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Airport Master Plan 2012 - City of Waterville

Airport Master Plan 2012 - City of Waterville

Approximately two miles

Approximately two miles west of downtown, the City owns and operates the Airport and is therefore considered a public use facility. Property abutting the airport is currently zoned and utilized for a variety of purposes including retail business, warehousing and shipping, and residential uses. A 50-acre business park is located west of the Airport and is part of an important economic development initiative by the City of Waterville. According to the 1999 City of Waterville Zoning Map, the land uses surrounding the Airport property are shown as commercial, residential, industrial, and institutional. The Capital Solid Waste Transfer Facility is located immediately west of the Airport. Nearby airports to Waterville include 1 : Central Maine Airport (Airport Identifier: KOWK), 14 nautical miles northwest in the Town of Norridgewock, Somerset County, Maine Augusta State Airport (KAUG), 14 nm south in the City of Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine Pittsfield Municipal Airport (2B7), 19 nm northeast in the Town of Pittsfield, Somerset County, Maine Belfast Municipal Airport (KBST), 29 nm east in the City of Belfast, Waldo County, Maine Dexter Regional Airport (1B0), 34 nm northeast in the Town of Dexter, Penobscot County, Maine Ortho-Photo The City of Waterville provided ortho-rectified aerial photogrammetry and digitized mapping of the airport environs including the runway approach areas. The ortho-rectified photo was projected on to the Maine State Coordinate System, North American Datum 1983. The City provided an electronic copy of this photo to the study team for use in this Master Plan. 1.2 Airfield Conditions Data identified herein was collected by the study team over numerous site visits during the months of October and November 2007. Some of this data was obtained and referenced from existing documents, plans and electronic files provided by the City of Waterville, Maine DOT and the FAA. This section describes the Airport’s airside and landside facilities. The airfield consists of two runways (designated 5-23 and 14-32), aircraft parking aprons and various taxiways. The two runways intersect on the northern end of the Airport. The existing condition of runways, taxiways, aircraft parking apron, pavement surfaces, drainage, utilities, lighting and navigational aids, and landside facilities on the Airport are described on the following pages. 1 Source: Airnav.com The City of Waterville Maine Baseline Conditions – Page 1-2 Airport Solutions Group, LLC & The Louis Berger Group, Inc. December 2011

Runways The orientation, physical dimensions and effective gradient of the runways are as follows: Table 1.1 Runway Configurations, Dimensions, and Gradient Runway Physical Dimensions (feet) Runway Orientation Effective Gradient 5-23 5,500 x 100 Northeast-Southwest 1.14 % 14-32 2,301 x 150 Northwest-Southeast 0.17% Runway 5-23 has a bituminous asphalt concrete surface with precision instrument runway markings, and is equipped with high intensity runway edge lights (HIRLs). Runway 5-23 is the primary instrument runway and has an Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach to Runway 5. Runway 23 is equipped with runway end identifier lights (REILs). There are visual approach slope indicators (VASI) on both Runways 5 and 23. Runway 5 has a medium intensity approach lighting system with sequenced flashers (MALSF). Runway 14-32 is paved with bituminous asphalt concrete and is equipped with medium intensity runway edge lights (MIRLs). The runway is marked with basic visual runway markings which include centerline and runway designator numerals. The present Airport Reference Point (ARP) is located at 44° 31’ 59.74” North latitude and 69° 40’ 31.86” West longitude. The established airport elevation, defined as the highest point along any of an airport’s runways, is 333 feet above mean sea level (MSL). Runway coordinates and elevations are based on the 1996 Airport Layout Plan (ALP). As of November, 2007 the magnetic declination was 16° 40’ west with an annual rate of change of 6 minutes east per year. Pertinent data for the existing runway ends is presented on the following table. Table 1.2 Runway Coordinates and Elevations Runway Elevation North Latitude (degrees) West Longitude degrees) 5 268.17 44º 31′ 35.47″ 69º 40′ 50.29″ 23 331.26 44º 32′ 23.16″ 69º 40′ 13.97″ 14 302.80 44º 32′ 07.22″ 69º 40′ 44.20″ 32 298.90 44º 31′ 54.12″ 69º 40′ 18.26″ Source: WVL Airport Layout Plan dated January 1996 Taxiways A full length parallel taxiway designated Taxiway “A” serves Runway 5-23. Taxiways “B” and “C” are stub taxiways intercepting the parallel Taxiway “A”, while Taxiways “G” and “H” connect to the runway ends. Taxiway “D” connects the Airport terminal area and the majority of private hangars, the passenger terminal, helipads, and aircraft parking aprons to the runways. All existing taxiways are constructed of bituminous concrete and have existing taxiway lights installed. The following table identifies the existing airport taxiways with minimum taxiway widths also noted: The City of Waterville Maine Baseline Conditions – Page 1-3 Airport Solutions Group, LLC & The Louis Berger Group, Inc. December 2011

  • Page 1 and 2: Waterville Robert LaFleur Municipal
  • Page 3 and 4: Table of Contents Chapter 1 - Intro
  • Page 5 and 6: Introduction to the Study Updating
  • Page 7 and 8: The Airport Master Plan Update is o
  • Page 9: 1.0 Baseline Conditions This Chapte
  • Page 13 and 14: Currently, the Airport pavement con
  • Page 15 and 16: VASI Visual Approach Slope Indicato
  • Page 17 and 18: 1.4 Airfield Aprons There are two m
  • Page 19 and 20: This hangar was moved to its presen
  • Page 21 and 22: Weather and Related Air Traffic Ser
  • Page 23 and 24: 1.6 Environmental Conditions and La
  • Page 25 and 26: than 20,000 s.f. Principal function
  • Page 27 and 28: Wildlife Habitat The Airport provid
  • Page 29 and 30: welfare is considered to include th
  • Page 31 and 32: 1.7 Historical Based Aircraft and A
  • Page 33 and 34: Year Table 1.8 Historic Aircraft Op
  • Page 35 and 36: Table 1.11 WVL Revenues 2006-07 Cat
  • Page 37 and 38: Airport Leases / Rates and Charges
  • Page 39 and 40: The mission of the Central Maine Gr
  • Page 41 and 42: Baseline Drawings This Master Plan
  • Page 43 and 44: 2.0 Airport Role and Forecasts Fore
  • Page 45 and 46: 2.1.1 Airport Service Area The airp
  • Page 47 and 48: FAA 5010 data for WVL indicated 24
  • Page 49 and 50: classification was created in 2005
  • Page 51 and 52: off one passenger for business in W
  • Page 53 and 54: 2.4 Airport Role The role of the ai
  • Page 55 and 56: Transport. This type of runway serv
  • Page 57 and 58: Forecast Scenario One (Baseline) As
  • Page 59 and 60: Figure 2.3 Graph of Forecasted Airc
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    3.0 Facility Requirements The facil

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    A full-length parallel taxiway to t

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    Table 3.4 Pavement Conditions and R

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    Runway Length The runway length req

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    Table 3.8 Runway Length Requirement

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    Due to poor maintenance or obsolesc

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    Table 3.11 General Aviation Termina

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    Based and Itinerant Aircraft Apron

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    Fuel Storage Facility Chapter 1 ide

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    The north hangar currently has over

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    Wind Rose Graphics The City of Wate

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    The City of Waterville Maine Facili

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    4.0 Alternatives Analysis Chapter 1

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    Runway 5-23 provides for over 94% w

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    T1b: Construct New Taxiway “E”

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    Aprons used for based aircraft shou

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    Table 4.3 Apron Alternatives Analys

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    F2: Upgrade and Utilize Old Telford

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    must be given to the level of site

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    H4: Expansion of Box Hangars on eac

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    Hangar Alternatives Conclusion The

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    Table 4.6 Snow Removal Equipment Bu

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    The City of Waterville Maine Altern

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    Waterville Robert LaFleur Municipal

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    Section 5.11 - Coastal Zone Managem

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    Obstruction removal could have pote

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    5.6 Historic, Architectural, Archae

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    If it is determined that the propos

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    These assumptions will be further c

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    6.0 Airport Layout Plan As part of

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    Exhibit 6 - Plan and Profile - Runw

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    7.0 Airport Management Structure As

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    Current Airport staffing is summari

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    Circulars, maintaining financial re

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    Airport Authority The Maine Legisla

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    current Airport management structur

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    7.2 Research of Other Airport Autho

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    Comparable Airports Overview When m

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    Mandan Municipal Airport (North Dak

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    7.4 Comparable Airports: Lessons Le

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    Private Ownership/Private Managemen

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    Private Ownership/Private Managemen

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    Obstruction remediation in the form

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    Waterville Robert LaFleur Municipal

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    Program (AIP). Therefore, projects

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    Phase 2 Development (6 to 10 years)

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    AIP monies are distributed to airpo

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    Table 8.5 Comparative Airport Rates

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    3) Facility Maintenance Unlike othe

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    Table 8.7 Historical FBO Expenses F

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    Table 8.9 Historical Airport Revenu

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    8.7 Summary of Airport Financial As

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    Therefore, in order to optimize the

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    accurate inventory of airport maint

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    Summary and Conclusion The total Ca

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    APPENDIX A - GLOSSARY ADVISORY CIRC

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    DISPLACED THRESHOLD - A displaced t

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    NON PRECISION INSTRUMENT RUNWAY - A

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    negotiated in case of an emergency

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    Waterville Robert LaFleur Municipal

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    WATERVILLE ROBERT LaFLEUR MUNICIPAL

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    WATERVILLE ROBERT LaFLEUR MUNICIPAL

  • Page 209:

    WATERVILLE ROBERT LaFLEUR MUNICIPAL

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