Variety

gov.bb

Variety

An evaluation of the most

suitable parsley under

protected systems

Mr. Colin Wiltshire BSc. Agricultural

Sciences Honors (UWI) MSc.

Environmental Engineering & Project

Management (University of Leeds)


Introduction

• Locally parsley is cultivated under open field

conditions where yields are typically low as result

of fungal problems

• During the rainy season (June – November) these

diseases become particularly troublesome

• Harvesting maybe limited to two or in extreme

cases one harvest before the plot is abandoned


Introduction

• Parsley is used in production of seasonings,

preparation of salads and pudding and souse (local

delicacy)

• Processors use fresh as well as dried parsley

• Joycelyn Headley of Amanda’s Seasoning prefers

dried ground parsley with the stems removed

• Shelf life of dried parsley is longer than fresh

parsley


Introduction

• Tremendous volume of parsley is imported

annually- exact figures are unknown

• In 2003 IICA estimated that 42 of 73 local

hotels and 31 of 87 restaurants use 2056kg

annually


Introduction

• Locally no research has been done concerning

production of parsley under protected systems

• It is therefore difficult to make recommendations

concerning its management or most appropriate

varieties

• This trial proposes to evaluate the most suitable

parsley cultivar for production under protected

systems


Introduction

• Results displayed during this presentation

are based on information analyzed over the

past 7 months.

• Greenhouse trial is still ongoing.

• All open field comparisons are based on

results obtained from a study completed by

A. Philips & S. Skeete 2009


Material & Method

• Involved four cultivars of curly parsley

petroselinum crispum

• Banquet

• Green River (normally cultivated under

open field conditions locally)

• New curl summer

• Triple Curl


Material & method

• Plot layout randomized block design with

replicates

• Irrigated using 12” drip irrigation

• At harvest the entire plant was cut to a height of

3” above ground level

• Immediately after harvest plants were treated with

mancozeb (fungicide) and a systemic insecticide

as well as micro nutrients


Material & Method

• Weights of the plants were recorded

• Processable biomass was calculated by

removing the petioles and recording the leaf

weights- The difference was expressed as a

percentage

• Dry matter content was calculated by drying

the processable biomass in a convection

oven at 60 0 C for 9 hours.


Materials & method

• Data was analyzed statistically using soft

ware programs Mini Tab 15 and Genstat v

5.3

• “cluster” is used to describe each plant as in

some cases more than one seed may have

germinated in cell


(cm)

Results & Discussion

• For the first three

weeks the rate of

growth was uniform

amongst all varieties

• After the first harvest

cultivar triple curl

grew more rapidly

than other varieties (F

pr>0.003)

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

GROWTH CURVE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

BANQUET

TRIPLE CURL

NEW CURL

GREEN RIVER


Results & Discussion

• During the following weeks trend did not

continue

• Growth remained generally uniformed


Results & Discussion

• Please view photo

showing parsley at 17

days

• All varieties displayed

similar plant

architectural

characteristics to green

river

• Uniform growth

amongst all cultivars


Growth Rate

• Please view photo

showing parsley at 38

days

• All varieties continue to

display similar plant

architectural

characteristics to green

river

• Growth continues to be

uniform amongst cultivars


(g)

Average yields

• Cultivar triple curl

produced highest yield per

plant with an average of

0.204 kg. There is no

information available

concerning the

performance of this

cultivar under open field

conditions

• Differences highly significant

• (F pr.< 0.002) SEM 0.498

0.25

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05

0

Average yields

BANQUET GREEN RIVER TRIPLE CURL NEW CURL


Yields

Variety Kg/plant Kg/Ha

Banquet 0.1541 16781

Green River 0.1663 18110

New Curl

summer

0.1331 14495

Triple Curl 0.2038 22194

SEM=0.0421


Kg/Ha

Comparison of open field and

greenhouse

• After 6 months

greenhouse vastly

exceeded open field

production

• Banquet 47.5% higher

• Green River 58.5% higher

• New Curl Summer 65.4%

higher

• Yields obtained after six

harvests from greenhouse

and two from open field

(A. Philips & S. Skeete

2009)

25000

20000

15000

10000

5000

0

Comparison of greenhouse and open field

BANQUET

GREEN

RIVER

TRIPLE

CURL

NEW CURL

Greenhouse

Open field


Processable biomass

• Calculated by weighing entire plant, then

removing the stems and expressing

difference as a percentage

• Processors prefer to have stems removed


Processable biomass

• Banquet provided the

highest percentage

with 57.4 and new curl

was lowest with 55.5

• Highly significant

differences in

processable biomass

• (F pr.< 0.002) SEM 0.798

58

57.5

57

56.5

56

55.5

55

54.5

PERCENTAGE PROCESSABLE BIOIMASS

57.4

56.8

56.6

55.5

BANQUET TRIPLE CURL NEW CURL GREEN RIVER


Variety

Processable biomass

Kg per plant

(cluster)

Kg

Banquet 0.1541 0.088

Green River 0.1663 0.094

New Summer

Curl

0.1331 0.075

Triple Curl 0.2038 0.113


Dry matter Content

• Calculated by drying leaves in convectional

oven

• Dried leaves have longer shelf life

• Some processors requests dried parsley


Dry matter content

• Triple curl yielded the

highest percentage

with 34.5 while

cultivar Banquet

yielded the lowest

with 27.8

• Differences highly

significant (F pr.< 0.001)

SEM 0.798

40

35

30

25

% 20

15

10

5

0

PERCENTAGE DRY MASS

33

34.5

30.8

27.8

BANQUET GREEN RIVER TRIPLE CURL NEW CURL


Dry matter content

Variety Kg/plant (processable) Kg/plant after

drying

Banquet 0.088 0.025

Green River 0.094 0.031

New Curl

summer

0.075 0.023

Triple Curl 0.113 0.039


Mean petiole value

Mean stem value

• New Curl Summer

75.5

• Green River 75

78

76

74

• Banquet 74

• Triple Curl 68

72

70

68

• Differences highly

significant (F pr.<

0.001) SEM 0.698

66

64

BANQUET

GREEN

RIVER

TRIPLE CURL

NEW CURL


Disease occurrence

• The plot was generally well maintained

• There was no occurrence of die back or any other

serious disease problem for the first six months

• During the 7 th month die back occurred in the

guard rows on the eastern side of the building

• A point to note is the plants were not treated with

mancozeb fungicide at the 6 th harvest


Disease occurrence

• Plants at 6.5 months

with no evidence of

die back or any serious

disease problem


Disease occurrence

• Along the guard row there was a section which

was more highly affected

• Through casual observation it was noted that the

section which was affected to a lesser degree

received unrestricted air flow.

• While the section which was more severely

affected received less air flow.

• There is another building located to the east of the

greenhouse in which trial was done


Disease occurrence

• Photo showing area

along guard row

which became affected

by die back


Variety

Disease occurrence

Banquet 3.5

Green River 4.2

Percentage population

affected

New Curl Summer 5.3

Triple

3

(F pr.< 0.001)

SEM 0.365


Conclusion

• Greenhouse allows for extended harvesting period.

• Increased number of harvests

• Plants display higher resistance to fungal

infestation

• Cultivar Triple Curl displays great potential for

greenhouse production as well as processing

• There appears to be no interaction between

number of petioles and overall plant weight


Recommendation

• More research should be carried out to determine

if there is an interaction between the application of

mancozeb (fungicide) and aeration on the

expression of die back in parsley.

• A density trial should be designed with varying

number of plants in each cell to decide if there is

an interaction between number of plants per cell

and overall yields


Acknowledgement

• Author would like to express appreciation

to all persons who lent assistance

• Special thanks to

• Mr. Adrian Kirton BADMC

• Mr. Damien Hinds IICA

• Mr. Selwyn Brathwaite MA

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines