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How safe is Spanaway Lake? - My High School Journalism

How safe is Spanaway Lake? - My High School Journalism

2 ON GUARD

2 ON GUARD Editor-In-Chief Kayla Whitehead Fighting for a cause? You hear about it in the hallways. The gossip runs through groups and clicks. You see it on television. Maury and Dr. Phil need something to talk about before Oprah. Violence. Its found its way into our media, our communities, and even our homes. It seems at school it always starts the same way. Some girl is upset about some other girl talking about her and “taking her man.” From what I’ve been told and have personally noticed, the fi ghting is usually because one individual didn’t “respect” another. So basically if one person does not give the required “respect,” then their punishment is usually a black eye. When we are children in elementary school, we were taught to use our words rather than our fi sts. Well, that where it begins. Those who usually engage in fi ghts generally use a lot of words before the actual punches start fl ying. Most of those words should never be repeated, especially in a high school news publication. Just words, right? Sticks and stones? WRONG. Any violence, verbal or physical can be detrimental. The only difference between the two are that physical violence hurts jawbones, breaks noses, and busts teeth and verbal violence hurts self-esteem and a person’s spirit. I have never understood violence. Sure I have felt hostility towards another individual but to actually infl ict physical pain on that person? Call me a wuss but its not in my character to “rough somebody up.” In fact I think violence shows a lack of maturity within, not only the halls of our school, but in our community. Must a person cause harm to another to show respect? Dominance? I understand that we are born with natural instincts that cause us to feel intense emotions such as anger, jealously and rage, however if our own generation cannot overcome such feelings as to beat another human being, then we are no better than wild animals. Op-Ed MONTH No longer dressing to impress Society’s fashion today is ever changing, but just how far will some go? By: Chelsea Barker In-Depth Editor Yet again, I have an opinion about our generation and the people that occupy it. Go ahead, roll your eyes. It was brought to my attention while sitting in my morning history class at Pierce College, that the fashion sense of teenagers and young adults today has turned into one that resembles what a homeless person might wear. I was sitting in my class, when a student walked in and sat in front me. I looked up, curious as to who now occupied the seat in front of me, and my jaw dropped in disgust of what I saw. The person sitting in front of me sported a sweatshirt with multiple holes and rips, along with jeans that not only had rips, but paint splattered on them. Pierce is not the only place I have seen such attire. I am sorry, but just because our school is run-down, that does not mean a person has to dress run-down as well. Have you such low self-esteem that you feel the need to bare parts of your body through holes in your clothing? It is one thing to buy a new pair of jeans, with nothing on them destroyed, and have them become torn and ripped over time. However, to go to a store and spend sixty dollars on a pair of jeans that were made to have tears and rips in them Dealing with the pain One student speaks out on how she overcame the loss of loved ones By: Melissa Brewer Staff Reporter In life we have to face many challenges. We go through our ups and downs, and overcome the obstacles that life so freely hands us. One of these things we unfortunately have to learn to cope with is losing a loved one. Take me for instance; I am the kind of person who puts my family and friends above anything in this world. I would honestly give my life for them, or give them whatever they wanted, if I could. They are my life, and without them I would not be able to survive. In the past fi ve months, I have lost four friends in road related accidents. Even to this day, I still feel remorse for the ones I have lost. Of course, at fi rst I was unable to cope with what was happening. How could I just deal with the fact that I wouldn’t be able to see the friend I lost again? It seemed like something that I would never be able to get through. But then I realized something: Life goes on. Although I will always miss the friends I “...remember that life goes on.” have lost, I cannot spend the rest of my life wishing for something that I couldn’t change. When you lose someone in your life, everything around you seems to turn black and white. Just having to deal with the fact that you may never see your best friend again is something that can weigh heavy on your heart. Talking to another friend, a family member or even a counselor if you are feeling down will help you through your hard time. Something that I choose to do is busy myself with other activities. I listen to music, read or even hang out with a few friends. Anything that got me through my hard time, helped. No matter how hard your situation is, remember that life does go on. Do not spend the rest of your life wallowing in grief over something that cannot be changed. Be thankful for the times that you spent with your loved one, and all the precious memories of them that will live in your heart forever. Remember, that at the end of every black cloud there is always a silver lining. is completely ridiculous. Argue that it is “in”, but what is “in”? I believe it is more of a stereotype that people place upon themselves. “In” is different for every person, and personally, for me, my defi nition of “in” is not dressing like a bum. For people who cannot afford such attire, but wish to look like everyone else, I have a simple solution for you: Buy a nice pair of jeans that have nothing wrong with them, and take a pair of scissors to them. Throw some paint or rub some dirt into them also if you would like. Sound stupid? That’s because it is. On Guard Staff Staff Adviser: Todd Keister Editor-In-Chief: Kayla Whitehead Ad Manager: Chelsea Barker Copy Editor: Kailee Harper Op-Ed Editor: Hunter Schweitzer-Whitson Sports Editor: Courtnie Martin A& E Editor: Pamela Kouassi Photographer: Tasha Sargent Cartoonist: Maria Vijarro Staff Reporters: Thomas Awadjie Melissa Brewer Michelle Courtney Krista Doogan Michelle Flores Lina Mace Kailey McArthur Katrina Oliver Carmelene Samana Editorial Policies 1.Letters to the editor are accepted, and shall be printed if they meet the following criteria; submissions must be 50-250 words in length, convey a defi ned opinion expressed with details, and signed by the author with a signature and grade level. 2. The On Guard reserves the right not to publish any editorial submission for any reason. The On Guard may also edit to condense submission that do not meet the given 50-350 word limit. 3. All opinionated publications must meet the same standards of fairness, accuracy, and integrity as all other submissions. 4. The Op-Ed page shall always give credit to all contributing staff members, in the staff box. 5.Staff editorials refl ect two-thirds majority opinion of the On Guard. The staff as a whole may appoint a specifi c person to write the opinion of the staff.

News 3 ON GUARD FEBRUARY KOMO’s Ken Schram has the Schrammies.... The On Guard’s Chelsea Barker has her... Chelsies WASL Comes to Spanaway By: Hunter “Schwa” Schweitzer-Whitson Staff Reporter April is coming soon, as we all know, and with every April in Spanaway Lake High comes what many students and staff alike call one of the busiest, most obnoxious procedures in the history of education—WASL testing. Though it is only the sophomores that have to take the actual WASL test, the schedule needs to be “remixed”, so to speak, to get it to work out correctly, and this affects everyone. Probably the busiest of all those who have to deal with this mandatory test is the one who coordinates it, our Dean of Students, Ms. Rubit. “It’s, um, busy. Time consuming,” she says with a laugh when asked about the WASL in general. She explains all the steps and measures that have to be taken to make sure WASL season fi nishes properly; test booklets have to equal the amount of sophomores in the school, those who haven’t taken the WASL their sophomore year have to all be met with individually, attendance has to be accurate to make sure everyone’s taken the test, teachers have to be trained, A “Chelsie” is awarded to the person who does the stupidest or craziest thing in the month. State of Washington “Chelsie” winner A man was arrested in Everett, Wash., in December, and charged with the attempted murder of his estranged wife’s boyfriend (who was treated for fi ve knife wounds). According to prosecutors, the man was surprised at the “attempted” charge. Allegedly, he told a detective, “What? I thought I stuck him like a pig. What do you mean, he’s alive?” United States “Chelsie” winner A teenager in Buffalo, MN who wanted to con- All stories found at http://newsoftheweird.com tinue the family tradition of running around A devastating blow to the football world Remember to visit the On Guard at http:// my.highschooljournalism.org /wa/spanaway/slhs for back issues and in depth news coverage not found in this issue the garden barefoot during halftime of the Super Bowl game has learned a painful lesson. It was 17 below zero at halftime Sunday in this city about 30 miles northwest of Minneapolis, and his dad said it was too cold to continue the tradition. But the 18-year-old ran outside in his T-shirt and jeans, threw off his socks and shoes, and ran around the block. He was outside only fi ve minutes, but his feet started swelling and blistering when he got back inside. The pain was excruciating. “I consider myself having a high pain thresh- every single booklet has to be accounted for after all is said and done, and plenty of other things need to be taken into account. Students don’t seem put off by the WASL for the most part. “I’m calm about it, it’s no big deal,” states Robert Perez, a sophomore who will be taking the WASL this year. “I’ll probably get at least a C on every subject.” In fact, some sophomores, specifi cally honors students such as Teresa Azcueta, have already taken the WASL their freshman year. “It was pretty easy,” she mentioned when asked. Exceptional students may be given the privilege of taking it a little early. The big problem, some people think, is how seriously the WASL is taken, and how big a deal it has become to some people. Robert believes that the reason some students don’t do so well on this test is because teachers end up making the WASL sound too scary. Congress may not be helping much either, with No-Child-Left-Behind laws potentially being passed that prevents students from graduating unless they pass the WASL. All in all, WASL season is a taxing time of the school year for nearly everyone. We should all look forward to fi nishing it this April so that it can be taken care of without much struggle. old, and this was just so 10 out of 10,” he said. “I was, like, chewing on a towel.” He was treated for second-degree frostbite on both feet at the local burn centerand was on crutches and pain medication. His burn specialist said he should be fi ne, but it’ll take a few weeks. The boy hopes others will learn from his mistake. “I wouldn’t want anyone else to go through this,” he said. An Alsatian police dog named Edge cornered two suspects on a cliff side after a grocery store robbery in Napier according to police. One of the suspects leapt down the slope and landed almost directly into the hands of police offi cers waiting at the bottom. The other suspect, who was armed with a knife, took By: Michelle Flores World “Chelsie” winner Staff Reproter On January 1, 2007, Darrent Williams, a cornerback for the Denver Bronco’s was shot only 12 hours after the Bronco’s season fi nale loss to the San Francisco 49ers. He was in his rented Hummer limousine when a drive by shooter shot his limo. He immediately died with a gunshot wound to the neck. Williams is survived by his 7-year-old son, a 4-yearold daughter and his 24-year-old girlfriend. Darrent Williams was born September 27, 1982. He was born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas and attended O.D. Wyatt High School. He played football and played Cornerback and Punt Returner. As a Cornerback he had fi ve interceptions and as a Punt Returner he averaged 30 yards per return with four touchdowns. Also, he was named 7-4A defensive MVP. During his senior year he received offers from only three colleges, which were: Texas Christian University, Louisiana Tech University and Oklahoma State University. Later he decided to play football for Oklahoma State University. on Edge and bit the dog in the struggle. “He bit the dog fi rst,” according to the detective sergeant. Edge was unfazed, sinking his teeth into his attacker. The dog ended up winning the fi ght with the offender taking home one or two lacerations. According to the detective sergeant, the man thought he knew he was going to get bitten, so he bit the dog fi rst. The two men were arrested and appeared in Napier District Court. charged with aggravated robbery for the attack on the grocery store, during which the owner was stabbed. They were ordered to remain in police custody until Feb. 21. Edge underwent emergency surgery last June after an offender stabbed him in the chest with a hunting knife. After surgery and a blood transfusion, the dog made a complete recovery. During his college years he played a total of about 30 or so games. For his tackles all together for all four years he had around 140. In the 2005 NFL Draft, the Denver Broncos selected Williams. He made his fi rst career interception against the Oakland Raiders on November 13, 2005. During his 2005 career as a cornerback for the Bronco’s he had 58 tackles and two interceptions for that year. For his 2006 year he played in 15 games and had 86 tackles and 4 interceptions. His last game that he played was against the San Francisco 49ers, which could’ve helped the team get into the playoffs. He only played for the fi rst two quarters and left the game with a shoulder injury. That game was not a success, the Bronco’s lost 26-23 in overtime. After the game, with it being New Years, He decided to go out to clubs to bring in the New Year. It is to be said that Williams was attending a New Years party and birthday party of Kenyon Martin from the Nuggets. After leaving, that is when all the action took place. Williams was pronounced dead at about 2:30 a.m. Suspects are unknown but this was a sad event that took place. Everyone hopes that this loss was not due to the loss of the game. In Loving memory Michael N. Shcherenkov Oct. 19, 1988-Jan. 11, 2007 On Jan. 11, 2007 Shcherenkov was hit and killed in a automobile accident. He will be greatly missed by all that knew him. “We miss him emensly,” said Marlene Hedgpeth. “I keep thinking we will wake up from this nightmare.” “I don’t think you ever forget a person like him,” said Don Sticka.

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