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Download - Gender Climate

Download - Gender Climate

Download - Gender

  • Page 3 and 4: This manual has been produced by th
  • Page 5 and 6: Foreword iv Climate change is a mos
  • Page 7 and 8: Assignments for this module .......
  • Page 9 and 10: 6.4.1 Technology needs and needs as
  • Page 11 and 12: 2 EUA FAO FCPF GDI GEF GEF-SGP GEO
  • Page 13 and 14: Introduction In November 2007, the
  • Page 15 and 16: Notes for trainers training: A vari
  • Page 17 and 18: Do not try to put too many topics i
  • Page 19 and 20: Module 1: Gender and gender mainstr
  • Page 21 and 22: Overcoming inequalities and maximiz
  • Page 23 and 24: mainstreaming, therefore, differs f
  • Page 25 and 26: Social Watch. (2008). Gender Equity
  • Page 27 and 28: Case studies Case study 1 Women pla
  • Page 29 and 30: Case study 2 UNEP Gender Plan of Ac
  • Page 31 and 32: Case study 3 CBD Gender Plan of Act
  • Page 33 and 34: Instruments and techniques I. Intro
  • Page 35: Instruments and techniques I. Intro
  • Page 38 and 39: 4. Ask the participants to choose a
  • Page 40 and 41: Instruments and techniques II. Tech
  • Page 42 and 43: Key question: • “So, what can b
  • Page 44 and 45: 4. Ask the groups to identify the c
  • Page 46 and 47: 2. Ask participants to take one ste
  • Page 48 and 49: 44 These include Agenda 21 (United
  • Page 50 and 51: procedures whereby women may file c
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    It is important to point out that o

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    • Strengthening accountability sy

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    52 hand, women are often well posit

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    importance of the agricultural sect

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    56 It should be noted that the CBD

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    Box 2 Examples of how gender and wo

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    NBSAP; of the 141 examined, 77 ment

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    In terms of the legal instruments,

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    Notes for the facilitator: It is fu

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    Table 1. Summary of the major legal

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    GENDER EQUALITY 52 nd Session of th

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    Specific text It calls for mainstre

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    Main inputs of policy making and im

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    Specific text General consideration

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    Procedure: 1. Divide the participan

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    80 Climate change and gender inequa

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    Table 1. Direct and indirect risks

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    3.3 Gender equality, climate change

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    MDG 3: (cont.) Women in developing

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    Further resources Enarson, E. (1998

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    Case studies Case study 1 The Mama

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    92 Furthermore, female yapuchiris h

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    94 CRiSTAL was applied three times

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    Instruments and techniques I. Techn

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    Handout 1. Direct and indirect risk

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    Handout 2. Establishing the linkage

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    MDG 5: Improve maternal health Incr

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    Module 4: Gender mainstreaming in a

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    The Human Development Report 2007-2

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    which limits their capacity to resp

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    According to Burón, risk managemen

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    • In Sri Lanka, it was easier for

  • Page 116 and 117:

    By excluding women from climate cha

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    Box 7 Women’s successful action i

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    The following resource sectors, in

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    occurred in poor urban homes due to

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    1. Direct effects of extreme climat

  • Page 126 and 127:

    Divert fresh water to areas where t

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    Establish aquaculture, including ma

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    men differently, and to explore sca

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    sustainable change (UN/ISDR, 2008).

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    Assignments for this module: Activi

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    direct beneficiaries. The programme

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    of the household. Women, in contras

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    participatory approaches with farme

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    Case study 5 Women will rebuild Mia

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    2. Assign people to small groups re

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    a. Water and sanitation; b. Biodive

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    Over the longer term, the Intergove

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    154 At the national level, the pict

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    not only reduced landslides, but al

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    Box 3 Gender considerations when pr

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    credits. By increasing the efficien

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    The second position suggests that t

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    Hope to Action is a good example of

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    Case studies Case study 1 Biofuel p

  • Page 164 and 165:

    Case study 2 A billion trees for cl

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    Case study 3 Nepal National Biogas

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    • Group 3 to look at point 5.1.2

  • Page 170 and 171:

    Procedure: 1. Paste the four differ

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    communications technologies, includ

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    variables strongly associated with

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    process, the developed country Part

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    grassroots organizations, is import

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    Reforestation projects are also bei

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    America, women preserve seeds for f

  • Page 184 and 185:

    Case study 2 Women’s vulnerabilit

  • Page 186 and 187:

    Case study 3 Lighting up hope and c

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    Instruments and techniques I. Techn

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    Instruments and techniques II. Anal

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    Women’s vulnerability in the rura

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    Module 7: Gender mainstreaming in c

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    These include women’s control “

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    7.3 What are the instruments, mecha

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    Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) a

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    7.4 Market-based schemes and privat

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    As with public sources of climate c

  • Page 206 and 207:

    Unfortunately, far too few of the m

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    steadfastly to the gender myths abo

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    7.7 Gender and the post-2012 climat

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    Strategic opportunities and opening

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    Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO).

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    order to secure their livelihoods a

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    Instruments and techniques I. Techn

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    Instruments and techniques II. Anal

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    Appendix 1: Annotated bibliography

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    Reference Description IPCC. (2001).

  • Page 226 and 227:

    Reference Description Canadian Inte

  • Page 228 and 229:

    Reference Description IPADE. (n.d.)

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    Reference Description Villagrasa, D

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    Reference Description GEF-UNDP SGP.

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    Reference Description Wamukonya, N.

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    Reference Description Jones, R., Ha

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    Reference Description UNDP Mexico.

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    Reference Description Aguilar, L. (

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    3. Portals and web sites Site Name

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    Site Name Contents Oxfam: Climate C

  • Page 246 and 247:

    Document Description The World Bank

  • Page 248 and 249:

    Social Watch. (2007). Gender Equity

  • Page 250 and 251:

    IPCC. (2001). Summary for Policymak

  • Page 252 and 253:

    Zhou, G., Minakawa, N., Githeko, AK

  • Page 254 and 255:

    Duncan, K. (2007). “Global Climat

  • Page 256 and 257:

    Meyreles, L. (2000). Huracán Georg

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    Module 5 Aboh, C.L. & Akpabio, I. A

  • Page 260 and 261:

    Women’s Environmental Network and

  • Page 262:

    Module 7 Brody, A., Demetriades, J.

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