PROCRASTINATION - The Ontarion

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PROCRASTINATION - The Ontarion

PROCRASTINATION Page 6

Page 5

JASON

COLLETT

161.8 1 www.theontarion.com Mar. 11 - 17, 2010

For the second year

in a row, the Human

Library took place on the

University of Guelph campus,

this time on Mar. 4 and 5. The

area in front of the Williams

Coffee stand was reserved for

one-on-one conversations;

human books, people who

face misconceptions and

assumptions about their

views and lifestyles, and the

readers who sign them out,

had half-hour conversations.

Stories were told, myths were

debunked, and perspectives

were challenged.

The aim of the Human

Library is to provide a safe

environment where people

can sit down face-to-face

with those who come from

stereotyped, misunderstood,

and occasionally marginalized

groups. The goal, in many ways,

is for readers to leave with a

more complete understanding

of their worldviews. The

human books are people who

have volunteered their time

for the event; there was no

charge for anyone interested in

participating.

When the Ontarion editorial

staff chose to participate in

the Human Library, we each

selected topics that particularly

resonated with us from the list

of available books. The task of

writing about such a personal

and subjective experience was a

difficult one to take on. So, we

each took a different approach.

Each of the editors was free to

respond to their conversation

with their human book in

whatever way they saw fit.

There were no parameters on

the writing, no rules for how to

describe the experience. Some

chose to retell the story relayed

to them by their human book,

while others focused more

heavily on their reaction to the

one-on-one interaction.

Regardless, all four of us left

the experience with a story that

in one way or another affected

us on a personal level. We

retold stories to each other. We

debated about the ideas that

our books brought up.

The experience was like no

other.

>

SEE PAGE 12 FOR MORE

Varroa mite is behind

the disappearing bee

Guelph professor

explains the root

of colony collapse

disorder in bees

TOM BEEDHAM

Imagine a world where bees

are extinct: a world without stings,

culturally abandoned apiphobia and,

most importantly, a world entirely

void of natural food.

That is the world that Canadian

author Douglas Coupland presents

readers to in his latest take on the

future, Generation A. In his book,

contact with even a single honeybee

warrants abduction by hazmat suited

troops and weeks of interrogation and

blood sampling. It is undoubtedly a

radical interpretation, but for the

last three years, honeybees have

been dying fast enough to earn the

phenomenon the moniker of colony

collapse disorder (CCD).

While perhaps well founded,

Coupland’s prophecy might never

come to fruition (much to the

delight of beekeepers around the

world). With funding from the

Ontario Beekeepers’ Association,

the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture,

Food and Rural Affairs, the Natural

Sciences and Engineering Research

Council and the Inter-American

Institute for Co-operation on

Agriculture, University of Guelph

environmental biology professor

Ernesto Guzman believes he’s

figured out the problem.

In a study published last month

in the biology journal, Apidologie,

Prof. Guzman shoes that Varroa

mites were the cause for over 85 per

cent of honeybee deaths in Ontario.

Varroa mites are small, eight-legged

parasites that thrive on the blood of

honeybees.

According to Guzman, the

Varroa mite has been a problem

for roughly twenty years, but has

become severe more recently.

International Women’s

Day in Guelph

KELSEY RIDEOUT

Upon finishing a hot yoga

class, filled with women of all

ages, I overheard a conversation

in the change room. With

endorphins running high, one

woman enthusiastically shouted,

“Happy International Women’s

Day!” Excitement started to spread

as smiles and kind words were

exchanged. For many individuals,

however, this annual event is met

with the same confusion and

ambiguity that circulated last month

during the newly established annual

holiday, National Family Day. In

effect, one woman looked puzzled,

and asked what International

Women’s Day was all about.

Without hesitation, it was

quickly explained that the day is

meant to celebrate being a woman,

and celebrate the lives of all women.

Aligned with the widespread

critiques that note the futility in

celebrating love for that special

someone on Valentine’s Day for

just 24 hours of a single year, the

question was quickly raised, “Well,

shouldn’t everyday be women’s day”

Considering that International

Women’s Day is only a national

holiday in 15 countries, all being

in Western Europe and North

America, it may seem not be

surprising that some women remain

unaware of the annual Mar. 8 event.

However, such ignorance is also

somewhat baffling, as the annual

event has been celebrated in Canada

for decades. In fact, the day has a

deeply rooted history, stretching

back 100 years to when Clara

Zetkin of the Social Democractic

Party of Germany launched the idea

in 1910 at the second International

Conference of Working Women in

Copenhagen, Denmark.

While the international

event does aim to celebrate the

achievements and lives of women, it

also operates as a vehicle to demand

>

SEE “CURE,” PAGE 4

>

SEE “WOMEN,” PAGE 4

the issues this week

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THE ONTARION 161.8

Transit among CSA referendum questions

NICOLE ELSASSER

In the last issue of the Ontarion

we asked one question of each of

the 11 candidates vying for the

five executive spots in the Central

Student Association (CSA) at the

University of Guelph. While a large

component of the annual elections

are the selection of candidates for

the CSA executive, what is equally

important, and at times more widely

discussed, are the referendum

questions being put forward for

student vote. While they usually

relate to changes to student fees,

they can also be questions relating

to various aspects of campus life

more generally. These questions

give students the opportunity to

have a voice in how their money

will be spent money and how their

school is governed. Voting on

these questions, as well as the CSA

executive elections, can be done

online through the CSA website

and will end on Mar. 12. The

questions appearing on the ballot

are as follows.

Universal Buss Pass

Referendum

Preamble:

The Universal Bus Pass (UPass)

is a mandatory fee that all students

pay to allow unlimited access to

Guelph Transit buses. A new

agreement has been negotiated

between Guelph Transit and the

Central Student Assocation &

Graduate Student Association. In

order to continue to offer the UPass,

an increase in price is required to

address increases in service (e.g.,

move to 20 minute service) and

costs as well as a reflection of better

calculating the cost associated with

Knowing your roots

A look at how

Canadians stay true

to their native roots

KAITLYN DINGMAN

As Canadians, we pride

ourselves on our capitalist economy,

our democracy, and as seen in this

year’s Olympic games, our ability to

dominate on the ice. With the

sense of Canadian national

pride still lingering post-

Olympics, the question

of what constitutes a

Canadian identity is fresh.

With a nation so large and

with the multicultural mosaic we

speak of so frequently, it becomes

difficult to pin-down something

that unites all Canadians alike.

The dynamics of what

Canadian identity is are constantly

changing and it becomes difficult to

define what being Canadian is in a

few words. Over the past few decades,

multiculturalism has played an

important role in defining Canada as

a nation. Many could argue that part

of Canada’s identity is our cultural

mosaic, that a mixture of ethnic

groups, cultures and languages coexist

in our nation. It is very common

for immigrants, even though they

providing this service to students. It

is not possible to continue to offer

these services at the present UPass

price. If this referendum passes,

all students will pay the new price

for the UPass. If it fails, the UPass

contract will be dissolved effective

Fall 2010 and students will have

the option to individually pay for

monthly student passes: $62/month

(equivalent of $248 per semester);

tickets: $18.50/ten tickets; or cash

fares: $2.75/ride.

Question:

Do you support the continuation

of the Universal Bus Pass (UPass) by

raising the semester fee by $20.52

for Spring and Fall 2010 which

represents an increase from $61.63

per semester to $82.15 per semester,

followed by a $2.00 increase to

$84.15 in Winter 2011 semester

and a $2.00 increase to $86.15 for

the spring/fall 2011 and winter

semester 2012, representing a total

increase of $24.52 per semester in

the UPass over two years

Global Vets Referendum

Preamble:

Global Vets, a group of student

veterinarians from the Ontario

Veterinary College at the University

of Guelph, works in partnership with

professionals, veterinary practices,

and organizations worldwide to

improve the health and welfare of

animals and humans in developing

countries. Our organization aims

to increase both local and national

awareness regarding the potential

role of veterinarians and veterinary

students in developing communities.

Through this collaboration, Global

Vets initiatives have advanced the

may have never been outside of

Canada, to identify themselves with

their native heritage.

Second-year Sheridan College

student, Jovana Stojkovic, is a prime

example of this.

“I believe it’s important to

identify myself

as Serbian because even though I

was born in Canada, I feel just as

Serbian as if I was born in Serbia,”

said Stojkovic.

Canadian immigrants

acknowledge their native

heritage by doing such things

as identifying themselves as a

‘hyphenated Canadian’ and by

moving into communities of similar

demographics.

ideals of international veterinary

medicine in countries in need of

assistance.

All student projects are aimed at

addressing both human and animal

problems globally. These include

projects related to: sustainable

agriculture, ecosystem health, habitat

conservation, wildlife rehabilitation,

rabies, public health and population

control of feral dogs and cats.

Global Vets also has a number

of initiatives in the OVC, the

University of Guelph, and the

broader community. These include

giving open presentations upon

return from their projects and

detailing the impact that they had.

They also help to organize the “OVC

Mini-Vet School” for members of

the community to attend.

Question:

Given the initiatives and goals

that members of Global Vets are

engaging in and striving towards,

both locally and globally, would you

support a student fee of $0.27 per

semester to support this program

TAP IN! Referendum

Preamble:

The practice of bottling and

transporting water is unsustainable.

Bottled water is harmful to the

environment, depleting nonrenewable

resources and creating

unnecessary waste. Contrary to

popular perception, only 35% of

plastic beverage bottles are properly

recycled in Ontario. Furthermore,

bottled water can be up to 4000

times more expensive than municipal

water.

Universities and municipalities

across Canada are choosing to

There are many reasons why

immigrants feel it is important to

seek out communities that share the

same ethnic backgrounds.

“I would say that parallel

communities, ethnic enclaves,

whatever you want to call them, are, to

some extent, a natural, unavoidable

and arguably even desirable

part of the immigration

experience as people come

to an immigrant-receiving

country and get settled

by attaching themselves

initially to communities

with which they’re

familiar, that provide social

support and social capital,”

said Jason Kenney, the minister

of citizenship, immigration and

multiculturalism in a speech at

the University of Huron.

University of Guelph political

science lecturer, J.P. Lewis, also had

insight into this idea of a shared

ethnic community.

There are many reasons

for immigrants to move into

communities of common culture,

background and language; social

and economic support would seem

to be the most obvious, while the

location of sponsors and family

create a natural locale to begin a new

promote public tap water over the sale

of bottled water. 72 municipalities, 6

Ontario school boards, 3 Canadian

universities (Brandon University,

Memorial University, and the

University of Winnipeg) and

countless restaurants, hospitals and

high schools have implemented

restrictions on the sale of bottled

water. On our own campus, over 35

student clubs, 2 colleges and 1 faculty

department have implemented

similar restrictions.

The Bullring is run for students

by students, and has a strong history

of supporting initiatives that promote

environmental sustainability. In

2005, students voted to convert the

Bullring to using sustainable, windproduced

power.

Last February, the Grad Lounge,

the student-run graduate eatery,

became the first commercial space

on campus to intentionally remove

bottled water from their shelves.

The Bullring is our space; by

choosing to support local tap water

we can continue our legacy of

environmental leadership.

Question:

In keeping with the Bullring’s

commitment to environmental

sustainability, do you support the

discontinuation of bottled water sales

at the Bullring, while continuing to

provide drinking water through the

existing free filtered water service

Students can

vote until

Mar. 12

life in,” said Lewis.

One main familiarity these

communities have is a shared

language.

“It has a lot to do with how

my parents raised me. When I was

little I learned Serbian as my first

language, I never knew anything else

existed until my brothers went to

school and came home and would

talk in English,” said Stojkovic. “I

believe identifying myself as Serbian

has given me culture, religion, values,

beliefs, and the chance to know a

different lifestyle which I adore.”

Lewis explained the distinction

between the “hyphenated” Canadian

and the “non-hyphenated” Canadian,

when it comes to national identity.

“While there is a heated

debate between the notion of the

hyphenated Canadian, say Polish-

Canadian, and non-hyphenated

Canadian, simply ‘Canadian,’” said

Lewis. “Both explicitly, through

governmental policies such as official

multiculturalism, and implicitly,

through perceived ideas about a

mosaic, it would appear that the

practice of one staying true to their

old country’s culture and heritage is

celebrated as a very Canadian thing

to do.”

NEWS

No election over

the budget

3

Opposition leader Michael

Ignatieff has said that the Liberals

will not trigger an election over the

federal budget, which was tabled

on Mar. 4 by Stephen Harper’s

conservatives. Although the

Liberals find the budget lacking

in some key areas, including

pensions, green technologies, and

youth unemployment, Ignatieff

said his party will propose

alternative legislation to address

these issues instead of sending

Canadians to the polls again. Jack

Layton has indicated that the

New Democratic Party will vote

against the budget on the grounds

that it favours corporations and

does too little to create jobs, and

Gilles Duceppe, leader of the Bloc

Quebecois, said his party will also

oppose the budget.

Florida’s sneaky

monkey outsmarts

officials again

A mischievous rhesus

macaque, apparently an escaped

or released pet, has avoided

capture yet again in Tampa, Fla.,

where it has been running loose

for over a year. The pink-faced

monkey is apparently resistant to

the sedatives in tranquilizer darts.

On Mar. 3 the animal was spotted

in a residential neighborhood

and authorities were notified.

However, the monkey escaped by

darting across a busy street and

ducking into an alleyway beside a

drug store, despite being hit twice

with tranquilizers. Witnesses say

the monkey stopped and waited

for traffic to clear before running

off.

Bigelow wins big

on Hollywood’s

biggest night

Hurt Locker director Katherine

Bigelow swept the 82nd Academy

Awards on Mar. 7 in Los Angeles,

taking Best Picture and beating

her ex-husband James Cameron,

director of Avatar. Bigelow

became the first woman to receive

an Oscar for Best Director, as well.

Other highlights of the ceremony

included big wins for Precious: Based

on the Novel Push by Sapphire. It

won Best Adapted Screenplay and

Best Supporting Actress, accepted

emotionally by Mo’Nique. “The

Weary Kind” from Crazy Heart

picked up Best Original Song

and Jeff Bridges won Best Actor

for his performance as a downand-out

country singer in the

same film. Sandra Bullock was

honoured as Best Actress for her

role as a mother hen in The Blind

Side. In her speech she thanked

“all mothers who take care of the

babies and the children, no matter

where they come from” and “my

lover, Meryl Streep”.


NEWS

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

4

Women across the world join to celebrate

and promote an annual event

<

CONTINUED FROM COVER

that the pursuit to attain gender

equality be coupled with supportive

political decisions.

Beginning in 1911, International

Women’s Day has continued

to exert an awareness regarding

injustices facing women across the

world, while publicly demanding

that oppressive conditions against

women be challenged and reversed.

Global protests and marches channel

international attention towards major

issues facing women, including the

higher burden of poverty on women,

the impact of war on the lives of

women, the implementation of

sexist and discriminatory laws, and

the exorbitant rates of pregnancyrelated

deaths in areas of the

developing world.

In Canada, 59 national events

took place across libraries, museums

and galleries on Mar. 8, centering on

issues such as violence against women,

the experiences of women belonging

to visible minorities in Canada, and

the artistic contributions of women.

Many university campuses also took

part in celebrating International

Women’s Day.

On the University of Guelph

Campus, Oxfam held an event

to explore women’s experiences

and suffering in Haiti. Guelph-

Wellington Women in Crisis held

an event featuring two remarkable

women, Lia Grimanis, founder of

the women’s rights organization, Up

With Women, and Briar Rose, who

was born in a women’s shelter, and at

the age of 10 became the youngest

finalist for Canada’s top 20 under 20.

The multitude of tribulations

confronting women in Guelph,

Canada and abroad appears to

have necessitated an internationally

recognized day of unified action,

advocacy and protest on behalf of

women’s rights everywhere.

Rashaad Bhamjee

The Heart and Stroke Foundation held an event in the UC courtyard

to raise money and awareness for their cause.

Cure for bee death

<

CONTINUED FROM COVER

“It’s becoming a stronger

problem…because mites are

developing a resistance to the

chemicals that are being used to

treat colonies against them,” said

Guzman.

In Ontario, colonies have been

reducing in size by one third for the

last three years.

“It’s not economically sustainable

to keep on losing [bees at that rate]

and to purchase bees or to split

colonies in half in order to make up

for losses,” said Guzman. “If they

have to do that every year, they’ll be

out of the business very soon.”

According to Guzman, an

understanding of the effect of bees

on food production is crucial.

“It’s important to underscore

that one third of the food that we

eat in western societies is produced

thanks to the pollinating services of

bees,” he said, adding that there is

no natural alternative to honeybee

pollination.

For Guzman, the Varroa

mite is among three main factors

contributing to the disappearing bee

phenomenon. He also attributes the

mortality rates to insufficient winter

food supplies within colonies, as

well as splitting colonies too late in

the season. According to Guzman,

the Varroa mite is particularly

problematic in the fall and winter

months when the queen is producing

less bees.

While the findings in Guzman’s

study are concerned with data from

Ontario, he said he is certain that

the Varroa mite is one of the factors

contributing to bee deaths globally.

Guzman’s current project is

finding an effective treatment, and

he’s not focused on finding a miracle

pesticide.

“I mean, many more synthetic

pesticides can be developed to

control the mite, but eventually, [the

Rashaad Bhamjee

U of G prof Ernesto Guzman discovered that the Varroa mite is a

major contributor to the staggering deaths in honeybees in Ontario.

Varroa] might develop a resistance

to all of them,” he said.

Guzman has been working on

natural compounds that mites will

be less likely to develop resistance

to and won’t contaminate honey. He

explained that thymol and oregano

oils have been “very effective” at

controlling the mites. Guzman

also suggested using bio-control

agents like fungi that are naturally

occurring in the environment, which

do not negatively effect bees, have

the potential to control the Varroa.

“A third way of approaching

this problem…would be to develop

genetically resistant bees, bees that

are naturally resistant against the

mite,” added Guzman.


THE ONTARION 161.8

The procrastination

habit

Why it happens

and how to deal

with it

VANESSA SZPURKO

Procrastination. It’s a common

topic of conversation (and cause

of worry) around campus. But why

does it happen

“Procrastination is actually a

fairly complex phenomenon. There

are a lot of different reasons why

students do it,“ said Maryann Kope,

who works at the University of

Guelph’s Learning Services Centre.

“For some people, they haven’t quite

figured out how to manage their

time in a way that’s really effective

for them and their program.”

Kope argues that

the subject a

person is studying can have a lot

to do with how students approach proach

homework.

They may find that with

the subjects they really like and

enjoy, they ydon’t procrastinate…

but with subjects that

they

find difficult, [or if] they don’t

like the course, it’s harder to get

motivated and to sit

down and do

the work,” said Kope.

Sunet Slabbert bert

is a fine arts

student at the U of G who admitted

to being a frequent ent procrastinator

and agreed that this was precisely

the case.

“I procrastinate on everything

except when it comes to art

projects, “ she said. “They’re much

more enjoyable than studying

or doing essays.”

Contrary to popular pular

belief, procrastination isn’t

only a practice employed

by the unmotivated.

According to Kope, there

is a solid correlation

between procrastination

and perfectionism.

“For [perfectionists],

their self-esteem esteem is often

heavily invested in their

academic performance. If they

procrastinate ate on an assignment,

nt,

and they do it at the last minute in

a big rush…when they get it back

and receive a B or a C they can

think, ‘Well I could have gotten an

A if I had put the time into it,’” said

Kope. “It provides them with an

emotional out that allows their self

esteem to remain intact. For a lot of

people, that’s a very subconscious,

unintentional kind of behavior

they’re not even aware of.”

Some students avoid a certain

assignment or piece of work so

strongly that they will classify other

non-work related tasks as more

important. Kope explained that this

is a technique that many students

use in order to make themselves

feel productive when in reality

they aren’t focusing on the truly

important tasks they should be

doing.

If a task is put off long enough,

students will reach the point where

they have no choice but to attempt

to complete their work in a very

short amount of time.

“Oftentimes, the amount of

stress and panic that’s involved

with trying to get through that

task means that you’re never really

realizing your own ability,” she said.

Some students might argue

that they do some of their best

work at the last minute, and thrive

under the pressure that crunch time

creates.

Mark Fenske, an assistant

professor of psychology at the U of

G and co-author of the soon-to-bereleased

book, The Winner’s Brain:

8 Strategies Great Minds Use to

Achieve Success, explained that

success isn’t about the speed work is

done at, but the focus involved.

“You’re forced by the deadline

to put everything else aside…which

pushes you into becoming engaged

with the material,” he said. “Once

you’re engaged with the material,

you see it’s not all that bad.”

So, how is it

possible to

Victor Zuydweg

achieve that level

of focus without waiting until the

eleventh-hour

“Think about a task in concrete

terms…break it down into its

constituent parts. What exactly are

the different elements that go into

it” said Fenske. “You can break

those down into smaller, more

manageable jobs. By laying it out

in that way, research shows that you

have a much higher success rate in

terms of being able to do the task

and not procrastinate.”

Kope emphasized that

Learning Services (on the first

floor of McLaughlin Library) has a

number of ways to offer assistance

to students, such as workshops,

one-on-one consultations with

peer helpers, and a website at www.

learningservices.uoguelph.ca.

“Everyone, at some point,

struggles with [procrastination and

time management] at some point

in their life,” she said. “And there

are a lot of good resources here to

help.”

AU student Sarah

in Calgary, Alberta, Canada




Include


NEWS

Can being altruistic help get you a

date

How giving back

to those around

you can improve

your love life

ALDIS BRENNAN

The idea of altruism, people

willing to sacrifice for others,

is something of a puzzle for

biologists and psychologists alike.

While many agree that altruism

does exist, it has not been easy to

come up with a viable evolutionary

explanation as to why this is.

According to Pat Barclay,

a psychology professor at the

University of Guelph, this is

because altruism is an activity

that appears to reduce a person’s

chance of survival.

“If people are doing things

to benefit others, but that carries

some cost, then we might expect

that behaviour to be selected

against by evolution or we might

expect people to learn to be selfish

given that altruism has this cost,”

said Barclay.

It is this problem that Barclay

attempts to address in his recent

article published in the British

Journal of Psychology. In the

article he finds that a person

is more likely to be attracted

to people who show altruistic

tendencies than to those who

don’t. This holds true for both

men and women, with women

exhibiting slightly more attraction

to the altruist than men.

To some, this may seem to

be an obvious conclusion; of

course being generous is an

attractive quality. This is a view

that Katie Neufeld, a fourth year

undergraduate student at the U of

G, also holds.

“Well, think of going on a date

with someone who’s selfless, and

is willing to go out of their way

to make sure that you’re having

a good time. Then think of one

with someone who is being pretty

selfish, only wants to talk about

themselves,” said Neufeld. “I

think we all want mates who are

willing to sacrifice their wellbeing

for others, especially their loved

ones and families.”

If this is so obvious, then why

has the bad boy or the selfish

archetype been thought of as the

norm, or even the preferred choice

for some

Once again Barclay offers

an answer; it is actually because

selfishness is rare.

“We tend to notice selfishness

first because it negatively affects


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us so much, so it stands out, and

second there are arguments that

people tend to really focus on

instances of cheating in order to

help protect [themselves] from

cheating,” he said. “All of the

instances of our cooperation we

don’t even think about them,

right, they come so naturally to us

that it becomes second nature so

you might not notice.”

But before subtly dropping a

generous donation to a charitable

organization near a prospective

mate, there are some limits as

to how much altruism can help.

Barclay reminds us that altruism

is but one factor in many that

determines the attraction a person

feels.

“I should caution that this

effect is one of these ‘all else being

equal’ [situations],” said Barclay.

“A little bit of altruism is not going

to turn the average person into

Casanova. You’re not suddenly

going to become the ‘Mac Daddy’

by being generous. It has an effect

but so does everything else. This is

just one factor in many.”

Even if this effect has its limits,

there is still a growing body of

evidence that shows nice guys

don’t always finish last.


6

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

JASON COLLETT

“HERE’S HOPING. WE’RE GAMBLING ON THIS

ONE A BIT.”

ZACK MACRAE

Lately, Jason Collett has

been pretty busy. With a brand

new album released earlier this

week, and an upcoming North

American tour that began last

night in Toronto for Canadian

Music Week, the only breaks that

Collett gets are spent talking to

journalists.

The last couple weeks have

just been nuts,” an exhausted but

persistent Collett tells. “It’s been

crazy. But good you know They’re

good problems to have.”

On Tuesday, Collett released

his fourth full-length album called

Rat A Tat Tat, an album that firmly

plants him in a sound that is fully

Collett. His vocals are there, his

characteristic geological musings

are there and in the background,

Zeus is there too.

Like a well oiled machine that

plays really good rock music, Zeus

helped Collett in the studio when

they weren’t working on their

newly released album Say Us, and

along with Bahamas, will back

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him up on the road too.

Currently, the three groups are

embarking on a rather unique tour.

They’re calling it the Bonfire Ball

Revue. The tour will have all three

groups playing each other’s songs

together over a three hour long set

with no breaks.

To get everything to flow

right, over the past couple of

weeks this gang of musicians has

been rehearsing whenever they

aren’t shooting videos or releasing

albums.

“Here’s hoping,” laughs Collett

about the outcome of these shows.

“We’re gambling on this one a bit,

but I think it’s going to turn out

great.”

The Bonfire Ball Revue will roll

into Guelph tonight at the eBar.

If you don’t have a ticket yet, you

should get there early and hope

they will be selling at the door

because this one is going to be a

doozie.

Earlier this week I had a

conversation with Collett about

the Bonfire Ball and a couple

ARTS & CULTURE

other things he’s been up to lately.

Calculated and at a relaxed pace,

Collett answered my questions

like a gentleman.

The Ontarion: So you’ve been

pretty busy in the past couple of

weeks.

Jason Collett: Yeah, the last

couple weeks have just been nuts.

We’re trying to rehearse. We’re

shooting videos, its just been kind

of crazy with Zeus’ record and my

record coming out at the same

time, its been crazy. But good you

know They’re good problems to

have.

TO: I guess releasing a record

is a pretty heavy thing.

JC: It can be, yeah. It really can

be. And that’s kind of what you

want.

Lately we’ve been rehearsing

this revue show to support the

album. So it’s not just rehearsing

your own thing, its rehearsing as

three bands trying to figure

out a show that flows and

that has nice interchange

between all the acts back and

forth. Now we have to do it in

two days and we are just taking a

deep breath hoping that we can

pull it off. It’s the kind of thing

that’s going to get better as we

go along. We’ll tweak it as we go.

So coming out of the gates with

a big show in Toronto is kind of

a suicide mission, but we seem to

roll that way.

With the Guelph show coming

the day after, we’ll already have

a show under our belts

so it will inevitably

be better.

TO: What

will the Bonfire

Ball Revue be

like

JC: Each

band’s music

will be well

represented.

And then

there will be

some overlap

w h e r e

everybody

will play. Then

sometimes it

will just be

me playing

alone, and

sometimes

it will just be

Bahamas, just

Afie and his

drummer. We work

like this on so many

other levels. Carlin

from Zeus has a studio

where both of our records

were recorded. There are a scene

of folks that just sort of drift

through the studio on a regular

basis. So with the revue shows we

are just taking that to its logical

conclusion. We just kind of said,

‘Well, let’s do what we do in the

studio on the road. Let’s take

that same spirit and lift the

show to a whole other level.’

And I think audiences will

respond well to that. Your not just

getting three separate bands with

three separate sets. Your getting

a combination and when you get

three bands combining you get

a whole other story. It’s not just

their three stories, but the story of

everybody working together.

TO: What is your relationship

with Zeus How did you meet

these guys.

JC: Well, half of Zeus used to

be a band called Paso Mino. And

that was my backing band previous

to Zeus. And Afie from Bahamas

was part of that band, but Afie left

to play with Feist. At that point

Paso Mino unraveled. All these

guys grew up in Barrie together

essentially, so they’ve got that

history together.

TO: I find that a lot of

Canadian artists are afraid to

admit that they’re Canadian.

But with your music it seems

important for you to tell your

listeners where you are. Is this

true

JC: I don’t have a real agenda

about this, it just comes out in

the songs. I’m pleased with it.

It’s been fun to just make the

references. Most interestingly, is

that people outside of Canada

seem more intrigued about it than

people inside of Canada. Really,

I’m just trying to communicate

ideas and shared experiences and

the geography of this country is

just one big shared experience.

It’s handy for me to make those

references and get quickly into

peoples heads or hearts, it’s a

direct route. Often I’m just

writing a story that is just a

shared experience. Maybe

it’s something that’s

happened to me, but

has happened to other

people too. So people

can relate to it and that’s

all music is really about

anyways. I just try to keep

it personal and that’s what

comes out.

TO: Do you take

inspiration from your city

JC: Toronto does inspire

me but not so obviously in

songs, its just a good place

to live, its my

home, I love

coming

back here.

I love

h o w

small

Toronto

actually

is once

you get

to know

it.


ARTS & CULTURE

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

7

Bicycles and business plans: Victor Stan makes

us all into artists

Victor Stan’s work

to appear in Zavitz

this week

JOSH DOYLE

“My life isn’t going to be an

awesome painting and my art isn’t

going to be like my life, but I think

there’s a space between the two

that can work,” Victor Stan says.

Stan is an artist here at the

University of Guelph on his

way to graduating. In light of

his upcoming exhibit in Zavitz,

Stan chatted with the Ontarion

about some of his latest work, his

opinions on art, and his experiences

as a childhood artist.

“My parents have always

encouraged me to take art. I’ve

been doing it since grade four,”

Stan said. Like many, this talented

and innovative young artist started

early, submitting portfolios to be

involved in his elementary school’s

art program. “It was odd because

it would have been a very childish

portfolio,” he added.

Stan studied art throughout

high school here in Ontario,

attending Cardinal Carter

Academy for the Arts in Toronto,

but lived most of his young life

in his native country of Romania.

He learned mostly about classical

methods while studying in these

schools, which he thinks is

important for a developing artist.

He expressed the need for an artist

to know where art as a whole

comes from.

“Otherwise you’re likely to

check it out at

niagara.edu/graduate

Graduate Degree Programs

Want a degree that will make a difference in your life

Then check out the outstanding graduate programs at

niagara.edu/graduate.

Master of Education The areas only private university

that’s both NCATE accredited and recognized by the Ontario Ministry of

Training. Niagara offers programs in Teacher Education, Educational Leadership,

School Counseling, School Psychology, Mental Health Counseling, Special

Education and Literacy.

Master of Business Administration With a nationally acclaimed faculty,

practice-oriented curriculum and AACSB accreditation, Niagara lets you

complete your MBA in as little as sixteen months with convenient weekday

evening or Saturday classes.

Master of Criminal Justice A traditional master’s program and the area’s only

five-year BS/MS program in Criminal Justice Administration lets Niagara meet

the needs of both incoming freshmen and working professionals.

Master of Arts-Interdisciplinary Studies An innovative curriculum that crosses

traditional disciplinary boundaries allows each student to design his or her own

degree. If you’ve always wanted to pursue a Master’s degree but have been

unable to find the right program, we can help you meet your goals.

To see how Niagara can make a difference

in your career, visit

www.niagara.edu/graduate

1.800.462.2111

e-mail admissions@niagara.edu

Josh Doyle

Stan’s efforts to blur the line between art and non-art will appear in Zavitz all week long with the opening

reception on Thursday night at 7pm.

assume that you’re going to do

something really interesting, that

isn’t actually interesting,” he said.

Stan explained that once you have

the background it’s easier to see

where you want to make changes,

and what direction to go with your

own art.

It’s easy to see while looking at

Graduate

Open House

April 17, 2010

Niagara University Campus

Lewiston, NY

9:30 am – 12:30 pm

Education That Makes a Difference

Office of Graduate Admissions

Bailo Hall PO Box 2011

Niagara University, NY 14109-2011

Stan’s work that he has no problem

making his work interesting.

Covering the walls of Stan’s studio

in Alexrod were pictures of what

looked like family trees without

any names. Stan explained that

they are actually corporate models

used for organizing people.

“You can almost fill in spaces

with whatever you want in terms of

imagining the hierarchies and the

way that we organize ourselves,”

Stan explained of his work. This is

part of Stan’s recent efforts to blur

the line between art and non-art.

“Traces of peoples actions,

either things they leave behind or

things that they make,” is a major

What are you reading

This week, Duncan Day-Myron talks

about Doris Lessing’s Mara and Dann

Doris Lessing has one of the

most varied bodies of work in

contemporary literature: it’s hard

to know what to expect from one

of her books, whether it is going

to be horror, thriller, or a historical

narrative. With Mara and Dann:

an Adventure, however, she sends

out no mixed signals. From the

beginning it’s clear that this book is

what its title suggests, adventure.

The book begins with two

young children being held captive.

They are taken from captivity and

brought to stay with a friendly

woman in a small town foreign to

them. There they grow up while the

world around them is falling apart.

On their journey to this town,

they encounter floods, the scattered

remains of dying or dead animals,

and reminisce about their former

lives of affluence. It’s here that

we learn that the story is set

thousands of years in the future,

on the continent of Ifrik on an

Earth ruined by environmental

collapse: Ifrik is suffering drought

and far spreading brushfires, while

the northern continents are going

through another ice age.

The adventure continues as

Mara and Dann leave the village,

heading only for an indescribable

“North,” a supposed land of

promise. They travel from town to

town, encountering progressively

more sophisticated cultures, but

each new city brings its own

challenges to the two, which seem

interest of his, Stan explained. One

of his projects involves looking at

different versions of the same book

from the library on campus and

documenting the markings people

made on the pages, creating what

he calls “a Coles notes made by

everyone.”

“I wanted to take a more critical

view of art. I tried to blend art

and regular life together,” he said,

while screening his adaptation of

Google Earth. By removing all of

the useful software offered by the

program, Stan leaves us with just a

globe spinning at the same rate as

the actual planet.

“We all share the pleasure of

looking at our home. We assume

we can spin the planet around,

zoom in and look at things

whenever we want… In reality you

can’t do that,” he said.

Pictures of abandoned bicycles

and barriers also cover a section of

wall in Stan’s space, this too echoes

one of Stan’s themes of the traces

people leave behind. It seems we,

as a society, are making art all

the time by just being ourselves.

The things we leave behind say

something about who we are,

making them good material for

art.

“I try to come in where

something’s already built … it

becomes what it is because of my

approach to art,” said Stan. His

work will be showing in Zavitz

all week long, but the official

opening is Thursday evening after

8pm when drinks and food will

compliment the art.

to probe social issues far outside of

the fantastic world the characters

are exploring. Racial, cultural and

language conflicts are all explored,

adding depth and resonance to the

narrative.

In Mara, Lessing has created

one of her most interesting

and complex narrators. The

development of her worldview is

what most carried my interest from

the beginning to end. Throughout

all the chaos and tumult of her

and her brother’s adventures,

Mara craves knowledge. She starts

the novel so sheltered, and as the

reader learns things, so does Mara.

The book is peppered with Mara’s

inner monologues, attempts to

rationalize her experiences with

her understanding of the world

and its history. These, in a sense recontextualize

much of the events

in a more philosophic light. If the

narrator were not so sympathetic,

the book would not have been

nearly as strong or endearing.

True to form, Lessing has crafted

a thoroughly engrossing world with

well-developed conflicts and social

issues; the pacing is as steady and

calculated as one would expect

from a writer of her distinction,

but she manages to create a tense,

powerful story unlike any other she

has written.


ARTS & CULTURE

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

7

Bicycles and business plans: Victor Stan makes

us all into artists

Victor Stan’s work

to appear in Zavitz

this week

JOSH DOYLE

“My life isn’t going to be an

awesome painting and my art isn’t

going to be like my life, but I think

there’s a space between the two

that can work,” Victor Stan says.

Stan is an artist here at the

University of Guelph on his

way to graduating. In light of

his upcoming exhibit in Zavitz,

Stan chatted with the Ontarion

about some of his latest work, his

opinions on art, and his experiences

as a childhood artist.

“My parents have always

encouraged me to take art. I’ve

been doing it since grade four,”

Stan said. Like many, this talented

and innovative young artist started

early, submitting portfolios to be

involved in his elementary school’s

art program. “It was odd because

it would have been a very childish

portfolio,” he added.

Stan studied art throughout

high school here in Ontario,

attending Cardinal Carter

Academy for the Arts in Toronto,

but lived most of his young life

in his native country of Romania.

He learned mostly about classical

methods while studying in these

schools, which he thinks is

important for a developing artist.

He expressed the need for an artist

to know where art as a whole

comes from.

“Otherwise you’re likely to

check it out at

niagara.edu/graduate

Graduate Degree Programs

Want a degree that will make a difference in your life

Then check out the outstanding graduate programs at

niagara.edu/graduate.

Master of Education The areas only private university

that’s both NCATE accredited and recognized by the Ontario Ministry of

Training. Niagara offers programs in Teacher Education, Educational Leadership,

School Counseling, School Psychology, Mental Health Counseling, Special

Education and Literacy.

Master of Business Administration With a nationally acclaimed faculty,

practice-oriented curriculum and AACSB accreditation, Niagara lets you

complete your MBA in as little as sixteen months with convenient weekday

evening or Saturday classes.

Master of Criminal Justice A traditional master’s program and the area’s only

five-year BS/MS program in Criminal Justice Administration lets Niagara meet

the needs of both incoming freshmen and working professionals.

Master of Arts-Interdisciplinary Studies An innovative curriculum that crosses

traditional disciplinary boundaries allows each student to design his or her own

degree. If you’ve always wanted to pursue a Master’s degree but have been

unable to find the right program, we can help you meet your goals.

To see how Niagara can make a difference

in your career, visit

www.niagara.edu/graduate

1.800.462.2111

e-mail admissions@niagara.edu

Josh Doyle

Stan’s efforts to blur the line between art and non-art will appear in Zavitz all week long with the opening

reception on Thursday night at 7pm.

assume that you’re going to do

something really interesting, that

isn’t actually interesting,” he said.

Stan explained that once you have

the background it’s easier to see

where you want to make changes,

and what direction to go with your

own art.

It’s easy to see while looking at

Graduate

Open House

April 17, 2010

Niagara University Campus

Lewiston, NY

9:30 am – 12:30 pm

Education That Makes a Difference

Office of Graduate Admissions

Bailo Hall PO Box 2011

Niagara University, NY 14109-2011

Stan’s work that he has no problem

making his work interesting.

Covering the walls of Stan’s studio

in Alexrod were pictures of what

looked like family trees without

any names. Stan explained that

they are actually corporate models

used for organizing people.

“You can almost fill in spaces

with whatever you want in terms of

imagining the hierarchies and the

way that we organize ourselves,”

Stan explained of his work. This is

part of Stan’s recent efforts to blur

the line between art and non-art.

“Traces of peoples actions,

either things they leave behind or

things that they make,” is a major

What are you reading

This week, Duncan Day-Myron talks

about Doris Lessing’s Mara and Dann

Doris Lessing has one of the

most varied bodies of work in

contemporary literature: it’s hard

to know what to expect from one

of her books, whether it is going

to be horror, thriller, or a historical

narrative. With Mara and Dann:

an Adventure, however, she sends

out no mixed signals. From the

beginning it’s clear that this book is

what its title suggests, adventure.

The book begins with two

young children being held captive.

They are taken from captivity and

brought to stay with a friendly

woman in a small town foreign to

them. There they grow up while the

world around them is falling apart.

On their journey to this town,

they encounter floods, the scattered

remains of dying or dead animals,

and reminisce about their former

lives of affluence. It’s here that

we learn that the story is set

thousands of years in the future,

on the continent of Ifrik on an

Earth ruined by environmental

collapse: Ifrik is suffering drought

and far spreading brushfires, while

the northern continents are going

through another ice age.

The adventure continues as

Mara and Dann leave the village,

heading only for an indescribable

“North,” a supposed land of

promise. They travel from town to

town, encountering progressively

more sophisticated cultures, but

each new city brings its own

challenges to the two, which seem

interest of his, Stan explained. One

of his projects involves looking at

different versions of the same book

from the library on campus and

documenting the markings people

made on the pages, creating what

he calls “a Coles notes made by

everyone.”

“I wanted to take a more critical

view of art. I tried to blend art

and regular life together,” he said,

while screening his adaptation of

Google Earth. By removing all of

the useful software offered by the

program, Stan leaves us with just a

globe spinning at the same rate as

the actual planet.

“We all share the pleasure of

looking at our home. We assume

we can spin the planet around,

zoom in and look at things

whenever we want… In reality you

can’t do that,” he said.

Pictures of abandoned bicycles

and barriers also cover a section of

wall in Stan’s space, this too echoes

one of Stan’s themes of the traces

people leave behind. It seems we,

as a society, are making art all

the time by just being ourselves.

The things we leave behind say

something about who we are,

making them good material for

art.

“I try to come in where

something’s already built … it

becomes what it is because of my

approach to art,” said Stan. His

work will be showing in Zavitz

all week long, but the official

opening is Thursday evening after

8pm when drinks and food will

compliment the art.

to probe social issues far outside of

the fantastic world the characters

are exploring. Racial, cultural and

language conflicts are all explored,

adding depth and resonance to the

narrative.

In Mara, Lessing has created

one of her most interesting

and complex narrators. The

development of her worldview is

what most carried my interest from

the beginning to end. Throughout

all the chaos and tumult of her

and her brother’s adventures,

Mara craves knowledge. She starts

the novel so sheltered, and as the

reader learns things, so does Mara.

The book is peppered with Mara’s

inner monologues, attempts to

rationalize her experiences with

her understanding of the world

and its history. These, in a sense recontextualize

much of the events

in a more philosophic light. If the

narrator were not so sympathetic,

the book would not have been

nearly as strong or endearing.

True to form, Lessing has crafted

a thoroughly engrossing world with

well-developed conflicts and social

issues; the pacing is as steady and

calculated as one would expect

from a writer of her distinction,

but she manages to create a tense,

powerful story unlike any other she

has written.


THE ONTARION 161.8

ARTS & CULTURE

Featured artist: Liam Sanagan

9

JOANNA NEWSOM

HAVE ONE ON ME

I must admit that I was not a

Joanna Newsom fan. I could not

get past the squawking vocals of

her debut, Milk-Eyed Mender,

and subsequently ignored the

highly critically acclaimed Ys. I

probably would have also written

off Newsom’s new album, Have

One On Me (HOOM), if I hadn’t

stumbled upon a headline from

The Observer aptly saying, “Now

that Joanna Newsom has finally

learnt to sing, she’s even greater

than ever” by reviewer Kitty

Empire. While the result is true,

the new vocal style is not entirely

out of choosing. Many reports

have discussed how vocal cord

nodules permanently affected

her voice, but she has also hinted

at “further vocal modifications.”

If you’re unfamiliar with “old”

Newsom’s quirky voice, I can only

obscurely compare it to Stephnie

Weir’s character, Leona Campbell

(Mad TV) or if Melanie Safka

plugged her nose and sang her

comical classic, “Brand New Key.”

In fact, it’s probably easier to check

out Newsom herself.

For those in love with the

Californian harpist/pianist’s

squeaks and nasally croons,

they are still subtly scattered

through HOOM, but are mostly

over powered by her impressive

operatic howls and soft trills.

However, if you are unfamiliar

with Newsom and/or didn’t

previously enjoy her, this album

is the perfect introduction to her.

Indeed HOOM is so accessible,

retrospectively listening to her

previous work is like meeting

someone for the first time who you

feel like you’ve known for years.

But, HOOM also has the effect of

putting Newsom’s body of work

into perspective. To over simplify,

say Milk-Eyed Mender was a movie

trailer, then Ys would be the full

feature and HOOM would be the

book that it is all based on. I forgot

to mention, HOOM is a three disc,

two hour long album with only

six songs per disc. That is a lot of

dense music to digest.

Albums like HOOM are not

meant to have stand-alone singles,

they are meant to be listened to

as a whole, which is why I have

discarded the “Notable Tracks”

section this week. However, with

the vast amounts of music available

at your finger tips and little time,

I can understand the tendency to

shy away from a two hour long

adventure without some kind of

preview. So if you must tastetest,

try the much hyped “Good

Intentions Paving Company,” or

the title track for her polyrhythmic

style. For those with a countrybone,

“Ribbon Bows” is a must

listen (Fingers crossed for some

weird Grammy-forced Newsom-

Dolly Parton collaboration).

HOOM takes you to places that

I haven’t been since Fleet Foxes

2008 debut. A place that is similar

to the feeling of when you first

stepped through that wardrobe

as a child reading Narnia. This is

why it’s no surprise to hear Robin

Pecknold covering “On a Good

Day” and is now confirmed to

support Newsom on her upcoming

tour.

While Newsom has been

reported to still be dating Andy

Samberg, so far there are no reports

of any T-Pain collaborations. Not

even on Jimmy Fallon could we

get a uestlove snare. Alas, there’s

still hope for an SNL skit and

performance.

Listeners May Also Enjoy: Fleet

Foxes – S/T , Sun Giant; Owen

Pallett – Heartland

Next Sound Check: Jason Collett

– Rat a Tat Tat

-Daniel Wright

COLLAPSING SPACE

AND TIME

Work all untitled.

You all have probably been to Axelrod, right Then most of you would know of its strikingly institutional

décor, design, and layout. What you might not know is that on the third floor there is a little cluster of rooms

that are studio spaces for the Specialized Studio Practice class (an upper year studio art class that is kind of like

a honors thesis). Anyway, to make a short story hopefully longer, this is where I met Liam Sanagan, in his little

section of an old science lab that had been retrofitted for an art studio.

We had a little chat about space and time. More specifically we talked about how space relates to Liam’s

practice. We spent a good chunk of time talking about these very beautiful drawings he made last year. In these

drawings, he paints the ether of space using india ink and acyclics, leaving little white circles of exposed paper

that represent the stars. This idea stemmed from comic books and science fiction, where space plays a major roll.

Sanagan found this drawing of comic book space on one of the pages and spent an afternoon making his first little

space drawing. After that, Sanagan developed the project into bigger drawings with a more refined technique.

It became more like an abstract representation of the cosmos, kind of like a space that has a significant lack of

space (which is what space is, I guess).

About half way through our conversation, we realized that Liam likes taking the three dimensional world

and flattening it into the two dimensional plane. He mentioned that he enjoyed the photograph of a sculpture

more than the sculpture itself because it flattens the image; he likes flatness. This is a completely hilarious and

wonderful idea, but it works for Sanagan and is brilliant because it makes him (and the viewer) laugh; always a

good sign.

With the space drawings, he is able to collapse the huge vastness of space in a single, simple yet elegant

drawing. Sanagan creates depth within the spacey cloud by clustering the stars closer together in some areas and

further apart in others. This produces the illusion of a billowy cloud of space and makes the images really pop

off the paper; a beautiful way of flattening the 3D. Which is a similar technique to the smooched can drawings

that Sanagan has recently been working on. He thinks of them as cubist drawings as you can see all planes at the

same time. He is making them because, as Sanagan puts it, “I like drawing them, because they’re flat.”

No one could have said it any better. You can see the correlation developing in his work and I am very excited

to see how his practice furthers. -Miles Stemp

Visit www.sundaycinema.ca for more info on these Central Student Association events

noon

8:00 pm

noon

7:00 pm

7:30 pm

doors







nooner Fri Mar 12

uc courtyard

Re-broadcast on CFRU 93.3 FM, Sat Mar 13 at 11 am.

Jazzy instrumentalism with trance-inducing indie pop.

sunday cinema Sun Mar 14

war memorial hall

$3 UoG stu | $5 general

The human capacity to grow and overcome.

nooner Wed Mar 17

uc courtyard

Live broadcast on CFRU 93.3 FM.

Outsider blues and noisy pop.

docurama Thurs Mar 18

thornbrough 1307 | free

Co-presented with MacLaughlin Library

The metaphysical effects of being struck by lightning.

live music Thurs Mar 25

club vinyl | 52 Macdonell

$15 all ages/licensed

Co-presented with Kaleidoscope Promotions.


SPORTS & HEALTH

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

10

Small’s goal not enough as Laurier wins seventh OUA title

Erin Small (centre) tips a shot past Golden Hawks goaltender Liz Knox in Saturday’s 2-1 loss to Laurier.

Rashaad Bhamjee

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SPORTS & HEALTH

Gryphons fall short in OUA Championships

THE ONTARION 161.8

JUSTIN DUNK

Despite hosting Game 2 of

the OUA Championship series on

Saturday at the Gryphon Centre,

the Guelph Gryphons women’s

hockey team saw their season

come to an end.

A large red and gold crowd

was on hand to see the hometown

Gryphons lose a hard-fought 2-1

decision to the Laurier Golden

Hawks.

“It hurts,” said Dayna Kanis,

a Gryphons fourth-year forward

and alternate captain,. “This is the

second year in a row [losing to

Laurier in the finals] and to lose

at home like this in front of such a

supportive crowd, it’s tough.”

Both teams came out of the

locker room playing with the kind

of energy and emotion that would

be expected in a championship

game. The Golden Hawks got on

the scoreboard early in the period

when third-year forward Katherine

Shirriff banged in a rebound, just

3:32 into the opening frame.

Less then three minutes later,

however, the Gryphons stormed

back when third-year forward Erin

Small tipped in a point shot from

Emily Corbett to tie the game at

one. Small’s league-leading fourth

goal of the playoffs ignited the

hometown crowd, which was loud

and proud from the first drop of

the puck.

The Golden Hawks were not

rattled by the hostile environment,

and just over six minutes later,

rookie forward Devon Skeats beat

Pair of Gryphons

had a major impact

after transferring

from Alberta

DAN HOWSE

While there is certainly plenty

to be excited about for next season,

one thing that no one on the

Guelph Gryphons men’s volleyball

team is excited for is losing fifthyear

captain Jonathon Whitton

and fifth-year Libero of the year,

Gabriel deGroot.

Second-year setter Riley

McAllister expressed how different

– and difficult – it will be to adjust

to playing without Whitton and

deGroot.

“It’s gonna be tough, those guys

are awesome,” McAllister said.

“We had a great passing lineup

with Gabe, Andrew Bartram and

Jon.”

Bartram, a fourth-year leftside

and another key defender and

passer for the Gryphons, is likely

finished school, but still has one

remaining year of eligibility. The

coaching staff is trying to bring

him back for one more season.

“We’re trying to talk him into

coming back for another year,” said

head coach Cal Wigston.

While the team remains

Gryphons goaltender Danielle

Skoufranis to grab the lead right

back.

The Gryphons had a flurry of

scoring chances to end the period,

but could not beat Golden Hawks

goaltender and OUA Player of the

Year, Liz Knox.

It’s hard. We out-shot

them in both games,

we out-chanced them,

and we really felt like

we deserved to win

both of those games.

Chelsey Roy

graduating Gryphons

goaltender

The second period started

slowly until the halfway point

when the Gryphons had a golden

opportunity to tie the game on a

five-on-three power play. Despite

the constant pressure, the Golden

Hawks were able to kill off the

disadvantage without any damage.

The was no scoring in the period,

and the Golden Hawks held a

slim 2-1 lead, going into the third

period.

With their season on the line,

the Gryphons seemed to find their

legs as the final 20 minutes of

play began. They were all over the

optimistic about Bartram

returning, they are also staying

realistic. Even if Bartram does

return, the Gryphons are still

losing part of the core of one of

the most effective passing lineups

Golden Hawks, keeping the puck

in the Laurier end of the ice for

the majority of the period.

The Gryphons had multiple

scoring chances, both at even

strength and on the power play,

but Knox continued to stand tall

and deny the Gryphons chances

for the equalizer that they were so

desperately seeking.

With Skoufranis on the bench

in favour of an extra attacker for

the final 90 seconds, time ran out

on the Gryphons, giving Laurier

the win. The win gave Laurier a

two-game sweep in the best-ofthree

OUA championship series as

the Golden Hawks claimed their

seventh straight OUA title.

“It’s hard,” said graduating

goaltender Chelsey Roy, who saw

her Gryphon career come to a

close. “We out-shot them in both

games, we out-chanced them, and

we really felt like we deserved to

win both of those games.

“It’s a special feeling you have,

being on a varsity team,” she

continued. “You do everything

together and you go through ups

and downs together. The memories

are what make it so great.”

The Gryphons were gracious

in defeat, looking at the positive

achievements of their season and

the bright future ahead.

Kanis hopes to come back next

season and be a part of the team

for one final season.

“I have no doubt in my mind

that next year we are going to be

bigger and better,” she said.

Whitton and deGroot conclude illustrious careers

Rashaad Bhamjee

Graduating fifth-year libero Gabe deGroot will be sorely missed for

his defensive instincts.

in the OUA.

“It’ll be hard to replace them,”

said Wigston.

The combination of Whitton’s

leadership and passing with

deGroot’s defensive tenacity

created a ton of opportunities for

the Gryphons. With deGroot at

the libero position, no spike was

un-diggable.

And with Whitton keeping

everyone calm and collected, very

few points led to overwhelming

streaks for the opposing team.

The result was a team that

turned tough kill attempts into

impressive passing sets. This

quality is imperative to a winning

volleyball team.

“I don’t think there’s a

more moment-rich game than

volleyball,” said Wigston. “It’s so

predicated on runs. It’s just such

an up and down sport.”

Whitton and deGroot helped

keep the Gryphons on the right

end of those runs.

Both Whitton and deGroot

came to the OUA two years ago

from the King’s University College

in Alberta. Whitton originally

comes from Edmonton and

deGroot from Langley, BC. Both

had tremendous success in college

and wanted a chance to prove they

could play at the CIS level.

Both earned all-star credentials

in college, where deGroot, in

particular, shined. deGroot became

the second all-time leader in digs

in the Alberta Colleges Athletic

Conference with 449.

“From the time he stepped on

11

Rashaad Bhamjee

Gryphons goaltender Danielle Skoufranis gets a face full of snow as

she turns away a shot in Saturday’s final against Laurier.

the court, Gabriel deGroot was a

huge success,” said Wigston. “It

will be hard to replace his work

ethic and on court presence.”

Whitton’s more versatile game

doesn’t lend itself to breaking

records with one specific statistic.

It’s his combination of defence,

offence and passing that made him

one of the most important players

for Guelph. However, the most

valuable commodity he brought

the Gryphons can’t be measured

at all.

“Jon’s on-court leadership has

been nothing short of tremendous

and will be greatly missed,” said

Wigston. “It will be very hard to

replace what Jon did for this team,

on and off the court.”

While every varsity team

eventually loses their key

contributors, the leadership and

energy these two brought will be

especially difficult to replace. Add

the potential additional loss of

Bartram and we could see a very

different looking Gryphons team

next year. That doesn’t, however,

faze Wigston.

“We’ve got some young guys

and some recruits,” he said. “And

we’re excited to see what they can

do.”


READING THE VOICES OF THE HUMAN LIBRARY

Pro-Life

Daniel bitonti

She isn’t a religious fanatic, she doesn’t ram her

views down people’s throats and she doesn’t subscribe

to every socially conservative viewpoint out there.

Cara is pro-life.

Before meeting Cara, I don’t think I had ever had

a conversation about abortion with a pro-lifer. I was

drawn to her as a book because over the years the

media had shaped my conception of what it meant to

be pro-life. Images from the southern United States

of violent protests outside of abortion clinics and

government buildings, with solemn citations from

the Old Testament, was what came to mind when I

thought about someone who was pro-life.

Cara is nothing like this at all. She is religious,

but her views on abortion are not intrinsically linked

to her faith. She’s pro-life because she’s convinced

by scientific evidence that life begins at fertilization

– to her, the unborn represent the most vulnerable

members of our society.

Our conversation touched on many different

things. I was curious about what it was like to hold

openly pro-life views on a university campus, where

I presume pro-life is a minority viewpoint. Cara told

me that more people than I might think hold pro-life

views, but more generally speaking, the curriculum at

universities has now become pro-choice. She says she

sometimes feels like an outsider.

I couldn’t help but remember a story I had written

for the Ontarion in November of 2008. The prolife

group on campus, Life Choice, had not been

accredited by the CSA. One of the commissioners at

the time publicly stated that it was the CSA’s position

that the abortion debate was now closed.

Now, I didn’t expect to come out of my meeting

with Cara as a pro-lifer. I have always been prochoice.

But Cara challenged my views on abortion,

raising questions I hadn’t considered. “How is it

really pro-choice” she asked. What Cara meant was

that perhaps the underlying issue is that women are

sometimes left in a position where there are in fact

few choices when deciding whether to have a baby:

either have an abortion or bring a child into a life

of financial despair, or into a life where the parents

don’t want the child. “Is that the best we can do as a

society” she asked.

Did I agree Not necessarily. And I left my meeting

with Cara surer of my pro-choice views. But this was

because for the first time she forced me to explore

the reasons why I was pro-choice: before it had been

almost instinctual for me to say that I was pro-choice,

without even questioning why. I had only ever talked

about abortion with people who held similar views.

For the first time I was asking why.

No one can deny that I had a conversation with

a person who came to her beliefs based on her own

rational thinking. No one can deny two people we

were sitting together on a university campus discussing

abortion. She challenged me. I challenged her.

Debate on this issue is not closed. And it should

never be.

Living a vegan life

Nicole elsasser

I am a proud omnivore. I “went vegetarian” once and gave it up one fine day for a chicken shawarma. Without intention, I had surrounded myself

with a group of equally omnivoric friends, and therefore had a very foggy understanding of what it was that urged a person to be a vegan. My totally

uneducated assumption was that most chose the lifestyle for its health benefits.

It was this incomplete understanding of the vegan lifestyle that caused me to find myself standing in the library, waiting to sit down for a block of

time with a total stranger. The idea of exposing myself to a totally different dietary philosophy was an exciting one.

When the time came and I sat down with my “vegan book,” I was instantly put at ease. My book had been doing this all day, had brought some

notes in case there was a lull in conversation, and could talk endlessly about his choice to be a vegan and the difficulties he faced in this decision.

As he explained, there were multiple prongs to his decision to be a vegan. Interestingly, the nutrition aspect that I had assumed would dominate this

decision was dwarfed by his genuine love and compassion for the animal kingdom. Tears seemed to appear in his eyes as he discussed the prospect of

killing and consuming any animal. He rocked back and forth in his chair while he discussed a dinner party he had been at where a comment from a

fellow diner, “As long as it once looked over a gate, I’ll eat it,” actually put him off all the food on his plate, though totally vegan it was. My book was so

dedicated to this philosophy that he didn’t even feel totally comfortable about owning a pet rabbit, one that he had rescued, even though he allowed it

to roam free in his bedroom and never trapped it in a cage.

I had not expected to encounter such genuine and unfaltering compassion for the animals I eat regularly. I was taken aback. I had become so

accustomed to the common environmental or nutritional explanations for the vegan lifestyle that I didn’t know how to rationalize this.

My mind, now guiltily, rushed to the pork chops I was planning on eating that night for dinner, to the leather boots on my feet, and the article I had

written just days before advocating the wearing of fur. For a moment, I felt frivolous.

And then I remembered myself, my reasons for eating meat, wearing leather and living the lifestyle that I did.

I kept these to myself, however. I had no desire to validate my choices to my book; he never asked me to. When I rose to leave the table, and my

book, I left not with a changed mind, but with a kind of relief that only comes from some necessary self-reflection. That while I do eat meat, I don’t do

it blindly or without understanding. I could stop feeling frivolous.

Co-infected: Hep c and hiv positive

daniel bitonti

By 1997, Pamela had spent more than a decade doing hard drugs and working the streets of Vancouver’s downtown eastside. She says she was worn out, emotionally

raped long before she was physically. She now wanted out.

Her downward spiral began in 1984 after she made the decision to put her first child up for adoption. During the pregnancy she had contracted Hepatitis C through

a blood transfusion. She turned to drugs to deal with the pain. She was just 20-years old.

In a Vancouver hotel room she was now getting high for one of the last times. She had convinced herself to get into rehab.

She had used all the veins in her arm, so she had a friend inject the needle into her neck. He prepared both a clean needle of hers and one for himself. He was openly

HIV positive.

He ended up sticking his needle into her neck. Pamela thinks it was because he had put more heroin into her clean needle and wanted it for himself. She says she

didn’t think twice about it at the time.

When you meet Pamela, you believe her when she says she once was a model and a dancer with the National Ballet School. She’s tall with blonde hair and piercing

blue eyes, incredibly charismatic and ready to speak candidly about her life.

She asked me why I wanted to read her. I had a simple answer: I had just been tested for HIV, after years of prolonging out of fear. I was negative, but I wanted

to explore where my own fears stemmed from. During my worst neurosis, I feared that having HIV would essentially be a social death sentence. How would my

relationships change Could I ever meet anyone romantically How would I possibly be able to get up in the morning

When Pamela entered rehab she had a meeting with a doctor who told her she had contracted HIV. She told me it was from the needle she had shared with her

friend.

The news put Pamela into a catatonic shock. She says she doesn’t remember what happened in the days following, becoming completely paralyzed. Pamela had out

of body experiences, finally coming back to consciousness 30 days later.

My meeting with Pamela was now challenging the worst fears and presumptions I had about HIV.

First of all, Pamela was not a gay man. Even though I know damn well HIV affects more than just gay men, as I was waiting to meet this book I couldn’t help but

anticipate a chat with someone who was gay.

I also thought everything would shut down if I had HIV. For Pamela everything had shut down, at least initially. In my own imaginings, after having accepted my

HIV, I thought I would be a social outcast among my friends and family. Pamela says it’s still hard. On one occasion she met someone from high school who inquired

whether it was true that she had HIV – she lied and said she didn’t.

Pamela hasn’t used drugs since finding out about her HIV. She moved back east after that. She started a new life.

There is no question her life is different living with both Hepatitis C and HIV. There are, of course, the obvious medical issues.

But she’s had lovers, HIV negative ones, and they all have accepted her.

In fact, she says HIV saved her life. If it hadn’t been for her diagnosis, she believes she would have ended up back on the street.

She now has incredible relationships with her other children, all of who are aware of her past.

She does say it’s still tough to get out of bed sometimes. But she’s on a mission to educate and to debunk the myths and assumptions about HIV. This is what gets her

up. She does countless workshops and leadership programs. “It should be in the school curriculums,” she says about educating people about HIV.

What is most amazing about Pamela’s story is her resiliency and her ability to take ownership of her life. “It would be easy to blame what has happened on alcoholic

parents or something like that,” she says. “But that wasn’t the case. I had a silver spoon.”

A couple of years ago she was able to be beside her mother as she died, becoming the daughter her mother always wanted her to be.

And just a month ago the son she gave up 25-years ago reconnected with her. “It’s been amazing,” she says. “It’s all come full circle,” the both of us trying to hold back tears.

Disabled Runner

Mike Treadgold

You can imagine my confusion when I first sat down with Cyndy

MacLean, the ‘Disabled Runner book’ from last week’s Human Library.

You see, when I met Cyndy, she was in a wheelchair, hardly something I

expected to see with a runner. She later explained that her ‘book title’ was

somewhat tongue-in-cheek. I’ll explain later.

In 2000, MacLean, at the age of 30 and an avid recreational runner

in near-perfect health, decided that she would run one marathon per

year, until she turned 40. And, after fulfilling this goal in each of the next

two years, she began training in Utah for yet another marathon in the

summer of 2003.

Accompanied by her father and dog, MacLean began her return

journey to Guelph, where she was an employee at the university’s Health

and Performance Centre. And during a short hiking trip through

Michigan, her life would change forever.

While trekking through some particularly hilly terrain, MacLean’s

father turned to speak to his daughter. All he saw, however, were Cyndy’s

boots in mid-air. She and their dog had slipped and fallen off the cliff.

Leaving his camera behind, MacLean’s father rushed to the base of the

cliff, some 30 metres below where his daughter had fallen. The date was

Friday, June 13, 2003. The number 13 would live on forever in MacLean’s

life.

Upon reaching his daughter at the base of the cliff, it was clear that

MacLean had suffered a serious injury. Paramedics soon arrived and she

was airlifted to a hospital in Minnesota, suffering from three broken

vertebrae and a severe spinal cord injury. Cyndy MacLean was paralyzed

from the waist down.

After MacLean was airlifted from the scene of her injury, her father

returned to the edge of cliff where he had left his camera. Prior to his

descent, he had taken exactly 12 pictures, before leaving the camera on

the ground. When he developed the film, however, 13 pictures were on

the roll of film. Inexplicably, the thirteenth picture was a bird’s eye view

of the rescue scene, taken by an unknown passer-by while Cyndy was

tended to below. To this day, the photographer remains unknown.

While recovering in hospital, MacLean was contacted by Rick Hansen,

who asked her to bring his Wheels in Motion program to Guelph.

MacLean happily obliged and she continues to be the chairperson of the

Guelph chapter. Interestingly, the program was set to begin on June 13,

2004, exactly one year to the day of her injury.

While rehabbing in Hamilton, MacLean was presented with the idea

of playing wheelchair tennis. A previously unfamiliar sport, MacLean

was interested and as she became familiar with using her wheelchair, her

love of the sport increased. Cyndy’s injury also forced her to find new

living accommodations. The apartment number of her first accessible

dwelling post-injury: 13.

MacLean has since been named to the Canadian national women’s

wheelchair tennis team, one of only two women in the country to play at

such a high level. The date of her first international competition in Italy:

June 13.

Now I return to MacLean’s puzzling ‘book title.’ As she explained to

me, Cyndy calls herself a ‘Disabled Runner’ because despite her injury,

the only thing that she cannot do now is run. Otherwise, she lives a

complete, healthy, active and productive lifestyle, uninhibited by her

injury.

The hour that I spent with Cyndy MacLean, hearing her inspirational

story, was a time that I will not soon forget. Her dedication and

commitment to hard work was as heartwarming as it was fascinating.

She is truly a role model and an inspiration for both disabled athletes

and women in sport.

survivor of suicide

of a loved one

zack macrae

I remember getting the call. It was early September and

I was riding my bike to the grocery store to get a few things

for dinner. I hadn’t even made it off my street when the phone

rang. Mom was on the other end. She was crying; her voice

was exhausted and muffled.

“Baby, something bad has happened, your uncle is gone.”

Stumbling from my bike and leaving it to lay on the

street, I sat against a brick wall, head bowed between my legs

sobbing frantically with my mom. Her brother, my uncle, had

committed suicide.

If you’re a survivor of suicide of someone you love, you

know that there are many extremely complicated emotions and

a great deal of consequences that follow.

When I read the booklist for this year’s Human Library,

one title stuck out: Survivor of Suicide of a Loved One.

Arriving at the library to take out the book, I had more

than one reservation. I wasn’t sure how helpful the conversation

would be. Was half an hour really enough time to delve under

the surface of such a complex and personal topic Would we

unearth anything constructive

From the first page, I can tell you that I was immersed. The

book told a story of how on one particularly normal afternoon,

her father, without any warning, committed suicide in the

driver’s seat of his car.

There were no signs to tell her that her father might be

contemplating such a heavy topic. He wasn’t depressed, he was

in good health, and to all who knew him he was a caring and

jovial man.

As we compared stories, the similarity of feeling was

eerie. My hands became clammy and the relationship and

understanding that we had forged together intensified.

We talked about feelings of confusion and resentment. Why

did her father want to leave Was it selfish that my uncle took

his own life Many of these questions cannot be answered, but

we landed on one conclusion concerning judgment. She told

me that it was important not to judge the actions of our loved

ones, that the decision was made by them alone and that we

should not be ashamed.

The inspiring part about her story was her perseverance and

ability to think positively of such a horrible situation. Since her

father committed suicide, she has spoken to numerous groups

and has started an event called the suicide watch walk, where

people come to walk and talk through the feelings associated

with suicide. She showed me the importance of honouring

the person you loved; through small, everyday occurrences

the memory of my uncle can live on and become something

physical.

In her last anecdote, the book left me with a detail from

her father’s suicide that she will always take comfort in. When

she was able to see the car that her father had died in only days

before, the passenger seat of the car was littered with pictures

of her family. A hint that tells her that his final thoughts were

with his family and that his love for them was above everything

in his life.


SPORTS & HEALTH

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

14

Gryphons come home with silver

Gryphon men’s

volleyball team falls

to Queen’s in OUA

finals

DAN HOWSE

Sometimes, a game comes

down to one play. Sometimes,

the play comes to do one bounce.

Sometimes, the bounce comes

down to one inch.

The Gryphon men’s five-set

loss to Queen’s in Saturday’s OUA

championship was one of those

games.

After upsetting the defending

champion McMaster Marauders

3-2 on Friday, in what was one of

the biggest comebacks in Guelph

sporting history, the Gryphons

lost what had to be the one of the

closest games in Guelph sporting

history the following evening.

Losing the first set 25-22 to

Queen’s, Guelph stormed back

and won both the second and third

sets by same scores of 25-17. After

Queen’s responded by winning the

fourth, the Gryphons appeared

poised to take the fifth and final

set, staying on top of the Gaels

throughout the set. But in the end,

junior national team members

Joren Zeeman and Michael

Amoroso of the Gaels proved too

much to handle, going on a 6-1

run to end the set and the match.

After picking up their

thirteenth point on a big kill

from departing fifth-year captain

Jonathan Whitton, the Gryphons

looked ready to close out the game.

But, after a pair of big blocks from

Bryan Faultley and Niko Rukavina,

the Gaels rode their star horse,

going to Zeeman’s power around

the net for the final two kills.

Obviously, in a game like

volleyball, saying the ball took a

bad bounce is kind of redundant –

it happens on nearly every point.

But when the final point in a gold

medal game comes down to a

clutch dig nicking the corner of an

overhanging basketball net, it’s fair

to say that for the Gryphons, the

Gryphons middle Andrew Revie goes up for a kill in Friday’s semi-final win over McMaster.

game was lost on a bad bounce.

“It’s just heartbreaking

right now,” said head coach Cal

Wigston. “It was ours to lose and

we found a way to lose it.”

While the loss put a decidedly

bittersweet aftertaste on an

otherwise incredible season and

playoff run, Wigston didn’t let it

ruin the year.

“It was phenomenal,” Wigston

said of the semi-final win on Friday

night. Down 2-0 in an enemy

arena, the Gryphons stormed

back and won the final three sets.

And while the program has been

consistently improving, beating a

dominant McMaster team on the

road gives the Gryphons a new

kind of legitimacy and reputation.

“It was almost monumental for

our program as we move ahead,”

said Wigston.

Whitton shared Wigston’s

enthusiasm over the weekend.

The games were exciting and

an incredible event to be a part of,”

he said.

While rotation regulars like

Whitton, Gabriel deGroot,

Andrew Bartram, Riley McAllister

and Winston Rosser all played very

solid games over the weekend, the

one player who came in and really

stood out was the feisty and athletic

second-year Jamie Stamler.

“Mac didn’t know what to do

with Jamie Stamler,” said Wigston.

They’d never seen him before.”

With his combination of

exceptional vertical, power hitting

instincts and unrivalled intensity,

few teams would know what to

do with the six-foot-four middle.

Queen’s certainly didn’t.

Stamler’s substitution in

Saturday’s game sparked the

Gryphons, and helped lead them

to winning the second and third

sets. Although Stamler started

last year, Wigston moved him into

a reserve role for 2009-10 in an

effort to create a more balanced

lineup and unexpected attack off

of the bench. Wigston said that

Stamler handled the switch with

impressive maturity.

“He’s a great teammate, a good

leader and the guys love him,” said

Wigston.

With both Queen’s and

McMaster game-planning around

Courtesy

neutralizing the bigger but slower

starting middle hitter Andrew

Revie, Wigston made the difficult

decision to give the bulk of his

minutes to the Gryphons’ secret

weapon.

“I felt sick for Andrew; we

would not have made it through

the [quarter-final] Windsor game

if not for him.”

But, with the season on the line,

Wigston had to show both the

Marauders and Gaels a different

and surprising new look.

The other surprise waiting for

both McMaster and Queen’s were

the fans. While both matches will

officially be recorded as road games,

memory suggests otherwise.

While the Marauders still

brought out a number of fans

at home, Guelph had a sizable

contingent of their own, harassing

the Marauder bench with pots,

pans and a whole lot of noise.

With no home team to contend

with, Guelph fans were even more

dominant in the Queen’s game,

taking over the arena and claiming

the Burridge Gym as their own.

Wigston could not contain his

gratitude.

“I’m unbelievably grateful to

our fans,” he said. “Guelph is a

phenomenal place and I will never,

ever forget that.”

Gryphons

quest for a

coach

Ex-Mounties coach,

LaLonde, the first to

interview for football

coaching vacancy

MIKE TREADGOLD

Head football coaching changes in

the OUA are always intriguing stories

in the world of university sport. With

former Gryphons head coach Kyle

Walters having tendered his resignation

just two weeks ago, the department of

athletics will be working against the

clock to fill the position by the end of the

month. With spring camp approaching

and potential recruits questioning the

direction of the program, the Ontarion

will be covering the university’s search

for a new head coach in the coming

weeks, following the candidates who

interview for the position.

Multiple reports have confirmed

that former Mount Allison Mounties

head coach Steve LaLonde was the

first interview candidate for the

Gryphons head football coaching

position. LaLonde met with Kendall,

as well as a group of approximately

20 returning players, for several hours

last Thursday morning in Guelph.

LaLonde was the head coach

of the Mounties from 2006-2008,

where he compiled a 3-21 record, but

was also named Atlantic University

Sport (AUS) Coach of the Year in

2006, when his Mounties won two

games, breaking a 34-game losing

streak for the program, dating back

to 2002.

Despite LaLonde’s less-thanstellar

record as a head coach, it is

important to note that the Mount

Allison program has a history of

being one of the worst in Canada.

As one source close to the story

indicated, the Mounties would be

in a class below York and Toronto

– by far the OUA’s worst teams – if

they played in Ontario, and the fact

that LaLonde led his team to any

victories during his tenure as head

coach is a testament to his skills.

Since leaving the Mounties in

2008, LaLonde, who has recruiting

experience in Ontario as well, has

coached community college and

high school football in Iowa and

Vermont.

With the job posting closing

on Friday, expect more candidates

to be interviewed in the coming

weeks. Stay tuned as the Gryphons

continue their quest for a coach.


THE ONTARION 161.8

The ultimate juggling act

Think playing varsity

sports is hard How

about playing two

JUSTINE BASKEY

University students are no

stranger to the necessity of multitasking

in order to stay in school,

have a social life, keep a part-time

job, and many other activities or

responsibilities. Even more familiar

with the necessity of good multitasking

skills are student-athletes

who find time to do school, train

for their respective sport, and

compete.

Jason Diston and Dustin

McCrank take this juggling act

to a new level. These two men are

among the athletes who take part

in not one, but two varsity sports

at the University of Guelph. Some

call them crazy, others know how

they feel, but no matter what your

viewpoint, you have to admire them

for the dedication.

First-year students may find

it daunting to come to university,

but Diston puts them all to shame.

Recently, Diston won the men’s

pentathlon at the OUA track and

field championships, and he is also

a receiver on the Gryphons football

team.

“Out of all of the difficulties,

I would say juggling school and

two sports is the most challenging

task I have ever had to face,” said

Diston, a first-year student himself.

Across the nation for a worthy cause

MIKE TREADGOLD

For Ian Whatley, the

combination was all too fitting: a

chance to combine a lifelong hobby

with an awareness campaign for a

highly personal illness.

Growing up in Peterborough

with limited access to transportation,

Whatley had to rely on his bicycle

to get around as a youth. Cycling

became a hobby and a necessity,

eventually leading to an individual

journey throughout Nova Scotia.

And like anyone else, Whatley

has also been forced to deal with

the trials and tribulations of family

illness, as two of his grandparents

– individuals with whom he shared

close relationships – have been

stricken by Alzheimer’s disease, the

degenerative, terminal condition

that initially affects one’s mental,

and eventually physical capabilities.

“It’s been difficult watching [my

grandparents] being taken over

by this disease,” said Whatley. “It’s

hard to watch someone cope with

it when they used to be so coherent

and loving. You can tell that on some

level, they know what is happening

to them, too, and you can see their

frustration.”

With a desire to draw awareness

to Alzheimer’s and make practical

use of his passion for cycling,

Whatley, along with fellow thirdyear

biological sciences student

and friend, Benjamin Love, have

decided to set forth on a two-wheel

journey across Canada, beginning in

late June.

“I probably spend, at the minimum,

six hours a day training or doing

something related to either football

or track.”

Similarily, McCrank finds

himself with a full plate. Not only

does he play for the Gryphon men’s

rugby team, but he is also an All-

Canadian weight thrower with the

track and field team. Originally,

McCrank was recruited to Guelph

to play hockey, and although he no

longer plays on the varsity team,

he is a hockey officiator in both

the OHL and OHA.

“While on my recruit visit

with Jeff Reid, the former hockey

coach, I met [Gryphons track

and field head coach] Dave Scott-

Thomas and let him know that I

had thrown shot put and hammer

in high school, so he told me to

come see him when I arrived in

September. I competed in both

sports my first year at Guelph,” said

McCrank. “I found myself missing

the team aspect of hockey. I had

some buddies on the rugby team

at the time, and they encouraged

me to come out for the team in the

fall.”

Not only do these men play a

juggling act with school and sports,

but they also have to deal with the

balance of two different types of

training

“My training schedule is

extremely time consuming,” said

Diston. “Someone who plays one

sport has only one training program.

For me, I have two totally different

weight lifting and technical training

[programs].

“During this track season, I still

try to do as much of the football

training as possible. But training

for two varsity sports every day is

definitely not an easy task, especially

if you want to excel in both.”

Though McCrank finds that

his seasons work well in relation to

one another, he too admits to the

difficulties he finds in two different

training styles.

“It is a challenge,” said McCrank.

“In the throws, you are training for

that one explosive moment each

time you step into the circle; heavy

lifting, explosive stuff. In rugby, it is

80 minutes of fitness and strength

and knowledge, a lot of reps,

running, thinking.”

Both men admitted to being

avid participants in many sports

since childhood. McCrank also

played volleyball and soccer,

while Diston boasts of a love for

basketball, which he wishes he

could fit in his schedule. Neither

felt they could choose between the

two sports they take part in and are

prepared to keep working at a fast

and full pace, despite all odds.

“It is extremely exhausting, both

physically and mentally, to be at the

top of two sports,” admitted Diston.

“I’m finding that out the hard way

[in] my first year. All the extra time

you put in makes a difference, and

you will be rewarded.”

Courtesy

Ian Whatley (left) and Benjamin Love will be embarking on their

cross-country cycling journey for Alzheimer’s in June.

The idea for the awareness

campaign was founded while the

two U of G students were having

lunch, late last summer. Each with

an appreciation for cycling and

Whatley, with his family history of

Alzheimer’s, the decision was easy.

“It really came out of nowhere,”

said Love. “I went to Ian and asked if

he wanted to [cycle] across Canada.

It’s something we’ve both always

wanted to do.”

Their trek will begin in Vancouver,

British Columbia, and remain

close to the Canada-US border,

traveling through the prairies and

into Ontario, before making their

way along the St. Lawrence River

through Quebec, New Brunswick

and finishing in Halifax, Nova

Scotia. Whatley and Love have set

their average daily target around 120

kilometres.

“On some days when we get a

nice tailwind, perhaps we can push

200 kilometres,” speculated Love.

SPORTS & HEALTH

15

Rashaad Bhamjee

Weight thrower Dustin McCrank is just one among many two-sport

Gryphons athletes.

“But going through the mountains

on other days, we might only be able

to go for 60 or so.”

By traveling close to the major

cities across the country, Whatley

and Love are hoping that their

journey gains momentum and

support as they move eastward.

While they don’t expect to acquire a

Forrest Gump-esque following, they

remain optimistic.

“We’d like to build momentum

leading up to the beginning of the

trip, and also as we get going,” said

Love. “We’re hoping that by keeping

people updated via our website, it’ll

get as big as possible.

“We’ve set our fundraising goal

at $5 000, but we’d love to exceed

that,” added Whatley. “We’re hoping

to generate awareness as we do the

ride and we hope that will happen as

we meet people along the way.”

Whatley and Love have done

extensive research leading up to

their June departure. Accounts from

other cyclists, who have made the

same journey, recommend beginning

on the west coast and traveling

eastward. This allows them to take

advantage of the prevailing winds,

and battle through the mountainous

stretches at the beginning of the trip,

instead of at the end.

In addition to soliciting publicity

from other newspapers and the

Alzheimer’s Society of Canada,

Whatley and Love have created

their own comprehensive website,

acrossthenation.ca, to complement

their initiative. The website contains

a secure link to the Alzheimer’s

Society of Canada where individuals

can make donations to support their

upcoming journey. As they travel,

Whatley and Love intend to update

the website on a regular basis with

pictures, blog updates and personal

accounts from their travels.

“We can’t wait to get started,”

said Love. “We’re really looking

forward to sharing our experiences

with everyone and we want to get

the word out as best we can and

really generate awareness.”

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SPORTS & HEALTH

16

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

Hats off to bald men

Life after hair loss:

the facts about

going bald

JOSH DOYLE

Last week, we reached out to

the men and women on campus

showing signs of silver in their

hair, in hopes of lessening their

burden. We promised to give that

same recognition and support to

those with different hair trouble.

As promised, we now present you

with the survival guide to going

bald.

As we males are fully aware,

baldness is not uncommon. It is no

surprise when we look at older, or

even middle aged men, to see an

absence of hair on their heads. As

we age, hair grows at a decreased

rate, causing it to thin over time.

Approximately 25 per cent of

men in North America will begin

losing their hair by the age of 30,

and nearly 75 per cent will go bald

before they are 80.

Our society deals with hair

loss rather well, many opting for

the time-tested comb over, while

others just shave their heads

altogether. Some try to balance

their hair equation by growing

the remaining hair rather long.

This, however, can have a negative

Ineffective officiating casts dark shadow over hockey finals

MIKE TREADGOLD

Ontarion

First, let me make one thing

clear: I am not usually a proponent

of criticizing officiating. In any

sport.

If an umpire has a wide strike

zone, expand your batting eye. If a

referee has a tendency for calling

soft fouls in the paint, ease up on the

contact under the basket. If skating

judges prefer jumps to footwork,

you’d better get some more air.

Because, although there are rules

in every sport, officiating remains

highly subjective. It is what it is, and

human error is inevitable in every case.

But, ask any athlete what is one

thing they crave among officials

in their respective sport and their

answers will be nearly unanimous:

fairness and consistency.

And such characteristics should,

for obvious reasons, be explicitly

on display in championship games.

In these games you have the best

athletes, who are deserving of the

best officiating.

Sadly, in Saturday’s OUA

women’s hockey finals between

Guelph and Laurier, the level of

officiating did not match the level

of play.

Right from when the puck was

first dropped, it became apparent

that the Gryphons and the Golden

Hawks did not like each other, and

Saturday’s game was bound to be

filled with physicality and emotion.

Their rivalry goes back several years,

amid a history of physical play, –

effect on your appearance, and the

Ontarion does not recommend it.

While losing hair with age

seems natural, a more difficult

phenomenon to accept is losing it

early on. Andrew, a University of

Guelph student in his third year,

provided some insight on how it

felt to lose hair in his early 20s.

Similar to last week’s interviewee,

Andrew was brave enough to share

stories, but not his last name.

“I’d say [I was] probably around

19 when I really noticed it,” he

said. “It seemed like my hairline

was getting higher, although I

liked to think it wasn’t.”

As is the case with greying,

most males do not consider their

potential to go bald until it starts

happening, making the experience

all the more traumatic. The truth

is, baldness can, and does begin

rather commonly in the late teens

and early 20s.

The condition affecting

Andrew, and most of the world’s

bald men, is referred to as male

pattern baldness. This is the most

common form of hair loss in males

and takes the shape of a receding

hairline at the front sides, often

coupled with a bald spot on the

top. It’s thought to be mostly

determined by genetics, but stress

can increase the rate at which hair

remember, women’s hockey is by

and large non-contact – tight games

and emotional players.

Initially, it seemed that despite

the rules, the referees were bound

and determined to let the women

play largely uninterrupted, physical

contact and all. Fine. But, be

consistent and above all else, do

NOT let the game get out of hand

to the point where someone could

get hurt.

As the intensity continued to

falls out.

While male pattern baldness

is natural, and does not imply

ill health, it can have a negative

impact on one’s self-esteem.

“I felt pretty embarrassed when

it first started happening,” Andrew

said. “I did what I could to hide it

from people, like wearing hats a

lot. I was worried about girls more

than anything.”

This is a common concern for

balding men. But while the average

Rashaad Bhamjee

Consistent officiating in OUA women’s hockey will help the legitimacy

of the sport.

build, players started to become

increasingly aggressive around the

crease, jabbing at non-existent

rebounds and interfering with Liz

Knox and Danielle Skoufranis,

the two respective goaltenders – a

major no-no in the hockey world,

regardless of the gender of the

players.

Despite the crease contact, the

referees’ whistles remained silent,

and the level of discomfort in the

play of Knox and Skoufranis became

Dion Hinchcliffe

woman may find a full head of hair

more attractive than none, or hair

that is thinning, it’s more often the

self-consciousness that comes with

hair loss that women are put off

by. Studies show that women are

commonly attracted to confidence

in a man, and a good sense of

humour, rather than appearance

alone.

Still, many seek remedies for

their hair loss, hoping to fight

the natural course of events, and

visible. The game was getting out of

hand, with no one to blame but the

stripes.

Now, in officiating circles, there

commonly exists the notion of

‘make-up calls’: when an official

makes a borderline call that clearly

favours one team, the next similarly

subjective decision often favours the

opposition, balancing the scales, so

to speak.

And, after calling two consecutive

penalties against the Golden Hawks

halfway through the second period,

Saturday’s officials clearly had

‘make-up call’ and not ‘make the

right call’ on their minds.

In the midst of a skirmish in

front of the Laurier bench, directly

in the line of sight of an official,

a Laurier forward inexplicably

punched Gryphons defenceman

Carla D’Angelo in the back of the

head. This unfounded and deliberate

infraction went ignored by the

officials, while D’Angelo retreated

to the Gryphon bench.

Furthermore, poorly judged

penalties were not the only missteps

from Saturday’s officiating crew.

At the beginning of the second

the period, with Tori Woods of the

Gryphons serving the remainder

of an interference penalty called at

the end of the first, the Gryphons

cleared the puck the length of the

ice, an acceptable action, given that

they were killing a penalty.

But, the officials blew the play

dead, calling the Gryphons for

icing. They had forgotten about

Woods’ penalty altogether. Upon

recognizing their mistake, the faceoff

was moved to centre ice, allowing

the Golden Hawks to continue

science does offer treatments to

help. Rogaine is easy to obtain and

is shown to decrease hair loss, and

sometimes, even encourage new

growth. Andrew experimented

with this method, but has recently

begun to seek other options.

“I tried using Rogaine and it

seems to work,” he said. “But, I’m

looking into surgeries to fix the

problem for good.”

Hair transplants or ‘plugs’ are

the option he was referring to.

These can have impressive results,

like they did for comedian Robin

Williams, but can be rather costly,

ranging from $6,000 to $20,000

per surgery.

Of course, there is the method

of acceptance, and while easier

said than done for most, this is

definitely a possibility. Famous

actor Patrick Stewart didn’t let

male pattern baldness slow him

down. As captain of the Enterprise

in the popular TV show Star Trek,

he led a fleet of explorers through

space, captivating the attention of

millions, being bald since 19.

Clearly it’s not over for you if

you’re losing your hair. It’s normal,

natural, and you’re not alone. The

best thing you can do in the event

of losing your hair, is keep your

confidence.

their attack. Missed offsides calls

and un-whistled goaltender freezes

continued throughout the final

40 minutes of play, leaving a black

mark on what was otherwise, an

outstanding game.

For a multitude of reasons,

women’s sports fail to garner the same

attention as their male counterparts.

Observers often criticize women’s

sports as being inherently amateur.

However, in the case of Saturday’s

final, it was not the gameplay that

was lacking, it was the officiating.

If the OUA wants to increase

attention paid to women’s sports, it’s

time to find capable individuals to

administer the rules.

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THE ONTARION 161.8

Life

makes lemon curd

17

NICOLE ELSASSER

I am a big fan of spreads: jams,

nut butters and tapenades. That

being said, I have never attempted

to make any at home except for one:

lemon curd. This several hundred

year-old British spread has a rather

unappealing name (even more so

by its other nomenclature “lemon

cheese”), but it lends a fresh burst

of flavour when spread on toast for

breakfast. It can also be used as

filling for pies and tarts, a flavoring

for yogurt, and a spread for other

bread products like muffins,

crumpets or scones.

Being a spread, one is tempted

to make the assumption that its

preparation must be complicated.

This, I happily discovered, is not

the case. If you are careful to take

a few precautions while cooking

the mixture, the process is fairly

disaster-proof and certainly

delicious.

With lemon curd, the tricky

part is tactfully cooking the

mixture enough so it thickens to

the desired consistency, but also

making sure the eggs don’t cook

separately. To achieve this, the

recipe calls for a double boiler to

Sexposure:

be used for cooking; this is not a

cooking utensil that I own. I have

discovered that the same results

can be achieved if you place a

metal bowl over a saucepan of

boiling water, but only if the bowl

is not directly in the water. If it’s

not suspended over the water

Kyle Gillespie

properly, being heated only by the

steam, the eggs will cook weird;

you will have scrambled eggs amid

the lemony spread.

Bringing kink to your bookshelf

RECIPE FOR

LEMON CURD

Ingredients

2 eggs

6 tbsp of lemon juice (approx 2

lemons or 4 Meyer lemons can be

used instead)

2 tbsp of lemon rind

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup butter

Directions

Beat eggs only until the yellow

and whites are just mixed. Put the

eggs into double boiler (or metal

bowl resting in saucepan of water).

Add lemon juice, rind, sugar and

butter. Turn heat on high and cook

until the mixture thickens and coats

a metal spoon (like a soft custard).

Make sure you stir throughout the

cooking to ensure that the eggs

don’t cook separately. Chill for

a little while so the mixture can

thicken further, and then spoon

over and spread onto the bread

item of your choice.

AISLINN WYATT

In this week’s issue of

Sexposure, I thought I’d take

things in a different direction:

I’m going to be reviewing a book.

The book in question is Screw the

Roses, Send Me the Thorns: The

Romance and and Sexual Sorcery

of Sadomasochism, by Philip

Miller and Molly Devon.

Screw the Roses is an

introduction to SM aimed at

beginners and those unfamiliar

with the scene. It includes

everything from how to furnish

your dungeon and how to make

sure all your SM fun is safe, sane

and consensual (which is the

comforting mantra of the SM

world). Miller and Devon are not

academic experts, but between

them have over 20 years on the

SM scene, and the book is written

from their perspective, informed

by this experience.

SM is defined by the authors

as “Advanced sexual practices

incorporating the consensual use

of pain, humiliation, and power

exchange for erotic enjoyment.

SM includes dominance and

submission, bondage and

discipline, love bondage and erotic

spanking”.

The book then introduces

the reader to a few key players.

There are ‘dominants’ who assume

a position of command and

authority; ‘submissives’ who are

placed in a position of helplessness

and vulnerability. Sadists are those

who take pleasure giving pain,

and masochists from receiving it.

Doms need not be sadists, nor subs

masochists, but this is often the

configuration. Confusing matters

further are the switches, who

enjoy taking on the role of either

dominant or submissive, depending

on any number of factors, such as

who their partner is. An individual

can feel submissive towards one

partner, but dominant towards

another.

The authors also make the

distinction between doms/subs

and tops/bottoms. Whereas

doms and subs have an emotional

connection between them, for tops

and bottoms the relationships

is purely physical, with the top

performing the action in the scene

and the sub receiving it.

The authors also take pains

to make it explicitly clear what

SM is not: abuse. Although the

dominant gives orders that the

submissive must follow, it is the

submissive that has the ultimate

control, since a sub only obeys

because they choose to. The dom

is empowered only by the sub’s

willing relinquishing of control.

The early chapters outline

the importance of safety in

SM and cover things like prescene

negotiation and planning

(including setting your limits,

which are lines never to be

crossed), how to meet good

partners and avoid dangerous

ones, and the importance of

good communication. They also

explain the importance of always

establishing safe words/signal.

This is a word, or action (like

dropping a ball) if the sub is

bound and gagged, unlikely to

come up in the natural course of

a scene, but used by a sub to stop a

scene, no questions asked. Words

like “Stop” and “No” aren’t good

safe words, since they could come

up in a scene, especially one using

themes of resistance.

Following this, the authors

delve more deeply into the fun,

nitty-gritty details with chapters

full of practical, step-by-step advice

about knot tying and bondages,

safe flagellation and spanking,

humiliation and the transcendent

state of consciousness known in

the community as “flying” which a

sub can experience in a particularly

intense scene. The book concludes

with information about the

equipment you might be using,

such as floggers, whips, crops and

cat-o-nines, along with handy

illustrations and instructions on

how to make your own.

Throughout the book the

authors use a very conversational,

easy to follow tone, which makes

its initially intimidating 200 plus

pages a breeze to read, along with

lots of photos. This might not be

a book to read on the bus, since

many of these pictures contain

nudity. The humour and anecdotes

in the book help ease a newbie

into the potentially daunting

world of SM.

While on the whole, Screw

the Roses is an excellent

introduction to SM and I would

highly recommend it, I would

only do so with some caveats in

place. Since, as the author’s freely

admit, this book is written from

their experiences, throughout

the book doms are referred to as

“he” and subs as “she,” since that

is the dynamic in the authors’

relationship. While they own up

to this bias, it does give the book

a painfully heterocentric focus,

and can make a reader come away

feeling that having a man being the

dom, and a woman the sub, is the

only viable set-up in SM, which is

most assuredly not the case.

The book was also released 15

years ago, so some of its content is

charmingly outdated. The section

about meeting people online refers

to “Bulletin Board Systems,” a

relic of the early days when people

actually had to dial up other

people’s computers to connect to

them. The world of SM is largely

online these days (on sites such

as www.fetlife.com) but you won’t

find many useful links in Screw

the Roses.

Also, this book could be a

bit difficult to get your horny

little hands on. I tried to order

it through Chapters in Guelph,

but after three week of waiting

ended up purchasing it in person

at Come As You Are in Toronto,

where it retailed for $29.99.

If you’re interested in learning

more about the world of SM, I

recommend picking up a copy

of Screw the Roses, Send Me

the Thorns. Happy flogging,

everybody!

As always, Sexposure wants

your questions! Send any and all

queries to oneditor@uoguelph.ca





















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pussy










came hard


THE ONTARION 161.8

LIFE

18

Food for thought: Vegan for a different reason

DAN O’KEEFE

Last Thursday, I went to the

library looking for a good read. I

happened to come across a very

unique section. After receiving a

little direction, I checked out a first

edition called ‘Vegan.’ He also goes

by Adam Bowers, and was a part of

the McLaughlin library’s Human

Library initiative.

When asked why a person became

a vegan, most will give an answer that

relates to concern for animal rights or

welfare. Others will offer health and

nutrition as their reason. But, how

about philosophy Bowers says that

philosophical reasons helped bring

about his choice to become a vegan.

While his reason for change

might be different, Bowers lives just

like any other vegan. He has gone

against the norm of North American

society. He has faced criticism and

stereotypes. And, he leads a healthy,

interesting, and fulfilling lifestyle.

So, how does philosophy affect

one’s belief that veganism is the way

of choice

“[I believe in] the utilitarian

concept of the greatest good for

the greatest number of people,”

said Bowers. “[I think about]

consequences and decisions, as well

as the implications of actions.”

Bowers looks for the course of

action that will bring the greatest

good. And often, the greatest good

seems to lie parallel to veganism, and

contrary to human practices.

Bowers identifies two of

the world’s greatest problems as

overpopulation/hunger and disease.

For the first of these issues, the

simple solution is to reduce the

amount of energy that humans use.

It isn’t so much that there aren’t

enough resources, but that there

aren’t enough resources for the rate at

which humans consume them.

No transfer of energy is 100 per

cent efficient. What is bewildering

is why so much energy is wasted

by growing food for animals, when

eating that food would be much

more energy efficient. But, industrial

agriculture continues to waste energy

raising animals en mass for food.

As Bowers suggested, money is

the bottom line for these companies

and they are sacrificing sustainability

for profit, and not thinking of the

larger issues.

“It’s not a problem if the input

into animals was equal to the output

for humans,” said Bowers. “But that

will never be possible.”

Animals are like middlemen

in business. If they are cut out, the

consumer gets more for less. As

veganism cuts out the animals, it

is much more efficient in terms of

energy and does the most good,

which is one reason it works for

Bowers.

Concerning the issue of disease,

the blame often lies with animals, or

rather, how humans treat animals.

The conditions in slaughterhouses

are ripe for disease. In order to be

efficient, these facilities pack as

many animals as possible into the

smallest space. This creates a filthy

and overcrowded setting, ideal for

the spread of disease, such as the

H1N1 swine flu (pigs) or the H5N1

avian flu (birds). The greatest good

for humanity would be to eliminate

slaughterhouses to prevent the

diseases that flourish within them.

On the topic of slaughterhouses,

Bowers quoted Leo Tolstoy.

“As long as there are

slaughterhouses, there will always be

battlefields,” he recalled, citing the

great novelist.

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completely and utterly horrible

waste of resources, money, and life, is

frequently fought over valuable and

disappearing resources, which could

be preserved and made available to

both sides, if they weren’t consumed

at such alarming and wasteful rates.

Again, the efficient and peaceful

vegan lifestyle stands as the best

solution.

Bowers also sees substantial

problems that lie in the treatment of

animals as property.

Animals are living things that,

like humans, can feel pleasure

and pain, and in some cases, even

exhibit emotions. People are quick

to condemn slavery or sweatshops,

because it is wrong to treat humans

like property; however, those same

people often see no problem in

treating animals as property.

Sadly, making animals into

property is what makes animal

cruelty seem acceptable.

“Animal cruelty is only [viewed

as] bad when someone owns the

animal,” said Bowers.

It is wrong if someone abuses

someone’s pet, but what if no one

owns the abused animal Who will

try to protect what isn’t theirs

At one point, Bowers struggled

emotionally when recalling a story

in which the abuse and exploitation

of someone’s ‘property’ was turned

into a revolting and disgusting

game. When the game was over, the

‘property’ had outlived its usefulness

to the ‘owner’ and was discarded, its

life no longer worth anything in the

eyes of its ‘owner.’

“Not exploiting animals at all

– that’s the goal of veganism,” said

Bowers, suggesting once again that

philosophy indicates veganism is the

right choice.

Bowers finished our discussion

with an interesting thought.

He compared veganism to a fork:

a multipronged approach to food

and life. Certainly, there are prongs

dedicated to health and nutrition,

environmentalism, and animal

welfare. But there are also prongs for

ethics, philosophy, and the utilitarian

principle of the greatest good for the

greatest number.

Hopefully, that fork is reaching

towards an ethical, philosophical, and ve

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THE ONTARION 161.8

OPEN CONTENT

The undoing of conferences

MICHAEL RIDLEY

Unconferences. Cool or

Crap Trendy or Transformative

Conferences of the “un” variety are

now commonplace. Sometimes

they are “camps” (ChangeCamp,

DemoCamp), perhaps even

tweetups, but most often they are

simply “unconferences.”

So when did conferences get

a bad name Why the need to un

them

The philosophy that underlies

the unconferences is straightforward:

the participants are the conference.

Forget Program Committees. Forget

schedules. Forget preplanning.

Choose an issue. Invite interested

folks. Let them figure out the

agenda when they get there. The

participants are the content. Those

who show up rule.

The recent surge of the un is

probably due to the influence of

Web 2.0. People aren’t interested

in being just passive. And why not.

Many, far too many, conferences are

like getting a bad undergraduate

degree; endless lectures with big

audiences and little interaction. No

more. The sage on the stage is again

challenged. The backchannel wasn’t

just the e-hecklers, it was also the

desire to engage, participate, and

contribute. With the unconferences

the backchannel goes foreground.

The discussion comes out of the

audience onto the stage. In fact it’s

all stage, all the time.

From a learning style

perspective, the unconference is a

natural expression of adult learning

preferences: experiential, involved,

engaged, and active. Learn by doing.

Learn by participating.

Having said that, I don’t think

all this is the end of traditional

conferences. Frankly, sometimes

I just want to be a spectator. Give

me a good lecture. I don’t need to

ask questions. I like the separation

OPINION

and the anonymity. Let me fade

into the crowd - I’m good with

that. Sometimes I want Facebook;

sometimes I want Avatar.

However, the popularity of

unconferences is telling us something

important about the nature of the

“audience.” Traditional conferences

can easily be seen as power plays.

They are a means to construct an

agenda of speakers, topics, flow, and

presentation that is an ideological

onslaught for the audience. As an

attendee your role is simply to soak it

up. Participating in an unconference

is a bit more challenging; you can’t

simply show up, you have to, well,

show up. You have to engage, speak

up, and contribute or the whole

thing is a bust.

The recent surge of the

un is probably due to the

influence of Web 2.0. People

aren’t interested in being

just passive. And why

not. Many, far too many,

conferences are like getting

a bad undergraduate

degree; endless lectures with

big audiences and little

interaction.

My colleague Kyle Mackie (in

Teaching Support Services) talks a

lot about this and organizes various

unconferences. His motivation is

simple: “how to make conferences

suck less.” I’ve learned a lot from

Kyle; mostly I’ve learned that new,

different, and diverse are all good.

Try something, just for the fun of

it. If it ain’t broke, push it off the

table. Kyle wants to crowdsource

the content and the agenda of a

conference. Before the event tell the

organizers what you want to learn

and what you have to contribute. Let

19

the technology match everyone up

and then, as Kyle says, “the sessions

choose you.”

As with so many things,

everything old is new again. Some of

the antecedents of the unconference

can be seen in the work of Harrison

Owen, particularly his idea of

“Open Space” – a set of techniques

for large scale collaborative

meetings. The central challenge is

to achieve authentic dialogue (i.e.

real communication) with a large

number of people in order to learn

and chart a direction (or make a

decision). Owen’s work was popular

in the 1990s and seems to have faded

a bit; it deserves to be revived.

I think, perhaps, the Library just

hosted a sort of unconference with

the recent Human Library event. In

the Human Library the books are

actually people (“Atheist” “Canadian

Solider” “HIV Positive” etc.) and

the readers check out the books

for a 30 minute talk. Simple focus,

unscripted, highly participatory, and

intimate. Very powerful. Very un.

Undoing the conference is

brilliant. Changing it up is good.

I’m looking forward to first antiunconference.

Whatever it is.

Michael Ridley is the Chief Information

Officer (CIO) and Chief Librarian

at the University of Guelph. Contact

him at mridley@uoguelph.ca or www.

uoguelph.ca/cio.

ANDREW T KNOWS SOMETHING ABOUT DINOSAURS

What did you do last Friday I formed a band

ANDREW T

Good Morning Angels,

In less than two hours last

Friday night I formed a band, wrote

and recorded thirteen songs, and

distributed an album. What did you

do last Friday Did you party Study

for a midterm Watch a movie

Am I bragging Yes. But I’m also

trying to teach a valuable lesson.

That lesson is that we are living in

some damn crazy times for music

making. What started out as a night

of sitting around the table, eating

delicious homemade pasta with

shell noodles (because they really

are the best) turned into arguably

the second best music venture I have

ever been in. Move over Grade 7/8,

junior high school band! Sayonara

that band I was in for one day in

high school (aka Black October)!

We’re called Bicentennial (www.

myspace.com/bicentennialisus) and

we are Guelph’s supreme 4-piece

acoustic improv band. Don’t think

so Please prove me wrong. Let’s

have a band off!

Now, I’m not just sitting here in

my bed relishing this past weekend,

trying to incite a riot and not be

sad that it’s currently Monday. This

article is about the economic and

technological ease with which bands

can do their thing.

Granted, not everyone can

afford a laptop. And it’s also true

that instruments are expensive. But

compared to back in the day, it’s

way easier to record some music

than ever before. I’d just fumble my

way around a 4-track, and don’t get

me started on the complications

of a mixing board, but I, like

But compared to back in

the day, it’s way easier to

record some music than

ever before. I’d just fumble

my way around a 4-track,

and don’t get me started

on the complications of a

mixing board, but I, like

millions of others, can press

record in GarageBand and

then export the song to

iTunes.

millions of others, can press record

in GarageBand and then export

the song to iTunes. And being a

student on the University of Guelph

campus, I find it hard to believe that

you don’t have a friend with some

recording software on their laptop

that you can punk for an afternoon.

You know why Because I’m your

friend! Wanna start a band We can

use my “home studio!” Then we can

meet for “practice” and maybe crank

out some “tunes.” The quotation

marks are to show my skepticism

about the quality of my music, not

for any sexual innuendo. We clear

on that

As for the distribution portion

of this production, all I did was .zip

the album, upload it to Mediafire,

and post the download link on my

tumblr (desirefortiger.tumblr.com). I

spent five minutes doodling to come

up with the cover. Easy peezy!

Probably the most important

thing about this process is that we

exist in a musical landscape that

values improvised sounds. Thank

Charles Dickens for that! Because,

check this, I can’t play an instrument.

Sure I can physically play one (I

have hands and a mouth), but I

don’t really know what I’m doing

at all! And that’s okay! It’s improv!

It is just as valid a record as any jam

session I’ve ever heard recorded. The

album (titled That Refuses to Die)

has moments where the songs are

actually “good,” but it’s mostly just

a grand artistic statement about

Friday night and the four friends

who spent it together. There’s still

some art in there. I’m just sad that

Scott wasn’t with us...

Again, am I bragging A little.

Am I hyping my own band Also a

little. But what I’d like to think I’m

doing more is kicking those of you

in the butt that need butt kicks so

that you go out there and record that

damn song you’ve always wanted

to record. It’s not hard to make and

release music. It’s just sometimes

hard to accept that you can make

awful, awful songs. I know I can!

And before March is out I plan

on recording and releasing an EP

of some more awful songs. With

it being so easy to put out music,

what’s The Arcade Fire’s excuse An

album every two years Give me a

break!

If you want to hear Bicentennial

(and believe me, you don’t) then

you can hear some stuff at http://

www.myspace.com/bicentennialisus

or download the album from

http://desirefortiger.tumblr.com/

post/429553300/tonight-paultommy-cayley-and-myself-formed

…Dang, that’s a long link…


OPINION

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

20

Yet again, apathetic tale

DAN HOWSE

I bet I can find 18,000 people

that don’t actually care.

The other day I was invited

to join a Facebook group “I bet

I can find 1,000,000 people who

still dislike George Bush.” If some

researcher were to take group

memberships as any indication

of actual preferences, values and

commitments, they would probably

consider our generation fairly

Regardless of

your personal

stance, to suggest

either party has

not actually made

an impact to the

things students

care about is

simply facetious.

politically concerned. In between

supporting their friends’ mediocre

bands, attending snowboarding trips

and spreading the gospel of Chuck

Norris, these researchers would

believe that University of Guelph

students were legitimately politically

aware. However, this awareness

frequently does not translate into

activity.

Over the last several weeks, the

Ontarion has been running a series

of articles about student apathy

towards their government. In a

response back, a reader wrote that

“maybe students would pay more

attention to the CSA and CFS if

they did something to improve the

world, instead of getting caught up

in their own self-importance of their

own bureaucracy.”

While it certainly is easy to see

the recent de-federation process

as being a clichéd example of

irrelevant bureaucracy, I feel this

claim needs to be addressed on

two levels. Firstly, as the Ontarion

has tried to make clear, the CSA

has been involved in protesting for

causes both practically and morally

relevant to students. Whether it is

for lower bus pass pricing or helping

to create a less discriminatory

campus, many initiatives led by the

CSA and the CFS have helped to

shape the friendly, accessible, safe

university so many of us know and

love. Regardless of your personal

stance, to suggest either party has

not actually made an impact to

the things students care about is

simply facetious. Unfortunately,

disputes over resource allocation and

representation are merely necessary

evils within a democratic system.

Secondly, and perhaps more

importantly, the reader claimed that

if these groups were more actively

involved in bringing about social

change, students would pay more

attention. Unfortunately, my own

recent experiences with protests

have led me to believe the contrary.

As some of you may remember,

last week I wrote a piece about the

screening of a documentary dealing

with the 2004 coup d’etat that

Canada helped support in Haiti. If

students were really concerned with

making a difference in the world—

or at least investigating what

actions their tax dollars had helped

contribute to—you would think

they would have shown up. After

all, the event was at 1pm; while I’m

sure a few students were still nursing

hangovers, a number had already

been to the Farmer’s Market and

back to cook breakfast. However,

while the cinema was fairly full, there

were maybe 10 people under the age

of 30 there and I’m fairly sure that

less than five university students.

There was a friend of mine I had

mentioned the documentary to who

happened to be doing a project on

Haiti, there was a girl he brought

along with him, and there was his

friend visiting from out of town.

There was also a farmhand I knew,

our local CUPE representative, a

young mother with a newborn baby

and yours truly. For those keeping

count, that’s four students.

Whether you agree or disagree

with the policies Canada has

implemented in Haiti, there is

undeniably no link between Haiti’s

abject poverty and the extreme

devastation caused by the earthquake.

If you really dislike George Bush

or believe Stephen Harper doesn’t

represent you, do something about

it. Leave the house, log off Facebook

and make an actual difference in the

world.

LOOSE CANNON

Fiscal denial begins at

home

GREG BENETEAU

Two different levels of

government. Two different ways of

ignoring a big problem.

At the provincial and federal

level, governments are grappling

with unprecedented deficits as

they try to claw their way out of

the Great Recession of 2008. The

massive shortfalls threaten to bog

down the economy with debt, and

hamper recovery.

Rather then address the issue,

our leaders have resorted to varying

degrees of hand waving and

hopefulness – anything to avoid

painful cuts or career-ending tax

increases. Looming elections tend to

make one short-sighted, I suppose.

On the one hand, the provincial

Liberal government is expected

to release its budget in late March

or early April. But if this week’s

throne speech was any indication,

Premier Dalton McGuinty is seeing

the future through rose-coloured

glasses.

Despite a record $24.7 billion

budget deficit, McGuinty pledged

to go easy on spending cuts in

the “Open Ontario” budget. The

government even managed to set

aside funding for 20,000 new postsecondary

education spaces in the

province this year – “the equivalent of

a whole new University of Guelph,”

Lt.-Gov. David Onley said, reading

the speech.

It’s an admirable goal: bump

up the percentage on Ontarians

with a university degree or college

diploma from 62 to 70 per cent,

helping to fill the high-skill jobs of

tomorrow. What’s less clear is how

the government will pay for it today.

McGuinty said the province

would “aggressively promote

Ontario postsecondary institutions

abroad” with the goal of increasing

international enrolment by 50 per

cent over five years, from 37,500 to

55,000.

Unlike domestic students, there

is no cap on tuition fee increases for

students from abroad, making them

potential cash cows for postsecondary

institutions. McGuinty has said

that Ontario should model itself

after Australia, which turned

international education into its

third largest industry, attracting over

400,000 students and netting $14

billion annually.

Even if the idea of selling off

spaces in our public institutions to

those who can afford them doesn’t

make you feel a bit squeamish,

Ontario is nowhere near Australia’s

levels when it comes to attracting

foreign students. The money netted

by an increase in enrolment seems

like a drop in the bucket compared

to the province’s looming deficit.

It also does nothing to address

the province’s tuition fees (still the

highest in the country), its deferred

maintenance costs or increasing class

sizes in or provinces postsecondary

schools.

Still, Ontario has other tricks

up its sleeve to clamp down on the

deficit, like overhauling health-care

funding to hospitals and possibly

selling shares in provincial assets like

the LCBO.

In that regard, they’re light years

ahead of the federal Conservatives,

who jettisoned their fiscal sanity

long ago.

The deficit for 2010-11 is

pegged at $53.8 billion. Next year,

it will be $49 billion (notably, much

of related to stimulus spending). To

bring Canada back to black, Finance

Minister Jim Flaherty pledged to

eliminate $17.6-billion in spending

over the next five years by clamping

down on the public sector, closing

tax loopholes for the wealthy, and

scaling back on foreign aid and the

military.

Still, Ontario has

other tricks up its

sleeve to clamp

down on the deficit,

like overhauling

health-care funding

to hospitals and

possibly selling

shares in provincial

assets like the

LCBO.

From there, Flaherty claims the

country will grow its way back into

surplus without any new taxes (if you

consider increasing EI premiums

or air travel fees not to be taxes) or

significant cuts.

The Conservative-appointed

Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin

Page has a much grimmer outlook.

Page, along with other economists,

note that the government’s

projections require the best-case

scenario of growth every year. They

also warn of a wave of retirements

that will significantly decrease tax

revenues and increase reliance on

the country’s health care system and

old-age benefits, putting Canada in

deep structural deficit for decades

unless the government implement

deep spending cuts, tax increases or

both

The government’s current fiscal

structure is not sustainable,” Page

warned in a report in February.

“Right now, we have a mindset that

if we got to balance, everything

would be fine. That’s a very shortterm

perspective.”

Short-term is the operative

word, because it seems like the

Conservatives have saved all their

tough choices until after a possible

election this fall. While total new

spending over the next five years

doesn’t even top $1 billion – a

gesture of austerity during difficult

times – they’ve also left themselves

precious little room to do much of

anything. And a long way to fall.


THE ONTARION 161.8

EDITOR'S PAGE

21

EDITORIAL

The value of face-to-face learning

The Human Library was an

event that was greatly anticipated

at the Ontarion office, with all of

the section editors participating

for the first time. We selected our

“human books” from the long list

of those available; a collection of

misrepresented viewpoints and

lifestyles, all seeking to challenge

the stereotypes they face through

conversation. When the time came,

we all sat down with our books

and simply talked. Some spent a

long time talking with their book,

while others stayed just for their

designated half-hour time-slot.

Regardless of the time spent with

our human books, there was one

thing that was plain to everyone in

our office: the Human Library is a

really good idea.

So often, we find the tendency

to constantly surround ourselves

with people who act like we do,

talk like we do, and share our

viewpoints rather than challenge

them. There is no surprise to be

found in this fact, but it becomes

clear after an event like the

Human Library that we might be

doing ourselves a disservice. The

point of the Human Library is

not to shake your personal beliefs

at their foundation, but rather to

present the opportunity to become

more aware, more sensitive, and

more informed about different

lifestyles and viewpoints that

we would otherwise go without

encountering. It allows for a

tweaking of our assumptions and

calls for self-reflection; gazing

inward and considering carefully

the views that we hold. For some,

this meant an affirmation of these

views, and for others, a new light

was shone on our own unconscious

prejudice.

The discovery here is that

one can be an educated, tolerant

and informed individual overall,

but still, without encountering

contrary perspectives, can carry

understandings of other lifestyles

that are based on stereotypes and

unfair assumptions. This kind of

one-on-one conversation with

someone who holds another

perspective may be the most

productive way to fine-tune your

own, to get clarification, and to see

more clearly.

Many of the “human books”

that we encountered we had only

known before as statistics. They

were, to us, numbers and figures

in a graph or chart. It wasn’t until

we sat down with them in this

organized fashion that they gained

a face, a story and a voice in our

minds. This is probably the most

important thing to be gained

by participating in the Human

Library.

So, the Human Library is a

good thing, right Maybe you’ll

participate next year, right

But, there is something larger

to take away from what can be

learned through this annual event.

While it may come naturally that

those we encounter have views

that run parallel to our own,

this isn’t always something we

should accept. It becomes our

responsibility to challenge our

worldviews and assumptions. It

falls to us to actively seek out other

perspectives and engage them in

the kind of productive one-onone

discussion that we see in the

Human Library. Certainly, this

might be uncomfortable for some,

intimidating even. But consider,

what is worse: to be uncomfortable

or ignorant

The Ontarion Inc.

University Centre

Room 264

University of Guelph

N1G 2W1

ontarion@uoguelph.ca

Phone:

519-824-4120

General: x58265

Editorial: x58250

Advertising: x58267

Accounts: x53534

Fax:

519-824-7838

Editorial staff

Editor-in-chief

Daniel Bitonti

Arts & culture editor

Zack MacRae

News editor

Nicole Elsasser

Sports & health editor

Mike Treadgold

Copy editor

Roli Wilhelm

Web editor

Sarawanan Ravindran

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Submit your Letters

to the Editor to

ontarion@uoguelph.ca

Please include your name

and phone number. 300

word limit on all letters.

Throughout the year there has

been much discussion on the issue of

the University of Guelph’s affiliation

with the Canadian Federation of

Students, provincially and federally.

Currently the CSA has taken the

CFS to court over the right to hold

a referendum and the verification

process of the petition signatures.

Many students probably wonder

what the U of G student body

receives for $200,000 a year.

The Federation has been

effectively advocating on behalf of

post-secondary students for almost

thirty years. They have won a series

of victories across every province in

Canada for students by lobbying

governments of all political stripes:

federally and provincially. The

victories include: tuition freezes,

tuition fee increase limits, more

grants and scholars and have most

importantly consistently defeated

the idea of Income-Contingent

Loan Repayment Plans, which

would have perpetuated the cycle of

poverty if made policy.

Proposing legislation like the

Post-Secondary Act, which would

guarantee the allocation of transfer

payments directly to education, just

like what is done for health care. The

leaders of the Liberal Party and the

New Democratic Party support this

idea.

Post-secondary education is not

just about attending university but

social issues that affect us all. The

Federation also takes a stance on

social issues: in Ontario the right

for international students to gain

employment off campus, the No

means No campaign, challenging

Islamophobia and representing

diversity in its membership.

We support the democratic

rights of students and constructive

dialogue that comes with a

referendum and we also call upon

students to stand behind the Student

Movement which has stood for the

rights of post-secondary students for

almost thirty years: The Canadian

Federation of Students.

Shayne Sangster

President Guelph NDP Youth

Re: Straight white male privilege in

CSA

While I agree that eliminating

the Human Rights Office would be

a loss for the school, I take offence to

the quote concerning the “privilege

of a straight white male.” This is

something that I have heard in the

past from my friends who are not

straight, white, or male. I realize that

STM’s have done some pretty bad

things in the past, but every ethnic

group has skeletons in their closets. I

have always tried to judge someone

by their personality and actions;

everyone is equal, no matter what

the background.

To make a statement that all

straight white males are privileged

is a stereotype and a racist one at

that. I am graduating with a load

of debt; I don’t own a car or even

have an elevator in my apartment

building while living on the top

floor. And every guy knows which

sex buys more drinks. I will have to

fight for the same jobs as many of

my colleagues without employment

equity. In most of my classes there

are more women than men, isn’t

Guelph known for having a ratio

of three to one Could it be that

since Canada is so proud of our

multiculturalism (and trust me I

do love it) we have finally reached a

point where straight white males are

the minority

For the CSA WTF to remain

anonymous and use racism to

combat racism is a joke. It shows

that they cannot be taken seriously

and are only interested in stirring

the pot. Treat Mr. Fick as you would

want to be treated, sit down and talk

about this, you can even do it over

the phone so you won’t have to see

the colour of his skin.

Sincerely,

James Duff

On Mar. 4, the Federal

Government released their budget

for 2010, it looked like something

hot off the press from the Fraser

Institute. They are a right wing think

thank that suggested tuition needed

to increase to fund universities.

Post-secondary education had a

significant place in the budget.

There is increased funding for

university infrastructure, funding

for research, funding for Aboriginal

communities, more for internships,

more for student loans and federal

transfers.

The unfortunate news being:

someone told them that financial

status is not a barrier to education,

that budget cuts are coming in all

sectors, more tax cuts for businesses,

leading to increased privatisation.

Where would the government get

this idea that financial status is not

a barrier to education.

A Senate Committee looked

into the question of accessibility

into post-secondary education.

They summoned the following

for testimony: one student

representative, two non-profit groups,

three government bureaucrats, three

university representatives and 3

statisticians. To this committee and

this government, students are only

a number and only worthy of being

heard through one representative.

The government has to realize

another statistic: thousands of

students are unemployed during

the summer months and graduates

declare bankruptcy because of

the size of their loans. The entire

economic system will be on the

backs of individuals who will carry a

debt for about 10-30 years.

I would urge everyone to

petition the federal and provincial

government to realize that a debt

based society is unacceptable. The

government should increase postsecondary

funding, decrease tuition

and the Senate and Commons

committees should hold meetings

in cities across Canada to hear our

voices and concerns and to know

that we are not just numbers but

people with dreams and uncertain

futures.

Shayne Sangster

Guelph NDP Youth

Dear Ontarion,

Last week’s piece “Fur Comes

Out of Hiding” provided advice on

how to become what I will call “the

guilt-free fur wearer.” I would like

to add some suggestions, in case,

like myself, others were less than

fully sold on the 3-point-plan. In

similar fashion, I would like to offer

the following 12-step program to

becoming the ultimate “guilt-free

fur wearer.”

1. Now, to avoid the whole “oppressive

child and immigrant labour” guilt, I

would suggest making the fur items

yourself. This way, you are also 100

per cent sure of the animal you are

wearing. Chinese fur farms often

use the fur of cats and dogs (without

labels), which would complicate

your “ethical cherry-picking.” An

additional bonus: Isn’t it trendy to

make your own clothes

2. Like the previous article suggested,

pick your animals wisely. If you can’t

find it on the side of the road it likely

isn’t plentiful enough to make

>

CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

Production staff

Photo & graphics editor

Rashaad Bhamjee

Ad designer

Anne Tabata

Layout director

Duncan Day-Myron

Office staff

Business manager

Lorrie Taylor

Office manager

Monique Vischschraper

Ad manager

Chris Hamelin

Board of directors

President

David Evans

Chairperson

Timothy McBride

Treasurer

Curtis Van Laecke

Secretary

Justine Baskey

Members

Matthew French

Andrew Goloida

James Hawkins

Aaron Jacklin

Rachel Jones

Marshal McLernon

Joanna Sulzycki

Contributors

Tom Beedam

Greg Beneteau

Aldis Brennan

Kaitlyn Dingman

Josh Doyle

Justin Dunk

Dan Howse

Dan O’Keefe

Kelsey Rideout

Michael Ridley

Neil Risk

Miles Stemp

Vanessa Szpurko

Andrew Townsend

Daniel Wright

The Ontarion is a non-profit organization governed by

a Board of Directors. Since the Ontarion undertakes

the publishing of student work, the opinions expressed

in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of the

Ontarion Board of Directors. The Ontarion reserves

the right to edit or refuse all material deemed sexist,

racist, homophobic, or otherwise unfit for publication

as determined by the Editor-in-Chief. Material of any

form appearing in this newspaper is copyrighted 2009

and cannot be reprinted without the approval of the

Editor-in-Chief. The Ontarion retains the right of first

publication on all material. In the event that an advertiser

is not satisfied with an advertisement in the newspaper,

they must notify the Ontarion within four working days

of publication. The Ontarion will not be held responsible

for advertising mistakes beyond the cost of advertisement.

The Ontarion is printed by the Guelph Mercury.


CROSSWORD

MAR. 11 - 17, 2010 THEONTARION.CA

22

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CROSSWORD

<

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

the “guilt-free” cut.

3. Moreover, if you can’t kill it

yourself, avoid it. You don’t want

to be responsible for implicating a

friend in murdering rabbits.

4. Be sure to avoid hitting the animal

of choice with your car as a method

of execution. You will not get a thick

and luscious coat this way.

5. To get the best fur-coat finish, it’s

best not to club or shoot the animal.

Instead, revert to the “tried and true”

method of the pros: electrocution.

6. You don’t want to fry the fur, so you

will have to electrocute the animal

inside out by placing an electrical

rod into the animal’s rectum.

7. It is strongly recommended that

you buy scratch-proof gloves so you

do not get harmed in the making of

your fur coat.

8. Make sure that your gloves are

rubber. I’m sure many Martha

Stewarts have had this project end

badly wearing gloves conducive to

electricity.

9. Skin the animal and dispose

of the now useless carcass (FYI:

fur and meat are entirely different

industries).

10. Repeat as needed until you have

sufficient fur for your coat.

11. As for the “impossibly glamorous”

but “unflattering” wolf coat in your

mom’s closet, I would suggest taking

it to a fur farm to keep the animals

warm at night. That should alleviate

any remaining guilty sentiments you

once had about wearing fur.

12. Please educate yourself before

you decide to wear fur.

Nicki Darbyson.

Kelsey Rideout’s “Israel

Apartheid Week at U of G” reads

more like an advertisement for an

event than an article. While she

does make important comments

about how imposing blame for the

conflict is a controversial task and

that individuals hold conflicting

opinions, she does not express that

diversity of opinion in her article.

Instead of taking the time to explore

the different opinions held by

members of our campus community,

she only interviewed those who

are part of the IAW initiative.

Several events were held last week

Across

1- Idle away time

5- Category

9- Autos

13- Conductor Klemperer

14- ___ New Guinea

15- It’s blown among the reeds

to present an alternative viewpoint

to IAW including a very successful

tabling campaign called Size

Doesn’t Matter, which showcased

the small country of Israel’s global

achievements, as well as a lecture

from world renowned academic

Dr. Barry Rubin and Palestinian

journalist Khaled Abu Toameh. Her

lack of coverage of these events in

addition to the ones presented by

IAW demonstrates unprofessional

and biased journalism. In the future,

I hope Rideout and the Ontarion

will make greater efforts to educate

students about campus issues by

representing a variety of viewpoints

and opinions.

Hava Goldberg

16- Asian sea

17- From Bern, say

18- ___ majeste

19- Lunatic

21- Aliens, for short

22- Lecherous look

23- Zwei cubed

25- Golfer Ballesteros

COMICS

27- Lasting for an extended period

31- Bind with a tourniquet

35- Comics canine

36- Film ___

38- Sherpa’s home

39- Brit. lexicon

40- Like a ___ bricks

42- Actress Peeples

43- Cram

46- Rain cats and dogs

47- Dispatched

48- Compositions

50- Star-shaped

52- Rebuff

54- Biblical birthright seller

55- Draw with acid

58- Buddy

60- Reverence

64- Actress Petty

65- Fine fur

67- Make indistinct

68- Langston Hughes poem

69- Perrier rival

70- Canadian gas brand

71- In stitches

72- Nailed obliquely

73- Spoils

Down

1- Rich soil

2- Other, in Oaxaca

3- ___ impasse

4- Leafage

5- Cutting tool

6- Mayberry moppet

7- Corrodes

8- Pendent ornament

9- School

10- Busy as ___

11- Ascended, flower

12- Clairvoyant

14- Crown of ancient Egypt

20- Perform in a play

24- Band

26- Bordeaux, e.g.

27- Unfettered

28- “Awake and Sing!” playwright

29- Nest

30- Legendary ruler of Crete

32- Sleep disorder

33- Spoil; 34- Delight

37- Path

41- Add more ice

44- Mode

45- Island of Denmark

47- Doze

49- Group that is part of a larger

group

51- Philosopher ___-tzu

53- “Hooray!”

55- Some Ivy Leaguers

56- Carry

57- Black bird;

59- Off-Broadway theater award

61- “______ sprach Zarathustra”

62- Sudden blast of wind

63- Archer of myth

66- Boy

Congratulations to last

week’s winner...

Joseph Marchionda!

Stop by UC 264 to

pick up your prize.

Submit your completed

crosswords for a chance to win

2 Bob’s Dogs!

Crosswords due at UC 264

on Mondays by 4pm


THE ONTARION 161.8

CLASSIFIED

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

CLASSIFIED & COMMUNITY LISTINGS

23

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Rural Landscapers Needed!

Planting small trees on farms

across south Ontario. Guelph

based, from April 19 - May 15.

Excellent rates - earn $150+ per

day. Treeplanting experience

an asset. bartramwoodlands@

sympatico.ca or call 519-836-

8774.

Townhouse at 1155 Gordon

Street. $525/month, all utilities

included. For more details,

please call Valerie at (905)599-

7993 or email Abbie: aviscard@

uoguelph.ca

Munford Centre, Rm 54.

Contact: rmcleod@uoguleph.

ca or x53244.

Writer’s block Professional

essay help available for all

subjects and levels. Masters and

PhD graduates specializing

in editing and research. Toll

free: 1-888-345-8295. Email:

customessay@bellnet.ca Visit

us: www. customessay.com

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

THURSDAY MARCH 11

Guelph Field Naturalists

present Joe Crowley of Ontario

Nature who will talk about

“Ontario Reptiles at Risk” at the

Arboretum, UofG campus 7:30

p.m. Donations appreciated.

Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony

in Guelph: Pops Series:

‘From the Rock’. 8pm. www.

kwsymphony.ca or 888-745-

4717.

COMMUNITY EVENTS

THE GUELPH RECORD

and CD SHOW - Sunday,

March 14. 10:30am - 4pm at

the Best Western, 716 Gordon

St. (opposite the university).

Over 35 vendors. Admission

$4. For further information

contact: 905-777-1763.

HOUSING

Student house – two bedrooms

available, fully furnished

SERVICES

SELF STORAGE – 1

MONTH FREE. Rent for 2

months & get the 3rd month

free. Heated, Safe, Secure,

Video Surveillance. Close to

U of G. 519-822-2810 www.

someplacesafe.ca

DIVERSE STUDENTS &

STUDENT OF COLOUR

SUPPORT GROUPS.

Mondays and Tuesday: One

on One Support 10am-2pm,

Discussion 1:30-3:30pm.

Wed: One on one support,

10am-2pm. Discussion 5-7pm.

Confidentiality ensured.

Migrante-Ontario works to

advocate for the rights of (im)

migrant people, focusing on

advocating for the welfare of

persyns working as migrant

live-in caregivers through

organizing educationals and

socials. Connect with us! Stay

involved! migrante.ontario@

gmail.com

FRIDAY MARCH 12

Fair Trade Day - Engineers

Without Borders encourage

Canadians to think more

about their consumptive power

and support the Fair Trade

movement. Music, free Fair

Trade chocolate samples, info

about fair trade. 9:30am-4pm,

Branion Plaza.

SUNDAY MARCH 14

SOFAM Presents: “Force of

Nature” by the University of

Guelph Choirs. St. George

Anglican Church, 99 Woolwich

St. 7pm. Adults $15, Seniors/

Students $10. Tickets and info

824-4120 ext.52991 or email

kbygden@uoguelph.ca.

MONDAY MARCH 15

The School of Environmental

Sciences, U of G and the

Bookshelf host “Environment

Bound,” a free series that

celebrates books related to the

environment by U of G authors,

Guelph community members.

7pm at the Bookshelf eBar.

www.uoguelph.ca/ses/content/

outreach.

TUESDAY MARCH 16

Falun Dafa free qigong

instruction. Soothe the mind,

heal the body. All ages welcome,

no experience needed. 6-8pm.

UC 005. Info: Mai 519-823-

2422.

ONGOING:

Stark Raven Radio. 1st-3rd

Tues of each month. 1-2pm.

Local and international focus

on resistance to colonialism

and capitalism. Prison justice,

indigenous sovereignty and

self-determination for all

peoples.

KITCHENER WATERLOO

Clinic


www.beatgoeson.com

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