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3 - HKU Libraries - The University of Hong Kong

UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

LIBRARY

Hong Kong Collection

Gift from

Labour Dept., H. K.

Reprography by th*Government Printer, Hong Kong 243402—27L—8/79 S9-F360178


REPORT ON SURVEY

OF

PART-TIME DAY-RELEASE COURSES

BY

THE COMMITTEE ON TECHNICAL TRAINING

IN INSTITUTIONS

OF THE

HONG KONG TRAINING COUNCIL

CONDUCTED IN

AUGUST 1978

NO

"" t JtMMMHMM

LTOCl


Acknowledgement

The Committee wishes to acknowledge the assistance given by

Dr. S.K, Lau of the Social Research Centre of the Chinese University

of Hong Kong in the design of the survey questionnaire and in making

available data-processing facilities for the survey* The Committee

also wishes to thank:«

(a) the Computer Centre of the Hong Kong Polytechnic

which provided computer card punching facilities f

(b)

the students of the Department of Mathematical

Studies of the Hong Kong Polytechnic who assisted

in the field work,

(c) the Federation of Hong Kong Industries, the

Chinese Manufacturers 1 Association of Hong Kong,

the Employers 1 Federation of Hong Kong, the

Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce and

the Hong Kong Hotel Association which helped

publicise the survey among their members,

(d) all the employers who responded to the survey,

and

(e) the Labour Department which co-ordinated the

whole survey project and provided the necessary

secretarial service.

iii


Table of Contents

Part

Page

I Introduction 1

II The Survey 3

III Summary of Survey Findings 6

IV Conclusions and Suggestions 12

V Summary of Main Recommendations 19

Appendix

1 Terms of Reference 20

2 Membership of the Committee on Technical 22

Training in Institutions

3 Survey questionnaire 2k

k Response rates by industry 28

5 Distribution of "interested" respondents by 29

industry and by employment size

6 "Interested" respondents 1 needs for technician 30

courses

7 Number of employees by industry likely to be 31

sponsored to technician courses

8 "Interested" respondents 1 needs for craft 32

courses

9 Number of employees by industry likely to be 33

sponsored to craft courses

10 Distribution of "not interested" respondents by 3^

industry and employment size

II

ft Not interested" respondents 1 reasons by 35

industry for not being interested in PTDR

courses

12 "Not interested" respondents 1 reasons by 36

employment size for not being interested in

PTDR courses

13 Suggestions for new courses 37

iv


PART I

INTRODUCTION

The government policy on industrial training is broadly that

both government and industry have a responsibility in the overall training

of technical manpower and the division of responsibility is that:

(a) practical training

Industry must accept the full cost of

providing this element of training, whether it

be given in industrial premises or in training

centres built and equipped for the purpose*

Where such centres are established, industry

must be responsible for both the capital and

recurrent costs* Government will, however, be

prepared to grant land free of premium for the

erection of such training centres provided that

they are non-profit-making* Alternatively, loans

may be provided by government from the Development

Loan Fund for the purchase of flatted factory space

to be used for non-profit-making group training

schemes,

(b) related technical education

Government is responsible for providing the

institutional training necessary for the organised

teaching of theoretical knowledge at all levels and

such practical training as is necessary to illustrate

the theory. Into this category would fall such

educational establishments as Polytechnic, technical

colleges, technical institutes, and pre-vocational

schools*

2. In accordance with the policy, part-time day-release (PTDR)

courses are available at the higher technician and technician levels*

Higher certificate courses are run in the Hong Kong Polytechnic together

with some certificate courses* The remainder of the certificate courses

together with the craft courses are run in technical institutes. These

courses normally require attendance of one full day and two evenings per

week. They are designed for apprentices and trainees sponsored by industry*

The usual entry requirement for a technician level course is completion of

Form V schooling and for a craft level course is completion of Form III

schooling*

3* There are at present four government technical institutes in

operation in Wan Cfaai, Kwun long, Kwai Chung and Cheung Sha Wan. A fifth

institute is being built in Kowloon Tong which is expected to be partially

open in 1979. It will not, however, be completed until 1980. At the end

of 1978, the Polytechnic and technical institutes together offered a total

of about 100 PTDR courses for industry and the total enrolment was about

7 t 300,


*f* Because PTDR courses are designed to complement the training

provided by industry, it is important that the courses offered in these

technical institutes are relevant to the actual needs of industry. To

ensure this relevance, regular feedback from industry is therefore

necessary for those who are responsible for planning PTDR courses.

5* This Committee, set up in 197^ under the aegis of the Training

Council, is responsible for advising the government on all matters

relating to technical training in institutions. Its terms of reference

and composition are given in Appendices 1 and 2 respectively. In order

to assist in the planning of PTOR courses, the Committee carried out a

survey in August 196 t which aimed to determine the needs of industry

for PUDE courses. Based on the findings of that survey, the Committee

published its report on the survey in March 1977, which contains useful

information to those who are responsible for the planning of PTDR courses.

6* At the beginning of 1978* the Committee found that much of the

information in the 197& report had been overtaken by events and needed

updating* The Committee therefore decided to carry out another survey

with the object of collecting up-to-date information on industry 1 s need

for PTDR courses. This second survey of PTDR courses was subsequently

conducted in August 1978 with the assistance of the Labour Department,

the Social Research Centre of the Chinese University of Hong" Kong and

the Department of Mathematical Studies and the Computer Centre of the

Hong Kong Polytechnic.


PART II

THE SURVEY

Survey Documents

7» In December 1977 * the Committee formed a small working party

comprising:

Mr, D,D, Watersi J*P«

(Convenor)

Mr, V,H, Greenwood

Mr, T, Zau

for the purpose of preparing documents for the survey. Subsequently ,

with the assistance of Dr* S,K» Lau of the Social Eesearch Centre of

the Chinese University f the working party designed a survey questionnaire

which aimed to collect the following informations

(a) the part-time day-release courses which

employers would like to be provided in

the Polytechnic and technical institutes,

and

(b)

the number of employees which employers

would sponsor to attend such courses in

September 198,

A copy of the questionnaire is at Appendix 3»

Scope of the Survey

8* Ideally f the Committee would like to cover all industrial

establishments in the present survey* This was however considered not

practical in view of the large number of such establishments and the

limited number of survey interviewers available to do the field work,

The Committee therefore decided to restrict the scope of the survey to

employers known to be running or to have run proper apprenticeship

schemes. Furthermore f the survey also covered hotel establishments

with a view to finding out their needs for PTDE courses,


9» On the basis of information supplied by the Labour Department

and the Hong Kong Hotel Association f a survey sample was drawn up

covering a total of 980 establishments. The distribution of these

establishments by industry is as follows:

Industry

Number of

establishments

Automobile Repairs and Servicing 100

Building and Civil Engineering

kO

Clothing 50

Electrical 100

Electronics 60

Machine Shop and Metal Working 300

Plastics 100

Printing 100

Shipbuilding and Ship Repairs 29

Textile 61

Hotel 40

980

The Field Work

10* The field work of the survey was carried out between 2nd and

31st August 1978* Eight students from the Department of Mathematical

Studies of the Polytechnic t all of whom had previous experience as

survey interviewers, were recfuited to carry out the field work. Prior

to the start of the field work, the students were well briefed about

the purpose of the survey and the range of PTDR courses offered in the

Polytechnic and technical institutes*


11* An explanatory letter together with a questionnaire was sent

to the selected establishments one week before the survey to inform them

of the purpose of the survey and to solicit their co-operation in providing

the information asked for in the questionnaire. During the survey, the

survey interviewers called on the establishments by appointment to collect

the questionnaires and, where necessary, to answer queries and assist in

completing the questionnaires*

12* To assist in publicising the survey, press release was issued

to local newspapers. The major employers associations - the Federation

of Hong Kong Industries, the Chinese Manufacturers 1 Association of Hong

Kong, the Employers 1 Federation of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong General

Chamber of Commerce and the Hong Kong Hotel Association - were also

approached for assistance in publicising the survey and in urging their

members to give active support to it.

Data Processing

15* The information collected was coded by the Labour Department

and computer cards were punched by the Computer Centre of the Polytechnic,

The cards were then processed by Dr» S*K« Lau who prepared statistical

tables for data analysis by the Committee. The tables are attached as

Appendices k - 13*


PART III

SUMMARY OF SURVEY FINDINGS

Survey Response

14. Of the 980 establishments covered in the survey, 856 supplied

the required information, giving an overall response rate of nearly 87.

A breakdown of the respondents by industry is as follows:

Industry

Automobile repairs and servicing

Building and civil engineering

Clothing

Electrical

Electronics

Machine shop and metal working

Plastics

Printing

Shipbuilding and ship repairs

Textile

Hotel

Responding

establishments

92

36

^91

5^

2k6

86

100

26

53

29

Percentage of the

respective industry f s

workforce covered

in the survey*

856

The total number of workers employed in these 856 establishments

represents approximately 22# of the total workforce in the manufacturing

industries.

* based on employment statistics published for September 1978 by the

Census and Statistics Department*


15. Further details of the response rates by industry are given

in Appendix ^ These range from 72«^ in the hotel industry to 10066

in the printing industry*

"Interested" Respondents

16. Out of a total of 856 respondents, 462, or about f were

reported to have expressed interest in sponsoring their employees to

PTDR courses. The following is a breakdown of the "interested 11

respondents by industry and employment size:

(a) "Interested" respondents by industry

Industry

Automobile repairs and servicing

Building and civil engineering

Clothing

Electrical

Electronics

Machine shop and metal working

Plastics

Printing

Shipbuilding and ship repairs

Textile

Hotel

No. of Percentage of total

"interested" number of respondents

respondents in the same industry

55

28

20

57

36

123

45

44

14

26

14

59.8*

77.8*

46.536

62.636

66.736

52.386

44.036

53.836

49.136

48.336

462


(b) "Interested- 11 respondents by employment size

Employment size

1 - 9

10 - 19

20 - 49

50 - 99

100 - 199

200 - ^99

500 - 999

1000 - 1999

2000 and over

Unknown

No. of respondents

interested to sponsor

employees to PTDR courses

118

51

60

kk

29

59

kk

25

12

20

Percentage of

total number of

respondents in the

same employment size

62.0*

46.8*

65.696

78.6%

71. 4#

80. 0»

66. 7#

k62

Further details of the "interested" respondents are given in Appendix 5»

Technician Courses

17. The needs of industry for technician courses, as expressed by

the "interested" respondents, are given in Appendix 6, The more popular

course are;

Courses

Mechanical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Electronics Engineering

Production/Industrial

Engineering

Construction

Number of respondents

who have expressed interest

76

51

37

33

28

8


18. According to the "interested" respondents, they were willing to

sponsor a total of 1«5*O employees to the technician courses* A breakdown

of these employees by courses is given in Appendix 7*

Craft Courses

19, The needs of the "interested 11 respondents for craft courses are

given in Appendix 8. The following is a list of the more important

craft courses:

Courses

Number of respondents

who have expressed interest

Mechanical Engineering 136

Electrical Engineering 69

Air-conditioning and

Kefrigeration

rr

Motor Vehicle Mechanic 64

Plastics Mould Making 50

20. The survey revealed that the "interested" respondents were

prepared to sponsor a total of 3 f 3^6 employees to the craft courses*

Details of the number of sponsored employees by course are given in

Appendix 9 *

"Not interested" Respondents

21. The number of respondents who had little or no interest in

sponsoring their employees to PTDR courses was reported to be 39^. A

summary of their distribution by industry and by employment size is

given below*


(a) "Notinterested" respondents by industry,

Number of Percentage of total

"not interested" number of respondents

Industry respondents in the same industry

Automobile repairs and servicing 37 40.2*

Building and civil engineering 8 22.2#

Clothing 23 53.5^

Electrical 34 37.4fc

Electronics 18 33.3^

Machine shop and metal working 123 50.Cfc

Plastics 41 47.7*

Printing 56 56.0#

Shipbuilding and ship repairs 12 46.2/6

Textile 27 50.9*

Hotel 15 51.7*

394

(b) "Not interested" respondents by employment size

Number of

Percentage of total

"not interested"

number of respondents

Employment size respondents in the same employment size

1-9 161 57.7*

10 - 19 56 52.3*

20 - 49 51 45.956

50 - 99 27 38.0*

100 - 199 33 53.2*

200 - 499 31 34.4*

500 - 999 12 21.4S6

1000 - 1999 10 28.656

2000 and over 3 20.056

Unknown 10 33.35

394

Further details of the "not interested" respondents are given in

Appendix 10.

10


22. The "not interested 11 respondents have given the following

reasons for not being interested in PTDR courses:

Number of

"not interested 11 respondents

who have given such reasons

No suitable employees 303

Too few employees 78

Apparent loss of production time i*2

Courses are not useful 20

It is not worth the cost 13

Employees not interested in PTDR courses

No suitable courses

k

k

Entry requirements too high 3

Courses too long 2

Only employ skilled workers 1

Employer has no training policy 1

Employee has no time 1

Evening courses preferred 1

Further analyses of the n not interested 11 respondents 1 reasons by industry

and by employment size are given in Appendices 11 and 12*

New Courses

23* A total of 3^ suggestions for new courses was reported. Details

of the suggestions are given in Appendix 13*

11


PART IV

CONCLUSIONS AND BECOMMENDATIONS

The Survey

2k. The Committee is generally happy with the overall response rate

of 87.3^ in the survey* The rate compares well with that in the previous

survey conducted in August 1976 , i.e.

"Interested" and "Not Interested" Respondents

25 '• The data in paragraph 16 indicate that about $k% of all the

respondents in the survey have expressed interest in sponsoring their

employees to part-time day-release courses. Having regard to the survey

sample which has been made up mainly of establishments known to be running

or have run proper apprenticeship schemes, the Committee is concerned that

46& of the respondents have little or no interest in sponsoring their

employees to PTDR courses. After careful analysis of the employment

jizes (Table (b) of paragraph 16) of the respondents and the reasons given

by the "not interested 11 employers (Appendix 11 ) f the Committee has come

to the following conclusions:

(i) The bigger establishments are generally more

willing (and probably more able) to sponsor

their employees to PTDR courses;

(ii) The majority of the n not interested 11

respondents f 303 out of 39*f (77%) f might

not actually be not interested in sponsoring

their employees to PTDR courses as they all

have stated "no suitable employees 11 as the

reason for being not interested in PTDR

courses. It could be that changes in future

staff recruitment or business plans might

result in these "not interested" respondents

sponsoring their employees to PTDR courses

again. It could also be that some of the

"not interested" respondents could be

employers who already have sufficient

apprentices and do not require additional

apprentices at the time of the survey; and

(iii)

Some of the 980 establishments covered in the

survey are firms which have been required to

run apprenticeship schemes as a result of the

enactment of the Apprenticeship Ordinance f and

apparently, they have indicated their unwillingness

to sponsor their employees to PTDR courses when

completing the questionnaires.

12


PTDR Course Enrolment

26. According to information provided by the "interested 11 respondents,

there would be 1,5^3 and 3 f 3^6 employees likely to be attending respectively

technician and craft PTDR courses in the Polytechnic and technical

institutes. However, statistics supplied by the Polytechnic and the

Education Department show that in October 1978 f the total number of

students enrolled in PTDR courses is greater than the above revealed by

the "interested 11 respondents. The difference is shown in the following

table :

PTDR Technician Courses

PTDH Craft Courses

No. likely

to attend

Enrolment in

technical

institutions

in October

1978

No. likely

to attend

Enrolment in

technical

institutions

in October

1978

Building and Civil

Engineering

279

950

-

569

Clothing

62

154

16

76

Electrical

236

261

728

871

(including

electronics)

Electronics

235

293

199

Mechanical

(including

automobile

repairs and

plastics)

533

580

2,100

2,232

Printing

kk

17

83

255

Shipbuilding and

Ship Kepairs

16

18

31

287

Textile

36

12

189

257

Hotel

Total

102

1,5^3

32*

2,317

-

3,3^6

-

kiM

Figure in December 1978

13


27. The above table shows that the actual enrolment in PTDR courses

is about *+Q.k% higher than the likely number provided by employers in the

survey. The discrepancies between the survey findings and the actual

enrolment figures may be attributed, in part, to the following:

(i) The survey covered only 980 hotels and

establishments in the ten major industries

while the enrolment figures include employees

sponsored by establishments other than the

980, and by other industries and government

departments not covered by the survey;

(ii) The designation of the five common trades

in February 1978 and three construction

craft trades in September 1978 under the

Apprenticeship Ordinance should have

effectively increased the enrolment

figures in technical institutes;

(iii)

(iv)

The number of employees likely to be sponsored

to attend PTDR construction craft courses was

not asked in the questionnaire because no such

courses were being offered at the time of the

survey;

Whereas the enrolment figures include the

majority of existing apprentices under valid

contracts of apprenticeship, the likely

numbers may not have included (at least for

some employers) those employees who were

already on roll in technical institutions at

the time of the survey.

Technician Courses

28. The table in paragraph 26 also shows that PTDR courses for

engineering technicians, i.e. construction, electrical, electronics

and mechanical engineering technicians get more support from industry.

However, the Committee notes that for electronics engineering technicians,

PTDR course is available only in the Polytechnic. The Committee would

therefore like to recommend that the Education Department should, when

there is such a need, consider starting PTDR courses for electronics

engineering technicians in technical institutes.


Craft Courses

29, Comparing with the figure in 1976 when the first survey was

conducted f the enrolment figure for PTDR craft courses has increased

greatly (from about 2 f OOO to more than *f,500)* While this increase is

attributable to a number of factors such as the designation of additional

trades under the Apprenticeship Ordinance, the coming into full operation

of the Haking Wong Technical Institute, and the introduction of new PTDR

courses in technical institutes in response to industry's needs, it also

reflects the support given by industry to PTDR craft courses. The

Committee would therefore stress that all those who are concerned with

the planning of PTDR courses, e,g« technical institutions, relevant

government departments and training boards of the Hong Kong Training

Council, should regularly assess the training needs of industry and

review the merits of PTDR courses to ensure that such courses can meet

the needs of industry, both quantitatively and qualitatively.

Demand for New PTDR Courses

30. Regarding the 3^ suggestions for new courses reported by

respondents in the survey, the Committee considers that most of these

suggested new courses are essentially subjects which could be included

in syllabuses of existing PTDR courses. As an alternative, these suggested

courses could be offered in technical institutions as short or specialist

courses* Although it would appear that in general, the demand in number

for most of these courses is too low to make them viable, technical

institutes would be willing to start any new courses suggested by industry

whenever there is a sufficient demand for such courses* The Committee

therefore recommends, as in paragraph 29 f that technical institutions

should continue to review the courses they are offering to ensure that

these courses meet the changing needs of industry*

Hotel-keeping and Tourism Courses

31 * The Committee is disappointed at the poor attendance of PTDR

courses for hotel-keeping and tourism as indicated by the enrolment

figures in paragraph 26* In spite of the considerable amount of publicity

given to these courses, the Haking Wong Technical Institute has only been

able to obtain six hotels to support its PTDR courses in hotel-keeping and

tourism by December 198* However, the Committee notes from paragraph 16

that 14 hotels have expressed their interest in supporting PTDR courses.

It therefore appeals to employers in the hotel-keeping and tourism

industry to make full use of the facilities in technical institutes by

sponsoring their employees to PTDR courses*


Respondents* Seasons for being not Interested in PTDB Courses

32. After analysing the reasons (paragraph 22) given by respondents

for being not interested in FIDE courses, the Committee has grouped these

reasons under three categories as below:

(i) * Reasons related to employees

No* of respondents

giving such reason

No suitable employees 303

Employees not interested

in PTDR courses

^

Entry requirements too high 3

Employee has no time 1

311

(ii)

Reasons related to costs

Too few employees 8

Apparent loss of production

time

^

It is not worth the cost 13

Course too long 2

Only employ skilled workers 1

Employer has no training *

policy

Evening courses preferred 1

138

(iii)

Reasons related to nature of work

Courses are not useful 20

No suitable courses

k

2k

16


33» Comparing with those given by employers in the previous survey,

the predominant reasons for the respondents being not interested in PTDR

courses have become more related to employees than costs. The reason for

this could have been a difference in the nature of the two survey samples

with the present sample consisting mainly of relatively more enlightened

and "interested 11 establishments. Nevertheless, the Committee feels that

the reasons related to employees and to nature of work do not seem valid

as employers should develop their employees by reviewing their training

policies to make available opportunities for their employees to attend

PIDR courses. The importance of staff development is becoming more

significant because more and more young people will be getting the

opportunity to continue senior secondary education and may result in

employers experiencing greater difficulty in recruiting suitable craft

apprentices in the future. Regarding the reasons related to costs, the

Committee wishes to re-iterate what it has stated in the report of the

previous survey that production costs would not go up merely by sending

a few trainees to PTDR courses but instead costs would eventually go down

as a result of improved skills and knowledge gained by the employees on

completion of the courses*

General Recommendations

34, As PTDR courses are made available in technical institutions

for the primary function of providing the related technical education to

complement the practical training provided by industry, it is therefore

important that industry should be made aware of and encouraged to utilise

the facilities available in the institutions. In order to achieve this

objective, the Committee makes the following recommendations:

(i) Both the Education Department and Labour

Department should continue, and where necessary

step up, their efforts in publicising PTDR courses

and proper apprenticeship schemes in order to

solicit a more positive response from industry in

the utilisation of facilities in technical

institutions*

(ii)

For those apprentices whose educational standard

is below that specified for entry into PTDR

courses, the Education Department should consider

running special classes as an interim measure to

raise their standard to the required level. This

would definitely encourage both employees and

employers to make better use of PTDR courses.

1


(iii)

(iv)

Sufficient places in relevant FIDE courses

should always be made available in technical

institutions for apprentices whenever such a

need arises.

Assistance should continually be sought from

major employers 1 associations in order that

their members can be encouraged to start

organised apprentice training and make use

of the facilities in technical institutions.

Future Survey

35 • At an appropriate later date, the Committee will review whether

there is a need to conduct another similar survey to update the information

in this report*

18


PAST V

SUMMAEf OF MAIN HSCOMMENDATIONS

36* The Education Department should f when there is such a need,

consider starting part-time day-release courses for electronics engineering

technicians in technical institutes* (paragraph 28)

37* Technical institutions, relevant government departments and

training boards of the Hong Kong Training Council should regularly assess

the training needs of industry and review the merits of part-time dayrelease

courses to ensure that such courses can meet the needs of industry,

both quantitatively and qualitatively* (paragraphs 29 and 30)

38. Employers in the hotel-keeping and toruism industry should

make full use of the facilities in technical institutes by sponsoring

their employees to PTDR courses, (paragraph 3*0

39* Employers should develop their employees by making available

opportunities for their employees to attend PTDR courses* (paragraph 33)

The Committee would like to recommend that:

(i) both the Education Department and Labour

Department should continue to publicise

PTDR courses and proper apprenticeship

schemes in order to solicit a more positive

response from industry in the utilisation

of facilities in technical institutions;

(ii)

(iii)

for those apprentices whose educational

standard is below that specified for entry

into PTDR courses, the Education Department

should consider running special classes as

an interim measure to raise their standard

to the required level;

sufficient places in relevant PTDR courses

should always be made available in technical

institutions for apprentices;

(iv) assistance should continually be sought from

major employers 1 associations in order that

their members can be encouraged to start

organised apprentice training and make use

of the facilities in technical institutions*

(paragraph

19


Appendix 1

Committee on Technical Training in Institutions

of

the Hong Kong Training Council

Terms of Reference

1. To investigate the need based on the requirements of industry and,

at a later stage, of the commercial and service sectors, for new

technical institutes (in addition to the four already approved) and

to make recommendations to the Training Council.

2» To investigate the need for new courses at the technical institutes

(i»e« craft^ and lower technician) and tertiary (i»e. higher

technician^ and technologist3) levels and to make recommendations to

the Training Council on the establishment of such courses.

3» To ascertain and consider the views of industry and, at a later stage,

commerce and the service sectors, regarding proposals for new courses

at the technical institute and tertiary levels*

*f«

To serve as the liaison body between various levels of technical

education with the aim of assisting to bring about, ultimately, a

balanced manpower structure in all sectors of the economy by

co-ordinating the curricula and throughput of various levels of

technical education, and to advise technical institutions on matters

relating to this objective*

5* To assist in forging closer links between technical education and

industry and t at a later stage, the commercial and service sectors,

by encouraging participation by these sectors of the economy in the

planning and running of courses, projects etc. at all levels.

6m

To report annually in March to the Council on:

(a) the work carried out by the committee in the preceding

twelve months, and

(b) the work which the committee proposes to carry out for

the following twelve months.

20


Definitions

1. Craftsman - a skilled worker in a particular occupation, trade or

craft who is able to apply a wide range of skills and a high degree

of knowledge to basically non-repetitive work with a minimum of

direction and supervision. He requires practical training (usually

under apprenticeship), which is normally combined with an appropriate

course of technical education*

2. Technician - technicians and other technical supporting staff occupy

a position between that of the qualified scientist, engineer or

technologist on the one hand f and the skilled foreman or craftsman

or operative on the other. Their education and specialised skills

enable them to exercise technical judgement. By this is meant an

understanding, by reference to general principles, of the reasons

for and the purposes of their work, rather than a reliance solely on

established practices or accumulated skills. In non-technical sectors

the technician is one who has acquired detailed knowledge and skills

in one specialist field, or knowledge and skill to a lesser degree in

more than one specialist field; is required to exercise judgement, in

the sense of both diagnosis and appraisal, and initiative in his work;

is frequently called upon to supervise the work of others; and has an

appreciation of the environment beyond the immediate limits of his

duties*

3« Technologist - has studied the fundamental principles of his chosen

technology and should be able to use his knowledge and experience to

initiate practical developments. He is expected to accept a high

degree of responsibility and, in many cases, to push forward the

boundaries of knowledge in his particular field. A technologist has

the qualifications and experience equivalent to those required for

membership of a professional institution.

21


Appendix 2

Membership of the Committee on

Technical Training in Institutions of

the Hong Kong Training Council

Chairman J

Mr* S* Eichardson

(up to 31st December 1978)

Mr* Graham C.H. Cheng

(from 1st January 1979)

(representing the Hong Kong

Polytechnic)

(representing the Chinese

Manufacturers f Association

of Hong Kong)

Vi ce-Chairman 5

Mr, M* Milliken

(up to 31st December 1978)

Mr* B*A* Adair

(from 8th February 1979)

(representing the Hong Kong

General Chamber of Commerce)

(representing the Employers 1

Federation of Hong Kong)

Members:

Mr* B*A* Adair

(up to 7th February 1979)

Mr* Graham C.H, Cheng

(up to 31st December 1978)

Mr* A«A*G» Crow

(from 1st January 1979)

Mr* V*E* Greenwood

Mr* K*E. Hunter

Mr* H.H* Knight, J*P.

Dr* LAM Yat-wah

(up to 31st December 197$)

(representing the Employers 1

Federation of Hong Kong)

(representing the Chinese

Manufacturers r Asso ciation

of Hong Kong)

(representing the Hong Kong

General Chamber of Commerce)

(representing the Director of

Public Works)

(representing the Hong Kong

Institution of Engineers)

(representing the Commissioner

for Labour)

(representing the Chinese

University of Hong Kong)

22


Dr* York Liao

(from 1st January 1979)

Mr* D*V* Lindsay

(from 1st January 1979)

Mr* A*L* Purves, J*P«

Mr« F*A*L* Turner

Mr* D,D* Waters, J.P*

Mr* T* Zau

(representing the Chinese

University of Hong Kong)

(representing the Hong Kong

Polytechnic)

(representing the Director of

Trade Industry and Customs)

(representing the University of

Hong Kong)

(representing the Director of

Education)

(representing the Federation of

Hong Kong Industries)

Secretary/

Mr* P*F, Mak

(up to 7th January 1979)

Mr* WONG Man-kai

(from 8th January 1979)


Case No* _

Appendix 3

Card I

1-3

HONG KONG TRAINING COUNCIL

Chairman;

The Honourable Francis Y.H* Tien f

1978 survey: manpower training requirements on

part-time day-release basis

(ONE DAY AND TWO EVENINGS PEE WEE*

in technical institutions

Company:

Total No* of employees:

Address*

4-7

Tel* No.:

It is industry f s responsibility to provide on-the-job training

whilst Government provides related technical education in

technical institutes and the Hong Kong Polytechnic.

Four technical institutes now exist in Wan Chai f Kwai Chung,

Kwun Tong and Cheung Sha Wan (a new technical institute will

be completed in Kowloon Tong in 1979) in addition to the

Polytechnic to provide part-time day-release courses in which

your employees may study one day and two evenings per week

(present course fee $80 a year in technical institutes and

$220 a year in the Polytechnic).

% Which of the following courses are you interested in

(Please tick the courses in which you are interested and

state approximately how many employees from your firm are

likely to attend each of the courses. THIS DOES NOT

COMMIT YOU IN ANY WAY)

(A) TECHNICIAN POUSSES (Duration: k years

Entry Requirement: Completion of

Form 5 (Hong

Kong Certificate

of Education

with grade E or

above in four

relevant

subjects))


Likely

Please tick Numbers attending

Card I

Automobile repairs

Instrumentation

8, 9-10

12-13

Mechanical engineering

Shipbuilding

Construction

17, 18-19

21-22

Electrical engineering

Electronics engineering

Production/indust rial

engineering

Clothing

Knitting

Textiles (spinning &

weaving)

3,

26,

29,

32,

35,

38,

27-28

30-31

36-37

39-^0

Printing

Vl, 42-43

Hotel-keeping & tourism

GRAFT (PUSSES (Duration: 3 years

Entry Requirement: preferably completion

of Form 3)

Likely

Please tick numbers attending

Aiivconditioning &

refrigeration

Electrical engineering

Electronics engineering

Instrumentation production

& maintenance

n n

50, 51-52

53, 5^-55

56, 57-58

25


Lift maintenance 8c repair |

Mechanical engineering

Motor vehicle mechanic

Plastic mould making 1

Radio & television mechanic !

Sheet-metal & fabrication

Yacht & boat building

Graphic reproduction

Printing & reprography

Dyeing| printing &

finishing

Textile & clothing mechanic

Likely

Please tick numbers attending

If you have little or no interest in your employees

attending the above courses t please tick the boxes which

best express your reason (s) for not being interested:

Apparent loss of productive ti

It is not worth the cost

Courses are not useful

No ffttl table employees

n

n

n

n

n

~~l

mA ... _ _ , nI, J

n

59, 60-61

62, 63-64

65, 66-6

68, 69-70

71, 72-73

74, 75-76

77, 78-79

80, Card II

1-2

Card II

3, 4-5

6, 7-8

9, 10-11

Card I

12

13

n n

15

16

26


Card II

Any other reasons

17

18

19

If the above courses do not fully meet your requirement,

please suggest any other course(s) you would like to see

run:

DURING THE PERIOD FROM

TO

A SURVEY

INTERVIEWER WILL CALL AT YOUR OFFICE TO COLLECT THE COMPLETED

QUESTIONNAIRE. IF NECESSARY HE CAN ASSIST YOU WITH THE FILLING

IN OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE. THANK YOU.

27


Appendix k

Response Rates by industry

Responding Number of establishments

Industry establishments in the sample

Response

rate

Automobile repairs

and servicing

92

100

92.036

Building and civil

engineering

36

90.0*

Clothing

43

50

86.0*

Electrical

91

100

91.0*

Electronics

54

60

90.0*

Machine shop and

metal working

Plastics

246

86

300

100

82.0*

86.0516

Printing

100

100

^00.0*

Shipbuilding and

ship repairs

26

29

89.7*

Textile

53

61

86.936

Hotel

Total

29

856

40

980

72.5*

87.3*

28


Appendix 5

Distribution of "interested 11 respondents by

industry and by employment size

\

;try «H

Ail

jj) fcQ

M C*

G) *O

H -H

*H >

,£> ^i

O

s

o

^

4^ Tl

^ §

•rl

O

to S

•O

§ H

•H (Q

fc 60 O

9) ti -H

0) -H M

£3

•H

bO

r£|

+>

O

4^

O

d>

§ 0 Si

09

O

•a pN

-PO0)

0


CQ (j)

2: s

CO

0

•P

§

SJ

cT

*H .p

1

••a

CT

60 CQ

£ ^

H

Ai

j3 fa


S3

4>

H

•g

O

H


Appendix 6

"Interested" respondents 1

needs for technician courses

V

x^Industry

>v

Technician

courses

x^

N^

(Q

•H

^ 5P

Automobile 2

and servicir

! to

£J tj

3 *3

jET 0

•0 H

H »H

il

Clothing

Electrical

Electronics

1 to

Machine shoj

metal workil

Plastics

Printing

-o

9t*n rn

Shipbuilding

Ship repairs

Textile

-P

£

•sl

43

8

a

Automobile repairs

17

0

0 2

0

4

1

0

0

0

1

25

Instrumentation

1

0

0 0

5

1

0

C

0

0

0

7

Mechanical engineering

3

3

0 11

9

31

9

0

7

1

2

76

Shipbuilding

0

0

0 0

0

0

0

0

8

0

0

8

Construction

Electrical engineering

0

1

26

2

1 1

0 12

0

10

0

16

0

3

0

0

0

3

0

2

0

2

28

51

Electronics

engineering

0

1

0 k

21

8

1

0

0

0

2

37

Production/industrial

engineering

0

0

0 2

8

12

9

0

1

1

0

33

Clothing

0

0

13 0

0

0

1

0

0

2

0

16

Knitting

Textiles (spinning

& weaving)

0

0

0

0

0 0

2 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

12

0

0

1

*

Printing

0

0

0 0

1

2

0

19

0

0

1

23

Hotel-keeping &

tourism

0

0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

13

13

Column Total

22

32

16 32

54

74

24

19

19

19

21

332

30


Appendix 7

Number of employees by industry likely

to be sponsored to technician courses

\

\ Industry

"V

\


^•v

N.

N.

>w

Nw

Technician N.

courses N.

CO

•H erf

jPnt

0) bO

iH £3

•H


O O

§ ^


Appendix 8

"Interested" respondents 1

needs for craft courses

N.

^v

\v Industry

NV

^v

\-

x^^>.

>.

>t

Craft courses x.

Air-conditioning &

refrigeration

Electrical engineering

CO

fc

*ri

rt

ft M

O

bO

k a •H

0) O

rH «H

||

»3 JQ

6

•P *£>

*

1>

bO


£H

* OS

^

•N3 Oo

(D « CD 03 **

O

d*

H- go H«*d

PJ f-f p$

O ctfcf-


09


ui

-* 0 0

» 0 0

CT* O

^

g

0 0

O O


a 4 £> d-

o ct- QJ

P> H' P


£*"


Appendix 10

Distribution of "not interested 11

industry and employment

respondents by

size

\ Industry

>.

EtaploymentV

size \

S

•a P<

z%•H

Automobile

and servic

H

•£

•rl

U

-d d bo

Building a

engineerin

Clothing

Electrical

(0

Electronic

•c

§*£

0 'H

Machine sh

metal v/ork

Plastics

IP

•rl

•P

P4

is §

bO CQ

8 fe

Shipbuildi

aiip repai


J5

A

1 - 9

27

0

6

22

2

5^

23

20

5

2

0

161

10 - 19

20-49

50-99

5

3

1

2

1

2

5

0

0

6

1

1

1

0

5

23

14

9

2

3

2

10

17

5

0

if

0

2

6

1

0

2

1

56

51

27

100 - 199

200 - 499

500 - 999

0

1

0

3

0

0

4

4

1

1

0

1

2

3

2

7

10

0

1

5

4

2

2

0

1

0

0

6

4

2

6

2

2

33

31

12

1000 - 1999

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

2

3

2

10

2000 and over

0

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

3

Unknown

Column total

0

37

0

8

0

23

2

&

1

18

6

123

0

41

0

56

0

12

1

27

0

15

10

39^


tf Not interested" respondents 1 reasons by industry for not

being interested in PTDR courses

Appendix 11

NL

N.

\. Industry

>t

\ \L

>v

\.

Reasons \.

CO

£•<

«H

0) 60

JN C*

•H

& o

sin

Q Q>

S CQ

4> 13

4S

H

•H

>

*0

G 3

cj

*rl

3

£

&0

*fi ,1^

1 §

1•H

1

ti

CQ

O

U


!! Not interested" respondents* reasons by employment size

for not being interested in PTDR courses

Appendix 12

\^ Employment

>v Size

Nv

1-9 10-19

20-49

50-99

100-

199

200-

499

500-

999

1,000-

1,999

2,000

and over

Unknown

Bow

Total

Reasons N.

Apparent loss of

production time

8 4

5

1

8

6

3

4

2

1

42

Too few employees

40 11

9

2

6

4

2

1

0

3

78

It is not worth

the cost

2 1

2

1

0

2

3

1

0

1

13

Courses are not

useful

>* 3

2

1

3

2

3

0

0

2

20

No suitable

employees

124 46

40

24

23

24

6

7

2

7

303

Entry requirement

too high

s 1 0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

Only employ

skilled workers

1 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

No suitable

courses

2 1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

Employee not

interested in

PTDR courses

0 0

0

1

1

0

0

1

0

1

4

Employer has no

training polic; T

0 0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

Employee hac

no time

0 0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Evening courses

preferred

0 0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

Courses too long

Column Total

0 0

182 66

0

60

0

32

1

*3

0

38

1

19

0

14

0

4

0

15

2

473


§

Automobile repairs

and servicing

Building and

civil engineering

ct-

H*

O

Clothing

Electrical

Electronics

•»

Machine shop and

metal working

8

503

09

Plastics

Printing

Shipbuilding and

ship repairs

Textile

£ 8&x

Total

Row Total


Hydraulic control theory

Machine setter

Optical technology

Metal handling

Work studies

Packaging

Pneumatic circuitry design

Powder spray

Brazing

Factory management

Plumbing

Plastics machine repairs

Mould making (technician)

Short courses

Advertising

Paint ing

Food -preparation and kitchen operations

Column Total

1 1

1

1

1

5 if 2 0 2 1 2 3 2 2 0 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

•1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

33


XDltfiDDl

* X 0 1 6 8 0 0 1 7 *

b 37i.^-u 5 1288429-of

Hoiif* Xonp. Co^nltt^ e on Technical

Trainirv" in Institutions.

Date Due

| 1288429 "r

ih

|.

* *•

H6T FOF TO*N

* m A''* n^M m ®

'^^^rr\^ - .. * .. _. i. . r

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