculty ratios

Scores on national assessments of learning, engagement, and satisfaction

Number of students receiving nationally competitive scholarships


Strategic Goal 2—Increased Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

UNT will significantly increase its levels of funded research, scholarly productivity, and

artistic expression in order to enhance undergraduate and graduate education, contribute to

economic growth, and improve UNT’s standing among peer institutions.

Strategies:

2.1 Increase the level of funded research activity at UNT;

2.2 Increase infrastructure support for research faculty to facilitate effective operations and

research productivity;

2.3 Increase the research, scholarship, and creative activity of tenure and tenure-track

faculty across the university, strengthening faculty development, recognition, and reward

systems;

2.4 Increase the research, scholarship, and creative activity of professional staff across the

university, strengthening development, recognition, and reward systems;

2.5 Develop effective relationships with government, business, education, the arts, and

others, in local, national, and international venues, to facilitate, fund, or disseminate

research, scholarship, and creative activity;

2.6 Actively develop UNT Research as a vehicle for intensive and collaborative research

activities

Performance Measures

Average federal research expenditures per tenure/tenure-track faculty

member

Total research expenditures

Faculty workload and productivity

Number of research-active faculty

Average award for externally funded programs

UNT

Strategic

Goal #2


Strategic Goal 3—Enhancing Institutional Reputation, Community Engagement, and

Advancement

UNT will enhance an institutional image that reflects the university’s character, relevance,

accomplishments, and value; strengthen the reputation of its academic, research, creative,

and athletic components; and promote supportive and collaborative relationships with

external constituents.

Strategies:

3.1 Strengthen and promote the university’s identity as a student-centered public research

university through strategic and integrated communications, media, advertising, marketing,

web-based technologies, and campus-wide initiatives;

3.2 Illustrate to our publics the contributions of faculty, students, and alumni to the

creation of new knowledge and the cultural, social, and economic well-being of our region,

state, nation, and beyond;

3.3 Promote university-community engagement to address the needs of our business and

government partners, surrounding communities, and area residents, engaging them in the

life and activities of the university;

3.4 Cultivate an informed and participatory university community through internal

communication mechanisms that meet the information dissemination and feedback needs of

students, faculty, and staff;

3.5 Promote UNT’s traditions, school spirit, pride, and prestige, increasing alumni, faculty,

staff, and student participation in university celebrations and educational, cultural, and

athletic events;

3.6 Improve fund-raising activities through new constituent relationships programs,

collaborative work with key personnel, and coordination of development activities across the

university;

UNT

Strategic

Goal #3


UNT

Strategic

Goal #3

continued

3.7 Align fund-raising priorities and activities in support of UNT strategic goals, including

research/scholarship, student-centered education, reputation and engagement, institutional

effectiveness, and the key initiatives arising from the pursuit of these goals;

3.8 Enhance communication and activities designed to increase involvement by alumni and

friends in the life of the university, and to increase membership in North Texas Exes;

3.9 Increase the visibility and reputation of UNT through hosted events and local, regional, and

national media coverage of athletic activities and accomplishments;

3.10 Conduct regular institutional research to address key questions related to institutional

identity, reputation, engagement, and other important concerns of external and internal

constituencies.

Performance Measures

Surveys of internal and external constituents regarding communication,

engagement, and pride

Number and amount of gifts to the university

Alumni memberships and chapters

Collegiate licensing revenues


Strategic Goal 4: Improved Institutional Effectiveness

UNT will improve managerial and operational accountability and effectiveness by developing

the human, financial, and physical resources necessary to achieve the university mission and

vision.

Strategies:

4.1 Increase funding and create new revenue streams (e.g., grants and gifts);

4.2 Develop and implement integrated management and resource allocation systems that

align strategic/unit-level planning, focus resource allocation, provide timely access to

relevant information, facilitate implementation/direction of action plans, and require

ongoing performance evaluation and continual improvement;

4.3 Align the campus master plan with the strategic plan, assuring that new construction,

renovation, and assignment of space reflect and support the UNT strategic goals;

4.4 Recruit, select, develop, reward, and retain an increasingly diverse and productive

faculty and staff of sufficient size and expertise appropriate for a recognized studentcentered

public research university;

4.5 Review and, where appropriate, restructure faculty, staff, and administrative workload,

responsibility, and reward structures.

Performance Measures

Administrative costs as a percent of operating budget

Capital improvements

Staff turnover rates

Number of full-time faculty and staff by gender and ethnicity

UNT

Strategic

Goal #4


2009—2010

Calendar

PACS Advisory Board

2009-2010 Calendar

Thursday August 6th

9:30 AM

Brookhaven CC

Thursday, October 1st

North Texas Council of Governments

Nicole Dash and Peggy Tobolowsky

Mike Eastland and Greg Dawson

Public Safety

Thursday, November 5th

University of North Texas

Chilton Hall

Feb 4th

Brookhaven CC

April 1st

Tentative: Autism Center/Easter Seals

Alicia Re Cruz and Rick Smith

Autism Research Education and Outreach

Retreat May 1st

Brookhaven CC

Thursday, August 6, 2010

University of North Texas

Chilton Hall

Committees and Subgroups meet as necessary


The College of

Public Affairs &

Community

Service

History at a

Glance

1973 School of Community Service was established with three

academic units

Center for Studies in Aging

Institute of Applied Economics

Center for Rehabilitation Studies

1974 Center for Behavioral Studies established

1983 Institute for Emergency Administration and Planning was

established

1984

Criminal Justice Institute was established

Center for Behavioral Studies became Center for Behavior

Analysis

1985 Department of Sociology joined SCS

1990 Institute of Anthropology joined SCS

1992 Department of Public Administration was established

1996 • EADP program moved to PADM

• Center for Studies in Aging became the Department of

Applied Gerontology

• Center for Behavior Analysis became the Department

of Behavior Analysis

• Center for Rehabilitation Studies became the

Department of Rehabilitation, Social Work and Addictions

• Institute of Criminal Justice became the Department of

Criminal Justice

1999 Educational Consortium for Volunteerism was developed

through line item from Texas state legislature

2002 Institute of Anthropology became the Department of

Anthropology


2005 School of Community Service became the College of Public

Affairs and Community Service

DEANS

Hiram J. Friedsam, Founding Dean, 1973-1982

William A. Luker, 1982-1991

Daniel M. Johnson, 1991-1997

David W. Hartman, 1997-2006

Thomas L. Evenson, 2006-


Funding

Opportunities

The PACS Advisory Board provides general support

that allows the Dean to make decisions on funding

priorities. In addition to the College of Public

Affairs and Community Service fund, contributions

can be directed to individual departments.

Scholarships provide a number of benefits to

individual students as well as to departments. In

addition to rewarding current students for their

accomplishments, scholarship funds help attract

high quality students to our programs. This leads to

high quality teaching and research and ultimately

elevated institutional reputation. Many programs

across the nation are able to offer full funding to

top PhD candidates.


College of Public Affairs & Community Service

Public Affairs and Community Service:

Available Scholarships:

PACS Advisory Board Scholarship ($1000)

For all PACS students who see themselves as social entrepreneurs with a 3.0 or higher

GPA.

Joyce Ann Brown/Popo Gonzalez Scholarship ($1000)

Awarded each fall semester to recognize PACS majors who have overcome adversity.

Gail Rola Memorial Service Learning Scholarship ($1000)

For students who participate in service to the community through either their own

volunteer efforts or in service-learning courses.

Scholarship for Service Learning Programs in Mexico ($500)

Awarded each spring semester for students who participate in one of the many PACS

Service Learning Courses or Field Schools offered in Mexico during the summer.

The Libertad Hernandez Landa Scholarship ($500)

Awarded each spring semester for undergraduate nationals from Mexico.

Service Learning Internship ($1000-$4000)

For community-based internships, that would otherwise be unpaid, PACS has competitive

Scholarships ranging from $1,000-4,000.

Anthropology:

Re Calderon Anthropology Scholarship ($800)

Awarded each fall semester to recognize Anthropology majors.

Applied Economics:

AECO Incentive Scholarship ($2000)

Awarded each fall semester to recognize Applied Economics majors.

Mediation Practicum Scholarship ($2250)

Awarded each fall semester to recognize practicing Mediation.


Applied Gerontology:

College of Public Affairs & Community Service

Continued Available Scholarships:

Asbury Methodist Services Scholarship ($1,000-$2500)

Scholarship established in 2000 with a gift from Asbury Services, Inc., and its

president/CEO, Department of Applied Gerontology alumnus Edwin C. Thomas, III. Not an

endowment, the scholarship is funded by periodic gifts from the donor. Awards limited to

full-time master's degree students in the Department of Applied Gerontology who are

pursuing careers in the administration of long-term care facilities and/or retirement

housing.

C.C. Young Memorial Home Scholarship ($750-$1200)

Scholarship established in 2004 with a gift from C.C. Young Memorial Home, and its

president/CEO, Department of Applied Gerontology alumnus Kenneth Durand. Not an

endowment, the scholarship is funded by periodic gifts from the donor. Awards limited to

full-time master's degree students in the Department of Applied Gerontology who are

pursuing careers in the administration of long-term care facilities and/or retirement

housing.

Clarence M. Ball Scholarship Fund

Scholarship established by Department of Applied Gerontology alumnus Clarence

Ball in 1990. Not an endowment, the scholarship is funded by periodic gifts from

the donor. Awards limited to black full-time Applied Gerontology master's degree

students who are pursuing careers in the administration of long-term care facilities

and/or retirement housing.

CSA Scholarship ($150-$400)

Endowed scholarship established circa 1982, with gifts from Department of Applied

Gerontology alumni. Awards limited to full-time master’s degree students in the

Department of Applied Gerontology.

Winston Dollahon Scholarship ($500-$1500)

Scholarship established by Department of Applied Gerontology alumnus Winston

Dollahon in 2004. Not an endowment, the scholarship is funded by annual gifts from

the donor. Awards limited to full-time master's degree students in the Department

of Applied Gerontology who are pursuing careers in the administration of long-term

care facilities and/or retirement housing.

Mary Jane Dowse Memorial Scholarship ($500-$1000)

Endowed scholarship established in 2002 with a bequest from University of North

Texas alumna Mary Jane Dowse, for the purpose of providing scholarships to

students in UNT’s College of Public Affairs and Community Service who are studying

geriatrics and gerontology. Awards limited to full-time master’s degree students in

the Department of Applied Gerontology.


Continued Applied Gerontology:

College of Public Affairs & Community Service

Continued Available Scholarships:

Grace Ann Dudney Memorial Scholarship ($250-$500)

Endowed scholarship established by UNT alumna Linda Dudney and her husband, Philip

Dudney, in 1986, in memory of Grace Ann Dudney. Awards limited to full-time master's

degree students in the Department of Applied Gerontology.

Hiram J. Friedsam Graduate Student Professional Development Fund ($250-$500)

Endowed scholarship established with numerous individual gifts in honor of Hiram J.

Friedsam, co-founder of the Center for Studies in Aging/Department of Applied

Gerontology, at the time of his retirement in 1983. Awards limited to full-time master's

degree students in the Department of Applied Gerontology.

Harry R. Kendall Scholarship (up to $1750)

Endowed scholarship established with a $20,000 gift from the Kendall Trust within the

Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church in 1990. The purpose of the

endowment, as stipulated in Harry R. Kendall's will, is "to provide for the training of

leaders for charitable service in hospitals and homes caring for needy Negro children and

aged persons of the Negro race." Awards limited to black full-time bachelor's and master's

degree students in Applied Gerontology who are pursuing careers in the administration of

long-term care facilities and/or retirement housing.

Cora A. Martin Scholarship Fund ($500)

Endowed scholarship established with numerous individual gifts in honor of Cora A. Martin,

co-founder of the Center for Studies in Aging/Department of Applied Gerontology, at the

time of her retirement in 1991. Awards limited to full-time master's degree students in the

Department of Applied Gerontology.

Memorial Scholarship ($500-$1000)

Scholarship established in the 1980s with gifts from numerous donors. Awards limited to

full-time master's degree students in the Department of Applied Gerontology.

Rapaport/Friedsam Scholarship ($500-$1000)

Endowed scholarship established by Bernard and Audre Rapoport in 1994, in honor of

Hiram J. Friedsam, co-founder of the Center for Studies in Aging/Department of Applied

Gerontology. Awards limited to full-time master's degree students in the Department of

Applied Gerontology preparing for careers in the provision of community services to the

aged.


Behavior Analysis:

College of Public Affairs & Community Service

Continued Available Scholarships:

Douglas P. Field Scholarship for Graduate Student Research

The Field scholarship is available to graduate students in behavior analysis for the purpose

of offsetting costs of completing an experimental thesis. The amount of the scholarship

varies depending on the costs of the student's thesis and the amount of money available

for scholarships in a given year.

Donald L. Whaley Memorial Scholarship

The scholarship is available to behavior analysis majors, and is usually awarded to students

at the time of admission to the graduate program. The scholarship is for $1,000,

distributed equally across Fall and Spring semesters. Recipients must be enrolled for a

minimum of 6 SCH any semester they receive scholarship funds.

Criminal Justice:

J. Edgar Hoover CJUS Student Scholarship

For undergraduates majoring in Criminal Justice who have completed 75 credit hours

toward their undergraduate degree, with at least 15 hours in residence at UNT and a 3.0

overall GPA.

Jacob Andrew Fritsch Memorial Scholarship

Awarded to full-time Criminal Justice students and meet the minimum entrance and

continuing academic performance standards of the Department of Criminal Justice.

Public Administration:

E. Ray Griffin Scholarship

Established in 1995 by former students of Dr. Griffin's, this endowed scholarship

recognizes the many contributions of this teacher and mentor. Dr. Griffin taught at UNT

from 1947 to 1982 and was involved in the MPA program's creation in 1961. In addition to

receiving the income from the endowment, which currently is about $1,000, the E. Ray

Griffin scholar receives a $2,000 alumni scholarship. Both awards are for the payment of

tuition and fees at UNT.

Debra Brooks Feazelle Internship Award

Recipients must be enrolled full-time in the MPA program and possess exceptional

potential for leadership in city government or the nonprofit sector. Recipients complete

their internship with a qualifiying small city or nonprofit organization. The employer, if

financially capable, provides a partial match to the award. Interns will receive this

award as hourly compensation during the duration of their employment. As growth in the

endowment warrants, the award may be expanded to include payment of tuition and

fees for interns while enrolled at UNT.


Continued Public Administration:

College of Public Affairs & Community Service

Continued Available Scholarships:

Clarence E. Ridley Scholarship

Sponsored by the Texas City Management Association, the Ridley scholarship provides

$3,500 for one year of study. Applicants should be in their second year of graduate study

and be either a full or part-time student. Applicants should have a strong career interest

in municipal management. The application deadline is usually mid-December and is

made to TCMA.

Lynn F. Anderson Fellowship

Sponsored by the Government Finance Officers Association of Texas, an annual one-year

award of $4,000 to a student interested in financial management. The application

deadline is usually March or April and is made to GFOAT.

Emergency Administration:

Tom Joslin Memorial Scholarship

Provides $1000 of funding for tuition, to be broken in equal payments over the Fall and

Spring semesters.

Rehabilitation, Social Work and Addictions:

RSA Undergraduate Scholarship

Eight of these scholarships are awarded each year to undergraduate students majoring in

rehabilitation studies and who make a commitment to pursue employment in support of

the State-Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Programs. This scholarship, which is designed

to cover student tuition and fee,s is made possible through support from the U.S.

Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Service Administration.

Social Work/Title IVE Child Welfare Scholarship ($5000 stipend)

Eight of these scholarships are awarded each year to undergraduate students majoring in

social work. The purpose of the scholarship is to help train and educate students for

careers in Child Protective Services (CPS). The stipend requires only that a student work

for a CPS agency upon graduation for one year. Please contact Dr. Anna Rae Rozell for

more information.

Fannie Belle Gaupp Scholarship ($300)

An annual award of $300 made to the outstanding social work major of the year selected

by the social work program faculty. Scholarship is named in honor of the founding social

work director who provided many years of professional leadership. This award recognizes

scholarship, participation in social work activities, leadership and character, as well as

the potential for future contributions in the field. All social work majors at UNT are

eligible for this scholarship. Please note that there is no application for this scholarship.


College of Public Affairs & Community Service

Continued Available Scholarships:

Continued Rehabilitation, Social Work and Addictions:

Ken Miner Scholarship ($200)

An annual award to undergraduate juniors, seniors, and graduate Rehabilitation majors

who have outstanding academic performance (3.0 GPA) and are enrolled full-time.

Ft. Worth Area Texas Rehabilitation Association Scholarship ($200)

An annual award to an undergraduate junior, senior, or graduate Rehabilitation majors

who has outstanding academic performance (3.0 GPA) and is enrolled full-time.

Sociology:

Benson Undergraduate Scholarship ($500)

For undergraduate Sociology majors.

Lynne Killgore Scholarship ($500)

Must be a Sociology graduate student or an undergraduate Sociology major.

Sociology Undergraduate Scholarship ($200)

Must be an undergraduate Sociology major with at least a 3.0 grade point average or

accepted unconditionally as a major.

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