FINAL Program Guide PDF 10-9-12 - American College of Allergy ...

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FINAL Program Guide PDF 10-9-12 - American College of Allergy ...

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

2012 Annual Scientific Meeting

Program Guide

© Disney

November 8-13, 2012

Anaheim, California

acaai.org


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The Product Theater content and views expressed therein are those of the sponsor

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Welcome

American College of Allergy,

Asthma & Immunology

Over the Horizon:

Expanding Expertise

November 8-13, 2012

Anaheim Convention Center & Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Anaheim, California

2011 – 2012 Officers and Board of Regents

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

President-Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Michael B. Foggs, MD, FACAAI

Vice-President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Bryan L. Martin, DO, FACAAI

Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Dana V. Wallace, MD, FACAAI

Immediate Past President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI

Past Immediate Past President . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Kevin P. McGrath, MD, FACAAI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Talal M. Nsouli, MD, FACAAI (Honorary). . . . . . . 2012

James M. Seltzer, MD, FACAAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012

Alnoor A. Malick, MD, FACAAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013

Janna M. Tuck, MD, FACAAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013

David R. Weldon, MD, FACAAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013

Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014

Warner W. Carr, MD, FACAAI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014

Chitra Dinakar, MD, FACAAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014

FIT Representatives: Paul B. Keiser, MD (’12) and Meagan Shepherd, MD (’12)

Speaker of the House: Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI (‘12)

Executive Medical Director: Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI

Alliance President: Rebecca A. Goldberg, RN


ACAAI Premier Partners

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology recognizes the indispensable role that health care

companies play in furthering the mission of the College. ACAAI would like to thank the following companies for their

generous support of this year’s Annual Meeting.

DIAMOND

$500,000 and above

Mylan Specialty L.P.

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Teva Respiratory, LLC

GOLD

$100,000 – $299,999

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

McNeil Consumer Healthcare

MEDA PHARMACEUTICALS®

Merck

Sanofi U.S.

ViroPharma Incorporated

SILVER

$50,000 – $99,999

Aerocrine

Allergan, Inc.

AstraZeneca

Genentech, Inc. and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS

ALK, Inc. • Boston Scientific Corporation • CSL Behring • GREER • HollisterStier Allergy

ISTA Pharmaceuticals • Lincoln Diagnostics, Inc. • Olympus Corporation of the Americas

Thermo Fisher Scientific


Table of Contents

Page

Greetings from the Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Greetings from the Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Corporate Supporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Commercial Supporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Special Announcements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Fundraiser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Education Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

Maintenance of Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Daily Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Committee Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

Thursday Pre-Meeting Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Thursday Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Friday Literature Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Friday Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Saturday General Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Saturday ACAAI President’s Welcome Reception and Awards Ceremony . . . .48

Sunday General Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

Sunday “Meet the Professor Breakfasts” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Sunday Concurrent Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Monday General Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Monday “Meet the Professor Breakfasts” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Monday Concurrent Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63

Tuesday Annual Business Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

Tuesday General Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

Allied Health Professionals Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72

Poster Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75

Plenary and Symposia Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100

Faculty Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102

CME/CPD Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103

Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104

Special Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110

Named Lectures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111

Tribute to Our Past Presidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112

Distinguished Fellows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113

ACAAI Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114

Alliance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115

Fellows-in-Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116

Travel Grant Recipients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

Product Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123

Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126

Index of Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140

Index of Exhibitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142

Exhibit Hall Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144

Anaheim Convention Center Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145

Anaheim Hotel Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146


General Information


Greetings From the Officers

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

President

The College is celebrating its 70th Anniversary!

Congratulations to all members on 70 years of shaping and

improving our specialty! It is humbling to

recall that our College was started by a

group of dedicated allergists who

established our organization to help

advance the science of allergy, meet the

educational needs of the practicing allergist

and ultimately improve the care of the

Dr. Fineman

allergy patients we serve. It is certainly

impressive to see how we’ve evolved.

At the start of my presidency this milestone year, the College

resolved to continue to help you, not only to promote your

allergy practice and learn more about our changing

marketplace, but also by advocating for the allergist.

Our 70th anniversary meeting, Over the Horizon: Expanding

Expertise, has been carefully orchestrated under the

leadership of President-Elect and Program Chair Richard W.

Weber, MD, FACAAI, and focuses on helping you adapt to our

changing health care environment through multiple tracks

including scientific sessions, Meet the Professor Breakfasts

and Workshops.

In addition to the annual meeting programs designed to

keep us at the forefront of change, we’ve initiated advocacy

activities for our members. A new section on our website

provides a resource for the “New Federal Health Regulations”

(see the “Advocacy and Inside Washington” menu on the

member website). This provides you easy access to

information that will help you understand the latest

developments in our changing health care marketplace

including several reports by our Joint Task Force on Health

Care Reform.

Our new D.C. Allergy Strike Force is an initiative to help

present the voice of allergists to our legislators on Capitol

Hill. It is made up of a group of members from the College,

Academy and Joint Council who interact with our legislators.

We met with Congressional leaders in D.C., October 2011 and

again in May, to discuss issues that are vital for the practicing

allergist, including Medicare reimbursement, GME,

importance of specialty care and the latest findings about

the benefit of allergy immunotherapy.

As you know, one of the major goals of the College is to help

promote the allergist, and we continue to make progress in

this area. More people than ever before have heard about our

unique qualifications through our Find an Allergist, Find Relief

campaign. This has been accomplished nationally through

increased ACAAI public microsite traffic, specifically to the

Find an Allergist Locator, improved search engine rankings

and ongoing coverage in national media. It has also been

implemented on a local level through our ACAAI member

use of professionally designed ACAAI Relief Team materials

which are free. The marketing campaign has:

• Raised awareness of allergies and asthma, and the benefits

of seeing an allergist for diagnosis and treatment

• Motivated allergy and asthma sufferers to take action

• Differentiated allergists from other clinicians

• Demonstrated improved patient outcomes with

allergist care

Our ACAAI Nationwide Asthma Screening Program is now in

its 16th year. More than a quarter of ACAAI members have

participated, reaching nearly 130,000 potential asthmatics.

Our publications are also very strong. The Annals of Allergy,

Asthma & Immunology, under the leadership of Editor-in-

Chief Gailen D. Marshall, MD, PhD, FACAAI, is in its 69th year

of publication and it continues to evolve to meet the needs

of College members. New features planned for this year will

be of great interest to the practicing allergist and we can

even get CME credit through the Annals. AllergyWatch, edited

by Anthony Montanaro, MD, FACAAI, continues to enjoy very

positive feedback from members and helps us remain

current through summaries of allergy articles from a variety

of journals.

I look forward to seeing you in Anaheim, as we explore Over

the Horizon: Expanding Expertise. We should all enjoy the

diverse educational programs, the planned social events and

the many fine local attractions in Anaheim.

If any of the original group of dedicated allergists who

founded the College 70 years ago were able to see us now, I

think they’d be very proud.


Greetings From the Officers

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

President-Elect and Program Chair

Welcome to the 2012 ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in

sunny Anaheim.

My concept of our meeting theme, Over the

Horizon: Expanding Expertise, is in the form of

an image looking out toward the horizon.

There has been encroachment of our allergyimmunology

territory by other specialists,

primary caregivers, and even non-medical

entities, squeezing and shrinking it.

Dr. Weber

Therefore, our practices are changing. Since

our training extends over the horizon of what we have

typically done and seen, we have expertise that allows us to

expand into areas of medical management that are just over

that horizon.

Working with ACAAI Vice President Michael B. Foggs, MD,

FACAAI, Symposium Committee Chair, it is our Annual

Program Committee’s goal for this meeting to present for

discussion areas we have knowledge about and in which we

can manage patients as effectively, or better, than other

practitioners.

The XIV International Food Allergy Conference on Thursday

will expand your diagnosis and management

armamentarium. The full day conference is co-chaired by

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI, Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH,

FACAAI, and Alessandro Fiocchi, MD, FACAAI (SC).

What to do about those medical journals you haven’t had

time to read Expert faculty will digest them for you at the

Friday Annual Literature Review, Everything You Should Have

Read Last Year, But Didn’t, organized by Mark T. O’Hollaren,

MD, FACAAI, and his committee.

Throughout the meeting, top experts will discuss issues

germane to your practice in a variety of formats including

workshops, led by Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI, and Meet the

Professor Breakfasts, led by Bradley E. Chipps, MD, FACAAI.

The Abstract Review Committee, chaired by Jay M. Portnoy,

MD, FACAAI, selected preliminary research germane to the

specialty for concurrent oral and poster presentations.

I hope to see you Saturday evening at the President’s

Welcome Reception and Awards Ceremony, where we will

honor the accomplishments of our colleagues, and also on

Sunday evening at the Annual Fundraising Dinner featuring a

fun Beatles tribute performance by the talented Fab Four

band.

Special courses are tailored to the needs of your staff,

Advanced Practice Health Care Providers and Allied Health

Professionals, under the direction of David A. Khan, MD,

FACAAI, Mary Lou Hayden, MS, NP, AE-C, and Deidre H.

Sanders, MSN, FNP-BC.

The Alliance has special programs planned for your family,

and I am sure you will all enjoy the area’s many popular

attractions.

General Information

/TheACAAI @eACAAI /Allergists

Easy access at ACAAI.org


Greetings From the Alliance

Welcome to Anaheim!

Dear Alliance Members,

Anaheim – truly a wonderland for children of all ages! While

best known for the magic of Disneyland, California offers the

opportunity to spend a day at the beach, or

perhaps head south and visit LegoLand or

San Diego. Others might find a trip to

Pasadena and Cal Tech a treat.

To help give you the best experience

possible, the Alliance has planned

Rebecca Goldberg presentations in our Hospitality Suite, both

for adults and children, from 8:00 – 10:30 am, Friday through

Monday mornings in the Orange County Ballroom of the

Anaheim Marriott Hotel. We warmly welcome all registered

spouses and guests to attend.

Volunteers are always needed to work in the hospitality suite,

the ACAAI KIDS programs and for the photography contest.

This new exciting fundraiser will feature pictures taken by

ACAAI and Alliance members. By volunteering, you can meet

with Alliance members from around the world, chat with old

friends and discover new ones.

This year’s business meeting will be held on Sunday at the

Tiffany Terrace and Patio at the Sheraton Park Hotel. A short

two-block walk from the Marriott, the room with its Tiffany

style glass ceiling and outdoor patio is lovely. Enjoy great

company, excellent food and learn about the Alliance. The

luncheon ticket costs $15 and you must be registered to

attend, so please do so in advance.

We welcome you all to Anaheim!

Rebecca A. Goldberg, RN

Alliance President

2011-2012

Anaheim Information

http://microsite.anaheimoc.org/

american-college-allergy-asthma-immunology

Visit the ACAAI Anaheim Site for Anaheim information and

local attractions.


Please Join Us for a Corporate Forum Dinner at

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

2012 Annual Scientific Meeting

The Evolving Science of Aerosol Therapy

in Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis

PM PM

Hilton Anaheim Hotel

California Pavilion AB, Anaheim, California

Talal M. Nsouli, MD

Clinical Professor of Pediatrics & Allergy-Immunology

Georgetown University School of Medicine

Medical Director, Watergate & Burke Allergy & Asthma Centers

Past President of the Greater Washington Asthma,

Allergy and Immunology Society

Distinguished Research Scientist, ICISI

Washington, DC

LeRoy M. Graham, MD, FCCP

Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates, PC

Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

Morehouse School of Medicine

Founder and Medical Director

Not One More Life, Inc.

Atlanta, Georgia

Nancy K. Ostrom, MD, CPI

Co-Director

Allergy & Asthma Medical Group & Research

Center, A P.C.

Associate Clinical Professor

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy

and Immunology

University of California, San Diego

San Diego, California

Robert M. Naclerio, MD

Professor and Chief

Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

University of Chicago

Chicago, Illinois

A Complimentary Dinner Will Be Served








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Allergic Rhinitis:

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PM PM

Anaheim Convention Center

Hall C, Product Theater #1

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Corporate Supporters

ACAAI appreciates the following promotional contributions from its corporate supporters.

AstraZeneca

Supporter of two Product Theaters… and smartphone

charging stations.

Boston Scientific Corporation

Supporter of a Product Theater.

CSL Behring

Supporter of a Product Theater.

Genentech, Inc. and

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

Supporter of two tables at the fundraising dinner… a

Product Theater… and the ACAAI member e-newsletter.

GREER

Supporter of Friday’s Fellows-in-Training Welcome

Reception.

ISTA Pharmaceuticals

Supporter of the Board of Regents dinners.

Lincoln Diagnostics, Inc.

Supporter of two tables at the fundraising dinner.

McNeil Consumer Healthcare

Supporter of the Internet Café/Printer Stations.

MEDA PHARMACEUTICALS ®

Supporter of the President’s Private Dinner… Product

Theater… hotel room key… TV clings… convention center

window clings… badge lanyards… and belly wrap on

hotel newspaper.

Merck

Supporter of the ACAAI Awards Ceremony… and Allergy

Watch and its placement on the ACAAI website.

Mylan Specialty L.P.

Supporter of a Product Theater… banner in the convention

hotel… the Airport Shuttle Bus Transportation… Gobo

Lasers… Daily Schedule Board… exhibit aisle markers…

floor clings in the convention center… and the Anaphylaxis

Member Survey.

Sanofi U.S.

Supporter of the FIT Bowl… hotel video and tent card…

and a Non-CME Corporate Forum.

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Supporter of the President’s Private Dinner… Non-CME

Corporate Forum… Women in Medicine Program

FIT Business Meeting… two tables and support of the

fundraising dinner… Preliminary Convention Program

convention center column wraps… hotel plasma

monitors… hotel restaurant and lounge promotion…

Advanced Registrants brochure… Foundation Honor

Board… refreshment breaks… Nasal Allergy Web Journal

Tool… belly wrap on hotel newspaper… and the ACAAI

Member eNewsletter.

Teva Respiratory, LLC

Supporter of the Nationwide Asthma Screening Program

two Non-CME Corporate Forums… three Product Theaters…

one table at the fundraising dinner… electronic signage…

escalator rails… hand sanitizer stations… banners in the

convention center… and the ACAAI printed Member

Newsletter.

Thermo Fisher Scientific

Supporter of two Product Theaters.

ViroPharma Incorporated

Supporter of the Hereditary Angioedema Campaign…

Hereditary Angioedema Roundtable… and the

Allergist Locator.

General Information


Commercial Supporters

This activity is supported by independent educational grants from the following commercial supporters:

Aerocrine

Supporter of the Monday symposium on FeNO: A Paradigm

Shift in Personalized Asthma Management… and in-kind

support consisting of loaned durable equipment and

disposable supplies for Workshop W-11 FeNO and other

Biomarkers.

ALK, Inc.

Supporter of 3 FIT Travel Grants.

Allergan, Inc.

Supporter of the Sunday Breakfast Symposium on Advances

in Ocular Allergy: Differential Diagnoses and Treatment.

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Supporter of the Saturday symposium on Early Diagnosis

and Treatment of Primary Immunodeficiency (PID) in Adults:

Insights for the Practicing Allergist-Immunologist… and a

vodcast of the symposium.

Genentech, Inc. and

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

Supporter of 50 FIT Travel Grants.

GREER

In-kind support consisting of disposable supplies for

Workshop W-13 Allergy Testing – Optimal Choices and

Interpretation.

HollisterStier Allergy

Supporter of 3 FIT Travel Grants… and Workshop W-8 –

JCAAI Presents 2012 Coding Update.

Lincoln Diagnostics, Inc.

In-kind support consisting of disposable supplies for

Workshop W-13 Allergy Testing – Optimal Choices and

Interpretation.

McNeil Consumer Healthcare

Supporter of 20 FIT Travel Grants… and the Monday

breakfast symposium on Management of Allergy with

Non-Prescription Drugs.

MEDA PHARMACEUTICALS ®

Supporter of the Friday breakfast symposium on Allergic

Rhinitis: Optimal Therapeutic Strategies to Improve Patient

Outcomes.

Merck

Supporter of 25 FIT Travel Grants… and Meet the Professor

Breakfasts.

Mylan Specialty L.P.

Supporter of all Plenary Sessions… 35 FIT Travel Grants…

the Friday program on Recommendations for the

Management of Patients with Anaphylaxis: A Consensus

Update… and the Grand Rounds Program.

Olympus Corporation of the Americas

In-kind support consisting of loaned durable equipment for

Workshop W-16 – Hands-On Session in Rhinolaryngoscopy.

Sanofi U.S.

Supporter of the Convention Literature Review… the

Thursday dinner symposium on Debatable Issues Regarding

the Prescription and Administration of an Automatic

Epinephrine Injector for Patients with Anaphylaxis… and

10 FIT Travel Grants.

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Supporter of the Saturday breakfast symposium on Allergic

Rhinitis: Current and Future Therapeutic Options for the

Allergist.

ViroPharma Incorporated

Supporter of the Sunday symposium on Evolving Issues in the

Management of Hereditary Angioedema: Can We Reach a

Consensus


Special Announcements

Admission by Badge Only

Admission to all meeting rooms and the exhibit area is by

badge only. This rule will be strictly enforced by security

guards at all entrances. Note: Children under 12 are not

admitted to the Scientific Sessions or the exhibit area.

Alliance Hospitality Suite

The Alliance Hospitality Suite – located in the Orange County

Ballroom at the Anaheim Marriott Hotel – is open to

registered spouses and guests only from 8:00 – 10:30 am,

Friday through Monday.

Badge Designations

Blue Member Physicians

Purple Non–member Physicians

Green Nurses/Allied Health

Lime Fellows–in–Training/Residents

Orange Non Physicians

Red Technical Exhibitors

Teal Spouses/Guests

Lt Orange Press

Fuchsia Staff

Replacement badges – $. each

Child Care Services

Please contact the concierge at the hotel at which you are

staying for a list of bonded independent babysitters and

babysitting agencies. Note: Children under 12 are not

admitted to the Scientific Sessions or the exhibit area.

Coat & Luggage Check

A coat and luggage check is located in Hall C Lobby on the

1st floor of the Anaheim Convention Center. The cost is $2.00

per item.

Hours:

Corporate Forums

7:30 am – 6:00 pm, Sunday

7:30 am – 6:00 pm, Monday

8:00 am – 11:30 am, Tuesday

NOT FOR

CREDIT

Following the close of Friday’s scientific session, all registrants

are invited to attend the special Corporate Forums at the

Hilton Anaheim Hotel.

Corporate Forums are promotional dinner symposia

organized by industry and designed to enhance your

educational experience.

The Evolving Science of Aerosol Therapy

in Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis

6:00 – 7:30 pm California Pavilion Salons AB

Supported by Teva Respiratory, LLC

Anaphylaxis in Community Settings:

New Treatment Option

6:00 – 7:30 pm California Pavilion Salon C

Supported by Sanofi U.S.

ZETONNA® (ciclesonide) Nasal Aerosol: A Dry Alternative

For The Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis

8:30-10:00 pm California Pavilion Salon D

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Innovations in the Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis

9:00 – 11:00 pm California Pavilion Salons AB

Supported by Teva Respiratory, LLC

Disclaimer

The primary purpose of the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting is

educational. Information, as well as technologies, products

and/or services discussed, are intended to inform participants

about the knowledge, techniques and experiences of specialists

who are willing to share such information with colleagues. A

diversity of professional opinions exists in the specialty and the

views of the ACAAI disclaim any and all liability for damages to

any individual attending this conference and for all claims which

may result from the use of information, technologies, products

and/or services discussed at the conference.

Doctors’ Job Fair

Looking for new opportunities, an associate for your group,

or a buyer for your practice The Doctors’ Job Fair brings

together all interested parties seeking or offering

professional opportunities.

This unique program is scheduled from Noon – 3:00 pm,

Sunday, in Hall C on the 1st floor of the Anaheim Convention

Center. Representatives of clinics, groups and physicians’

offices looking for associates, will be among those

conducting interviews, which will be held in private,

draped booths.

DVD-ROM

Selected sessions from the Plenaries, Symposia, Literature

Review and International Food Allergy Conference will be

placed on an interactive DVD. Visit the Conference Recordings

sales desk located on the 3rd floor outside Ballroom B-E of the

Anaheim Convention Center to learn more about this exciting

opportunity and order your copy at the special on-site

discounted rate. (Sorry, no personal audio or video recorders will

be allowed in the meeting rooms.)

Exhibit Hall

More than 80 technical and scientific exhibitors in 165

booths are displaying their latest products in Hall C on the

1st floor of the Anaheim Convention Center during the

convention. ACAAI appreciates the support of its exhibitors

and urges all registrants to visit the displays.

Exhibit hours are:

9:45 am – 4:00 pm, Saturday

9:45 am – 4:00 pm, Sunday

9:45 am – 1:30 pm, Monday


General Information


Special Announcements

First Aid Station

A First Aid Station is located in the Main Lobby between Halls

A & B of the Anaheim Convention Center during the

following hours:

7:00 am – 5:00 pm, Thursday

6:00 am – 6:00 pm, Friday

7:00 am – 5:30 pm, Saturday

7:00 am – 5:30 pm, Sunday

7:00 am – 11:00 pm, Monday

7:00 am – 11:00 am, Tuesday

Foundation Display

The Foundation of the ACAAI is proud to recognize those

individuals who have generously contributed to the

Foundation. A list of donors can be found on the Foundation

Honor Display located on the 3rd floor outside Ballroom B-E

of the Anaheim Convention Center.

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Internet Café

Visit the “Internet Café” to surf the internet and send and

retrieve email. The Internet Café is located on the 2nd level of

the Anaheim Convention Center and is complimentary to all

meeting registrants from Thursday to Tuesday.

Supported by McNeil Consumer Healthcare

Networking Goes Viral

with #ACAAI

Whether you’re sharing valuable insights from keynote

presentations or interacting with meeting attendees, don’t

miss the conversation taking place on Twitter! Use the

hashtag #ACAAI in your meeting-related tweets. This will

store a backlog of meeting news from ACAAI, members,

media and industry professionals. Be sure to follow @eACAAI

for professionals and @ACAAI for the public. The College will

also be posting meeting news on its Facebook page. Feel free

to “share” these posts with your followers.

Photography/Video Recordings

By registering for this meeting, attendees acknowledge and

agree that ACAAI or its agents may take photographs during

events and may freely use those photographs in any media

for ACAAI purposes, including but not limited to news and

promotional purposes.

The presentations, slides, and materials provided in this

program are the property of ACAAI or used by permission. You

may not photograph, videotape, audiotape or otherwise record

or reproduce any of the presentations without express written

permission from ACAAI. Any attendee believed to be violating

this restriction will be removed from the session and may be

prohibited from participating in further ACAAI meetings.

Poster Presentations

Scientific Posters #P1 – P352 will be on display in Hall C on

the 1st floor of the Anaheim Convention Center beginning

Saturday morning. Authors are requested to be at their

poster to discuss their work from 12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday

and noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday.

President’s Welcome Reception &

Awards Ceremony

The College invites all registrants to attend this event on

Saturday from 7:30 – 9:00 pm in the Marquis Ballroom at the

Anaheim Marriott Hotel. There will be drinks and light

appetizers, followed by a short program where we will honor

our new Fellows for their accomplishments and recognize

the recipients of the Distinguished Fellow, International

Distinguished Fellow, Distinguished Service, Woman in

Allergy, Young Faculty Support and the von Pirquet Awards.

Finally, we will introduce this year’s winner of the prestigious

Gold Headed Cane Award, Rufus E. Lee, Jr., MD, FACAAI,

and invite him on stage to accept the award and address

the audience.

Plan to join us for this fun-filled event.

Supported in part by Merck

This Conference is Paper-Lite

In an effort to be

environmentally responsible,

ACAAI is reducing the amount of paper we use at our

annual meeting. Electronic program materials and online

materials will replace paper and will be accessible online

before, during and after the program.

Visit acaai.conferencespot.com or snap the QR

code for a menu of online materials.


ONLINE

MATERIALS


Special Announcements

Press Room

The Press Room, located in Room 304B at the Anaheim

Convention Center, is open from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm, Friday

through Monday for representatives of the general and

scientific media.

Registration Desk Hours

The Registration Desk is located in Hall C lobby on the 1st floor

of the Anaheim Convention Center and will be open:

7:00 am – 6:00 pm, Thursday

6:00 am – 6:00 pm, Friday

6:00 am – 4:00 pm, Saturday

6:30 am – 4:00 pm, Sunday

6:30 am – 4:00 pm, Monday

7:00 am – 11:00 am, Tuesday

Speaker Ready Room

The Speaker Ready Room is located in Room 304A at the

Anaheim Convention Center and will be open:

3:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Wednesday

7:00 am – 7:00 pm, Thursday

6:00 am – 7:00 pm, Friday

6:00 am – 6:00 pm, Saturday

6:00 am – 6:00 pm, Sunday

6:00 am – 6:00 pm, Monday

7:00 am – 11:00 am, Tuesday

Wireless Internet

The Anaheim Convention Center has complimentary

wireless internet.

General Information

Y Young Physicians – sessions that may be of

special interest to young physicians are

identified throughout the program.

Online Evaluation, Credit Claim and Certificate System

ACAAI will utilize a convenient online evaluation, credit

claim and certificate system for the 2012 Annual Scientific

Meeting. This system will allow you to complete

evaluations of the certified CME sessions that you attend

which are directly sponsored by ACAAI. Upon completion

of the Overall Evaluation, Session Evaluations and credit

claiming information, you will be able to immediately

access, save and/or print your certificate. Physicians will

receive a certificate of credit and other healthcare

professionals will receive a certificate of attendance.

Locations to access the evaluations, claim credit, and

obtain certificates:

• Kiosks (2nd level of the Anaheim Convention Center)

• Other available internet sources onsite

• Office or home computers (recommended)

Online access: http://www.pswebsurvey.com/ACAAI

You will be asked to enter your Last Name and ID Number

in order to complete the evaluations. Your ID Number is

located on your Registration Card and Badge.

We encourage you to complete the appropriate

evaluations, claim your credit, and obtain your certificates

as soon as possible either onsite or following the meeting.

A checklist will be provided to help you track the sessions

you attend. The Evaluation site will close on December ,

. Up until then, you will be able to complete the

evaluations, claim credit and obtain your certificates from

your home or office computers.

For sessions attended, nurses and other healthcare

professionals may receive a certificate of attendance via

the online system. However, nurses may also use the online

system this year to obtain a CBRN certificate for the Allied

Health and Advanced Practice sessions.

Attendees of a jointly sponsored activity will need to

complete the paper forms that will be available at that

session in order to obtain credit. These must be returned to

the coordinator onsite.

Visit www.acaai.org for additional information.


The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

2012 Annual Scientific Meeting

Please Join Us for Two

Product Theater Presentations

Saturday, November 10, 2012

10:35 AM – 11:00 AM

Advances in Exercise-

Induced Bronchospasm:

Therapeutic Considerations

Anaheim Convention Center

Hall C, Product Theater #1

Anaheim, California

William W. Storms, MD

USOC Sports Medicine Advisory Committee

USA Swimming Sports Medicine Committee

The William Storms Allergy Clinic

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Sunday, November 11, 2012

10:05 AM – 10:30 AM

The Value of Targeting the

Small Airways in Asthma

Anaheim Convention Center

Hall C, Product Theater #1

Anaheim, California

Phil Lieberman, MD

Clinical Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics

University of Tennessee College of Medicine

Memphis, Tennessee















Sponsored by

Complimentary Refreshments Will Be Served

TEVA 2012 November 2012 122404


Supported in part by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Education Information

This activity is supported by independent educational

grants from:

• Aerocrine

• ALK, Inc.

• Allergan, Inc.

• Baxter Healthcare Corporation

• Genentech, Inc. and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

• HollisterStier Allergy

• McNeil Consumer Healthcare

• MEDA PHARMACEUTICALS®

• Merck

• Mylan Specialty L.P.

• Sanofi U.S.

• Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

• ViroPharma Incorporated

This activity is also supported by Aerocrine, GREER, Lincoln

Diagnostics, Inc. and Olympus Corporation of the Americas

through independent educational grants consisting of loaned

durable equipment and disposable supplies.

Target Audience

• All practicing allergists/immunologists

• Fellows in allergy/immunology training programs

• Primary care physicians who care for allergy patients

• Allied health professionals in the field of allergy and

immunology

• Recognize emerging trends in the prevalence of allergic

and immunologic disorders and discuss their impact on

public health

• Evaluate the impact of new diagnostic and therapeutic

strategies on healthcare costs and outcomes

• Discuss processes, tools and technologies for the efficient

allergy and immunology practice

Accreditation

The American College of Allergy, Asthma &

Immunology (ACAAI) is accredited by the

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical

Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education

for physicians.

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

(ACAAI) designates this live activity for a maximum of

AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only

the credit commensurate with the extent of their

participation in the activity.

This continuing medical education activity has been

reviewed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and is

acceptable for a maximum of AAP credits. These credits

can be applied toward the AAP CME/CPD Award available to

Fellows and Candidate Members of the American Academy

of Pediatrics.

Overall Educational Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be

able to:

• Identify major advances in key areas of cutting-edge

research in immunologic mechanisms and allergic

responses including anaphylaxis and pathophysiology of

the upper airways, lungs, eyes, skin, and gastrointestinal

tract

• Demonstrate knowledge of basic processes linking

molecular and cellular biology and genetics with allergic

pathophysiology and immunodeficiency

• Translate emerging clinical science principles to clinical

practice in patients with allergic and immunologic

disorders

• Evaluate and implement state-of-the-art diagnostic and

therapeutic strategies for treating patients with allergic

and immunologic diseases

• Explain the impact of environmental exposures and

external influences on patients with allergic disorders

Online Evaluation, Credit Claim and

Certificate System

ACAAI will utilize a convenient online evaluation, credit

claim and certificate system for the 2012 Annual

Scientific Meeting. This system will allow you to complete

evaluations of the certified CME sessions that you attend

which are directly sponsored by ACAAI. Upon completion

of the Overall Evaluation, Session Evaluations and credit

claiming information you will be able to immediately

access, save and/or print your certificate. Physicians will

receive a certificate of credit and other healthcare

professionals will receive a certificate of attendance for

most sessions.

See page 13 for details.


Maintenance of Certification

Through its responsibility to provide quality CME to its membership, the ACAAI continues its support of the ABAI, which

credentials and evaluates allergy and immunology specialists. Since 1977, ABAI has offered its Diplomates a recertification

process to demonstrate their efforts in continuing education. In 2009, ABAI transitioned to the more comprehensive

Maintenance of Certification (ABMS MOC © ) program.

Linking the education content of the ACAAI Annual Meetings to the MOC © program is one way ACAAI helps its members

provide ABAI with evidence of their commitment to lifelong learning. Ultimately, CME activities for which MOC © credit is

awarded may be cross-referenced to the ABAI examination content outline, available on the ABAI website: www.abai.org.

Members are encouraged to select areas of interest from the program, which will enhance their knowledge of state-of-the-art

allergy/immunology and improve the quality of patient care.

The ACAAI will assist Allergy/Immunology Training Programs with additional curricular resources and assessment measures

that may be used to help meet their requirements for assessing competency in the six core areas as designed by the ACGME.

The six core competencies include:

General Information




Patient Care – the ability to provide patient care that is

compassionate, appropriate, and effective for the treatment

of health problems and the promotion of health:

• data gathering

• history taking

• patient examination

• diagnosis

• interpretation/decision-making/assessment

• management/treatment plans

• preventive care

• procedures

Medical Knowledge – the knowledge about

established and evolving biomedical, clinical, and

cognate sciences and the application of this knowledge

to patient care:

• general principles/concepts/theories

• applied basic sciences

• applied biomedical sciences

• applied clinical knowledge

• epidemiology and psychosocial behavioral sciences

• population-based medicine

Practice-based Learning and Improvement – the

ability to investigate and evaluate patient care practices,

appraise and assimilate scientific evidence, and improve

their patient care practices:

• benchmarks/best practices

• practice related quality improvement

• evidence-based practice/medicine

• continuing professional development/continuing

medical education

• practice self-assessment

• information technology/medical informatics

• teaching and learning and life-long learning




Interpersonal and Communication Skills – the

ability to demonstrate interpersonal and communication

skills that result in effective information exchange and

collaboration with patients, their families, and other

health professionals:

• teaming and team leadership skills (inter-professional,

multi-disciplinary)

• effective communicator and listener

• caring, respectful behavior

• written and verbal communication skills

• educating/counseling patients and family members

• teaching skills

Professionalism – reflects a commitment to carrying

out professional responsibilities, adherence to ethical

principles, and sensitivity to a diverse patient population:

• physician accountability

• humanistic qualities (respect, compassion, integrity)

• professional ethics

• socio-cultural factors (sensitivity to culture, diversity,

gender, age, disabilities)

• advocacy for and responsive to patient needs

• commitment to excellence and quality care

• mentorship and role-modeling

System-based Practice – an awareness of and

responsiveness to the larger context and system of

healthcare, and the ability to call effectively on other

resources in the system to provide optimal health care:

• patient safety

• cost-effective care

• management of resources

• medical errors

• continuity of care

• healthcare delivery and systems of care models

• utilization issues

• risk management

• electronic record keeping

• management and leadership skills


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Thursday, November 8th

7:00 am – 6:00 pm Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C Lobby (1st Flr)

7:00 am – 7:00 pm Speaker Ready Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304A

7:30 am – 5:00 pm Board of Regents Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1-3 (Marriott)

8:00 – 10:00 am International Food Allergy Conference: Navigating Eosinophilic

Gastrointestinal Disorders: The Allergist at the Helm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

10:00 – 10:15 am International Food Allergy Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A Foyer (3rd Flr)

10:15 am – 12:15 pm International Food Allergy Conference: Getting Comfortable With

Off-the-Beaten-Track Food Allergies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

Noon – 1:00 pm Board of Regents Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 7 (Marriott)

12:15 – 1:15 pm International Food Allergy Lunch Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On Own

1:15 – 3:00 pm International Food Allergy Conference: Expanding Our Diagnosis and

Management Armamentarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

3:00 – 3:15 pm International Food Allergy Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A Foyer (3rd Flr)

3:15 – 5:00 pm International Food Allergy Conference: The Allergist Among the Colleagues . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

6:15 – 8:15 pm Dinner Symposium: Debatable Issues Regarding the Prescription and

Administration of an Automatic Epinephrine Injector for Patients

With Anaphylaxis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 1-6 (Marriott)

Friday, November 9th

6:00 am – 6:00 pm Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C Lobby (1st Flr)

6:00 am – 7:00 pm Speaker Ready Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304A

7:00 – 8:00 am Alliance Executive Committee Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1 (Marriott)

7:45 – 11:30 am Literature Review – Part I Morning Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

8:00 – 10:30 am Alliance Hospitality Suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:00 am – 12:30 pm Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E (Marriott)

8:00 am – 3:00 pm W-1 A Practical Approach to Aeroallergen Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212AB

8:30 – 9:30 am Alliance: The History of Anaheim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:30 – 10:30 am Breakfast Symposium: Allergic Rhinitis: Optimal Therapeutic Strategies

to Improve Patient Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 1-6 (Marriott)

8:30 am – 4:00 pm Press Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304B

9:45 – 10:00 am Literature Review Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A Foyer (3rd Flr)

9:45 – 10:00 am Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course Refreshment Break

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E Foyer (Marriott)

11:00 am – 1:00 pm FIT Bowl Planning Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208B

11:30 am – 1:00 pm Literature Review Lunch Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On Own

11:30 am – 1:30 pm Luncheon Program: Recommendations for the Management of

Patients With Anaphylaxis: A Consensus Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 1-6 (Marriott)

12:30 – 1:30 pm Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course Lunch Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On Own

1:00 – 3:45 pm Literature Review – Part II Afternoon Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

1:30 – 3:00 pm Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Workshops

AP1 Pulmonary Function Testing for Advanced Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E (Marriott)

AP2 Eosinophilic Esophagitis, GER, FPIES: Belly Pain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom AB (Marriott)

AP3 Pharmacology for Advanced Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom CD (Marriott)

1:45 – 2:45 pm AACA Board of Directors Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1 (Marriott)


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Friday, November 9th (continued)

2:30 – 2:45 pm Literature Review Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A Foyer (3rd Flr)

3:00 – 3:15 pm Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course Refreshment Break

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E Foyer (Marriott)

3:15 – 4:45 pm Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Workshops

AP4 Pulmonary Function Testing for Advanced Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E (Marriott)

AP5 Eosinophilic Esophagitis, GER, FPIES: Belly Pain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom AB (Marriott)

AP6 Pharmacology for Advanced Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom CD (Marriott)

3:30 – 5:30 pm Workshops

W-2 Drug Allergies / Eruptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209AB

W-3 Chronic Cough: Pediatrics & Adult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210AB

W-4 Insect Allergy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213AB

W-5 Skin Biopsy for the Allergist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210C

3:30 – 5:30 pm FIT Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304CD

3:45 – 4:00 pm Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E Foyer (3rd Flr)

4:00 – 6:00 pm House of Delegates Meeting and Town Hall Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303AB

4:00 – 6:00 pm Alliance Pre-Board Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 2 & 3 (Marriott)

5:30 – 6:30 pm FIT Business Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304CD

6:00 – 7:30 pm Non-CME Corporate Forum: Teva Respiratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .California Pavilion AB (Hilton)

6:00 – 7:30 pm Non-CME Corporate Forum: Sanofi U.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .California Pavilion C (Hilton)

6:00 – 9:00 pm American Association of Allergists & Immunologists of Indian Origin . . . . . .Grand Ballroom F (Marriott)

6:30 – 7:30 pm Fellows-in-Training Welcome Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:30 – 10:00 pm Non-CME Corporate Forum: Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .California Pavilion D (Hilton)

9:00 – 11:00 pm Non-CME Corporate Forum: Teva Respiratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .California Pavilion AB (Hilton)

Daily Events

Saturday, November 10th

6:00 – 7:30 am Breakfast Symposium: Allergic Rhinitis: Current and Future

Therapeutic Options for the Allergist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 5-6 (Marriott)

6:00 am – 4:00 pm Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C Lobby (1st Flr)

6:00 am – 6:00 pm Speaker Ready Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304A

6:30 – 7:30 am Committee Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E (Marriott)

Adverse Reactions to Foods

Asthma & Respiratory Disease

Dermatological Allergy

Managed Care & Health Plans

Medical Informatics

Public Education & Outreach

6:30 – 7:30 am Immunotherapy & Diagnostics Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 4 (Marriott)

6:30 – 7:30 am Joint RADAR Task Force – Session 1 – Advocacy – Influencing Legislators

(By Invitation Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 3 (Marriott)

7:30 – 11:00 am Consortium on Children's Asthma Camps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1 & 2 (Marriott)

7:45 – 8:10 am Opening Ceremony and Welcome Announcements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

8:00 – 10:30 am Alliance Hospitality Suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:00 am – noon Allied Health Professionals Course: Interactive Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Saturday, November 10th (continued)

8:1010:30 am Plenary Session: Managing Asthma Patients in the 21st Century . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

8:30 – 9:30 am Alliance: Artistic Anaheim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:30 am – 4:00 pm Press Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304B

9:00 – 10:30 am Joint Task Force for Healthcare Reform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208A

9:30 – 10:30 am ACAAI KIDS: Learn to Draw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

9:45 – 10:00 am Allied Health Professionals Course Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

9:45 am – 4:00 pm Exhibit Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

9:45 am – 4:00 pm Poster Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:00 am – noon W-6 Creating a Website for Your Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

10:30 – 11:00 am Refreshment Break / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:35 – 11:00 am Product Theater 1: Teva Respiratory, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:35 – 11:00 am Product Theater 2: CSL Behring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

11:00 am – 12:30 pm Plenary Session: When Shortness of Breath Is Not Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

Noon – 2:00 pm Allied Health Professionals Course Lunch Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .On Own

12:20 – 1:15 pm Allergy / Immunology Program Directors Luncheon Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

12:30 – 1:30 pm Lunch / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

12:30 – 1:30 pm Poster Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

12:35 – 1:30 pm Product Theater 1: Teva Respiratory, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

12:35 – 1:30 pm Product Theater 2: MEDA PHARMACEUTICALS® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

1:00 – 3:00 pm W-7 Preparing Your Practice for an EHR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

1:30 – 2:30 pm ACAAI Foundation Board Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208A

1:30 – 3:00 pm Plenary Session: The Great Anaphylaxis Raft Debate: Which Is the Most

Important Mediator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

2:00 – 3:15 pm Allied Health Professionals Workshops

SA1 Hands-on Basic Spirometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom AB (Marriott)

SA2 Advanced PFT: What to Order and How to Interpret . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom CD (Marriott)

SA3 Obstructive Sleep Apnea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom GH (Marriott)

SA4 Competency and Procedural Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom JK (Marriott)

SA5 Allergen Extracts: Evidence-based Vaccines . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom 1 & 2 (Marriott)

SA6 Pharmacology in Allergy and Asthma: Update and

Patient / Family Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom 3 & 4 (Marriott)

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

3:05 – 3:30 pm Product Theater 2: AstraZeneca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

3:15 – 3:30 pm Allied Health Professionals Course Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom Foyer (Marriott)

3:30 – 4:45 pm Allied Health Professionals Workshops

SA7 Hands-on Basic Spirometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom AB (Marriott)

SA8 Advanced PFT: What to Order and How to Interpret . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom CD (Marriott)

SA9 Obstructive Sleep Apnea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom GH (Marriott)

SA10 Competency and Procedural Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom JK (Marriott)

SA11 Allergen Extracts: Evidence-based Vaccines . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom 1 & 2 (Marriott)

SA12 Pharmacology in Allergy and Asthma: Update and

Patient / Family Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom 3 & 4 (Marriott)


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Saturday, November 10th (continued)

3:30 – 5:00 pm Investments Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208A

3:30 – 5:30 pm Annals Editorial Board Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208B

3:30 – 5:30 pm Symposium: Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Immunodeficiency (PID)

in Adults: Insights for the Practicing Allergist-Immunologist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

3:30 – 5:30 pm Workshops

W-8 JCAAI Presents 2012 Coding Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209AB

W-9 Patch Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210AB

W-10 Hot Topics in Pediatric Allergy (SOAI-AAP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210C

W-11 FeNO and Other Biomarkers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210D

W-12 Dermatology Dilemmas: Fascinating Cases to Learn From . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

W-13 Allergy Testing – Optimal Choices and Interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213AB

W-14 Introductory Course in Rhinolaryngoscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213CD

W-15 Anaphylaxis Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303AB

5:00 – 7:00 pm 21st Annual FIT Bowl Competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom EF (Marriott)

6:00 – 7:00 pm Alliance International Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 1-2 (Marriott)

7:30 – 9:00 pm ACAAI President's Welcome Reception and Awards Ceremony . . . . . . . . . . . .Marquis Ballroom (Marriott)

Daily Events

Sunday, November 11th

6:00 am – 6:00 pm Speaker Ready Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304A

6:15 – 8:15 am Breakfast Symposium: Advances in Ocular Allergy:

Differential Diagnoses and Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 5-6 (Marriott)

6:30 – 8:15 am Committee Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E (Marriott)

Drugs & Anaphylaxis

Geriatrics

Integrative Medicine

Ocular Allergy

Pediatrics

Rhinitis / Sinusitis

Sports Medicine

Women's Health

6:30 – 8:30 am W-16 Hands-on Session in Rhinolaryngoscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212AB

6:30 am – 4:00 pm Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C Lobby (1st Flr)

7:00 – 8:15 am Meet the Professor Breakfasts

S1 What Is the Current Status of SLIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom AB (Marriott)

S2 Management of Immunodeficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom CD (Marriott)

S3 Assessment of Airway Reactivity: Mannitol vs. Methacholine . . . . .Grand Ballroom GH (Marriott)

S4 Cough in Children and Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom JK (Marriott)

S5 Chronic Rhinosinusitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 1 (Marriott)

S6 Office Evaluation of Drug Allergy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 2 (Marriott)

S7 Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 3 (Marriott)

S8 All That Wheezes Is Not Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 4 (Marriott)

S9 Implications of Local Allergic Responses: Entopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 8 (Marriott)

S10 Food Allergy: Controversies in Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 9 (Marriott)


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Sunday, November 11th (continued)

7:30 am – noon JCAAI Board of Directors Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1 & 2 (Marriott)

8:00 – 9:30 am Exhibitors Advisory Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208B

8:00 – 9:45 am W-17 Meaningful Use of EHRs and the Health Information Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

8:00 – 10:30 am Alliance Hospitality Suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:00 am – noon Allied Health Professionals Course: Interactive Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

8:30 – 9:30 am Alliance: Making a Difference, One Bowl of Pasta at a Time . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:30 – 10:00 am Plenary Session: Developing Competence in Contact Dermatitis

Diagnosis and Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

8:30 am – 4:00 pm Press Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304B

9:30 – 10:30 am ACAAI KIDS: Anaheim History for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

9:40 – 10:00 am Allied Health Professionals Course Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

9:45 am – 4:00 pm Exhibit Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

9:45 am – 4:00 pm Poster Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:00 – 10:30 am Refreshment Break / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:00 am – noon W-18 Marketing Your Practice Online: Beyond the Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

10:05 – 10:30 am Product Theater 1: Teva Respiratory, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:05 – 10:30 am Product Theater 2: AstraZeneca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:30 am – noon Plenary Session: Disturbed Sleep Syndromes: More Than Snoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

Noon – 1:00 pm Lunch / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

Noon – 1:00 pm Poster Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

Noon – 1:30 pm 2013 Annual Meeting Program Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

Noon – 1:30 pm Meet the Professor Breakfasts Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

Noon – 1:30 pm Symposium Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

Noon – 1:30 pm Workshop Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

Noon – 2:00 pm Past Presidents' Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208B

Noon – 3:00 pm Doctors' Job Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

12:05 – 1:00 pm Product Theater 1: Mylan Specialty L.P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

12:05 – 1:00 pm Product Theater 2: Genentech, Inc. and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

12:30 – 3:00 pm Alliance Annual Business Meeting and Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Off-Site

1:00 – 2:00 pm SETTaF-Specific IgE Testing Task Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208A

1:00 – 3:00 pm W-19 Implementing an EHR Successfully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

1:00 – 3:00 pm W-20 RADAR Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213AB

1:00 – 3:00 pm WAO Symposium: Current Insights on Eosinophilic Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

1:00 – 3:00 pm Concurrent Session A: Adverse Food and Drug Reactions, Insect Reactions,

Anaphylaxis and Food Allergy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

Concurrent Session B: Asthma, Other Lower Airway Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303AB

Concurrent Session C: Aerobiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303CD

Concurrent Session D: Basic Science Allergy & Immunology and Rhinitis,

Other Upper Airway Disorders, and Ocular Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304CD

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

3:05 – 3:30 pm Product Theater 1: Boston Scientific Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

3:05 – 3:30 pm Product Theater 2: Thermo Fisher Scientific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Sunday, November 11th (continued)

3:30 – 5:30 pm Symposium: Evolving Issues in the Management of Hereditary Angioedema:

Can We Reach a Consensus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

3:30 – 5:30 pm Workshops

W-21 Food Allergy: What's New! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209AB

W-22 Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210AB

W-23 Anaphylaxis: Ready to Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210C

W-24 JCAAI 2012 Reimbursement and Regulatory Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210D

W-25 Occupational Asthma and Dermatitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

W-26 Statistics Simplified for Clinicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212AB

W-27 Chronic Hypertrophic Sinusitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213AB

W-28 Molecular Biology of Allergens: Towards More Accurate Diagnosis and Treatment . . . . . . .213CD

W-29 Immunotherapy Beyond Traditional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304CD

7:00 – 8:00 pm Fundraiser Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Marquis Ballroom Foyer (Marriott)

8:00 – 10:30 pm Fundraiser Dinner & Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Marquis Ballroom (Marriott)

Daily Events

Monday, November 12th

6:00 am – 6:00 pm Speaker Ready Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304A

6:15 – 8:15 am Breakfast Symposium: Management of Allergy With

Non-Prescription Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 5-6 (Marriott)

6:30 am – 4:00 pm Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C Lobby (1st Flr)

6:30 – 8:15 am International Committee) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1 & 2 (Marriott)

7:00 – 8:00 am Joint RADAR Task Force – Session II – Advocacy – Influencing Payers

(By Invitation Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 10 (Marriott)

7:00 – 8:15 am Meet the Professor Breakfasts

M1 How to Use Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Treatment of Asthma . . .Grand Ballroom AB (Marriott)

M2 Evaluation of Immunodeficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom CD (Marriott)

M3 Occupational Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom GH (Marriott)

M4 Indoor Allergens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom JK (Marriott)

M5 Dermatology for the Allergist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 1 (Marriott)

M6 HAE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 2 (Marriott)

M7 Severe Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 3 (Marriott)

M8 Dynamic Dosing in Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 4 (Marriott)

M9 Diagnostic Assessment of Airway Inflammatory Patterns . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 8 (Marriott)

M10 Food Allergy: Controversies in Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 9 (Marriott)

8:00 – 9:45 am W-30 EHR Roundtable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213CD

8:00 – 10:30 am Alliance Hospitality Suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Orange County Ballroom (Marriott)

8:30 – 10:00 am Plenary Session: Are There Differences in Urticaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

8:30 am – 4:00 pm Press Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304B

9:45 am – 1:30 pm Exhibit Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:00 – 10:30 am Refreshment Break / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:00 am – noon Continuing Medical Education / Continuing Professional Development Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

10:00 am – noon W-31 Computerizing the Mixing Lab and Injection Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB


Daily Events

HOURS

All programs held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted

ROOM

Monday, November 12th (continued)

10:05 – 10:30 am Product Theater 2: Thermo Fisher Scientific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

10:30 am – noon Plenary Session: Maintenance of Certification and the Allergist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

10:30 am – noon Alliance Post-Board Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elite Ballroom 1 & 2 (Marriott)

Noon – 1:00 pm Lunch / Visit Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C (1st Flr)

Noon – 1:00 pm Women in Medicine Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Ballroom E (Marriott)

1:00 – 3:00 pm Concurrent Session A: Clinical Immunology, Immunodeficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

Concurrent Session B: Food Allergy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom A (3rd Flr)

Concurrent Session C: Allergy Testing, Clinical Laboratory Immunology,

Immunotherapy/Immunizations and Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303AB

Concurrent Session D: Pharmacology / Pharmacotherapeutics and Skin Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303CD

1:30 – 2:30 pm Communications Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208A

1:30 – 2:30 pm Professional Education Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208B

1:30 – 2:30 pm Scientific Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207C

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E Foyer (3rd Flr)

3:30 – 5:30 pm Symposium: FeNO: A Paradigm Shift in Personalized Asthma Management . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

3:30 – 5:30 pm Workshops

W-32 Severe Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209AB

W-33 Everything You Thought Was Atopic Dermatitis That Wasn't . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210AB

W-34 Immunotherapy: How to Write the Prescription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210C

W-35 Practical Ocular Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210D

W-36 Basics of a Home Environment Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211AB

W-37 Urticaria and Angioedema: Something Old, Something New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212AB

W-38 Immunodeficiency and State Screens: Role of the Allergist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213AB

Tuesday, November 13th

7:00 – 7:30 am Past Presidents' Breakfast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 5-6 (Marriott)

7:00 – 11:00 am Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hall C Lobby (1st Flr)

7:00 – 11:00 am Speaker Ready Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304A

7:30 – 8:45 am Annual Business Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Platinum Ballroom 5-6 (Marriott)

9:00 – 9:30 am Plenary Session: Bela Schick Lecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)

9:30 – 11:00 am Plenary Session: Integrative Medicine for the Allergist-Immunologist . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ballroom B-E (3rd Flr)


Committee Meetings

Complimentary continental breakfasts will be served at the committee meetings listed below.

Saturday, November 10

Grand Ballroom E

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

6:30 – 7:30 am

Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee

Asthma & Respiratory Disease Committee

Dermatological Allergy Committee

Managed Care & Health Plans Committee

Medical Informatics Committee

Public Education & Outreach Committee

Sunday, November 11

Grand Ballroom E

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

6:30 – 8:15 am

Drugs and Anaphylaxis Committee

Geriatrics Committee

Integrative Medicine Committee

Ocular Allergy Committee

Pediatrics Committee

Rhinitis/Sinusitis Committee

Sports Medicine Committee

Women’s Health Committee

Friday, November 9

FIT Bowl Planning Committee

11:00 am – 1:00 pm Room 208B

Saturday, November 10

Immunotherapy &

Diagnostics Committee

6:30 – 7:30 am Platinum Ballroom 4

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Consortium on Children’s

Asthma Camps

7:30 –11:00 am Elite Ballroom 1& 2

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Joint Task Force for

Healthcare Reform

9:00 – 10:30 am Room 208A

Allergy/Immunology Program

Directors Luncheon Meeting

12:20 – 1:15 pm Room 207C

ACAAI Foundation Board

1:30 – 2:30 pm Room 208A

Investments Committee

3:30 – 5:00 pm Room 208A

Annals Editorial Board

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 208B

Other Committee Meetings

All committee meetings will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center unless otherwise noted.

Sunday, November 11

Exhibitors Advisory Meeting

8:00 – 9:30 am Room 208B

Annual Meeting Program

Committee

Noon – 1:30 pm

Room 207C

Meet the Professor

Breakfasts Committee

Noon – 1:30 pm

Room 207C

Symposium Committee

Noon – 1:30 pm

Room 207C

Workshop Committee

Noon – 1:30 pm

Room 207C

Past Presidents’ Council

Noon – 2:00 pm

Room 208B

SETTaF – Specific IgE Testing

Task Force

1:00 – 2:00 pm Room 208A

Monday, November 12

International Committee

6:30 – 8:15 am Elite Ballroom 1 & 2

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Continuing Medical Education/

Continuing Professional

Development Committee

10:00 am – noon Room 207C

Communications Council

1:30 – 2:30 pm Room 208A

Professional Education Council

1:30 – 2:30 pm Room 208B

Scientific Council

1:30 – 2:30 pm Room 207C

Committee Meetings


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Friday

W- A Practical Approach to

Aeroallergen Identification

Y

8:00 am – 3:00 pm Room 212AB

Fee: $100 (FITs $50) Lunch on your own.

Estelle Levetin, PhD and Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) set up a sampling station to collect airborne pollen and fungal

spores; 2) recognize the most common types of pollen and fungal

spores found in the atmosphere; 3) list pollen characteristics that help

identify specific pollen types; and 4) identify representative pollen

genera or groups.

W- Drug Allergies/Eruptions


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 209AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Aleena Banerji, MD and Stephen A. Tilles, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) summarize the basic mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity;

2) recognize drug eruptions and differentiate from other causes; and

3) prepare a treatment plan to manage drug hypersensitivity and

eruptions more effectively.

The American Board of Allergy & Immunology (ABAI) will grant

MOC Part II credits to Diplomates who complete this workshop

and are currently enrolled in ABAI’s Maintenance of Certification

(MOC) program.

Special note re MOC/CME eligibility for this workshop:

To be eligible for MOC Part II credit, participants must participate in the

entire workshop and complete all necessary components, including:

brief Pre-/Post Surveys and Pre-/Post Tests onsite as well as the

Evaluation online. Additionally, a follow-up Outcomes Assessment

regarding application of this workshop to your practice will be sent

online approximately 6-8 weeks later and must also be promptly

completed and submitted to ACAAI online. ABAI will recognize the

2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits earned as 4 MOC Part II credits after you

submit your ACAAI certificate of credit from the Anaheim meeting to

the ABAI portal and confirmation of eligibility for MOC credit is sent by

ACAAI to ABAI. ABAI will count this activity toward 4 of the 8 selfassessment

credits needed by physicians each year for Part II of MOC.

It is imperative that participants must participate in the entire

workshop and complete all necessary components, as partial

credits will not be permitted for MOC eligibility related to this

MOC/CME workshop.

W- Chronic Cough: Pediatrics & Adult

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Alan B. Goldsobel, MD, FACAAI and Pramod S. Kelkar, MD

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe current cough guidelines and pitfalls in cough management;

2) describe practical and cost-effective ways to manage chronic cough;

3) apply and interpret common tests used to evaluate patients with

chronic cough; 4) describe causes and management of cough; and

5) describe management strategies for habit, unexplained cough.

W- Insect Allergy


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 213AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Theodore M. Freeman, MD, FACAAI and

David F. Graft, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss evaluation and management of stinging insect

hypersensitivity; and 2) discuss key changes from the 2004 to the 2011

practice parameter.

W- Skin Biopsy for the Allergist


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210C

Fee: $100 (FITs $50)

Marcella R. Aquino, FACAAI and

David R. Weldon, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) examine the use of punch biopsies to diagnose cutaneous disease;

2) demonstrate skills needed to perform a punch biopsy with optimal

results; 3) define common terms used in interpretation of biopsy

results; and 4) obtain correct biopsies to enhance diagnostic ability in

deciphering immune-mediated rashes.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Saturday

W- Creating a Website for

Your Practice

Y

10:00 am – noon Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

G. David Hopper, MD and J. Allen Meadows, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss advantages of communicating online and explain how to

avoid potential medical-legal risks of online communication with

patients; 2) describe benefits to an allergy practice of having a dynamic

web site, including e-newsletters; 3) use effective strategies to reduce

non-revenue generating telephone traffic to the office; 4) describe the

basic components and design elements of Web design; and 5) discuss

the practical considerations and legal ramifications of using e-mail to

communicate with patients.

W- Preparing Your Practice for an EHR Y

1:00 – 3:00 pm Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

David D. Tanner, MD, FACAAI and

Richard L. Wasserman, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the options for electronic health records (EHR) in an allergy

practice, including fully integrated software, interfaced software and

application service provider model; 2) list five questions that should be

asked during a site visit of an EHR installation; 3) discuss requirements

to meet Meaningful Use criteria to qualify for federal incentives; and

4) evaluate an EHR for its ablility to record the measures needed to

attest and to report for Meaningful Use.

W- JCAAI Presents Coding

Update

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 209AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Donald W. Aaronson, MD, JD, MPH, FACAAI and

Gary N. Gross, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) implement new CPT coding for ingestion challenges and

venom/drug testing; and 2) discuss physician participation

requirements for vial preparation and skin test reading and

interpretation.

Supported by an independent educational grant from

HollisterStier Allergy

W- Patch Testing


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Marcella R. Aquino, MD, FACAAI and

Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) identify the varied clinical manifestations of contact dermatitis; and

2) describe some practical pearls for diagnosis of contact dermatitis.

W- Hot Topics in Pediatric

Allergy (SOAI-AAP)

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210C

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Chitra Dinakar, MD, FACAAI and Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) review the current literature and discuss recent important

developments in pediatric allergy; 2) apply recent information on the

management of pediatric allergic disorders; 3) review new and current

recommendations for prevention and management of childhood

asthma; and 4) apply new and current diagnostic and therapeutic

options in respiratory allergies.

W- FeNO and Other Biomarkers


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210D

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Peter B. Boggs, MD, FACAAI; Neal Jain, MD, FACAAI and

Myron J. Zitt, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) identify biomarkers currently being utilized and studied in the

clinical management of asthma and other respiratory diseases;

2) identify the biologic origin of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO)

and how its biology helps to define its role in the clinical management

of asthma; 3) discuss monitoring of airway inflammation for improved

asthma control; 4) describe the role of fractional exhaled nitric oxide

(FeNO): a measurement of airway inflammation (“Inflammometry”) in

the diagnosis and management of asthma; 5) describe the ATS

Guidelines on the Interpretation of FeNO in Asthma Care; and 6) apply

the ATS Guideline recommendations to patient care.

This activity is supported by Aerocrine through an

independent educational grant consisting of loaned

durable equipment and disposable supplies.

Workshops







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Saturday (continued)

W- Dermatology Dilemmas:

Fascinating Cases to Learn From

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Kristin M. Leiferman, MD and Javed Sheikh, MD

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss challenging urticaria and dermatologic cases in the allergist’s

office; 2) discuss some distinguishing features of different causes of

eczema; 3) discuss the distinguishing features that are helpful in

diagnosis; and 4) identify different approaches to disease work-up as

well as the related controversies.

W- Allergy Testing: Optimal

Choices and Interpretation

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 213AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Bryan L. Martin, DO, FACAAI and

John J. Oppenheimer, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the current burden of allergic disease and the diagnostic

value of allergy skin testing; 2) identify the factors affecting variability in

skin testing and describe the approval process for an allergy skin test;

3) discuss the most current practice parameters on allergy skin testing

and use currently available data to determine which skin test device is

best for their clinical practice; and 4) better perform, document and

interpret skin testing as well as utilize different forms of skin testing and

various devices that can be employed in prick skin testing.

This activity is supported by GREER and Lincoln

Diagnostics, Inc. through independent educational

grants consisting of disposable supplies.

W- Introductory Course in

Rhinolaryngoscopy

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 213CD

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Seong H. Cho, MD and Jerald W. Koepke, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss the surgical anatomy of the upper airway, including the nasal

cavity, pharynx, and larynx; 2) identify normal and abnormal anatomy,

as well as disease presentations and post-operative changes found with

endoscopic examination of the upper airway; and 3) identify the

indications for, and the use of, the fiberoptic rhinoscope in the

allergist’s office.

W- Anaphylaxis Review


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 303AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

John M. Kelso, MD, FACAAI and

Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the mechanisms and symptoms of anaphylaxis; 2) use

epinephrine appropriately to treat anaphylaxis; 3) prepare the office and

staff for the treatment of anaphylaxis; 4) recognize early anaphylaxis due

to immunotherapy; and 5) initiate appropriate treatment with

epinephrine and other office-based treatment modalities.

Sunday

W- Hands-on Session in

Y

Rhinolaryngoscopy

6:30 – 8:30 am Room 212AB

Fee: $100 (FITs $50) Includes Continental Breakfast.

Jerald W. Koepke, MD, FACAAI; Kevin R. Murphy, MD;

Grant C. Olson, MD, FACAAI; Donald W. Pulver, MD, FACAAI;

Nathan Segall, MD, FACAAI and C. Ross Westley, MD, FACAAI

SOLD OUT

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the major anatomical structures of the nasal, pharyngeal

and glottic areas as visualized during examination with the fiber-optic

rhinolaryngoscope; 2) describe variations of normal seen when

participants examine one another in this hands-on session; and

3) demonstrate the proper handling and initial skills needed to perform

a comprehensive upper airway examination with a fiberoptic

endoscope.

Prerequisite: Introductory Course in Rhinolaryngoscopy (W-14)

This activity is supported by Olympus Corporation of the

Americas through an independent educational grant

consisting of loaned durable equipment.

W- Meaningful Use in EHRs and the

Health Information Exchange


8:00 – 9:45 am Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

G. David Hopper, MD, FACAAI and

A. Sean McKnight, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) define meaningful use; and 2) list the features of an EHR that are

required to meet meaningful use criteria.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Sunday (continued)

W- Marketing Your Practice Online:

Beyond the Basics


10:00 am – noon Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

J. Allen Meadows, MD, FACAAI and Brooks Lape

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe how patients are searching for allergy treatment and

practices online; 2) discuss tactics that are key to increasing online

visibility; 3) describe how to turn website visitors into patients;

4) discuss the impact of website design and content on lead

generation; and 5) implement reputation management through

monitoring and control of online information regarding a practice.

W- Implementing an EHR Successfully Y

1:00 – 3:00 pm Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

David J. Shulan, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss whether they should have computers in their office or rent

space from a remote computer to run their electronic health record

system; 2) describe strategies and identify challenges in successful EHR

implementation; and 3) discuss EHR implementation as a continual

process.

W- RADAR Workshop

Y

1:00 – 3:00 pm Room 213AB

Fee: Complimentary

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI;

Richard W. Honsinger, MD, MACP, FACAAI;

J. Allen Meadows, MD, FACAAI; and

James M. Tracy, DO, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe techniques for building relationships with key leaders in the

local area; 2) effectively interact with insurers and governmental

officials; 3) make a decision to be willing to become a RADAR team

member; 4) be willing to enter the vetting process to join RADAR;

5) describe the genesis and purpose of the RADAR (regional, advocacy,

discussion and response) network; and 6) discuss the concept and

importance of vetting of regional representatives.

W- Food Allergy: What’s New!


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 209AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI and

A. Wesley Burks, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss the status of food allergen-specific immunotherapy and other

modalities in key clinical trials and studies in food allergy treatment;

2) utilize diagnostic tests for food allergy that are currently available,

and know about those under development; and 3) apply current

management strategies and therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy.

W- Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal

Diseases


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Seema S. Aceves, MD, PhD and

Jonathan M. Spergel, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) explain the clinical presentation of eosinophilic gastrointestinal

diseases (EGIDs); 2) explain the management options in EGIDs;

3) discuss diagnosis of eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGIDs);

and 4) relationship of food allergies in EGIDs.

W- Anaphylaxis: Ready to Roll


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210C

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Nabil El Sanadi, MD and Dana V. Wallace, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss the most common life threatening presentations of

anaphylaxis; 2) describe how to best prepare their practice setting to

deal with emergencies; 3) ensure the entire office staff is comfortable

interacting with 911 responders; 4) define anaphylaxis and prepare for

anaphylaxis in the office; 5) help prevent anaphylaxis in the office; and

6) diagnose and treat anaphylaxis in the office.

Workshops







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Sunday (continued)

W- JCAAI Reimbursement and

Regulatory Issues

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210D

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Donald W. Aaronson, MD, JD, MPH, FACAAI and

Gary N. Gross, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) implement new CPT Coding for oral food challenge and for venom

and drug testing; 2) discuss physician participation requirements for

vial preparation, skin test reading and skin test interpretation;

3) effectively manage claims denials from varying insurance carriers;

4) discuss the importance of compliance with allergy-adopted

standards of sterile compounding of allergy extracts; and 5) discuss

value-based purchasing.

W- Occupational Asthma and

Dermatitis


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Jonathan A. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI and

Michael Zacharisen, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) explain the differences between high and low molecular weight

causes of occupational asthma (OA); 2) determine the different causes

of OA; 3) evaluate and manage a worker with OA; 4) recognize common

occupational asthma and dermatitis presentations; and 5) develop a

plan for evaluation and treatment of occupational asthma and

dermatitis.

W- Statistics Simplified for Clinicians


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 212AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI and

Steve Conrad, MD, PhD

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) plan study design and data collection appropriate for the research

objective; 2) use optimal tabular and graphic data presentation;

3) choose valid sampling methods and size; and 4) apply appropriate

simplified statistical methods for data analysis of clinical studies.

W- Chronic Hypertrophic Sinusitis


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 213AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Larry Borish, MD, FACAAI and Eli O. Meltzer, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss chronic hyperplastic sinusitis as it comprises numerous

distinct diseases each with its own pathogenic mechanism;

2) incorporate disease-specific approaches into patient care and

treatment of these distinct diseases; and 3) review the distinct clinical

presentations and individualized disease-specific management of the

different presentations of chronic sinusitis, including non-eosinophilic,

eosinophilic and aspirin-intolerant sinusitis.

W- Molecular Biology of Allergens:

Towards More Accurate Diagnosis

and Treatment


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 213CD

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Jay M. Portnoy, MD, FACAAI and

P. Brock Williams, PhD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss various allergens and the properties that they have in

common; 2) select relevant allergens from a variety of different sources

and review their prognostic values; 3) determine when and which

components to measure to help in diagnosis; and 4) interpret the

results of component tests.

W- Immunotherapy Beyond

Traditional

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 304CD

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Peter S. Creticos, MD and Charles J. Siegel, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the mechanistic differences in newer immunotherapy (IT)

approaches including SLIT, T-cell tolerizing Peptide IT, and modified

constructs including adjuvants; 2) evaluate the clinical outcomes of

these therapeutic approaches based on the data from evidence-based

clinical trials; 3) discuss clinical findings from the recent North American

clinical trials of SLIT-tablet and SLIT-aqueous formulations in seasonal

pollen-induced allergic rhinitis; 4) recognize the role of cluster

immunotherapy in the treatment of airborne allergies; 5) judge the role

of rush immunotherapy in the treatment of airborne allergies; and

6) classify the reactions to immunotherapy according to the World

Allergy Organization guidelines.

.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Monday

W- EHR Roundtable

Y

8:00 – 9:45 am Room 213CD

Fee: $60 (FITS $25)

Tao T. Le, MD, MHS, FACAAI; David J. Shulan, MD, FACAAI;

Richard L. Wasserman, MD, PhD, FACAAI;

Ira Finegold, MD, FACAAI; A. Sean McKnight, MD, FACAAI;

Dana V. Wallace, MD, FACAAI; and Hugh H. Windom, MD

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) list factors affecting EHR adoption and selection by allergists;

2) discuss best practices for EHR selection and implementation;

3) describe how allergists currently maximize their EHRs in practice;

4) identify resources for evaluating and selecting an EHR; 5) identify

resources for implementing an EHR; 6) list the benefits and challenges

of EHR adoption; 7) name two EHRs with allergy modules; and 8) list an

advantage of the application service provider model of EHR.

W- Computerizing the Mixing Lab

and Injection Room


10:00 am – noon Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Dan A. Dalan, MD, FACAAI and

Michael R. Nelson, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) identify advantages and complexities associated with conversion

from a paper based to an electronic mixing lab and shot room; and

2) improve adherence to current immunotherapy practice parameter

guidance by incorporating an electronic solution for a mixing lab and

shot room.

W- Severe Asthma


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 209AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Bradley E. Chipps, MD, FACAAI and

Lanny J. Rosenwasser, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the systematic approach to the evaluation of patients with

difficult to treat asthma; 2) review data from severe asthma registry

cohorts including ENFUMOSA, SARP, TENOR, and BTS; 3) discuss the

application of phenotype, endotype, and cluster for the clinical,

immunologic and pathophysiologic presentations of difficult to treat

asthma; and 4) investigate the adjunctive therapies that may be used in

patients with asthma not responding to Step 6 EPR-3 care.

W- Everything You Thought Was

Atopic Dermatitis That Wasn’t


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Marcella R. Aquino, MD, FACAAI and

Mark Boguniewicz, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss differential of eczematous inflammatory skin lesions,

including contact dermatitis vs.drug eruption, hand dermatitis, facial

dermatitis, and diaper dermatitis; 2) recognize diseases that may be

misdiagnosed as atopic dermatitis; 3) discuss insights into

pathophysiology of primary immunodeficiencies with eczema and

aberrant IgE synthesis; and 4) utilize appropriate testing in patients

where the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis is in question.

W- Immunotherapy: How to

Write the Prescription

Y

3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210C

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Bryan L. Martin, DO, FACAAI and

John J. Oppenheimer, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) explain the differences between standardized and non-standardized

extracts; 2) compose a therapeutic mix for immunotherapy through

review of the literature; 3) write a prescription for immunotherapy that

contains effective doses of each component; and 4) use current

guidelines to improve the safety and effectiveness of immunotherapy

in the office.

W- Practical Ocular Examination


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 210D

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Anand Bhatt, MD and Milton Hom, OD

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) describe the common ocular surface conditions that may present to

the allergist; 2) utilize questionnaires to diagnose ocular surface

conditions; and 3) identify common ocular allergic processes and

awareness of options to treat ocular allergic processes.

Workshops







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Workshops

Admission by ticket only • All Workshops will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center

Monday (continued)

W- Basics of a Home Environment

Assessment


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 211AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Kevin Kennedy, CIEC and Jay M. Portnoy, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) ask appropriate questions to identify indoor environmental quality

(IEQ) issues; 2) use visual evidence observed in homes to identify

environmental quality issues; 3) explain and demonstrate the five

quantitative measurements recommended for home assessments; and

4) teach patients how to identify IEQ issues and help them develop an

action plan.

W- Immunodeficiency and State

Screens: Role of the Allergist


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 213AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Stuart L. Abramson, MD and Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) specify the components of the innate immune system; 2) evaluate

patients for deficiencies in innate immunity; 3) identify patients with

deficiencies of the cellular (T-cell) and humoral (B-cell) immune

systems; 4) initiate laboratory evaluation and treatment of patients with

innate, T-cell and antibody deficiencies; 5) describe the components

and the interpretation of state screens for immunodeficiency disorders;

and 6) discuss appropriate additional testing and treatment plans

based on immune screening results.

W- Urticaria and Angioedema:

Something Old, Something New


3:30 – 5:30 pm Room 212AB

Fee: $60 (FITs $25)

Richard G. Gower, MD, FACAAI and

William R. Lumry, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1) discuss the differential diagnosis for urticaria and angioedema and

properly assess patients with these conditions; 2) identify patients with

physical urticaria/angioedema; 3) summarize current and emerging

therapies for urticaria and angioedema; and 4) describe an evidencebased

and cost-effective approach to diagnosis and management of

patients with chronic urticaria/angioedema.

In an effort to be

environmentally responsible,

ACAAI is reducing the amount of paper we use at our

annual meeting. Electronic program materials and online

materials will replace paper and will be accessible online

before, during and after the program.

Visit acaai.conferencespot.com or snap the QR

code for a menu of online materials.


ONLINE

MATERIALS







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Thursday Pre-Meeting Course

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

International Food Allergy Conference

Separate Registration Fee • Ticket Required

7:00 am Registration (Hall C Lobby)

Navigating Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal

Disorders: The Allergist at the Helm

Moderators: Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI and

Karen A. DeMuth, MD, FACAAI

8:00 am Welcome and Introductions

8:15 am Eosinophilic Esophagitis and

Food Allergy: Where Do They Meet

Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD, FACAAI

8:45 am Optimal Pharmacotherapy:

Types and Duration

Seema Aceves, MD, PhD


9:15 am Clinical Relevance of the

Food-Pollen Syndrome

M. Antonella Muraro, MD


9:45 am Questions and Panel Discussion

10:00 am Refreshment Break (Ballroom A Foyer)

Getting Comfortable With

Off-the-Beaten-Track Food Allergies

Moderators: Helen H. Chan, MD, FACAAI and

Brian G. Wilson, MD, FACAAI

10:15 am Food Protein Induced


Enterocolitis: Raising Awareness

Among the Primary Care Physicians

Jonathan M. Spergel, MD, PhD, FACAAI

10:45 am Spice Allergy

Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI


11:15 am Allergy to Tree Nuts:

A Rising Concern

Alessandro Fiocchi, MD, FACAAI (SC)





Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

11:45 am Abstract Presentation

F – Investigation of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in

Adults using Skin Testing, ImmunoCAP and

ImmunoCAP ISAC IgE Quantitation

A. Tripathi* 1 , L.J. Workman1, C.B. Cho 2 , A.S. Clark 1 ,

R.G. Hamilton 3 , T.A. Platts-Mills 1 , E.A. Erwin 2 ,

1. Charlottesville, VA; 2. Columbus, OH;

3. Baltimore, MD.

Noon Questions and Panel Discussion

12:15 pm Lunch Break (on own) and Poster Viewing

(see page 35 for poster listing)

1:15 pm

Expanding Our Diagnosis and

Management Armamentarium

Moderators: Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI and

Vivian Hernandez-Trujillo, MD, FACAAI

1:45 pm Food Immunotherapy

Procedures: Are We There Yet

A. Wesley Burks, MD, FACAAI

Luisa Businco Memorial Lecture

Predicting the

Natural History of

Food Allergy

Y

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI

Y

Continued next page

Thursday Symposia







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Thursday Pre-Meeting Course

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

International Food Allergy Conference

(continued from previous page)

2:15 pm Abstract Presentations

F – Age-Dependent Trends in Peanut Allergy

Versus Cross-Reactive Pollen Sensitization

J. Thompson* 1 , B. Williams 2 , M. Morris 1 ,

1. Onalaska, WI; 2. Kansas City, MO.

F – The High Economic Burden of Childhood

Food Allergy in the United States

R. Gupta*, L. Bilaver, D. Holdford, A. Dyer, C.H. Lau,

J. Pongracic, J.L. Holl, D. Meltzer, Chicago, IL.

2:45 pm Questions and Panel Discussion

3:00 pm Refreshment Break (Ballroom A Foyer)

The Allergist Among the Colleagues

Moderators: Marcella R. Aquino, MD, FACAAI and

Alessandro Fiocchi, MD, FACAAI (SC)

3:45 pm Immunodeficiency Disguised

as Food Allergy

Jordan S. Orange, MD, PhD, FACAAI


4:15 pm Abstract Presentations

F – Heiner Syndrome Masquerading as an

Immune Deficiency

J.A. Sigua* 1 , M. Zacharisen 2 , 1. Milwaukee, WI;

2. Bozeman, MT.

F – Performance of Skin Prick Testing and

Serum Specific IgE Testing in Pediatric

Oral Food Challenges to Cow’s Milk, Egg and

Peanut Allergy

M. Nanda*, P. Windom, J. Khoury, M. Lierl,

A. Assa'ad, Cincinnati, OH.

4:45 pm Questions and Panel Discussion

5:00 pm Adjourn

Y

3:15 pm Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis:

Generating a Common Approach

With the Dermatologist

Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI




Y

Conference Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify the

basic etiology and mechanism of eosinophil-associated gastrointestinal disorders (EGID); 2) explain the relationship of EGID to food allergy;

3) discuss current and future treatment strategies for EGID, especially, eosinophilic esophagitis; 4) list different therapeutic options for eosinophilic

esophagitis (EoE); 5) list the efficacy rates that are currently known for therapies; 6) recognize the clinical presentation of food-pollen syndrome and

utilize testing modalities for the diagnosis; 7) identify the best management strategy for each patient; 8) describe how to identify food proteininduced

enterocolitis (FPIES); 9) discuss outreach and educational efforts for FPIES; 10) review various types of spices; 11) recognize the important

spice proteins and the effect of processing on their allergenicity; 12) identify spice allergy manifestations; and 4) discuss the diagnosis and

management of spice allergy; 13) describe the prevalence of tree nut allergy; 14) discuss diagnostic itinerary for tree nut allergy and treating tree

nut allergy with avoidance; 15) summarize new options in desensitization; 16) recognize the difference in natural history among various food

allergens as well as among various food allergy syndromes; 17) apply the knowledge to the clinical management of patients; 18) apply current

management strategies and therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy; 19) discuss the status of food allergen-specific immunotherapy and other

modalities in key clinical trials and studies in food allergy treatment; 20) compare the approach of the dermatologist and the allergist to atopic

dermatitis; 21) generate consensus protocols for the co-management of atopic dermatitis; 22) discuss the primary immunodeficiencies that have

an increased prevalence of what can present as food allergy; and 23) identify primary immunodeficiencies within food allergy cohorts.

IFAC Oral Abstract Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: F1) discuss food and aeroallergen sensitivity patterns in adult patients with

eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) through skin and serum IgE testing with component analysis, as related to dietary therapy and disease management;

F2) distinguish peanut allergy from cross-sensitization and discuss how the prevalence of these conditions changes with the age of the patient;

F3) summarize the direct and indirect costs of childhood food allergy and discuss major components of both the direct and indirect costs;

F4) identify common manifestations of Heiner Syndrome and discuss a differential diagnosis of chronic pulmonary infiltrates and summarize an

appropriate diagnostic evaluation of Heiner Syndrome; and F5) identify the shortcomings of current skin prick testing and serum specifiic IgE

testing for clinically relevant food allergy.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Thursday Pre-Meeting Course

Room 303AB • Anaheim Convention Center

International Food Allergy Conference – Posters

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

Engineered Osmotin Variant Demonstrates

Reduced Allergenic Potency With Hypersensitive

Patients’ Sera and Mice

P. Sharma*, S.N. Gaur, N. Arora, Delhi, India.

Buckwheat Allergy- New Allergen to Watch in

the US

C. Radojicic, D. Mlinarik*, Independence, OH.

Pectin Anaphylaxis Associated With Cashew and

Pistachio Allergy

M. Rafeeq*, Oregon, OH.

Management of Anaphylaxis: Are We Compliant

With the National Guidelines

A. Chouksey*, D. Super, P. Puri, K. Swamy,

Cleveland, OH.

Epinephrine Auto-Injector and Medical Alert

Bracelet Preparedness in Pediatric Food Allergy

J. Shih*, K. Demuth, Atlanta, GA.

Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Educational

Curriculum in Urban Child Care Centers

B.J. Lanser*, J.A. Bird, A.T. Tang, Dallas, TX.

Current Food Allergy Diagnosis and Management

Practices of Pediatricians

R. Gupta* 1 , A. Dyer 1 , C.H. Lau 1 , M.W. Sohn 1 ,

B. Altshuler 2 , J.A. Brown 3 , J. Necheles 1 , 1. Chicago, IL;

2. Crystal Lake, IL; 3. Barrington, IL.

Poor Predictability of Specific IgE and Skin Prick

Testing to Sesame as Demonstrated by Oral

Food Challenge

J. Kattan*, J.A. Lieberman, M. Vitale, H.A. Sampson,

A.L. Cox, New York, NY.

Identifying Characteristics in Egg-Allergic

Subjects to Predict Heated Egg Tolerance:

A Retrospective Review

N.U. Swamy*, M. Crain, J.A. Bird, Dallas, TX.

Baked Egg Oral Food Challenges: A Single-Center

Pediatric Hospital Experience

R.W. Saltzman*, M. Kelleher, J.M. Spergel,

Philadelphia, PA.

Potential Unreliability of RAST Testing for

Diagnosis of Food Allergy

D.E. Riester*, Burlington, MA.

A Significant Proportion of Patients With

Symptoms During an Oral Food Challenge Can

Successfully Complete the Challenge

I. Mikhail* 1 , L. Arnold 2 , S. Mancia 2 , H. Robinson 2 ,

A. Sprunger 2 , A. Troger 2 , D. Mansoor 2 , C. Nguyen 2 ,

H. Sharma 2 , 1. Arlington, VA; 2. Washington, DC.

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

Serum Specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) Levels of

Common Food Allergens in Children Presenting

With Food Allergy

M. Amin*, J.C. Khoury, A.H. Assa'ad, Cincinnati, OH.

Prevalence of Sensitivity to Food/Drug Additives in

Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIUA)

J. Rajan* 1 , R. Simon 1 , J. Bosso 2 , 1. San Diego, CA;

2. West Nyack, NY.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis in South Dakota

M.E. Bubak, L.R. Peterson*, Sioux Falls, SD.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) to Unsuspected

Food Allergens

S.K. Mane*, P. Jordan, S.L. Bahna, Shreveport, LA.

Outgrowing IgE Food Allergy to Milk and

Developing Eosinophilic Esophagitis

S.M. Maggadottir*, J.M. Spergel, T.F. Brown-

Whitehorn, Philadelphia, PA.

Childhood Food Allergy Tolerance and Associated

Factors

R. Gupta*, C.H. Lau, E.E. Springston, B. Smith,

J. Pongracic, S.M. Boudreau-Romano, J.L. Holl,

Chicago, IL.

Prevalence of Peanut Allergy in Children of

Peanut Farmers

A. Jagdis* 1 , G. Liss 1 , S. Maleki 2 , P. Vadas 1 , 1. Toronto,

ON, Canada; 2. New Orleans, LA.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

Triggered by Orange Juice

T. Federly*, P. Ryan, C. Dinakar, Kansas City, MO.

Late onset of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis

Syndrome After Food Challenge in a Boy With

Gastroschisis

C.T. Quezada-Chalita* 1 , R.T. Quezada Medrano 2 ,

1. Mexico City, DF, Mexico; 2. Tepic, NA, Mexico.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Triggered by

Pork: a Case Report

G. Ram*, J. Heimall, S.P. DaVeiga, Philadelphia, PA.

Food Hypersensitivity Presenting as Protein-

Losing Enteropathy Without Gastrointestinal

Symptoms

N. Farooqui*, R. Scherzer, D.W. Hauswirth,

Columbus, OH.

Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

(FPIES) to Trivial Oral Mucosal Contact

S.K. Mane*, M. Hollister, S.L. Bahna, Shreveport, LA.

Peanut Induced Food Protein Enterocolitis

Syndrome: A Case Report

B. Prince*, C. Szychlinski, M. Makhija, Chicago, IL.

Thursday Symposia


Thursday Pre-Meeting Course

Room 303AB • Anaheim Convention Center

International Food Allergy Conference – Posters

(continued from previous page)

IFAC Poster Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: FP1) discuss the reduction of allergenic potency with

hypersensitive patients’ sera and mice as demonstrated by an engineered osmotin variant; FP2) differentiate wheat allergy from

buckwheat wheat allergy and recognize potential allergens in 'gluten-free food'; FP3) review presentation of pectin allergy and

anaphylaxis and discuss association of pectin allergy with cashew and pistachio allergy; FP4) discuss compliance with the national

guidelines regarding anaphylaxis and the need for prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent fatal outcomes and summarize the

need to educate patients about home epinephrine use and advise follow up for a definitive workup; FP5) discuss the reality of

allergy preparedness in food allergic pediatric patients; FP6) recognize the need for an educational curriculum regarding food

allergy and anaphylaxis among child care center workers and discuss the results of a pilot program and goals of future research;

FP7) summarize current trends in management of food allergy among pediatricians and compare current practices to the NIAID

food allergy management guidelines; FP8) discuss the limitations of current diagnostic testing for sesame allergy; FP9) identify

characteristics that predict heated egg tolerance in egg-allergic subjects; FP10) discuss the emerging phenotypes of food allergy

(heated egg, native egg) and implications for development of tolerance; FP11) discuss the potential limits of serological testing for

food allergy; FP12) discuss possible outcomes of oral food challenges following signs or symptoms during the challenge;

FP13) interpret serum food specific IgE levels in children for the common food allergens and recognize that the rise of serum food

specific IgE over time is an expected finding; FP14) identify the prevalence of reactions to food/drug additives in patients with

chronic idiopathic urticaria; FP15) discuss the current methods used for the diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

by allergists and gastroenterologists in the state of South Dakota; FP16) obtain esophageal biopsy even if the mucosa appears

grossly normal and conduct a detailed food allergy evaluation in spite of lack of food suspicion by history; FP17) discuss cases

where apparent true IgE mediated food allergy evolves or changes into eosinophilic esophagitis and describe the plasticity of

food allergies; FP18) discuss the frequency of tolerance to food allergy among children in the US and identify food allergies that

children are likely to outgrow and discuss symptoms and other factors associated with the development of tolerance;

FP19) discuss the prevalence of peanut allergy in children of peanut farmers in comparison to the general population;

FP20) consider FPIES induced by unusual agents such as oranges or other citrus fruits; FP21) identify the possibility of a late onset

of food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome after a food challenge; FP22) identify patients with FPIES-mediated food allergy

and recognize mammalian meats as a possible trigger for FPIES; FP23) recognize uncommon symptoms presenting as food

hypersensitivity; FP24) recognize that FPIES can be caused by indirect exposure to trivial quantities of food allergen; and

FP25) discuss the clinical presentation and diagnosis of Food Protein Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES) and identify foods known

to cause this syndrome.


Thursday Symposia

Dinner Symposium • Platinum Ballroom 1-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Debatable Issues Regarding the Prescription and

Administration of an Automatic Epinephrine Injector for

Patients With Anaphylaxis

Supported by an independent educational grant from Sanofi U.S.

Moderator: Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI

6:15 pm Panelists for Case Presentations

and Debates

8:15 pm Adjourn

Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI





F. Estelle Simons, MD, FACAAI





Dana V. Wallace, MD, FACAAI





Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) correctly recognize the bulk of patients presenting signs and

symptoms of anaphylaxis requiring immediate treatment; 2) correctly apply guidelines and practice parameters in managing of

patients with anaphylaxis; and 3) develop educational plans to address compliance by patients for the proper administration and

maintenance of prescribed epinephrine auto injectors.

Thursday Symposia

Photo courtesy of AOCVCB







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Friday Literature Review

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Everything You Should Have Read Last Year, But Didn’t!

Supported in part by an independent educational grant from Sanofi U.S.

Separate Registration Fee • Admission by Ticket Only

Part I – Morning Session

Moderator: James T. Li, MD, FACAAI

Chair: Mark T. O’Hollaren, MD, FACAAI

Part II – Afternoon Session

Moderator: Mark T. O’Hollaren, MD, FACAAI

7:45 am Basic Immunology and Genetics

for the Allergist

David A. Khan, MD, FACAAI

8:15 am Anaphylaxis, Drug Allergy and

Stinging Insect Hypersensitivity

Anthony Montanaro, MD, FACAAI

8:45 am Occupational and Environmental

Allergy

Mark S. Dykewicz, MD, FACAAI

9:15 am Asthma and Lower Respiratory

Diseases

James T. Li, MD, FACAAI

9:45 am Refreshment Break (Ballroom A Foyer)

10:00 am Urticaria, Angioedema and Other

Skin Disorders

Gerald W. Volcheck, MD, FACAAI














Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

1:00 pm Immunotherapy

David I. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI


1:30 pm Food and Additives Allergy


Vivian Hernandez-Trujillo, MD, FACAAI

2:00 pm Population Management

of Asthma

William W. Crawford, MD


2:30 pm Refreshment Break (Ballroom A Foyer)

2:45 pm Rhinitis and Sinusitis

Richard A. Nicklas, MD, FACAAI

3:15 pm The Ten Best Articles in the Specialty

of Allergy

Mark T. O’Hollaren MD, FACAAI

3:40 pm Questions and Discussion

3:45 pm Adjourn















Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

10:30 am Update in Pediatric Allergy

John M. Kelso, MD, FACAAI




Y

11:00 am Update on Infectious Diseases,

Antimicrobials, and Vaccines

Michael S. Blaiss, MD, FACAAI




Y

11:30 am Lunch (on your own)

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss recent updates in basic immunology and genetics as pertains to allergy and

immunology; 2) identify new concepts in anaphylaxis, drug allergy and stinging insect hypersensitivity; 3) utilize clinically relevant information in practice;

4) discuss recent advances in understanding environmental influences on respiratory and atopic disease; 5) discuss recent advances in the diagnosis and

management of latex allergy and occupational respiratory diseases; 6) apply the results reported in recently published articles on asthma and COPD to

clinical practice; 7) expand treatment options for patients with hereditary angioedema; 8) counsel patients on treatment options for chronic urticaria and

angioedema; 9) discuss recent literature in pediatric allergy, asthma and immunology regarding important developments with practical applications;

10) discuss asthma as related to the risk of pertussis infection; 11) discuss evidence of antibiotic use and intranasal corticosteroids in treatment of acute

rhinosinusitis as well as the efficacy of Dead Sea salt irrigation; 12) discuss new insights into mechanisms of immunotherapy and define long term efficacy

of sublingual immunotherapy; 13) compare effectiveness of immunotherapy with single vs. multiple allergens and identify new approaches to allergen

immunotherapy; 14) describe recent literature on food allergy and food additives; 15) apply new information and treatment strategies to the practice of

allergy; 16) list the 3 specific interventions that are most commonly used in asthma population management interventional studies; 17) name the precise

definition of an asthma exacerbation that is recommended for use in clinical trials; 18) use histologic information to determine the effectiveness of

corticosteroids in the treatment of nasal polyps; 19) decrease use of antibiotics in treatment of sinus infections; 20) review cutting edge research results

that will impact the practice of allergy; 21) discuss innovative clinical pearls and utilize the information to improve clinical practice; and 22) summarize

significant advances over the last year in the field of allergy and immunology.








See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Friday Symposia

Breakfast Symposium • Platinum Ballroom 1-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Allergic Rhinitis: Optimal Therapeutic Strategies to

Improve Patient Outcomes

Supported by an independent educational grant from MEDA PHARMACEUTICALS®

Moderator: William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

8:30 am Welcome and Introductions

William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

8:40 am Epidemiology and Characterization

of Rhinitis

William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

9:10 am Topical Therapy for Allergic

Patients: Advantages and Underlying

Mechanisms

Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI







9:40 am Emerging Therapies for

Allergic and Non-Allergic Rhinitis

Warner W. Carr, MD, FACAAI

10:10 am Questions and Discussion

10:30 am Adjourn







Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) describe the epidemiology and characterization of rhinitis;

2) delineate strategies to consider in the treatment of rhinitis; 3) explain the advantages of topical therapy for allergic rhinitis

(AR); 4) discuss the pharmacologic mechanisms underlying these advantages; and 5) describe emerging therapies for allergic and

non-allergic rhinitis.

Things to Do in Anaheim

http://microsite.anaheimoc.org/

attendees/what-to-do







Photo courtesy of AOCVCB/SeaWorld® Adventure Park

See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Friday Symposia


Friday Luncheon Program

Platinum Ballroom 1-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Recommendations for the Management of

Patients With Anaphylaxis: A Consensus Update

Jointly Sponsored by the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI)

and the American Association of Certified Allergists (AACA)

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Target Audience: This activity has been designed for board-certified allergists/immunologists and other health care

providers involved in the management of patients with anaphylaxis.

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to: 1) implement evidence-based

criteria to promptly recognize and diagnose anaphylaxis; 2) utilize intramuscular epinephrine for the treatment of an

anaphylactic episode; 3) provide patients and caregivers with education on avoidance of anaphylactic triggers and

self-management of anaphylaxis; and 4) create emergency action plans with patients and caregivers that incorporate

instructions for self-management.

Accreditation: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American College

of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) and the American Association of Certified Allergists (AACA). The American

College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical

Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation: American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) designates this live activity for a maximum of

2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their

participation in the activity.

Moderator: Sheldon L. Spector, MD, FACAAI, President, American Association of Certified Allergists

11:30 am – 1:30 pm

With recent estimates suggesting that there has been a rise in allergic reactions, it has become critically

important that health care providers are armed with the most up-to-date information on the diagnosis,

treatment, and prevention of anaphylaxis. With 3 sets of clinical guidelines having been released

between 2010 and 2011, the ideal source of information on anaphylaxis management remains elusive.

In an educational setting, experts can better provide what must be known (diagnostic criteria, trigger

avoidance, treatment strategies, emergency action plans, etc.) to ensure that optimal care is given to

patients who are at risk for anaphylaxis, regardless of a patient’s past history or sensitivity to a given

allergic trigger.

Anaphylaxis

Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI

Critical Issues in the Treatment of

Patients With Anaphylaxis

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI

Difficult to Treat Anaphylaxis:

Case Study Review

Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Questions and Discussion


House of Delegates & Friday Program

4:00 – 6:00 pm • Room 303AB • Anaheim Convention Center

House of Delegates Meeting

and Town Hall Forum

Y

NOT FOR

CREDIT

Plan to attend the expanded House of Delegates Town Hall Forum. Pressing issues in allergy health care will be

discussed and everyone’s participation is welcome.

4:00 pm Welcome and Call to Order

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI

Speaker, HOD

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

ACAAI President-Elect

4:10 pm Approve HOD Minutes

4:15 pm Update on the JCAAI

Richard W. Honsinger, MD, MACP, FACAAI

JCAAI President

4:30 pm Accountable Care Organizations

and the Allergy Specialist:

Navigating the System

Daniel Ein, MD, FACAAI

4:50 pm Update of Allergen Extracts and

the FDA: Where We Stand on Saving

Our Extracts

Ira Finegold, MD, FACAAI

5:10 pm New Role Proposed for Pharmacists

in Health Care Delivery: Impact on

Allergists

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI

5:30 pm Quorum Call

5:35 pm Election of Officers

5:40 pm Resolutions

5:50 pm New Business

6:00 pm Adjourn







Online Evaluation, Credit Claim and

Certificate System

ACAAI will utilize a convenient online evaluation, credit

claim and certificate system for the 2012 Annual

Scientific Meeting. This system will allow you to complete

evaluations of the certified CME sessions that you attend

which are directly sponsored by ACAAI. Upon completion

of the Overall Evaluation, Session Evaluations and credit

claiming information you will be able to immediately

access, save and/or print your certificate. Physicians will

receive a certificate of credit and other healthcare

professionals will receive a certificate of attendance for

most sessions.

See page 13 for details.

See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.

Friday Program


Friday Program

Annual Session and Business Meeting • Grand Ballroom F • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

American Association of Allergists and

Immunologists of Indian Origin

NOT FOR

CREDIT

Moderator: Mansi Kanuga, MD

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this program, participants should be able to: 1) recognize the clinical signs and

symptoms of ocular allergies; 2) develop the differential diagnosis of ocular allergies; 3) identify use of new treatment

options in the management of allergic rhinitis; and 4) select and apply the various treatment options for ocular allergies

and allergic rhinitis.

6:00 pm Registration, Hors d’oeuvres/Cocktails

6:30 pm Update, Diagnosis and Management of

Allergic Conjunctivitis

Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

7:00 pm New Treatment Options in the Management

of Seasonal and Perennial Allergic Rhinitis

William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

7:30 pm TBD

8:00 pm Dinner

9:00 pm Adjourn

In an effort to be

environmentally responsible,

ACAAI is reducing the amount of paper we use at our

annual meeting. Electronic program materials and online

materials will replace paper and will be accessible online

before, during and after the program.

Visit acaai.conferencespot.com or snap the QR

code for a menu of online materials.


ONLINE

MATERIALS


Saturday General Sessions

Breakfast Symposium • Platinum Ballroom 5-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Allergic Rhinitis: Current and Future Therapeutic

Options for the Allergist

Saturday Gen Sessions

Supported by an independent educational grant from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Moderator: Mark S. Dykewicz, MD, FACAAI

6:00 am Welcome and Introductions

Mark S. Dykewicz, MD, FACAAI

6:05 am The Pharmacological Basis of

Allergic Rhinitis Management: Past and Present

Therapies: What Have We Learned

Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD, FACAAI

6:55 am Individualizing Therapy for Allergic

Rhinitis: An Evidence-Based Approach

Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI

7:20 am Questions and Discussion

7:30 am Adjourn




6:30 am The Pharmacological Basis of Allergic Rhinitis

Management: Emerging Therapies

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss past, present and recent advances in allergic rhinitis and

recent advances in allergen immunotherapy (SCIT vs SLIT); 2) review the comparison of SCIT vs SLIT, mechanisms and applications;

3) develop an individualized treatment plan for the patient with allergic rhinitis (AR); 4) discuss allergic trigger avoidance in the

management of AR; and 5) recognize where immunotherapy fits in the treatment algorithm of the patient with AR.

Theme Park Activities for

Convention Attendees

http://microsite.anaheimoc.org/attendees/

theme-parks-and-attractions/theme-parks

Photo courtesy of Knott’s Berry Farm/AOCVCB







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Saturday General Sessions

Opening Ceremony and Welcome Announcements

7:45 – 8:10 am • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

President

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

Program Chair and President-Elect

Rebecca A. Goldberg, RN

Alliance President

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Managing Asthma Patients in the 21st Century

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderators: Bryan L. Martin, DO, FACAAI and John R. Seyerle, MD

8:10 am Welcome & Introductions

8:15 am

Daniel Goodman Lecture

Asthma

Heterogeneity:


Phenotypes and Endotypes

Sally E. Wenzel, MD, FACAAI



9:15 am Exhaled Nitric Oxide: Does It Have

a Role in Asthma Management

Rohit K. Katial, MD, FACAAI


9:45 am Practical Issues in Asthma


Management: Dealing With Confidence,

Compliance, and Satisfaction

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI







8:45 am The Role of Vitamin D in Asthma:

Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Potentials

Michael B. Foggs, MD, FACAAI


10:15 am Questions and Discussion

10:30 am Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify ways to address asthma heterogeneity and define

phenotypes and potentially endotypes; 2) use these phenotypes and endotypes to begin to personalize the management of

asthma; 3) describe the pathophysiology of vitamin D metabolism; 4) define some of the major immunomodulatory functions of

vitamin D in association with asthma; 5) explain some of the epidemiology and seasonal variations associated with UVB band

radiation and its impact on vitamin D physiology; 6) discuss some of the controversies associated with vitamin D’s therapeutic

potentials as it relates to asthma; 7) discuss the role of the biomarker FeNO in airway inflammation; 8) identify key points of the

2011 practice guideline on the clinical applications of FeNO; 9) interpret FeNO values to aid in clinical decision making; 10) explain

why patients stop their asthma medications; and 11) discuss the concept of patient satisfaction with asthma treatment options.

10:30 – 11:00 am Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Saturday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

When Shortness of Breath Is Not Asthma

Saturday Gen Sessions

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderators: Bradley E. Chipps, MD, FACAAI and Travis A. Miller, MD, FACAAI

11:00 am Welcome and Introductions

11:05 am Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis/


Sarcoidosis: Clinical Presentations & Evaluation

Joshua Solomon, MD

11:55 am Swallowing Disorders & Aspiration:

Evaluation & Management

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

12:20 pm Questions and Discussion




11:30 am Autoimmune Lung Diseases: SLE, RA,

and Sjogren’s Syndrome Management

Kevin Brown, MD




12:30 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) state the similarities and differences between granulomatous

lung diseases and asthma; 2) describe the workup of patients with suspected granulomatous lung diseases; 3) generate a list of

potential diagnoses associated with diffuse lung disease that may present with wheezing and dyspnea; 4) describe a number of

ways in which the lung is affected in the autoimmune diseases; 5) list the risk factors for chronic aspiration; 6) discuss the

diagnostic modalities available; and 7) discuss the treatment options available to minimize further aspiration.

12:30 – 1:30 pm

Visit Exhibits

Lunch On Own

(Concession Stand Open in Exhibit Hall C)

12:30 – 1:30 pm

Poster Session

Hall C

Online Evaluation, Credit Claim and

Certificate System

ACAAI will utilize a convenient online evaluation, credit

claim and certificate system for the 2012 Annual

Scientific Meeting. This system will allow you to complete

evaluations of the certified CME sessions that you attend

which are directly sponsored by ACAAI. Upon completion

of the Overall Evaluation, Session Evaluations and credit

claiming information you will be able to immediately

access, save and/or print your certificate. Physicians will

receive a certificate of credit and other healthcare

professionals will receive a certificate of attendance for

most sessions.

See page 13 for details.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Saturday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

The Great Anaphylaxis Raft Debate:

Which Is the Most Important Mediator

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderators: William K. Dolen, MD, FACAAI and David R. Weldon, MD, FACAAI

1:30 pm Histamine

Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI


Nitric Oxide

Stephen F. Kemp, MD, FACAAI





Leukotrienes

Larry Borish, MD, FACAAI



3:00 pm Adjourn

Platelet Activating Factor

Mitchell H. Grayson, MD, FACAAI




Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the role of histamine in the pathophysiology of

anaphylaxis; 2) describe how histamine interacts with other mediators of anaphylaxis; 3) discuss cysteinyl leukotrienes as the most

important mediators of anaphylaxis; 4) discuss histamine, FeNO and PAF as having little if any role in causing anaphylaxis;

5) discuss the diverse roles of nitric oxide in anaphylaxis pathogenesis; 6) discuss the potential clinical relevance of nitric oxide in

refractory anaphylaxis; 7) discuss the studies that support the hypothesis that PAF is the most important mediator in anaphylaxis;

and 8) describe the beneficial effects of PAF antagonism in mouse models of anaphylaxis.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Saturday General Sessions

Symposium • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Early Diagnosis and Treatment of

Primary Immunodeficiency (PID) in Adults:

Insights for the Practicing Allergist-Immunologist

Saturday Gen Sessions

Supported by an independent educational grant from Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Moderator: Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI

3:30 pm Challenges in Early Diagnosis of PID in Adults

Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI

3:40 pm PID Presenting in Later Life: Opportunities for

Earlier Diagnosis

Vincent R. Bonagura, MD, FACAAI

4:10 pm Confirming a Diagnosis of PID in Adults:

Current and Future Technologies

James Verbsky, MD, PhD



4:40 pm Management of Antibody

Deficiencies in Older Adults

Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI

5:10 pm Questions and Panel Discussion

5:30 pm Adjourn





Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) recognize patterns of infections that correlate with specific

primary immune deficiencies; 2) discuss current testing that can help define suspected primary immune deficiencies; 3) describe

novel technologies used to define primary immune deficiencies; 4) calculate the appropriate dose of replacement

immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy for patients with antibody deficiency; and 5) determine the need for prophylactic antibiotic use in

patients with immune deficiency.

The above symposium will be featured on the ACAAI website.

21st Annual

FIT Bowl Competition

5:00 – 7:00 pm, Saturday

Grand Ballroom EF

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Complimentary

Supported by Sanofi U.S.

NOT FOR

CREDIT







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Saturday President’s Welcome Reception

and Awards Ceremony

ACAAI President’s Welcome Reception and

Awards Ceremony

Marquis Ballroom • Anaheim Marriott Hotel • 7:30 – 9:00 pm

Supported in part by Merck

The College invites all registrants to this prestigious event where we will recognize our 2012 award recipients and

formally welcome our newly-approved Fellows.

This event begins at 7:30 pm with drinks and light appetizers, and will be followed by a short program where we

will honor our new Fellows and recognize the recipients of the Distinguished Fellow, International Distinguished

Fellow, Distinguished Service, Woman in Allergy, Young Faculty Support and the Clemens von Pirquet Awards.

Finally, we will introduce this year’s winner of the prestigious Gold Headed Cane Award, Dr. Rufus Lee, and invite

him on stage to accept the award and address the audience.

Plan to join us for this fun-filled event.

I. Welcome

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President

II. Recognition of Newly-Elected Fellows

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI, ACAAI President-Elect

III. Distinguished Fellow Award

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President

IV. International Distinguished Fellow Award

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President

V. Distinguished Service Award

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President

VI. Woman in Allergy Award

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President

VII Young Faculty Support Awards

Nathan Segall, MD, FACAAI

ACAAI Foundation President

VIII. Clemens von Pirquet Awards

Rebecca A. Goldberg, RN, ACAAI Alliance President

IX. Gold Headed Cane Award

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

ACAAI President, and

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI

ACAAI Executive Medical Director


Photo courtesy of John Mairs/AOCVCB


Dr. Rufus E. Lee to Receive Gold Headed Cane Award

The College is proud to honor Rufus E. Lee,

Jr., MD, FACAAI, as this year’s recipient of

the ACAAI Gold Headed Cane Award. The

Award will be presented during the ACAAI

President’s Welcome Reception & Awards

Ceremony scheduled at 7:30 pm, Saturday,

in the Marquis Ballroom, at the Anaheim

Dr. Lee Marriott Hotel.

The ACAAI Gold Headed Cane Award is presented annually

to an allergist who has demonstrated the highest

standards of scientific excellence and integrity while

serving as a Fellow of the College for at least 20 years. It is

designed to serve as an inspiration to younger doctors and

encourage them in their family, social, civil, religious and

professional lives. Past winners include Harold S. Nelson,

MD, FACAAI; Joseph A. Bellanti, MD, FACAAI; Edward J.

O’Connell, MD, FACAAI; Elliot F. Ellis, MD, FACAAI; John C.

Selner, MD, FACAAI; Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI; Betty

B. Wray, MD, FACAAI; Donald W. Aaronson, MD, JD, MPH,

FACAAI; Emil J. Bardana, Jr., MD, FACAAI; Raymond G.

Slavin, MD, MS, FACAAI; and Ira Finegold, MD, FACAAI.

Dr. Lee was ACAAI president, 1983-84. He orchestrated and

participated in several actions during his leadership that

helped build the College’s future foundation, including

hiring James Slawny with Executive Administration Inc.,

our current management group. Joseph Bellanti, MD,

FACAAI, also was hired as editor-in-chief of Annals of

Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, and the Annals was made

the sole property of ACAAI.

Gold Headed Cane

An extensive ACAAI membership drive recruited 200 new

members and Allergy-Immunology board-certification was

enacted as a requirement for College membership. Yearly

financial audits, the Site Selection Committee, Visiting

Professor grants and Fellows-in-Training grants were

established. The first all academic Annual Meeting was

held when Dr. Lee was program chairman. He continued

his involvement as a member of the Annals Editorial Board,

1983-90, and is current chair of the Financial Oversight

Committee.

Dr. Lee was president of the American Association of

Certified Allergists, 1985-1986, and a member of the first

Joint Council of Allergy and Immunology, 1979-1985.

Former co-chair of the Joint Task Force of Practice

Parameters, Dr. Lee worked for over 10 years as editor,

sharing responsibility for development of 20 practice

parameters and updates for all major diseases and

problems treated by allergists-immunologists.

He was founder and served as president of the Alabama

Society of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology 1975-76,

1990-91, and held many other state and county

appointments.

Dr. Lee received numerous honors including ACAAI’s

Distinguished Service Award in 1999, Distinguished Fellow

Award in 1985, and Awards of Appreciation from ACAAI

and JCAAI. He also received the Ira L. Meyers Service Award

from the Medical Association of Alabama in 2004.

Saturday Program


Sunday General Sessions

Breakfast Symposium • Platinum Ballroom 5-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Advances in Ocular Allergy:

Differential Diagnoses and Treatment

Supported by an independent educational grant from Allergan, Inc.

Moderator: Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

6:15 am Welcome and Introductions

Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

7:20 am Epithelial Barrier Defect and Ocular Allergy

Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

6:20 am Differential Diagnosis of Ocular

Allergy/Dry Eye Syndromes: Signs

and Symptoms

Milton Hom, OD



7:50 am Panel: Presentation of Case Discussions

8:15 am Adjourn

6:50 am Treatment Update

William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss questionnaires used to diagnose allergic conjunctivitis

and dry eyes; 2) describe the most common treatments for both conditions; 3) discuss the potential of the epithelial barrier defect

in allergy for lung, skin and eye; and 4) describe the potential impact of ophthalmic treatment on the ocular surface.

Photo courtesy of AOCVCB


Meet the Professor Breakfasts

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

: – : am • Admission by ticket only • Fee $ (FITs $) • Limit:

Supported by an independent educational grant from Merck

S

SOLD OUT

S

SOLD OUT

S

S

S

What Is the Current Status of SLIT

Grand Ballroom AB

Michael S. Blaiss, MD, FACAAI and

Peter S. Creticos, MD

Management of Immunodeficiency

Grand Ballroom CD

I. Celine Hanson, MD, FACAAI and

James Verbsky, MD, PhD

Assessment of Airway Reactivity:

Mannitol vs. Methacholine

Grand Ballroom GH

Aidan A. Long, MD, and

Sheldon L. Spector, MD, FACAAI

Cough in Children and Adults


Grand Ballroom JK

Alan Goldsobel, MD, FACAAI and

Pramod S. Kelkar, MD

Chronic Rhinosinusitis


Platinum Ballroom 1

Larry Borish, MD, FACAAI and

Talal M. Nsouli, MD, FACAAI (Honorary)







Sunday











S

SOLD OUT

S

S

S

S

Office Evaluation of Drug Allergy

Platinum Ballroom 2

Roland Solensky, MD and

Timothy J. Sullivan, MD, FACAAI

Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal


Disease

Platinum Ballroom 3

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI and

Jonathan M. Spergel, MD, PhD, FACAAI

All That Wheezes Is Not Asthma

Platinum Ballroom 4

Rohit K. Katial, MD, FACAAI

Implications of Local Allergic Responses:

Entopy

Platinum Ballroom 8

Mitchell H. Grayson, MD, FACAAI

Food Allergy: Controversies in


Therapy

Platinum Ballroom 9

A. Wesley Burks, MD, FACAAI
















Sunday MTP Breakfasts

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the requirements for SLIT approval in the US;

2) describe studies done in the US for approval of SLIT; 3) describe the mechanistic differences in newer IT approaches including

SLIT, T-cell tolerizing Peptide IT, and modified constructs including adjuvants; 4) evaluate the clinical outcomes of these

therapeutic approaches based on the data from evidence-based clinical trials; 5) discuss the clinical findings from the recent N.

American clinical trials of SLIT-tablet and SLIT-aqueous formulations in seasonal pollen-induced allergic rhinitis; 6) discuss the

diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiencies; 7) state the purpose of bronchoconstriction challenges; 8) contrast

methacholine challenges with mannitol challenges; 9) discuss whether or not mannitol inhalation challenges will replace

methacholine challenges; 10) discuss differential diagnosis and treatment options for chronic cough; 11) describe management

strategies for habit, unexplained, idiopathic cough; 12) discuss differences in causes of chronic cough in children and adults;

13) describe approaches to treatment of chronic, idiopathic cough in adults; 14) discuss chronic hyperplastic sinusitis as it

comprises numerous distinct diseases each with its own pathogenic mechanism; 15) incorporate disease-specific approaches into

patient care and treatment of these distinct diseases; 16) discuss the pathophysiology of sinus disease and state of the art

treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis; 17) evaluate patients presenting with drug allergies with detailed drug allergy history and

available diagnostic testing; 18) manage patients with drug allergy using graded challenge or desensitization procedures;

19) identify from among their practice patients those who are likely to have an eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder, perform the

diagnostic modalities and prescribe the most suitable therapy; 20) summarize the diagnosis criteria for eosinophilic

gastrointestinal disease (EGID); 21) describe management options for EGID; 22) describe what is meant by the term entopy and

how it relates to allergic disease; 23) describe the studies that support or refute the idea of entopy in allergic disease; 24) apply

current management strategies and therapies for IgE-mediated food allergy; 25) discuss the status of food allergen-specific

immunotherapy and other modalities in key clinical trials and studies in food allergy treatment; 26) discuss the differential

diagnosis for the wheezing patient who presents with a diagnosis of asthma; and 27) discuss appropriate evaluation for the

wheezing patient and current as well as new therapeutic options for the severe asthmatic.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Sunday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Developing Competence in Contact Dermatitis

Diagnosis and Treatment

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderator: David I. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI

8:30 am Welcome and Introductions

8:35 am

John P. McGovern Lecture

Defining Contact


Dermatitis: More Than Just a Rash

Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI

9:25 am Dealing Effectively With Contact

Dermatitis: Avoidance and More

Donald Belsito, MD

9:50 am Questions and Discussion

10:00 am Adjourn







9:00 am Diagnosis of Contact Dermatitis:

Beyond the Standard Test Panel

Kristin M. Leiferman, MD



Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) describe causative agents of dermatologic disorders;

2) recognize the range of allergens that may cause allergic contact dermatitis; 3) integrate the clinical presentation of allergic

contact dermatitis with exposures and immunological responses; 4) effectively counsel patients with allergic contact dermatitis in

allergen avoidance; and 5) manage and treat patients with allergic contact dermatitis in whom avoidance is not possible.

10:00 – 10:30 am Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Online Evaluation, Credit Claim and

Certificate System

ACAAI will utilize a convenient online evaluation, credit

claim and certificate system for the 2012 Annual

Scientific Meeting. This system will allow you to complete

evaluations of the certified CME sessions that you attend

which are directly sponsored by ACAAI. Upon completion

of the Overall Evaluation, Session Evaluations and credit

claiming information you will be able to immediately

access, save and/or print your certificate. Physicians will

receive a certificate of credit and other healthcare

professionals will receive a certificate of attendance for

most sessions.

See page 13 for details.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Sunday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Disturbed Sleep Syndromes: More Than Snoring

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderators: Kevin P. McGrath, MD, FACAAI and Maeve E. O’Connor, MD, FACAAI

10:30 am Welcome and Introductions

10:35 am What Does Disturbed Sleep Mean for the

Provider and the Patient

Teofilo Lee-Chiong, MD



11:25 am The Upper Airway and Sleep

Disturbance

Richard D. deShazo, MD, FACAAI

11:50 am Questions and Discussion







11:00 am The Connection Between


Disturbed Sleep and Pulmonary Hypertension

Michael Littner, MD

Noon

Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify sleep disorders that contribute to pulmonary

hypertension; 2) identify the effects of normal sleep on respiratory conditions that contribute to pulmonary hypertension;

3) identify the important interactions between obesity, inflammation and sleep apnea; 4) enumerate the effects of sleep apnea on

various organ systems and neurocognition; 5) appropriately diagnose, treat and refer patients who have sleep disordered

breathing; 6) describe the complexity of the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea and the contributions of the upper

airway to it; 7) identify sleep disorders that contribute to pulmonary hypertension; and 8) identify the effects of normal sleep on

respiratory conditions that contribute to pulmonary hypertension.

Sunday Gen Sessions

Noon – 1:00 pm

Visit Exhibits

Lunch On Own

(Concession Stand Open in Exhibit Hall C)

Noon – 1:00 pm

Poster Session

Hall C

Noon – 3:00 pm

Doctors’ Job Fair

Hall C

1:00 – 3:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions

(See pages 55-58)







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Sunday General Sessions

WAO Symposium • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Current Insights on Eosinophilic Disorders

Moderators: Ruby U. Pawankar, MD, PhD, President, WAO and Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI, President, ACAAI

1:00 pm Welcome and Introductions

1:05 pm Overview of Eosinophil Biology

Hirohito Kita, MD

1:35 pm Eosinophilic Esophagitis:

Current Insights

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI






2:05 pm Targeting Eosinophils in Asthma

and Allied Conditions

Lanny J. Rosenwasser, MD, FACAAI

2:35 pm Questions and Discussion

3:00 pm Adjourn







Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the basic biology of eosinophils and the mechanisms of

eosinophilic disorders; 2) summarize new developments regarding eosinophil biology and Th2-type inflammation; 3) identify from

among their patients the ones who may have an eosinophilic gastrointesitnal disorder; 4) perform appropriate and timely

diagnostic procedures and treat the patients with the most effective treatment; 5) explain the function of eosinophils and

describe the classification of eosinophilic disorders in allergic disease; and 6) outline the treatment of eosinophilic disorders.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Symposium • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Evolving Issues in the Management of Hereditary

Angioedema: Can We Reach a Consensus

Supported by an independent educational grant from ViroPharma Incorporated

3:30 pm Panelists:

Aleena Banerji, MD

Richard G. Gower, MD, FACAAI

David M. Lang, MD, FACAAI

William R. Lumry, MD, FACAAI

















5:30 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) review molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology

of HAE; 2) use established clinical criteria to achieve early and accurate diagnosis of HAE; 3) review evidence-based strategies

for acute and prophylactic management of HAE; and 4) describe management strategies that minimize attack risk in patients

with HAE.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Sunday Concurrent Sessions

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Session A – Adverse Food and Drug Reactions,

Insect Reactions, Anaphylaxis and Food Allergy

Moderators: Helen H. Chan, MD, FACAAI and Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Paramedic Detection of Signs and Symptoms

of Patients Calling for Possible Allergic

Reaction and Anaphylaxis

N. El Sanadi* 1 , P. Rowe-King 1 , D. Erdman 1 ,

K. Raczek 2 , K. Kutzarov 2 , 1. Fort Lauderdale, FL;

2. Miami, FL.

1:15 pm – Allergic Triggers and Profiles of Patients

Calling in a Large Urban Setting

N. El Sanadi* 1 , P. Rowe-King 1 , D. Erdman 1 ,

K. Raczek 2 , K. Kutzarov 2 , 1. Fort Lauderdale, FL;

2. Miami, FL.

1:30 pm – Penicillin Blood and Skin Prick Testing Are

Not Useful for the Clinical Diagnosis of Serious

Systemic Reactions in the United States

J.L. Mutnick*, Morris, MN.

1:45 pm – A Randomized Double Blind Placebo

Controlled Crossover Study of the Effect of

Swallowed Beclomethasone Dipropionate on

Inflammatory Markers in Adult Patients With

Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Pilot Study

G. Ghaffari*, Hershey, PA.

2:00 pm – Anaphylaxis in America: Results From a

National Physician Survey

R. Wood* 1 , C.A. Camargo 2 , P. Lieberman 3 ,

H.A. Sampson 4 , L. Schwartz 5 , F.E. Simons 6 , M. Zitt 7 ,

M. Wilkinson 8 , C. Collins 9 , M. Tringale 9 , J. Boyle 8 ,

1. Baltimore, MD; 2. Boston, MA; 3. Germantown, TN;

4. New York, NY; 5. Richmond, VA; 6. Winnipeg, MB,

Canada; 7. Stony Brook, NY; 8. Silver Spring, MD;

9. Landover, MD.

2:15 pm – Management of Anaphylaxis: Are We

Compliant With the National Guidelines

A. Chouksey*, D. Super, P. Puri, K. Swamy,

Cleveland, OH.

2:30 pm – Age-Dependent Trends in Peanut Allergy

versus Cross-Reactive Pollen Sensitization

J. Thompson* 1 , B. Williams 2 , M. Morris 1 , 1. Onalaska,

WI; 2. Kansas City, MO.

2:45 pm – Surveillance of Alpha-Gal IgE Sensitization in

the United States

J. Hester*, L. Flebbe-Rehwaldt, A. Vatz, M. Altrich,

Lee’s Summit, MO.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) recognize the deficiencies and limitations of paramedic

prehospital assessment of patients with allergic reactions and anaphylaxis; 2) discuss strengths and weaknesses of paramedic

assessment and treatment of patients with allergic reactions and anaphylaxis in a prehospital setting; 3) discuss the limitations of

skin prick and blood testing for penicillin and penicillin-derivative reactions and discuss the danger of anaphylaxis with drug

provocation testing, the gold standard; 4) describe the effects of topical steroid treatment on variouse cytokines in patients with

EoE; 5) recognize potential limitations in the diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis by physicians in the U.S.; 6) discuss

compliance with the national guidelines regarding anaphylaxis and the need for prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent fatal

outcomes and summarize the need to educate patients about home epinephrine use and advise follow up for a definitive workup;

7) distinguish peanut allergy from cross-sensitization and discuss how the prevalence of these conditions changes with the age of

the patient; and 8) identify regions of the United States that have a high prevalence of alpha-gal sensitization.

Concurrent Sessions

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Sunday Concurrent Sessions

Room 303AB • Anaheim Convention Center

Session B – Asthma and Other Lower Airway Disorders

Moderators: Chitra Dinakar, MD, FACAAI and John J. Oppenheimer, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Diagnosis of Asthma at a Resident-Run

Primary Care Clinic

E. Karlin* 1 , M. Tang 2 , P. Korenblat 2 , 1. Nashville, TN;

2. St. Louis, MO.

1:15 pm – Relationship Between Asthma and

Depression: The Cooper Longitudinal Study

T.D. Trojan*, D.A. Khan, L.F. DeFina, E.S. Brown,

Dallas, TX.

1:30 pm – Ambulatory Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide

(Feno) Measurement in Children - Years of Age

J. Hanson*, S. DeLurgio, D. Williams, C. Dinakar,

Kansas City, MO.

1:45 pm – Identification of Ashtha Phenotypes at

MUSC

J.L. Kuhlen*, A.E. Wahlquist, P.J. Nietert, S.N. Bains,

Charleston, SC.

2:00 pm – Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure in

Children From Low-Income Families in Kansas

City and Its Influence on Asthma and IgE

Sensitization

C.E. Ciaccio*, A. DiDonna, C. Barnes,

L. Rosenwasser, J. Portnoy, Kansas City, MO.

2:15 pm – Severe Alpha - Antitrypsin (AAT) Deficiency

in a Patient With Persistent Cough

P. Bajaj*, S. Abbasi, G. Ghaffari, Hershey, PA.

2:30 pm – Assessing Usefulness and Accuracy of

Childhood Asthma Control Test (ACT) at a

University Medical Center in Mississippi

B.Q. Khan*, A. Yates, Jackson, MS.

2:45 pm – Alpha One Antitrypsin Genotypes in an

Asthma Referral Clinic

D.K. Hogarth*, Chicago, IL.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 9) recognize the disparities in medical education regarding

asthma diagnosis; 10) recognize that mild asthmatics may have current depressive symptoms beyond other comorbid conditions

and overall health status; 11) describe the relationship between FENO and multiple clinical variables and recognize office based

FENO measurement as a clinically useful tool in the management of asthma; 12) discuss a new asthmatic classification system and

describe how asthmatic patients are phenotypically classified using the SARP algorithm; 13) summarize the rates of environmental

tobacco smoke exposure in children from low-income families in the Kansas City area and summarize the influence of tobacco

smoke exposure on asthma development and IgE sensitization; 14) recognize that a diagnosis of AAT deficiency should be

considered in a patient with persistent cough or refractory asthma and describe how early diagnosis of AAT deficiency can prevent

pulmonary complications and improve patient outcomes; 15) discuss the accuracy of childhood asthma control test in assessing

asthma control in children in different population groups and educate caregivers about the importance of allowing the child to

answer questions intended for the child; and 16) describe the need for testing for alpha one antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in

asthma patients.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Sunday Concurrent Sessions

Room 303CD • Anaheim Convention Center

Session C – Aerobiology

Moderators: Joseph A. Bellanti, MD, FACAAI and Michael R. Nelson, MD, PhD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Climate Change (CC) and Future Pollen

Production Using Intergovernmental Panel on

Climate Change Scenarios (IPCC): The Year

and

L. Bielory* 1 , Y. Zhang 2 , S. Isukapalli 2 ,

P. Georgopoulos 2 , 1. Springfield, NJ;

2. Piscataway, NJ.

1:15 pm – Ocular and Nasal Allergy in the U.S.,

- (NHANES II Vs III)

P. Panagiotis 1 , L. Bielory* 2 , 1. Piscataway, NJ;

2. Springfield, NJ.

1:30 pm – In Vitro Cross-Allergenicity Between

American Elm, Cedar Elm and Hackberry

D. Rose*, R. Gomez, K. White, San Antonio, TX.

1:45 pm – Sensitization to Pan-Allergen Predicts

Increased Skin Reactivity to Pollen Allergens

in Children

M.B. Hogan* 1 , N.W. Wilson 1 , G. Fenwick 1 , N. Mehta 1 ,

G. Plunkett 2 , E. Richardson 1 , 1. Reno, NV;

2. Redrock, TX.

2:00 pm – U.S. Internet Search Volume for Allergy-

Related Terms Compared With Pollen Counts

(-)

O. Zuckerman 1 , L. Bielory* 2 , 1. New Brunswick, NJ;

2. Springfield, NJ.

2:15 pm – Controlled Birch Pollen Distribution in the

Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU):

Confirmation of the Dispersal System

T. Walker, J. Thiele, C. Hartman, B. Hobsbawn,

A.K. Ellis*, Kingston, ON, Canada.

2:30 pm – Quantification of the Impact of Cleaning on

Surface and Airborne Allergen Associated With

Carpets

A. Southey 1 , V. Mahon 2 , M. Fox 2 , B. Mitchell* 2 ,

1. Dublin, Ireland; 2. Grand Canal Quay, Ireland.

2:45 pm – Identifying Aeroallergen Sensitization

Patterns in New Orleans for Improved

Aeroallegen Extract Selection

K. Anthony*, J.C. Carlson, L.G. Wild, New Orleans, LA.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 17) describe the potential impact of climate change on

aerobiology; 18) discuss the change in allergy skin testing and ocular and nasal symptoms in the United States based on a

national health survey; 19) identify the possible cross allergenicity patterns between American elm, cedar elm, and hackberry;

20) describe the role of pan-allergens in establishing IgE cross-sensitization and discuss how pan-allergen sensitization may alter

immunotherapy prescriptions; 21) discuss the use of internet searching for allergy terms corresponding to pollen counts;

22) explain that the Environmental Exposure Unit can be used as a model for the study of birch pollen allergic individuals;

23) quantify the effect that an intensive carpet cleaning procedure has on airborne particle counts and allergen levels at the

carpet surface; and 24) describe the techniques used for identifying pan allergen sensitizations within a population.

Concurrent Sessions

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Sunday Concurrent Sessions

Room 304CD • Anaheim Convention Center

Session D – Basic Science Allergy & Immunology and

Rhinitis, Other Upper Airway Disorders, Ocular Disorders

Moderators: Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD, FACAAI and Travis A. Miller, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Microrna Expression in Eosinophilic

Esophagitis: A Pilot Study

N. Bhardwaj*, F.T. Ishmael, G. Ghaffari, Hershey, PA.

1:15 pm – Lung Function Impairment in Children With

Allergic Rhinitis

K. Chiong-Manaysay*, A. Andaya, Manila,

Philippines.

1:30 pm – Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-):

A Predictor of Post-Surgical Improvement in

Patients With Chronic Sinusitis

J. Kennedy*, M. Hubbard, P. Huyett, J. Patrie,

L. Borish, S. Payne, Charlottesville, VA.

1:45 pm – Nasal Lavage Cytokine Levels After

Rhinoscopy Directed Allergen Challenge

B. Geng*, H. Wedner, St. Louis, MO

2:00 pm – Pollen and Allergies in a Changing Climate

S. Saha*, Atlanta, GA.

2:15 pm – Allergic Conjunctivitis Symptoms

Correlation With Ocular Surface Disease

Index (OSDI)

M.M. Hom* 1 , A.L. Nguyen 2 , L. Bielory 3 , 1. Azusa, CA;

2. Fullerton, CA; 3. Springfield, NJ.

2:30 pm – Clinical Predictors for the Diagnosis of Vocal

Cord Dysfunction

H.P. Windom*, U. Singh, S. Gorman, J. Bernstein,

Cincinnati, OH.

2:45 pm – High Correlation Between Responses to

Mountain Cedar Pollen in a Pollen Challenge

Chamber Versus Seasonal Exposure

D.A. Ramirez, R.L. Jacobs, N. Harper, W. He, C.

Rather, C.P. Andrews*, S.K. Ahuja, San Antonio, TX.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 25) identify diffential microRNA expression in serum of patients

with eosinophilic esophagitis compared to controls; 26) evaluate children with allergic rhinitis, investigate subtle signs of

obstruction and conduct spirometric measurements even without signs of obstructions as appropriate and discuss the

relationship between allergic rhinitis and asthma in children with allergic rhinitis and concurrent episodes of persistent coughing;

27) discuss the components of the Sino-nasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22) that predict patient improvement after sinus surgery

and recognize which demographic and laboratory data may predict improvement after sinus surgery; 28) discuss techniques for

direct allergen stimulation of the nose and describe the changes in nasal cytokine level that occur rapidly following allergen

stimulation; 29) assess the association between elevated pollen levels and allergic rhinitis outpatient visits and allergy medication

refills; 30) describe the correlation between allergic conjunctivitis symptoms and dryness; 31) discuss the prevalence of vocal cord

dysfunction (VCD) in the US and identify clinical characteristics that predict a diagnosis of VCD; and 32) summarize the advantages

and limitations of potential use of pollen challenge chamber in clinical trials of therapeutic agents for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Monday General Sessions

Breakfast Symposium • Platinum Ballroom 5-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Management of Allergy With Non-Prescription Drugs

Supported in part by an independent educational grant from McNeil Consumer Healthcare

Moderator: Michael B. Foggs, MD, FACAAI

6:15 am What Does History Tell Us:

The Background on OTCs

Michael B. Foggs, MD, FACAAI



7:20 am The Strategies by Allergists for

Adapting to a New Reality

William K. Dolen, MD, FACAAI






6:20 am The “System” Proposed by FDA

Using a New Paradigm

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI





7:50 am Questions and Discussion

8:15 am Adjourn

6:50 am The Economic Impact of a New

System for the United States Using Other

Countries’ Experiences

Michael S. Blaiss, MD, FACAAI




Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) describe options for change as outlined by FDA and

pharmacists; 2) discuss options for change as manifested by pharma: patient-pharmacist-specialist coalition; 3) discuss changes

occurring in the healthcare environment and its effect on switch of prescription to OTC status of allergy medicines; 4) describe

risks and benefits that patients face with the new OTC availability of previously prescribed allergy and asthma medications;

5) discuss how the allergist can educate the patients in order to mitigate the risks associated with inappropriate use of

medications for asthma and the other allergic diseases; 6) discuss what advice can be provided to practicing allergists to cope

with the new and evolving paradigm for drug availability for treatment of asthma and the other allergic diseases; and 7) discuss

the prospects for non-prescription management of asthma and the other allergic diseases.

Monday Gen Sessions







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Meet the Professor Breakfasts

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

: – : am • Admission by ticket only • Fee $ (FITs $) • Limit:

Supported by an independent educational grant from Merck

Monday

M

M

M

M

M

SOLD OUT

How to Use Biomarkers in Diagnosis

and Treatment of Asthma

Grand Ballroom AB

Don A. Bukstein, MD, FACAAI and

Sheldon L. Spector, MD, FACAAI


Evaluation of Immunodeficiency


Grand Ballroom CD

Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI and

Vincent R. Bonagura, MD

Occupational Asthma


Grand Ballroom GH

David I. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI

Indoor Allergens


Grand Ballroom JK

Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, FACAAI and

Jay M. Portnoy, MD, FACAAI

Dermatology for the Allergist


Platinum Ballroom 1

Gerald Gleich, MD and Kristen Leiferman, MD






M

M

M

M

M

HAE

Platinum Ballroom 2

William R. Lumry, MD, FACAAI and

Stephen A. Tilles, MD, FACAAI

Severe Asthma

Platinum Ballroom 3

Dennis K. Ledford, MD, FACAAI

Dynamic Dosing in Asthma


Platinum Ballroom 4

Bradley E. Chipps, MD, FACAAI and

John J. Oppenheimer, MD, FACAAI

Diagnostic Assessment of Airway

Inflammatory Patterns

Platinum Ballroom 8

Neal Jain, MD, FACAAI

Food Allergy: Controversies in

Diagnosis

Platinum Ballroom 9

Karen A. DeMuth, MD, FACAAI and

Chitra Dinakar, MD, FACAAI























Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss broncho-challenge test as marker of inflammation and blocking the

challenge as an indicator of useful treatment; 2) discuss the advantage, disadvantage and limitation of NOe as a marker of inflammation;

3) delineate a role priostin, exhaled breath condensation and eosinophils in the blood and sputum have as markers of inflammation; 4) outline the

role of the biomarker FeNO and others in your daily care of asthma patients; 5) identify key points of the 2011 ATS practice guideline on the clinical

applications of biomarkers; 6) interpret FeNO/Biomarker values to aid in clinical decision making; 7) specify the components of the innate immune

system; 8) evaluate patients for deficiencies in innate immunity; 9) identify patients with deficiencies of the cellular (T-cell) and humoral (B-cell)

immune systems; 10) initiate laboratory evaluation and treatment of patients with T-cell and antibody deficiencies; 11) recognize adult primary

immunodeficiency and how to assess it; 12) identify some primary immunodeficiencies that commonly present in adulthood; 13) describe

approach to evaluation of occupational asthma; 14) identify effective interventions for patients diagnosed with occupational asthma; 15) define

the four components that lead to exposure, including facilitative factors, sources, reservoirs and pathways; 16) prescribe an integrated pest

management program for patients; 17) diagnose and treat problems arising from the indoor environment; 18) identify and work with qualified

home assessors and remediators; 19) discuss indoor allergens; 20) describe the role of environment in allergic disease development and morbidity;

21) utilize intervention strategies in practice; 22) interact in and expand discussions about dermatology problems faced by allergists in practice;

23) become collaborative in common patient care problems that allergists and dermatologists are presented with; 24) discuss the clinical and

laboratory features of hereditary angioedema with abnormal and normal C1-INH level; 25) summarize the current therapeutic options for

treatment of hereditary angioedema; 26) describe an evidence-based and cost-effective approach to diagnosis and management of patients with

hereditary angioedema; 27) list the available prophylactic and abortive treatment options for HAE patients; 28) compare relative costs of various

treatment approaches; 29) complete a more detailed differential diagnosis of severe asthma; 30) develop more effective treatment plans for severe

asthma; 31) discuss the literature regarding indicators of asthma exacerbation and potential interventions that may ameliorate further decay in

control; 32) identify the biologic factors that influence different measures of airway inflammation; 33) distinguish the utility of fractional exhaled

nitric oxide (FeNO), sputum eosinophils (EOS), and measures of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in the diagnostic process of asthma; and

34) identify the role of FeNO, AHR, sputum EOS, periostin and other measures in determining the responsiveness to therapies for asthma; 35) utilize

dynamic dosing in asthma; 36) differentiate between proven and emerging diagnostic tests for food allergy; 37) identify clinical scenarios where

use of component resolved diagnostics might be appropriate in the evaluation of food allergy; 38) discuss the different mechanisms of food allergy

(IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, etc.) and how that relates to testing; and 39) describe the different types of food allergy testing (Food-specific

IgE, Component resolved food specific IgE, skin prick testing, etc.)







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Monday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Are There Differences in Urticaria

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderators: Meagan W. Shepherd, MD and Janna M. Tuck, MD, FACAAI

8:30 am Welcome and Introductions

8:35 am Physical & Contact Urticaria:


Are They Different & What Is the Role of Further

Evaluation

Sandra M. Gawchik, DO, FACAAI

9:00 am

Bernard Berman Memorial Lecture

9:25 am Presented in memory of I. Leonard Bernstein, MD

Chronic Urticaria Management:

More Than Antihistamines

David A. Khan, MD, FACAAI


9:50 am Questions and Discussion

10:00 am Adjourn

Evaluation and


Management of

Pruritus Without Rash

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI



Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify characteristic features of the various forms of physical

urticaria and contact urticaria; 2) identify appropriate current diagnostic procedures; 3) discuss current concept, or lack thereof,

regarding the pathology of the physical and contact urticarias; 4) describe an approach to treatment based on current guidelines;

5) discuss a differential of the issue of pruritis; 6) describe treatment formats from several disciplines in medicine; 7) discuss

limitations and recommendations on testing in chronic urticaria; and 8) utilize alternative agents in refractory chronic urticaria.

10:00 – 10:30 am Refreshment Break in Exhibit Hall

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Online Evaluation, Credit Claim and

Certificate System

ACAAI will utilize a convenient online evaluation, credit

claim and certificate system for the 2012 Annual

Scientific Meeting. This system will allow you to complete

evaluations of the certified CME sessions that you attend

which are directly sponsored by ACAAI. Upon completion

of the Overall Evaluation, Session Evaluations and credit

claiming information you will be able to immediately

access, save and/or print your certificate. Physicians will

receive a certificate of credit and other healthcare

professionals will receive a certificate of attendance for

most sessions.

See page 13 for details.

Monday Gen Sessions







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Monday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Maintenance of Certification and the Allergist

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderators: Chitra Dinakar, MD, FACAAI and Lyndon E. Mansfield, MD, FACAAI

10:30 am Welcome and Introductions

10:35 am The ABAI MOC Perspective and

Navigating the Process

Mary Beth Fasano, MD, FACAAI

11:00 am The MOC Non-enrolled Allergist

Charles J. Siegel, MD, FACAAI





Y

Y

11:25 am The MOC Compliant Allergist

Mark L. Corbett, MD, FACAAI

11:50 am Questions and Discussion

Noon Adjourn






Y

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) list the four components of the ABAI Maintenance of

Certification (MOC) program; 2) describe how to access, navigate and utilize the ABAI Web Portal for MOC; 3) question the

necessity of a board certified allergist to have ongoing Maintenance of Certification (MOC) by the American Board of Allergy and

Immunology (ABAI); 4) critique the current ABAI MOC format; 5) decide the relevance of enrolling in the ABAI MOC program by

individuals who are diplomates of the ABAI and hold a time unlimited certificate; 6) describe reasons Maintenance of Certification

(MOC) is necessary for allergists; and 7) discuss potential benefits of participating in MOC.

Noon – 1:00 pm

Visit Exhibits

Lunch On Own

(Concession Stand Open in Exhibit Hall C)

1:00 – 3:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions

(See pages 63-66)







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Monday Concurrent Sessions

Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Session A – Clinical Immunology, Immunodeficiency

Moderators: Stuart L. Abramson, MD and Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Underutilization of Self/Home On-Demand

Treatment for Attacks of Hereditary Angioedema:

Results of International Physician Survey

P. Bajaj*, M. Dispenza, T. Craig, Hershey, PA.

1:15 pm – Safety and Efficacy of Escalating Doses of

C Esterase Inhibitor [Human] as Prophylaxis in

Patients With Hereditary Angioedema (HAE)

J. Bernstein* 1 , M. Manning 2 , H. Li 3 , M.V. White 4 ,

J. Baker 5 , W.R. Lumry 6 , M. Davis-Lorton 7 ,

K. Jacobson 8 , R.G. Gower 9 , C. Broom 10 , D. Fitts 10 ,

J. Schranz 10 , 1. Cincinnati, OH; 2. Scottsdale, AZ;

3. Chevy Chase, MD; 4. Wheaton, MD; 5. Lake

Oswego, OR; 6. Dallas, TX; 7. Mineola, NY; 8. Eugene,

OR; 9. Spokane, WA; 10. Exton, PA.

1:30 pm – The Role of the Immune System in Cystic

Fibrosis: Benefits of IVIG

I. Melamed*, A. Testori, A. McDonald, Centennial, CO.

1:45 pm – B Cell Depletion in An Infant Exposed to

R-CHOP in Utero: Report of a Case

R. Mittel*, J.J. Kulik, Chicago, IL.

2:00 pm – Residual NADPH Oxidase Activity and

Isolated Lung Involvement in X-Linked Chronic

Granulomatous Disease

M.J. Gutierrez*, G.D. McSherry, F.T. Ishmael,

A.A. Horwitz, G.R. Nino, Hershey, PA.

2:15 pm – The Effect of Demographics on IgG, IgA and

IgM in a Large Pediatric Population With

Recurrent Infections

A. Mehta* 1 , G. Ye 2 , S.J. McGeady 1 , C. Chang 1 ,

1. Philadelphia, PA; 2. Orlando, FL.

2:30 pm – All in the Family: Siblings Diagnosed With

C Deficiency After Nongroupable

Meningococcal Meningitis

B.A. Locke* 1 , M.K. Hintermeyer 2 , J.M. Routes 2 ,

J.W. Verbsky 2 , 1. Marshall, WI; 2. Milwaukee, WI.

2:45 pm – Variable Clinical Phenotype in a Kindred

With STAT Deficiency/Hyper-IgE Syndrome

A.W. Boyd* 1 , T. Atkinson 2 , H. Schroeder 2 ,

A. Cajacob 2 , 1. Gainesville, AL; 2. Birmingham, AL.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 33) discuss that HAE attacks may be effectively treated by ondemand

self/home treatment and recognize that recommended self/home treatment is minimally utilized by physicians treating

HAE at international level; 34) summarize the results of an open-label study of a C1 esterase inhibitor [human] dose escalation in

patients with hereditary angioedema; 35) recognize the various forms of cystic fibrosis mutations and the benefit of IVIg therapy;

36) discuss the potential complications in the newborn of in utero exposure to B cell-depleting chemotherapy agents, such as

CHOP alone or combined with rituximab (R-CHOP) and summarize the associated immunologic defects, notably absence of

peripheral blood B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia in the newborn, and the appropriate management of these defects;

37) identify chronic granulomatous disease as a disorder with variable phenotype that correlates closely with residual NADPH

oxidase activity independenly of the gene affected; 38) identify and discuss how demographics can affect immunoglobulin levels;

39) discuss terminal complement deficiencies, despite no previous infections and describe the familial nature of some

immunodeficiencies; and 40) identify clinical features of autosomal dominant Hyper-IgE syndrome and unique features of

this kindred.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Ballroom B-E Foyer

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Concurrent Sessions


Monday Concurrent Sessions

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Session B – Food Allergy

Moderators: Karen A. DeMuth, MD, FACAAI and Santiago E. Martinez, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Microarray Component Testing in

Association With IgE Mediated Food Allergy: A

Retrospective Analysis Assessing Performance of

Multiple Versus Individual Components

I. Fung* 1 , J.S. Kim 2 , J.M. Spergel 1 , 1. Philadelphia, PA;

2. New York, NY.

1:15 pm – The High Economic Burden of Childhood

Food Allergy in the United States

R. Gupta*, L. Bilaver, D. Holdford, A. Dyer, C.H. Lau,

J. Pongracic, J.L. Holl, D. Meltzer, Chicago, IL.

1:30 pm – Childhood Food Allergy Tolerance and

Associated Factors

R. Gupta*, C.H. Lau, E.E. Springston, B. Smith,

J. Pongracic, S.M. Boudreau-Romano, J.L. Holl,

Chicago, IL.

1:45 pm – Poor Predictability of Specific IgE and Skin

Prick Testing to Sesame as Demonstrated by Oral

Food Challenge

J. Kattan*, J.A. Lieberman, M. Vitale, H.A. Sampson,

A.L. Cox, New York, NY.

2:00 pm – Identifying Characteristics in Egg-Allergic

Subjects to Predict Heated Egg Tolerance:

A Retrospective Review

N.U. Swamy*, M. Crain, J.A. Bird, Dallas, TX.

2:15 pm – Investigation of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in

Adults Using Skin Testing, ImmunoCAP, and

ImmunoCAP ISAC IgE Quantitation

A. Tripathi* 1 , L.J. Workman 1 , C.B. Cho 2 , A.S. Clark 1 ,

R.G. Hamilton 3 , T.A. Platts-Mills 1 , E.A. Erwin 2 ,

1. Charlottesville, VA; 2. Columbus, OH;

3. Baltimore, MD.

2:30 pm – Baked Egg Oral Food Challenges:

A Single-Center Pediatric Hospital Experience

R.W. Saltzman*, M. Kelleher, J.M. Spergel,

Philadelphia, PA.

2:45 pm – A Significant Proportion of Patients With

Symptoms During an Oral Food Challenge Can

Successfully Complete the Challenge

I. Mikhail* 1 , L. Arnold 2 , S. Mancia 2 , H. Robinson 2 ,

A. Sprunger 2 , A. Troger 2 , D. Mansoor 2 , C. Nguyen 2 ,

H. Sharma 2 , 1. Arlington, VA; 2. Washington, DC.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 41) discuss the use of microarray in the diagnosis of food allergy

and summarize the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of this technique in clinical practice; 42) summarize the direct and

indirect costs of childhood food allergy and discuss major components of both the direct and indirect costs; 43) discuss the

frequency of tolerance to food allergy among children in the US and identify food allergies that children are likely to outgrow and

discuss symptoms and other factors associated with the development of tolerance; 44) discuss the limitations of current

diagnostic testing for sesame allergy; 45) identify characteristics that predict heated egg tolerance in egg-allergic subjects;

46) discuss food and aeroallergen sensitivity patterns in adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) through skin and serum

IgE testing with component analysis, as related to dietary therapy and disease management; 47) discuss the emerging phenotypes

of food allergy (heated egg, native egg) and implications for development of tolerance; and 48) discuss possible outcomes of oral

food challenges following signs or symtoms during the challenge.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Ballroom B-E Foyer

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Monday Concurrent Sessions

Room 303AB • Anaheim Convention Center

Session C – Allergy Testing, Clinical Laboratory Immunology,

Immunotherapy/Immunizations and Other

Moderators: Ira Finegold, MD, FACAAI and J. Andrew Grant, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Are Primary Care Offices Equipped to

Handle AIT Related Adverse Events

R.E. Parker* 1 , M. Lunn 2 , 1. South Portland, ME;

2. Portland, ME.

1:15 pm – A Comparative Study of the SPT and

Specific IgE in Patients of Bronchial Asthma

and Rhinitis

R. Kumar*, G. Mahakud, M. Kumar, I. Bisht,

S. Mathew, Delhi, India.

1:30 pm – Safety of Subcutaneous Allergy

Immunotherapy in Children < Years of Age With

Recurrent Wheeze

R.J. Epstein* 1 , Y. Pichardo 2 , R. Nazari 2 , M. Chin 2 ,

A. Wiznia 2 , D. Rosenstreich 2 , G. de Vos 2 , 1. New York,

NY; 2. Bronx, NY.

1:45 pm – Influence of Allergen Specific

Immunotherapy on Mitogen-Activated Protein

Kinase in Blood Serum of House Dust Mite

Allergic Patients

R. Gawlik* 1 , B. Jawor 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Katowice,

Poland; 2. Gardner, MA.

2:00 pm – Systemic Reactions to Inhalant

Immunotherapy in an Academic Practice Using

: Target Dosing

A. DeZure*, C.L. Holland, K.M. Samuels, E. Reed,

J. Postma, J.L. Baldwin, M.J. Greenhawt, Ann

Arbor, MI.

2:15 pm – Safe and Effective Rush Immunotherapy:

A Cumulative Experience of Patients

W. Smits 1 , J.T. Inglefield* 2 , 1. Fort Wayne, IN;

2. Hickory, NC.

2:30 pm – Improving the Quality of Care for

Hereditary Angioedema Patients

G. Sabharwal*, T.J. Craig, Hershey, PA.

2:45 pm – Is Localized Seminal Plasma

Hypersensitivity Associated With Infertility

J. Bernstein, J.S. Tan*, Cincinnati, OH.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 49) discuss adverse events related to allergen immunotherapy

(AIT) as well as the primary care physician’s role in administering AIT and summarize the practice parameters and up to date

protocols used in the event of an adverse reaction; 50) discuss the standard tools used to measure different allergens;

51) summarize the safety and severity of local and systemic reactions of immunotherapy in children less than 4 years of age;

52) discuss the influence of allergen specific immunotherapy on mitogen-activated protein kinase in serum of house dust mite

allergic patients; 53) identify risk factors for systemic reactions to subcutaneous immunotherapy, as well as the risks that may

result from dosing of subcutaneous immunotherapy at 1:1 maintenance target, in a large, academic population and describe

which aspects of use of 1:1 maintenance target dosing show equivocal safety to use of lesser concentration maintenance dosing;

54) discuss rapid desensitization and that premedication reduces systemic reaction rates and recognize that lower targeted end

point dosages for rapid desensitization minimizes anaphylaxis; 55) care for hereditary angioedema patients in accordance with

evidence based guidelines; and 56) identify the relationship between localized SPH and infertil and discuss the lack of correlation

between treatment response to localized SPH and infertility.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Ballroom B-E Foyer

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Concurrent Sessions


Monday Concurrent Sessions

Room 303CD • Anaheim Convention Center

Session D – Pharmacology/Pharmacotherapeutics

and Skin Disorders

Moderators: Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI and Jay M. Portnoy, MD, FACAAI

1:00 pm – Omalizumab in the Treatment of Severe

Refractory Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria

C. Song*, S. Stern, S. Maclachlan, N. Leader,

G.L. Sussman, Toronto, ON, Canada.

1:15 pm – Paramedic Assessment and Treatment of

Patients With Allergic Reactions and Anaphylaxis

in a Large Urban Pre-Hospital System

N. El Sanadi* 1 , P. Rowe-King 1 , D. Erdman 1 ,

K. Raczek 2 , K. Kutzarov 2 , 1. Fort Lauderdale, FL;

2. Miami, FL.

1:30 pm – Efficacy and Retention of Epinepherine

Auto-Injector Training

R.Q. Chaudhry* 1 , A. Wolff 2 , 1. Jersey City, NJ;

2. Newark, NJ.

1:45 pm – Comparison of Treatments for Chronic

Idiopathic Urticaria

J. Stitt*, R. Katial, Denver, CO.

2:00 pm – Nickel and Cobalt Content in Cell Phones in

the United States

T. Mucci*, A. Shaikh, M. Davis-Lorton, M.R. Aquino,

L.S. Fonacier, Mineola, NY.

2:15 pm – High-Dose Bilastine Is Effective in Reducing

Temperature Thresholds in Cold Contact

Urticaria

K. Krause*, A. Spohr, M.K. Church, T. Zuberbier,

M. Maurer, Berlin, Germany.

2:30 pm – A Case of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

Presenting as Steroid-Dependent Eczema

D.S. Gupta* 1 , J. Boggavarapu 2 , C.H. Kirkpatrick 3 ,

S.C. Dreskin 3 , 1. Denver, CO; 2. Lakewood, CO;

3. Aurora, CO.

2:45 pm – Asthma Symptoms: Potential Guide to the

Persistence of Atopic Dermatitis

J.P. Garrett*, D.J. Margolis, Philadelphia, PA.

3:00 pm Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 57) discuss omalizumab as an effective treatment for severe

chronic refractory idiopathic urticaria, and that it may induce complete remission in some patients and describe the effects of

omalizumab in the management of severe chronic refractory idiopathic urticaria that may be evident at a low dose (150 mg

subcutaneously); 58) discuss strengths and weaknesses of paramedic (prehospital) treatment for allergic reactions and

anaphylaxis; 59) describe deficiencies in current training of auto-injector usage and discuss practical methods of auto-injector

training for patient's who require epinephrine; 60) identify the rate of response of chronic urticaria patients to antihistamines and

name several immunomodulatory therapies for antihistamine resistant chronic urticaria; 61) identify nickel and cobalt content in

cellular phones and educate patients with a history of allergic contact dermatitis to these metals as to which phones are nickel

and cobalt free; 62) diagnose and treat cold contact urticaria more effectively; 63) identify patients with dermatitis who should be

screened for cutaneous T cell lymphoma and describe the diagnostic utility of an assay for T cell receptor clonality; and 64) list

specific symptoms that are consistent with asthma and summarize the symptoms of asthma that may influence control of atopic

dermatitis symptoms.

3:00 – 3:30 pm Refreshment Break in Ballroom B-E Foyer

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


Monday General Sessions

Symposium • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

FeNO: A Paradigm Shift in Personalized Asthma Management

Monday Gen Sessions

Supported by an independent educational grant from Aerocrine

Moderator: James M. Seltzer, MD, FACAAI

3:30 pm Welcome and Introductions

James M. Seltzer, MD, FACAAI

3:35 pm Overview of FeNO in the Pathophysiology of

Inflammatory Airway Disease

Warner W. Carr, MD, FACAAI

4:05 pm Role of FeNO in the Diagnosis of

Asthma and Non-Specific Respiratory

Symptoms

Neal Jain, MD, FACAAI



4:35 pm Health Economic Impact of Using

FeNO in Asthma Diagnosis and Management

Myron J. Zitt, MD, FACAAI

5:05 pm Questions and Discussion

5:30 pm Adjourn


Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify the key biologic process that results in the

upregulation of iNOS and the production of FeNO; 2) demonstrate the utility of FeNO as a marker of likelihood to respond to ICS

in asthma and other respiratory conditions; 3) compare the utility of FeNO to other modalities in the diagnosis of the complex

clinical syndrome that is asthma; 4) recognize the economic impact of asthma; and 5) discuss the role of fractional exhaled nitric

oxide (FeNO), a measurement of airway inflammation (“Inflammometry”), to improve outcomes, in an effort to decrease costs.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Annual Business Meeting

Platinum Ballroom 5-6 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Tribute to Our Past Presidents

NOT FOR

CREDIT

The College will pay tribute to its leaders at the Past Presidents’ Breakfast, 7:00 am, Tuesday, in the Platinum Ballroom 5-6

at the Anaheim Marriott Hotel. All registrants and their registered spouses/guests are invited to join in the tribute at the

complimentary breakfast. The ACAAI Annual Business Meeting will follow the breakfast.

7:00 am

Past Presidents’ Breakfast

All registrants invited

7:30 am Annual Business Meeting

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

President, American College of Allergy,

Asthma & Immunology

Annual Business Meeting

7:30 – 8:45 am, Tuesday

Agenda

I. Call to Order – Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

II. Approval of 2011 Minutes and Standing Rules – Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

III. Historian’s Report – Joseph A. Bellanti, MD, FACAAI

IV. Alliance President’s Address –Rebecca A. Goldberg, RN

V. Recognition of Retiring Regents – Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

VI. Nominating Committee Report and Election of Officers – Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI

VII. Presentation of New Officers and Regents – Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

VIII. Installation of New President – Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

IX. President’s Acceptance – Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

X. Presentation to Retiring President – Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

XI. New Business – Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

XII. Adjournment – Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI


Tuesday General Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderator: Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

9:00 am

Bela Schick Lecture

The Future of


Allergy: What Would Bela Do

James L. Sublett, MD, FACAAI

Upon completion of this session, the participants should be able to: 1) improve patient care by applying the concept of patientfocused

care; 2) improve patient care by embracing practice parameters; and 3) improve community awareness of allergists

through public relations.

Tuesday Gen Sessions

Plenary Session • Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Integrative Medicine for the Allergist-Immunologist

Supported by an independent educational grant from Mylan Specialty L.P.

Moderator: Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

9:30 am Welcome and Introductions

10:25 am

Anjuli S. Nayak Lecture

9:35 am Integrative Medicine and


Allergy-Immunology: Why Should We Care

Use of Traditional Chinese

Medicine in Food Allergy

Gailen D. Marshall, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Julie Wang, MD

10:00 am Use of Herbals in Our Allergy

Practices: Whether You Like it or Not

William S. Silvers, MD, FACAAI 10:50 am Questions and Discussion


Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) describe the components of care that define integrative

medicine; 2) define how an integrative approach, including conventional, complementary and spiritual aspects, can be used to

provide optimal care for allergy, asthma and immunology patients; 3) identify potential uses and adverse effects of herbs and

vitamin supplements in allergic and immunologic disorders for application in their practices; 4) demonstrate an increased

understanding of the impact and importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in the United States moving

forward, resulting in improved communication of alternative options to the patient; 5) discuss the effects of Traditional Chinese

Medicine (FAHF-2) in a murine model of food allergy; and 6) describe recent clinical trials using FAHF-2 for food allergic patients.

11:00 am Meeting Adjourns







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course

Grand Ballroom E • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Separate Registration Fee • Admission by ticket only

Friday

Target Audience: Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, allergy/immunology nurses, other health care providers with extensive

experience, and physicians.

Overview: This course is designed for those in advanced practice, including allied health professionals and physicians who want to

network with other professionals, interactively learn state-of-the-art treatment of asthma, allergy-related dermatologic conditions,

hereditary angioedema, recurrent infections, eosinophilic esophagitis, pulmonary function testing, updated pharmacotherapy in

allergic and respiratory disease, and the use of technology in patient education.

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss signs and symptoms, testing and

treatment of recurrent infections; 2) discuss presentation, diagnostic testing and treatment options for hereditary angioedema;

3) describe and discuss most common skin rashes seen in an A/A/I office; 4) discuss presentation, testing and treatment of severe

and difficult-to-treat asthma; 5) discuss and apply current technology to teach patients in A/A/I practice; 6) discuss and interpret

pharmacotherapy for asthma; and 7) identify various presentations for eosinophilic esophagitis; and 8) discuss up-to-date

pharmacotherapy for asthma, COPD, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and sinusitis.

Nursing Accreditation: Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 14486 for

8.7 contact hours.

Moderator: Deidra H. Sanders MSN, FNP-BC

Moderator: Charlotte M. Jacobsen, RN, MSN

8:00 am Introduction

Deidra H. Sanders MSN, FNP-BC

8:05 am Recurrent Infections

Paul V. Williams, MD, FACAAI

8:55 am Angioedema/HAE

Aleena Banerji, MD

9:45 am Refreshment Break (Foyer)






10:00 am Rashes and Itches in an

Allergy Practice

David R. Weldon, MD, FACAAI


10:50 am Severe and Difficult to Control

Asthma (Problem Based Learning format)

Gwen Carlton, DNP, AE-C and

Ray S. Davis, MD, FACAAI

11:40 am Allergy and Asthma Education in an

Ever-Changing World of Technology

Kathy Chojnacki, RN, MSN, CPNP-AC and

Jodi Shroba, RN, MSN, CPNP


12:30 pm Lunch (on your own)







Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) list criteria for when patients should be evaluated for an

immunodeficiency; 2) order preliminary tests appropriate for the type of infections presented; 3) discuss the pathophysiology of

hereditary angioedema; 4) discuss the clinical presentation and evaluation of hereditary angioedema; 5) develop a management

approach for both acute and prophylactic therapies for hereditary angioedema; 6) define the differential diagnoses for the most

common rashes seen in an allergist's practice; 7) recognize common dermatoses found in an allergist's practice; 8) interactively

discuss the differential diagnosis of a patient with exercise-induced dyspnea; 9) evaluate and treat a patient with exercise-induced

dyspnea in an interactive PBL group discussion; 10) recognize the expanding role of technology in health care education and the

benefits of using mobile devices and smart applications in patient education and treatment; and 11) describe current applications

that are available for allergy and asthma patients.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Advanced Practice Health Care Providers Course

1:30 – 3:00 pm

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Separate Registration Fee • Admission by ticket only

Friday

Interactive Concurrent Workshops

3:15 – 4:45 pm

AP Pulmonary Function Testing for

Advanced Practice

Grand Ballroom E

Mary Kay Bossard BS, RRT, AE-C and

Concettina Tolomeo, DNP, AE-C

AP Eosinophilic Esophagitis, GER,

FPIES: Belly Pain

Grand Ballroom AB

Seema S. Aceves, MD, PhD

AP Pharmacology for


Advanced Practice

Grand Ballroom CD

Maureen George PhD, RN, AE-C and

Mary Lou Hayden MS, FNP-BC, AE-C

3:00 pm Refreshment Break (Grand Ballroom Foyer)

AP Pulmonary Function Testing for

Advanced Practice

Grand Ballroom E

Mary Kay Bossard BS, RRT, AE-C and

Concettina Tolomeo, DNP, AE-C

AP Eosinophilic Esophagitis, GER,

FPIES: Belly Pain

Grand Ballroom AB

Seema Aceves, MD, PhD

AP Pharmacology for


Advanced Practice

Grand Ballroom CD

Maureen George PhD, RN, AE-C and

Mary Lou Hayden MS, FNP-BC, AE-C

4:45 pm Adjourn

Health Care Providers

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify indications and measurements related to spirometry;

2) identify indications and measurements related to spirometry; 3) list possible results of spirometry and steps for interpretation of

spirometry; 4) explain the clinical presentations and differences between GERD, EoE and FPIES; 5) compare and contrast the

mechanisms of action of the different bronchodilators used in patients who have both asthma and COPD; 6) explore alternative

explanations for "steroid resistance"; 7) discuss recently approved and some investigational medications for allergic rhinitis and

allergic conjunctivitis; 8) discuss 2012 recommendations from IDSA for treatment of acute sinusitis; and 9) discuss patient and

family education regarding newer medications.

In an effort to be

environmentally responsible,

ACAAI is reducing the amount of paper we use at our

annual meeting. Electronic program materials and online

materials will replace paper and will be accessible online

before, during and after the program.

Visit acaai.conferencespot.com or snap the QR

code for a menu of online materials.


ONLINE

MATERIALS







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Allied Health Professionals Course

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Saturday Interactive Panels

Separate Registration Fee • Admission by ticket only

Target Audience: Health professionals including, but not limited to, RNs, LPNs/LVNs, NPs, PAs, RTs, and medical assistants.

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the risk factors and diagnosis

of acute and chronic sinusitis and the pros and cons of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment; 2) identify various

presentations and state-of-the-art diagnostic testing and treatment options for eosinophilic esophagitis, vocal cord

dysfunction, anaphylaxis, common rashes and ocular allergy; 3) discuss the impact of culture and health literacy and develop

culturally and literacy appropriate educational materials; 4) perform accurate basic spirometry; 5) discuss performance and

interpretation of pulmonary function testing and apply to patient case presentations; 6) discuss risk factors, presentation, and

treatment of pharmacotherapy in A/A/I practice and appropriate patient/family education; and 7) describe ordering,

interpretation and patient/family education associated with most commonly ordered laboratory tests in A/A/I practice.

Accreditation: Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 14486, for 12.0 contact hours.

Moderator: Maureen George PhD, RN, AE-C

Moderator: Mary Lou Hayden, RN, MS, FNP-BC, AE-C

8:00 am Welcome

David A. Khan, MD, FACAAI and

Mary Lou Hayden, RN, MS, FNP-BC, AE-C

10:00 am Dermatology in the Allergy

Office

Jeannette Arnold, NP







8:05 am Sinusitis

Sheldon L. Spector, MD, FACAAI

8:55 am Eosinophilic Esophagitis, GER,

FPIES: Belly Pain

Seema S. Aceves, MD, PhD

9:45 am Refreshment Break (back of room)









10:50 am Cultural Diversity and Health

Literacy

Maureen George PhD, RN, AE-C


11:40 am Questions and Answers/Panel Discussion

Noon Lunch (on your own)




Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the pathogenesis, the etiology, predisposing factors

and diagnosis of acute sinusitis; 2) contrast the microbiology and treatment of acute and chronic sinusitis; 3) explain the clinical

presentation of EoE and explain the differences between EoE and GERD; 4) explain the clinical presentation of FPIES; 5) discuss key

clinical indicators toward identifying some of the most common skin dermatoses found in the allergy office; 6) identify

pathologies associated with chronic urticaria; 7) describe reasons why knowledge alone is not sufficient to explain, predict and

modify patient self-management behaviors; 8) implement an approach for obtaining culturally relevant perspectives of health and

health literacy levels; and 9) modify teaching plan based on one of these.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Allied Health Professionals Course

Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Saturday Interactive Concurrent Workshops

2:00 – 3:15 pm

3:30 – 4:45 pm

SA Hands-on Basic


Spirometry

Grand Ballroom AB

Mary Kay Bossard BS, RRT, AE-C and

Karen Gregory, DNP, AE-C

SA Advanced PFT: What to Order


and How to Interpret

Grand Ballroom CD

Concettina Tolomeo, DNP

SA Obstructive Sleep


Apnea

Grand Ballroom GH

Gwen Carlton, DNP and Kimberly Clay, NP

SA Competency and


Procedural Skills

Grand Ballroom JK

Cheryl A. Blackwell, RN and Deidra Sanders, NP

SA Allergen Extracts:


Evidence-based Vaccines Orange County 1 & 2

Cheryl Bernstein, BSN

SA Pharmacology in Allergy


and Asthma: Update and Orange County 3 & 4

Patient/Family Education

Maureen George PhD, RN, AE-C and

Mary Lou Hayden, RN, MS, FNP-BC, AE-C

3:15 pm Refreshment Break (Grand Ballroom Foyer)

SA Hands-on Basic


Spirometry

Grand Ballroom AB

Mary Kay Bossard BS, RRT, AE-C and

Karen Gregory, DNP, AE-C

SA Advanced PFT: What to Order


and How to Interpret

Grand Ballroom CD

Concettina Tolomeo, DNP

SA Obstructive Sleep


Apnea

Grand Ballroom GH

Gwen Carlton, DNP and Kimberly Clay, NP

SA Competency and


Procedural Skills

Grand Ballroom JK

Cheryl A. Blackwell, RN and Deidra Sanders, NP

SA Allergen Extracts:


Evidence-based Vaccines Orange County 1 & 2

Cheryl Bernstein, BSN

SA Pharmacology in Allergy


and Asthma: Update and Orange County 3 & 4

Patient/Family Education

Maureen George PhD, RN, AE-C and

Mary Lou Hayden, RN, MS, FNP-BC, AE-C

4:45 pm Adjourn

Health Care Providers

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) identify ATS criteria for performance of spirometry;

2) demonstrate proper procedure for obtaining a valid, reproducible test and recognize two problems that may result in

inaccurate or invalid tests; 3) list indications for at least three different types of pulmonary function tests; 4) describe how to

interpret at least 2 different pulmonary function tests; 5) assess patients for the presence of signs and symptoms related to sleep

apnea and select which patients would benefit from referrals for sleep studies; 6) offer patients advice with regard to treatments

for sleep apnea and discuss the relationship between asthma & OSAS; 7) develop a comprehensive approach to assess the

cognitive and psychomotor skills of clinical staff to promote optimal patient care delivery; 8) describe how the identification of

staff strengths and weaknesses associated with procedure performance can be fostered, remediated and incorporated into the

annual review process; 9) describe the methods used to decrease the risk of bacterial contamination during extract preparation

and mixing; 10) discuss compliance with USP chapter 797; 11) describe the qualifications and certification process of the

compounding personnel; 12) compare and contrast priming, care and administration requirements for asthma MDIs and DPIs;

13) implement discussion of black box warnings to address a variety of patient concerns; 14) discuss recently approved

medication for allergic rhinitis and allergic conjunctivitis; 15) discuss pertinent patient and family education regarding

pharmacotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis; and 16) discuss 2012 recommendations from IDSA for the treatment of sinusitis.







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Allied Health Professionals Course

Ballroom A (3rd Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

Sunday Interactive Panels

Moderator: Kimberly Clay, NP

Moderator: Gwen Carlton DNP, AE-C

8:00 am Ocular Allergy

Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

8:50 am Anaphylaxis

David A. Khan, MD, FACAAI

9:40 am Refreshment Break (back of room)




10:00 am Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Diagnosis

and Treatment

Stephen A. Tilles, MD, FACAAI and

Karen Drake, MA, SLP


10:50 am Common Labs in Allergy


Christine Wagner, MSN, CPNP, FNP-BC, AE-C





11:40 am Question and Answer/Panel Discussion

Noon

Adjourn

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) recognize the various clinical presentations of anaphylaxis;

2) describe the various etiologies of anaphylaxis; and 3) discuss the appropriate management of anaphylaxis; 3) describe the

major phenotypes of vocal cord dysfunction and how they are diagnosed; 4) feel confident with how speech pathologists

employ relaxed breathing exercises as a treatment for vocal cord dysfunction; 5) identify commonly ordered tests used in

allergy/immunology practice; 6) discuss what are normal vs abnormal results; and 7) describe appropriate patient education for

abnormal test results.

In an effort to be

environmentally responsible,

ACAAI is reducing the amount of paper we use at our

annual meeting. Electronic program materials and online

materials will replace paper and will be accessible online

before, during and after the program.

Visit acaai.conferencespot.com or snap the QR

code for a menu of online materials.


ONLINE

MATERIALS







See page 17 for ACGME Competencies. • Y Sessions that may be of interest to young physicians.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

All Scientific Posters will be on display in Hall C beginning Saturday morning. Authors of these posters are requested to be

at their poster to discuss their work from 12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and from Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday.

Adverse Food and Drug Reactions, Insect

Reactions, Anaphylaxis

P

Utility of a Web Site Based Database of Drug

Allergy: Perceptions of Staff Allergists in Canada

T. Pun* 1 , Z. Abdurrahman 2 , A. Noyek 3 , R. Warrington 1 ,

1. Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 2. Hamilton, ON, Canada;

3. Toronto, ON, Canada.

P Successful Desensitization Protocol to L-

Asparaginase in a Boy With Acute Lymphoblastic

Leukemia

C.T. Quezada-Chalita* 1 , M. Castells 2 , G. Castellanos 3 ,

1. Mexico City, DF, Mexico; 2. Boston, MA; 3. Tepic, NA,

Mexico.

P High Dose Fluconazole Desensitization

M. Demirjian* 1 , J.S. Yusin 2 , 1. Granada Hills, CA; 2. Los

Angeles, CA.

P Rates of Honey Bee Sting Anaphylaxis in San

Antonio During “Honey Bee Colony Collapse”

B. Coons*, J. Quinn, San Antonio, TX.

P A Case of Post-Procedure Anaphylaxis

A. Trikha*, R.S. Bonds, Galveston, TX.

P Rapid Oral Desensitization to Trimethoprim-

Sulfamethoxazole in a Child of Years Old

With AIDS

G.A. Ricartti Humarán*, B.E. Del Rio Navarro, J. Del

Rio C, M.A. Rosas Vargas, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

P A Case of IgE Mediated Anaphylaxis to Peppermint

R. Bayat, R. Borici-Mazi*, Kingston, ON, Canada.

P A Retrospective Database Study of US Patients

Treated in the Emergency Department (ED) or

Hospital With Anaphylaxis: Factors Associated

With Severe Anaphylaxis

S. Clark 1 , S. Rudders 2 , W. Wei* 3 , C. Camargo 4 , 1. New

York, NY; 2. Providence, RI; 3. Bridgewater, NJ;

4. Boston, MA.

P Infliximab-Graded Challenge in a Patient With

Crohn’s Disease and Adalimumab Hypersensitivity

C. Song* 1 , J. Quirt 2 , J.K. Lee 1 , 1. Toronto, ON, Canada;

2. Hamilton, ON, Canada.

P A Retrospective Database Study of US Patients

With an Emergency Department (ED) Visit or

Hospitalization for Stinging Insect Anaphylaxis

S. Rudders 1 , S. Clark 2 , W. Wei* 3 , C. Camargo 4 ,

1. Providence, RI; 2. New York, NY; 3. Bridgewater, NJ;

4. Boston, MA.

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Ethosuximide Associated Drug-Induced

Hypersensitivity Syndrome

M.L. Tierce*, E. McGrath, J. Montejo, M. Pansare,

Detroit, MI.

An Unusual Case of Aspirin Desensitization

K. Farnam* 1 , S.S. Teuber 2 , 1. Sacramento, CA;

2. Davis, CA.

Successful Desensitization to Antithymocyte

Globulin in a Child With Severe Aplastic Anemia

M.A. Liévano*, R. Muriel, B. Del Rio, M. Rosas, Mexico

City, DF, Mexico.

Exanthematous Drug Eruption to Prasugrel:

A Case Report

M.H. Bashir*, P. Buddiga, M.N. Baz, Fresno, CA.

Gadolinium Adverse Reaction

A. Ravi*, M. Park, Rochester, MN.

Prevalence of Sensitivity to Food/Drug Additives

in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIUA)

J. Rajan* 1 , R. Simon 1 , J. Bosso 2 , 1. San Diego, CA;

2. West Nyack, NY.

Topical Triple Antibiotic Ointment Anaphylaxis:

A Case Report

J. Greiwe*, B. Schroer, Cleveland, OH.

Omalizumab as a Desensitizing Agent in a Patient

With Cutaneous Mastocytosis

K.C. Sokol*, N.K. Amar, R.D. Divekar, A. Ghazi,

A.P. Reddy, A. Trikha, S.S. Raimer, J.A. Grant,

Galveston, TX.

Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

(FPIES) to Trivial Oral Mucosal Contact

S.K. Mane* 1 , M. Hollister 1 , S.L. Bahna 2 , 1. Shreveport,

LA; 2. Shreeveport, LA.

Peanut Induced Food Protein Enterocolitis

Syndrome: A Case Report

B. Prince*, C. Szychlinski, M. Makhija, Chicago, IL.

Bullous Reactions to Bed Bug Bites Reflect

Cutaneous Vasculitis

P. Stewart* 1 , R.D. deShazo 1 , M.F. Feldlaufer 2 ,

M.C. Mihm 3 , J. Goddard 4 , 1. Jackson, MS; 2. Beltsville,

MD; 3. Boston, MA; 4. Mississippi State, MS.

Risk Factors for Increasing Severity of Adverse

Drug Reactions in a Tertiary Care Center

J.M. Sher*, K.J. Hahn, L.S. Fonacier, M.R. Aquino,

S. Wang, B. Malone, Mineola, NY.


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P


Corticosteroid Hypersensitivity: Case Report of

Urticaria Induced by Glucocorticosteroids and

Aspirin

Y. Zgherea* 1 , S. Gierer 2 , J.D. Martinez 2 , 1. Merriam, KS;

2. Kansas City, KS.

Compliance With Self-Injectable Epinephrine in

Patients With Imported Fire Ant Hypersensitivity

K.E. Adams* 1 , J.M. Quinn 1 , S.C. Stokes 2 , J.J. Sacha 3 ,

K.M. White 1 , 1. San Antonio, TX; 2. Glendale, AZ;

3. Fairfield, CA.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P1) list 5 medications commonly seen on

the drug allergy consult service and 2) discuss the

utility of a web-site based database of drug allergy

case reports and desensitization protocols; P2) discuss

the safety and success of the twelve-step

desensitization protocol for L-asparaginase in children

with drug allergy, as well as, the reduction in the risk

of anaphylaxis in continued therapy; P3) use a safe

protocol for fluconazole desensitization with a 3-5 day

duration for non-HIV infected patients; P4) discuss the

origin of the Honey Bee Colony Collapse and describe

the method of Honey Bee venom skin testing and the

prevalence of Honey Bee anaphylaxis from 2006 until

present; P5) discuss evaluation of a patient with

procedure related anaphylaxis; P6) discuss a rapid and

safe desensitisation scheme to trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole

that can be used in clinical practice;

P7) recognize uncommon causes of anaphylaxis and

the role of airborne sensitization in prelude of

anaphylaxis and educate the patient to avoid

uncommon triggers; P8) identify demographic and

clinical characteristics associated with severe

anaphylaxis; P9) describe an approach to managing

patients with a history of hypersensitivity to an anti-

TNF therapy; P10) describe patients’ characteristics,

costs and post-discharge care associated with an ED

visit/hospitalization for stinging insect anaphylaxis;

P11) identify the causes of drug-induced

hypersensitivity (DIHS) and associated clinical

presentations and lab findings to better recognize the

presentation of DIHS; P12) discuss the clinical

presentation of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

and the optimal doses reported in the literature for

aspirin desensitization; P13) discuss available

techniques of drug desensitization for antithymocyte

globulin and summarize the advantages,

disadvantages, and limitations of these techniques in

clinical practice; P14) identify signs and symptoms of a

drug eruption and discuss the action steps once a

drug eruption is recognized; P15) discuss the clinical

manifestations of a gadolinium adverse reaction and

summarize the management options for a patient with

a history of a prior gadolinium or radioactive contrast

adverse reaction; P16) identify the prevalence of

reactions to food/drug additives in patients with

chronic idiopathic urticaria; P17) discuss the standard

approach to managing a case of anaphylaxis and

recognize the potential that triple antibiotic topical

ointments have to induce an anaphylactic response;

P18) discuss the benefit of administering omalizumab

concurrently with venom immunotherapy (VIT) to

reduce the risk of anaphylaxis and discuss whether

omalizumab has a role in improving symptoms,

including skin lesions of cutaneous mastocytosis;

P19) recognize that food protein induced enterocolitis

syndrome (FPIES) can be caused by indirect exposure

to trivial quantities of food allergen; P20) discuss the

clinical presentation and diagnosis of food protein

induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) and identify

foods known to cause this syndrome; P21) identify the

time course and histopathologic findings of complex

(bullous) cutaneous reactions to bedbugs in order to

determine the optimal treatment for them;

P22) identify risk factors for more severe adverse drug

reactions that are allergic/immunologic in etiology;

P23) identify the possibility of side effects to

corticosteroids; and P24) identify factors that affect

compliance rates with self-injectible epinephrine in a

population with fire ant hypersensitivity.

Aerobiology, Allergens, Allergen Extracts

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Allergen Stabilities and Compatibilities in Mixtures

of High Protease Fungal and Insect Extracts

T.J. Grier*, D.M. LeFevre, E.A. Duncan, R.E. Esch,

T.C. Coyne, Lenoir, NC.

Factorial Analysis of Allergenic Extract

Compatibilities Using a Fractional -Factor, -Level

Experimental Design Matrix

T.J. Grier*, D.M. LeFevre, E.A. Duncan, R.E. Esch,

T.C. Coyne, Lenoir, NC.

The Pollen Seasons of San Antonio

H.C. Crisp* 1 , R.A. Gomez 2 , J.M. Quinn 2 , K.M. White 2 ,

1. Lackland AFB, TX; 2. San Antonio, TX.

Skin Testing

K. McGrath*, A. Simoes, M. Guida, Wethersfield, CT.

Grass Pollen in Kansas City

S.C. Argo*, C.S. Barnes, M.G. Dhar, J.M. Portnoy,

P. Dowling, Kansas City, MO.

Shifting Trends of Ragweed (Ambrosia)

Measurements ( Factors): During a Year Period

in the New York /Northern New Jersey

Metropolitan Area (NY/NJ)

J. Maik* 1 , Y. Zhang 1 , P. Georgopoulos 1 , L. Bielory 2 ,

1. Piscataway, NJ; 2. Springfield, NJ.

The Association of Meteorological Conditions and

the Average Spore Counts in Kansas City

R.N. Donegan*, N. Raje, M. Dhar, H. Dai, C. Ciaccio,

C.S. Barnes, Kansas City, MO.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

P

P

P

Allergen Sensitivity by Region of the United

States, - (NHANES II to NHANES III)

P. Koutsoupias 1 , L. Bielory* 2 , 1. Piscataway, NJ;

2. Springfield, NJ.

Prevalence of Ambrosia (Ragweed) Pollen in

Ukraine

V. Rodinkova* 1 , O. Palamarchuk 1 , L. Kremenska 1 ,

O. Bilous 1 , I. Motruk 1 , O. Mazjur 1 , L. Slobodyanuk 2 ,

L.M. DuBuske 3 , 1. Vinnitsa, Ukraine; 2. Lviv, Ukraine;

3. Gardner, MA.

Allergy Shots

K. McGrath*, A. Simoes, M. Guida, Wethersfield, CT.

Sensitization to Indoor Aeroallergens in Pediatric

Patients

V. Yáñez-Pérez*, A. Arias-Cruz, S. González-Díaz,

C. Gallego-Corella, H. Hernández-Sánchez, K. Mejía-

Salas, M. Calva-Mariño, L. Domínguez-Sansores,

L. Rangel-Garza, Monterrey, NL, Mexico.

The Effects of Rainfall on Ragweed and Chenopod

Counts

S. Anvari*, C.S. Barnes, M.G. Dhar, J.M. Portnoy,

Kansas City, MO.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P25) recognize the potential for proteases

from fungal or insect extracts to degrade allergens in

other high-protease products and describe the effects

of glycerin and mixing with other high -protease

extracts on fungal and insect extract activities;

P26) discuss the clinical importance and practical

limitations of studies examining allergen

compatibilities in complex, multi-extract mixtures

formulated for immunotherapy and recognize the

utility of factorial design matrices as tools for assessing

extract recoveries in diverse product mixtures using a

convenient subset of all possible combinations;

P27) identify the pollen seasons for trees, weeds, and

grasses in San Antonio; P28) describe the pertinent

allergens in the Connecticut region of the United

States; P29) discuss the features of grass pollen

dispersal in Kansas City over the last decades; P30)

describe the change in ragweed pollen release over

the past 25 years in the New York/New Jersey

metropolitan area; P31) discuss the association

between average mold spore counts and various

meteorological variables in Kansas City, such as

average yearly outdoor temperature, wind direction,

wind speed, humidity, barometric pressure and inches

of rainfall; P32) discuss the difference in skin test

reactivities in the various regions of the United States

and describe the changes in skin test reactivity in the

US regions over time; P33) discuss the prevalence of

ambrosia pollen in Ukraine; P34) identify the pertinent

immunotherapy components in the Connecticut

region of the United States; P35) identify the most

common indoor aeroallergens in pediatric patients;

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

and P36) identify the correlation between rainfall and

airborne ragweed and chenopod.

Allergy Testing, Clinical

Laboratory Immunology

A Cost Effective Algorithm for Determination of

Sensitization to Aeroallergens

N. Raje*, J.M. Portnoy, C.S. Barnes, C.E. Ciaccio,

Kansas City, MO.

Skin Test Reactivity to Blomia Tropicalis in Patients

With Allergic Rhinitis in an Urban Area

M. Javier* 1 , F. Padua 2 , 1. Quezon City, Philippines;

2. Manila, Philippines.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P37) discuss the concept of algorithmic

approach to aeroallergen sensitization determination;

and P38) recognize Blomia tropicalis as an important

trigger of allergic rhinitis in urban areas that must be

included in the panel of tests for allergic rhinitis in

all ages.

Asthma and Other Lower

Airway Disorders

A Potential Relationship Between Genetic

Ancestry and Asthma Exacerbations Among

African American Individuals

J.A. Rumpel* 1 , B.K. Ahmedani 2 , E.L. Peterson 2 ,

K.E. Wells 2 , M. Yang 2 , A.M. Levin 2 , J.J. Yang 2 , R. Kumar 3 ,

E.G. Burchard 4 , L.K. Willliams 2 , 1. Bloomfield Hills, MI;

2. Detroit, MI; 3. Chicago, IL; 4. San Francisco, CA.

The Risk of Asthma Exacerbation After Stopping

Inhaled Corticosteroids: A Systematic Review and

Meta-Analysis

M.A. Rank*, J.B. Hagan, M.A. Park, J.C. Podjasek,

S.A. Samant, G.W. Volcheck, P.J. Erwin, C.P. West,

Rochester, MN.

Individualized Dynamic Phenotyping Using

Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide Levels in Children

With Asthma

D.A. Bukstein*, Madison, WI.

Meta Analysis of Asthma Exacerbation Rates

During Asthma Managed Using Fractional Exhaled

Nitric Oxide Versus Standard Clinical Parameters

Alone

N. Jain* 1 , J.F. Donohue 2 , P.M. Dorinsky 3 , 1. Gilbert, AZ;

2. Chapel Hill, NC; 3. Durham, NC.

Relation Between Serum Vitamin D Level and

Asthma

J.R. Zaragoza* 1 , L. Perez 2 , R. Bredy 2 , 1. Arecibo, Puerto

Rico; 2. Ponce, Puerto Rico.

Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P


Correlation Between the Number of Outdoor Visits

and Climate Variables for Asthmatics in a

Developing Country: A Retrospective Study

S.H. Alam*, Z. Yousaf, Z. Butt, S. Afzal, Lahore,

Pakistan.

Sodium Sulfite Enhances Rhinovirus-Induced

Chemokine Production in Airway Epithelial Cells

J. Yoon*, W. Chung, Y. Chun, S. Won, H. Kim, J. Kim,

J. Lee, Seoul, Korea, Republic of.

Patient Characteristics Predictive of Omalizumab

Response in Extra

A. Dorenbaum* 1 , B. Trzaskoma 2 , T. Haselkorn 2 ,

D. Mink 2 , H. Chen 1 , P. Solari 1 , 1. South San Francisco,

CA; 2. San Francisco, CA.

Increased Epidermal Growth Factor in Nasal

Secretion of Young Children With Recurrent

Wheeze

H. Chung*, M. Chu, H.L. Chung, Taegu, Korea,

Republic of.

Efficacy of Fish Oil Oral Supplementation for the

Treatment of Exercise Induced Asthma

S.M. Nsouli*, Danville, CA.

Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperventilation (EVH)

Challenge but Not Methacholine Challenge

Identifies Exercise Induced Bronchospasm:

A Case Report

L. Shora 1 , R.R. Rosenthal* 2 , H. Howe 3 , P. Knause 3 ,

1. Vienna, VA; 2. Great Falls, VA; 3. Fairfax, VA.

Evaluation of Diary Data on Asthma Control

Factors Managed With Combined Mometasone

Furoate and Formoterol Fumarate in Patients With

Severe Asthma

H. Nolte 1 , M. White 2 , S.F. Weinstein 3 , R.A. Nathan 4 ,

D. Gates 1 , E.O. Meltzer* 5 , 1. Whitehouse Station, NJ;

2. Wheaton, MD; 3. Huntington Beach, CA; 4. Colorado

Springs, CO; 5. San Diego, CA.

Effects of Mometasone Furoate and Formoterol

Fumarate Combination Therapy on Quality of

Life Domains in Patients With Moderate Asthma

K.R. Murphy* 1 , E.O. Meltzer 2 , S.F. Weinstein 3 ,

R.A. Nathan 4 , M. White 5 , D. Gates 6 , H. Nolte 6 , 1. Boys

Town, NE; 2. San Diego, CA; 3. Huntington Beach, CA;

4. Colorado Springs, CO; 5. Wheaton, MD;

6. Whitehouse Station, NJ.

Asthma Champions: Defining the System and

Implementing a “Change Project” Proposal

N. Kolluru, T. Jimenez, M. Reddy*, D. Strom,

L. Krinsky, J. Jacobs, L. Brown, R. Kairam, Y. Persaud,

R. Neugebauer, Bronx, NY.

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Making the Business Case: Importance of

Educating Physicians About Future Healthcare

Models

N. Kolluru, Y. Persaud*, M. Reddy, R. Kairam,

S. Hanumanthu, D. Strom, L. Krinsky, T. Jimenez,

J. Jacobs, R. Neugebauer, Bronx, NY.

Asthma Champions: Empowering Future Physician

Leaders to Improve Their Accuracy in Classifying

Asthma Severity

N. Kolluru, T. Jimenez, M. Reddy*, L. Krinsky,

L. Brown, D. Strom, J. Jacobs, R. Kairam, Y. Persaud,

R. Neugebauer, Bronx, NY.

The Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of Repeated

Administration Intravenous MN-: A Highly

Selective Beta Adrenergic Receptor Agonist, in

Stable Moderate to Severe Chronic Obstructive

Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients

P. Ratner* 1 , K. Johnson 2 , K. Matsuda 2 , H. Ishibashi 2 ,

F. Hampel 3 , 1. San Antonio, TX; 2. San Diego, CA;

3. New Braunfels, TX.

Effect of Fixed Airflow Obstruction (FAO) on

Response to Budesonide/Formoterol Pressurized

Metered-Dose Inhaler (BUD/FM pMDI) or BUD in

African-American Adolescents and Adults With

Moderate to Severe Asthma

D.P. Tashkin* 1 , B.E. Chipps 2 , T. Uryniak 3 , F. Trudo 3 ,

J.G. Zangrilli 3 , 1. Los Angeles, CA; 2. Sacramento, CA;

3. Wilmington, DE.

Asthma Symptoms and Immunotherapy Tablet

(AIT) Treatment: An Analysis of Data From Two

Ragweed AIT Clinical Trials

H. Nolte* 1 , P. Creticos 2 , S. Gawchik 3 , G. Berman 4 ,

D. Bernstein 5 , J. Maloney 1 , A. Kaur 6 , N. Liu 1 ,

K. Murphy 7 , 1. Whitehouse Station, NJ; 2. Baltimore,

MD; 3. Upton, PA; 4. Minneapolis, MN; 5. Cincinnati,

OH; 6. Whitehouse Station, NY; 7. Boys Town, NE.

Adherence to the EPR- Guidelines in Emergency

Department Management of Childhood Asthma

Exacerbations in a Private Community Hospital

C.Y. Lee*, S. Patel, Los Angeles, CA.

Effect of Obesity on Serum HDL-Cholesterol Levels,

Paroxonase Activity and Tiffeneau Index in

Mexican Adolescents With and Without Asthma

L.O. Hernandez-Mondragon*, B.E. DelRio-Navarro,

R.D. Pietropaolo-Cienfuegos, M.A. Rosas-Vargas,

Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

Clinical Features of Churg Strauss Syndrome in

Eastern Ukraine

K. Lishchuk-Yakymovych* 1 , R. Pukalyak 1 ,

L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Lviv, Ukraine; 2. Gardner, MA.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

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Methacholine Challenge by Spirometry and

Impulse Oscillometry Versus Auscultation Method

in Preschool Asthmatic Children

J. Yoon*, Y. Shin, H. Kim, M. Han, Seongnam-si, Korea,

Republic of.

Increase of Exhaled Breath Temperature After

Mobilizing Secretions From the Lower Airways of

Asthmatics Using Acoustic Wave Technology

T.Z. Kralimarkova 1 , Z. Dimitrov 1 , M. Koleva 1 ,

V. Filipova 1 , M. Rasheva 1 , M. Gugutkova 1 ,

M. Mincheva 1 , V.D. Dimitrov 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 ,

T.A. Popov* 1 , 1. Sofia, Bulgaria; 2. Gardner, MA.

Bronchial Thermoplasty Success and Failure:

Pathologic Correlates to Clinical Cases

D. Doeing 1 , A. Mahajan 1 , I. Gordon 2 , A. Husain 1 ,

D.K. Hogarth* 1 , 1. Chicago, IL; 2. Cleveland, OH.

Allergen Sensitization and Bronchial Reactivity in

Young Patients With Atopic Asthma

V. Tsybulkina* 1 , N. Kurmaeva 1 , N. Tsybulkin 1 ,

L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Kazan, Russian Federation;

2. Gardner, MA.

Expression and Targeting of Leukocyte Function

Antigen- (LFA-) on White Blood Cells From

Allergic Asthma Patients

A. Gupta 1 , L.E. Galusha 1 , V. Rahimian 2 , K.L. Miro* 1 ,

E. Capitle 1 , S.C. Kachlany 1 , 1. Newark, NJ; 2. Little

Neck, NY.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P39) recognize the substantial disparities in

severe asthma exacerbations by race-ethnicity in the

United States and some of the factors that may

contribute to these disparities and discuss methods by

which genetic ancestry is estimated and how these

methods can be used to discern genetic and nongenetic

contributors to disease in admixed

populations; P40) estimate the risk of asthma

exacerbation in individuals who stop low-dose inhaled

corticosteroids compared to those who continue

inhaled corticosteroids; P41) describe how to establish

the most cost efficient way of monitoring childhood

asthma utilizing FeNO in individualized dynamic

phenotype of these patients; P42) discuss and

summarize the relative merits of asthma managed

with a FeNO based algorithm versus a standard clinical

algorithm on asthma exacerbation rates; P43) identify

serum vitamin D levels and the impact it has in

asthmatic patients; P44) identify the relationship

between climate variables and asthma exacerbations

that would help in educating patients regarding the

increased need for compliance in certain months and

identify the months in which a possible adjustment of

medication doses is needed due to the increasing

frequency of asthma, thus reducing the symptoms and

patient morbidity; P45) describe the combined action

of sodium sulfite and rhinovirus on human airway

epithelial cells; P46) identify patient characteristics

which differentiate the response to omalizumab and

improve asthma management in patients with

moderate-to-severe uncontrolled asthma;

P47) recognize the link between early recurrent

wheeze and development of later asthma; P48)

recognize the beneficial role and efficacy of fish oil as

oral supplementation in patients with documented

exercise induced bronchoconstriction; P49) describe

the differences in sensitivity between methacholine

and eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH)

challenge test and discuss the clinical utility of EVH

challenge; P50) identify the effects of mometasone

furoate/formoterol combination on patients' diaryrecorded

symptoms, SABA use, and peak flow;

P51) identify AQLQ(S) domains in which mometasone

furoate/formoterol combinations achieved significant

improvements compared with placebo and

formoterol; P52) discuss the six components of the

Chronic Care Model and summarize the relationship

between scores on the Assessment of Chronic Illness

Care (ACIC) Survey and an organization's level of

support for chronic illness care; P53) discuss the

importance of understanding various evolving health

care models, and summarize strategies for “making the

business case” in support of engaging in activities

related to systems improvement; P54) discuss three

key clinical concepts outlined by the National Asthma

Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP), and

summarize gaps in care demonstrated by early career

physicians in accurately classifying asthma severity;

P55) discuss the results of a clinical trial: “Safety and

Efficacy of Repeated Administration Intravenous MN-

221, a Highly Selective Beta2 Adrenergic Receptor

Agonist, in Stable Moderate to Severe Chronic

Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients”;

P56) discuss the effect of fixed airflow obstruction on

asthma treatment response in African-American

patients with moderate to severe asthma; P57) discuss

the safety of ragweed allergy immunotherapy tablet in

patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and

comorbid asthma; P58) recognize the need for: greater

adherence to national guidelines for acute asthma

exacerbation in the emergency department setting,

greater follow up and referral to appropriate

allergist/asthma specialists, personalized asthma

action plans, and the development and utilization of

education/instruction from medical staff on inhaler

technique upon discharge from an emergency

department; P59) identify obesity effects on

antioxidant parameters and lung function in

adolecents with and withot asthma; P60) recognize

clinical features of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) in

Eastern Ukraine; P61) discuss techniques and

physiology of bronchial responsiveness; P62) discuss

the increase of exhaled breath temperature after

mobilizing secretions from the lower airways of

asthmatics using acoustic wave technology:

P63) evaluate the histologic changes seen with

bronchial thermoplastic and correlate these with

clinical responses; P64) discuss allergen sensitization

and bronchial reactivity in young patients with atopic


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center


asthma: and P65) identify the importance of leukocyte

function antigen-1 (LFA-1) as a marker on cell types

involved in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma.

Basic Science Allergy and Immunology

P

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P

P

P

Weight Reduction Modulates Ventilatory

Functions, Inflammatory and Adipocytokines in

Obese Asthmatic Children

O. Jiffri*, F. Al-Sahrif, S. Abd El-Kader, E. Ashmawy,

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Caspase Has a Role in CD Induced Eosinophil

Apoptosis

J. Kim*, H.J. Lee, Uijeongbu, Korea, Republic of.

Carbamylcholine Increased the Mitogen-Activated

Protein Kinase (MAPK) Phosphorylation in Airway

Smooth Muscle Cells From a Murine Model of

Asthma

F.A. Placeres*, R. Gonzalez de Alfonzo, I. Lippo de

Becemberg, M. Alfonzo, Caracas, Distrito Capital,

Venezuela.

Effect of Histamine Strength and Devices on Skin

Prick Test (SPT) Response Following Antihistamine

Inhibition

G. Plunkett*, J. Young, R. Erskine, Round Rock, TX.

Purification of a Phosphodiesterase-A Coupled to

Muscarinic Receptors Located At Plasma

Membranes From Bovine Tracheal Smooth Muscle

P. Mastromatteo*, F.A. Placeres, R. Gonzalez de

Alfonzo, I. Lippo de Becemberg, M. Alfonzo, Caracas,

Distrito Capital, Venezuela.

Th- Cells in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples of

Asthmatic Patients

A. González-Carsolio*, A.A. Velasco-Medina,

A.L. Burbano-Cerón, G.A. Velázquez-Sámano, Mexico

City, DF, Mexico.

CDd+ Neutrophils are Found in the Nasal

Lavage of Atopic But Not Non-Atopic Individuals

B. Buelow*, M. Klancnik, D. Hunter, E. Buell,

M. Vasudev, D. Cheung, M. Grayson, Milwaukee, WI.

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Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P66) identify the effects of weight

reduction on cytokines and ventilatory functions in

obese children with bronchial asthma; P67) discuss

how to induce the eosinophil apoptosis in allergic

diseases; P68) evaluate the activation of the mitogenactivated

protein kinase (MAPK) in response to a

muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine (Cch) in ASMC,

which were isolated from trachea of Sprague-Dawley

rats sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and the Control

group; P69) recognize the differences between

histamine strength and devices following

antihistamine on skin prick testing; P70) discuss a

study that purified and identified vinpocetinesensitive

and calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide

PDE located at plasma membranes fractions from

BTSM; P71) discuss the demonstrated presence of

Th-17 cells in asthmatic patients; and P72) discuss the

significance of the presence of CD49d+ neutrophils in

nasal lavage and determine differences in CD49d+

neutrophils in atopic and non-atopic subjects.

Clinical Case Reports

Cutaneous Polyarteritis Nodosa in a Baby After

Hepatitis B Vaccination

C.T. Quezada Chalita*, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

A Clinical Case of Wells Syndrome After An

Arthropod Bite

P. Wang*, A. Sarwari, Y. Demirdag, Morgantown, WV.

Acute Idiopathic Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a

Year Old Male With a Month History of Dyspnea,

Cough and Significant Dust Exposure

A. Pinion* 1 , S. Mathur 2 , 1. Fairway, KS; 2. Kansas City,

MO.

Successful Use of CINHRP as Procedural

Prophylaxis in a Patient With Isolated Abdominal

Attacks of Hereditary Angioedema and Normal

CINH

D.R. Scott*, K.M. Woessner, Del Mar, CA.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Protein Losing

Enteropathy and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

S. Akkina*, K. Bupathi, M. Frieri, East Meadow, NY.

Successful Intravenous Acyclovir Desensitization

in HIV Pediatric Patient With Cutaneous Herpes

Zoster Reactivation

E. Sandoval-Ramirez*, M. Rosas-Vargas, B. Del Rio-

Navarro, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

Chronic Urticaria and Angioedema in a Pediatric

Patient With Elevated Total Tryptase Level Who

Responded to Cyproheptadine

C. Nguyen*, Washington, DC.

Prolonged Erythrodermic Reaction to Single Dose

Amoxil

C.C. Randolph*, Waterbury, CT.

A Protracted Course of Diarrhea Caused By

Cryptosporidium in a Nonimmunocompromised

Patient

H.K. Lin*, J. Yusin, Los Angeles, CA.

Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome and

Agammaglobulinemia: A Therapeutic Dilemma

K. Payne* 1 , M. Nelson 2 , M. Petersen 2 , 1. Silver Spring,

MD; 2. Bethesda, MD.

Unusual Presentation of DRESS Treated With IVIG

and Pulse Steroids

J. Hajjar*, S. Kumar, Richmond, VA.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

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P

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Cutaneous Polyarteritis Nodosa in a Baby After

Hepatitis B Vaccination: Case Report

C.T. Quezada-Chalita* 1 , B. Mercado 2 , R.T. Quezada

Medrano 2 , 1. Mexico City, DF, Mexico; 2. Tepic, NA,

Mexico.

Intravenous Hydration: A Novel Therapeutic

Option for Symptomatic Treatment in Systemic

Mastocytosis

S.R. Hariri* 1 , I.S. Randhawa 2 , T.W. Chin 2 , 1. Los Angeles,

CA; 2. Long Beach, CA.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

Uncovers Heterozygosity of Trimethylaminuria

N.B. Miller*, M. Shinawi, A. Beigelman, St. Louis, MO.

Recurrent Anaphylaxis After Cystoscopy in a

Gentleman With Bladder and Prostate Cancer

C.L. Hedberg* 1 , L.N. Demers 2 , F.J. Pilgrim 2 ,

M.R. Wilson 2 , 1. Rogers, AR; 2. Fayetteville, AR.

The Need for Individualized Hereditary

Angioedema Acute Action Plans: Two Case Studies

of Misdiagnosed Attacks and Unnecessary

Surgeries

M. Dispenza* 1 , M. Gutierrez 2 , P. Bajaj 2 , T. Craig 2 , 1. York,

PA; 2. Hershey, PA.

Rare Case of Acquired Angioedema (Type ) Due

to T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

S. Benouni*, L. Do, A. Rafi, L. Sheinkopf, M. Bush,

S. Fisher, A. Spokojny, R. Katz, Los Angeles, CA.

Acute Hemolysis Secondary to High-Dose

Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG)

A. Shakouri*, S.L. Bahna, Shreveport, LA.

A Young Woman With Chronic Urticarial Rash Since

Birth

P. Wang*, M. Alleman, Y. Demirdag, Morgantown, WV.

A Rare Case of Anaplastic Large T-Cell Lymphoma

Presenting With Peripheral Eosinophilia

S. Choi*, J. Yusin, Los Angeles, CA.

Brentuximab Vedotin Desensitization in a Female

With Relapsed, Refractory, Anaplastic Large-Cell

Lymphoma (ALCL)

N. Qamar*, S. Cho, Chicago, IL.

Intraoperative Anaphylaxis Caused by Indigo

Carmine: A Case Report

L.P. Newton*, R. Gutta, D. Lang, R. Siles,

Cleveland, OH.

Anaphylaxis to a Rat Bite in an Animal Handler

T. Kampitak*, S. Betschel, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis to Grapes

T. Kampitak*, S. Betschel, Toronto, ON, Canada.

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Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma As a Rare Cause

of Acquired Angioedema

T. Burnett* 1 , F. Hoyte 2 , 1. Aurora, CO; 2. Denver, CO.

Successful Intravenous Heparin Infusion in a

Patient With Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity to

Heparin

B. Everist*, M. Hartz, M. Park, Rochester, MN.

Netherton’s Syndrome: Flexural Lichenification,

Not to be Confused With Atopic Dermatitis

A. Salami*, A. Suresh, S.R. Patel, Los Angeles, CA.

Type Hereditary Angioedema: A Case Report

N. Zhu*, A. Bewtra, Omaha, NE.

Chronic and Isolated Idiopathic Angioedema of

the Tongue

J.B. West* 1 , N.K. Amar 2 , J.A. Grant 2 , 1. Phoenix, AZ;

2. Galveston, TX.

Horse Allergy in a Patient Requiring Equine Anti-

Thymocyte Globulin (Eatg)

S. Anandan*, Y. Luo, D.W. Rosenthal, Manhasset, NY.

Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis in a

Cystic Fibrosis Patient

C.T. Quezada-Chalita* 1 , R.T. Quezada Medrano 2 ,

1. Mexico City, DF, Mexico; 2. Tepic, NA, Mexico.

A Case of IgG Associated Cholangitis and Rapid

Response to Steroids

K.J. Garg* 1 , S. Reznick 2 , D. Anthony 2 , 1. Cleveland

Heights, OH; 2. Cleveland, OH.

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Improved on

Multimodality Therapy: A Case Report

A.M. Jongco*, V.R. Bonagura, Great Neck, NY.

A Case of Pruritic Dermatitis for Years That

Failed to Resolve With Standard Therapy

S. Jain*, J.G. Black, L.G. Wild, E.E. Boh, New

Orleans, LA.

Tongue Microabscess Presenting As Angioedema

J. Hsu*, N. Qamar, K. McGrath, Chicago, IL.

Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease and Angioedema:

Unusual Manifestation in an Uncommon Disease

R.D. Divekar*, A. Ghazi, R. Bonds, Galveston, TX.

A Case of Drug Induced Angioedema and

Dyshidrosis, or Is There Something More to It

M.G. Gates*, J. Anderson, Birmingham, AL.

A Case Report of Solid Food FPIES Presenting As

Gluten Sensitivity

N.S. Agarwal*, J. Yu, New York, NY.

A Patient With Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

Presented With Skin Rash and Angioedema and

Responded to Steroid Treatment

Y. Hui*, B. Corn, New York, NY.


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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P

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Incomplete Digeorge Syndrome With

Lymphadenopathy, Rash, and Thrombosis

Masquerading as Autoimmune

Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

M.W. Shepherd*, A. Patterson, Columbus, OH.

Mechanical Valve Versus Tissue Valve: Ask the

Allergist

S.S. Griffin*, J.T. Anderson, Birmingham, AL.

A Case of Benign Cutaneous Polyarteritis Nodosa

Associated With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

S. Bandi*, B. Yu, Chicago, IL.

Fixed Angioedema as a Presenting Sign of

Dermatomyositis

J.R. Duncan*, M.S. Tankersley, San Antonio, TX.

A Case of Acute Hepatotoxicity Caused by

Cetirizine

A. Subramanian*, D. Lang, Cleveland, OH.

Porcine Valve Replacement in a Patient With

Positive Titers to Alpha-GAL

S. Mozzicato*, J. Posthumus, T. Platts-Mills,

S. Commins, Charlottesville, VA.

Evaluation and Management of Suspected Steroid

and Heparin Allergies Before Organ

Transplantation

E. Wang*, A. Nickels, V. Dimov, Chicago, IL.

Allergy to Tonic Water

S. Ting*, El Paso, TX.

Onion Anaphylaxis: Case Report

A.L. Burbano-Cerón*, A.A. Velasco-Medina,

A. González-Carsolio, G. Velázquez-Sámano, Mexico

City, DF, Mexico.

Conversion to IgE-Mediated Dairy Allergy One

Week After Introduction of Dairy Into the Diet of a

Patient With a History of Food Protein-Induced

Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES) and Prior Negative

Allergy Testing and Food Challenge to Dairy

M.W. Shepherd*, R. Raveendran, R. Scherzer,

Columbus, OH.

Methylprednisolone Allergy in a Newly-Diagnosed

Demyelination Patient

J.K. Shorten*, Sutton Coldfield, United Kingdom.

Malakoplakia of the Colon in a Child With Common

Variable Immunodeficiency

C. Kuo*, S. Yusung, M. Garcia-Lloret, Los Angeles, CA.

Idiopathic Anaphylaxis in a Year Old Female

K. Tse*, D. Boide, B. Zuraw, La Jolla, CA.

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Recurrent Lip Angioedema With Unknown

Etiology

L. Helfner* 1 , Y. Luo 2 , S. Farzan 2 , 1. Manhasset, NY;

2. Great Neck, NY.

Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis Diagnosed

by a Delayed Hypersensitivity Reaction to

Progesterone

M. Saeedian*, M. Riedl, A. Akopians, Los Angeles, CA.

A Case Report of Bradykinin Receptor Antagonist

Use in Idiopathic Non-Histaminergic Angioedema

V. Sridhara*, C.R. Weiler, Rochester, MN.

Familial Cr Functional Deficiency

R. Honeine*, S. Ramesh, Buffalo, NY.

Hypersensitivity to Honey Demonstrated by

Elevated Honey Specific Serum IgE

K. Achar*, P. Parikh, D. Ferastraoaru, D. Rosenstreich,

New York, NY.

A Case of Anaphylaxis in a Fungi-Sensitized Tuba

Player

M.R. Henson*, D. Sedlak, Durham, NC.

Successful Treatment of Antihistamine-Resistant

Physical Urticarial/Angioedema Syndrome With

Omalizumab

A. Gonzalez-Estrada* 1 , R. Siles 2 , D. Lang 2 , 1. Cleveland

Heightts, OH; 2. Cleveland, OH.

Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome Presenting as Severe

Asthma in a Year Old Native-American Female

C. Cleveland*, D.M. Fleischer, Denver, CO.

A Case of Kimura’s Disease in an African American

Male

Y. Kopyltsova*, V. Bonagura, Great Neck, NY.

A Case of Acquired Angioedema Masquerading as

an Allergy to Shrimp

Y. Samarasena*, A.M. Staveren, M.S. Kaplan,

B.J. Goldberg, Los Angeles, CA.

Formaldehyde-Induced Systemic Reaction

A. Low*, M.T. Nguyen, Oakland, CA.

A Novel BTK Mutation With Normal Sequencing of

Genomic DNA

M. Mohiuddin* 1 , N. Hubbard 2 , J. Abbott 1 ,

T. Torgerson 2 , H. Ochs 2 , E. Gelfand 1 , 1. Denver, CO;

2. Seattle, WA.

A Case of Chronic Eosinophilia Associated With

Toxocariasis and Severe Asthma

N. Jinjolava*, G. Hudes, S. Jariwala, Bronx, NY.

Acquired Hemophilia: Case Report

F.R. Ruiz Hernandez*, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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Idiopathic Nonhistaminergic Angioedema Treated

With Ecallantide and Icatibant

C.K. Harris* 1 , M. Stahl 2 , 1. Beavercreek, OH; 2. Dayton,

OH.

Successful Desensitization to Agalsidase Beta After

Anaphylaxis

A. Butt*, N. Talreja, R. Lopez, R. Fox, R.F. Lockey,

Tampa, FL.

Il- Receptor Defect Predisposes to

Histoplasmosis

T.A. Hwangpo* 1 , W.T. Harris 2 , P. Atkinson 2 , K. Cassady 2 ,

S. Kankirawatana 2 , 1. Helena, AL; 2. Birmingham, AL.

A Case of DRESS Syndrome Associated With

Strongyloidiasis

L. Rampur*, P. Patel, S. Jariwala, R. Viau, G. Hudes,

D.L. Rosenstreich, Bronx, NY.

Cq-Deficient Urticarial Vasculitis Sensitive to

Hydroxychloroquine

J.E. Fergeson*, D. Fitzhugh, M. Glaum, Tampa, FL.

Food Allergy Unmasked After a Lifetime of

Unexplained Food Aversion

J.L. Geslani*, R.S. Bonds, Galveston, TX.

Adult Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and

q. Deletion

S. Sawlani*, A. Kulczycki, St. Louis, MO.

Uvular Edema: A Clinical Case Report

K.E. Holmberg*, Mölndal, Sweden.

TACI Mutation Associated Granulomatous CVID

Treated With Infliximab

T.J. Franxman*, J.R. Baker, Ann Arbor, MI.

Allergic Reactions to Vaccines

H. Mehta*, H.A. Sampson, A. Nowak-Wegrzy, New

York, NY.

Recurrent Fungal Infections and Lymphopenia in a

Girl With Turner’s Syndrome

J. Diaz*, B. Kaplan, Great Neck, NY.

Latex Exposure and Allergy

A. González-Carsolio*, A.A. Velasco-Medina,

A.L. Burbano-Cerón, G. Velázquez-Sámano, Mexico

City, DF, Mexico.

Septic Pneumonia With Transient Lymphopenia in

a Patient With IgA and IgG/IgG Deficiencies

R.M. Young* 1 , V. Chand 2 , C. Tiozzo 1 , 1. East Meadow,

NY; 2. New York, NY.

Refractory Thrombocytopenia in a -Year Old

Man With Digeorge Syndrome

A. Patel*, T. Hogan, Y. Demirdag, Morgantown, WV.

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Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis: A Case

Report

P. Chopra*, G. Gibbon, J. Yusin, Los Angeles, CA.

Two Unusual Presentations of Chronic

Granulomatous Disease

A. Reddy*, F.C. Schmalstieg, Galveston, TX.

Patient Experience With Ecallantide Nurse Home

Administration

A.B. Vegh*, N. Boyden*, Tacoma, WA.

Successful Treatment of a Prolonged

Hypersensitivity Reaction to Intravesical Bacillus

Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Given for Bladder

Carcinoma With Cyclosporine

K. Hannouch*, B.A. McGoey, G. Rosenberg,

M. Michelis, Hackensack, NJ.

Hemodialysis-Induced Anaphylaxis With Elevated

Tryptase Level Using the AN- Membrane

J. Moreau*, Y. Kopyltsova, B. Kaplan, Great Neck, NY.

The Treatment of Inhibitors and Anaphylaxis in

Patients With Hemophilia A

B. Dyer*, J. El-Dahr, New Orleans, LA.

Mast Cell Leukemia on an Inner City African

American Female

M. Vastardi*, R. Joks, Brooklyn, NY.

An Interesting Case of Good Syndrome

A. Hamad, S.Z. Faghih*, A. Bulkhi, Detroit, MI.

Development of Interstitial Lung Disease in a Child

With Crohn’s Disease Receiving Treatment With

Infliximab

L. Wall*, C. Otu-Nyarko, K. Paris, New Orleans, LA.

Type Autoimmune Pancreatitis in a Pediatric

Patient

C.M. Pimentel* 1 , R. Marquez 2 , J.R. Alvarez 1 , F. Nieves 2 ,

C. Micames 3 , S. Nazario 1 , R. Diaz 1 , 1. San Juan, Puerto

Rico; 2. Bayamon, Puerto Rico; 3. Mayaguez, Puerto

Rico.

Childhood Maculopapular Mastocytosis With

Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Diffuse Cutaneous

Mastocytosis

S.K. Chan*, M.G. Buheis, I.C. Hanson, Houston, TX.

Agammaglobulinemia With Negative Genetic

Markers: A Nonspecific Immunodeficiency

S. Elenburg* 1 , R. Casper 2 , 1. Tolleson, AZ;

2. Phoenix, AZ.

Airway Fungal Isolation in Severe Asthma: A Short

Case Series

N. Seth*, M.B. Narra, G. Mak, P. Porter, D.B. Corry,

Houston, TX.


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P


A Year Old Woman With Eosinophilia and

Systemic Symptoms

S. Peterson*, A.M. Ditto, Chicago, IL.

Novel Intronic Mutation of STAT Resulting in

Features of Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE

Syndrome

J. Brown*, M. Dorsey, N. Tang, St. Petersburg, FL.

An Unusual Case of Aspirin Hypersensitivity

M.D. Ikeda*, A.A. Petrov, Pittsburgh, PA.

Successful Treatment of Macrophage Activation

Syndrome in a Patient With Systemic onset

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

M.E. Hollister* 1 , S. Umer 2 , A. Casillas 2 , 1. Bossier City,

LA; 2. Shreveport, LA.

Hypersomnia and Recurrent Sinusitis

A.B. Teodoro*, C. Akman, R. Herzog, New York, NY.

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: Likely Diagnosis in

an Adolescent and Her Family With Elevated

Tryptase and Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

[POTS]

A.C. Sprunger* 1 , C.T. Nguyen 2 , 1. Annandale, VA;

2. Washington, DC.

Ketotifen in the Management of Angioedema

N.K. Amar*, R.S. Bonds, J.A. Grant, Galveston, TX.

A Case of Delayed-Pressure Urticaria as a

Dermatophytid “Id” Reaction to Tinea Infection

P. Parikh* 1 , D. Ferastraoaru 2 , S. Jariwala 2 ,

D. Rosenstreich 2 , 1. New York, NY; 2. Bronx, NY.

Heart Failure With Eosinophilia

M. Smith*, Indianapolis, IN.

Case Report: Overlapping of Henoch Schonlein

Purpura and Microscopic Polyangiitis

S. Cerda*, A. Gutiérrez- Hernandez, V. Hernández-

Bautista, M. Saez-de Ocariz, R. Rodríguez-Jurado,

A. Huante-Anaya, D. Carrasco-Daza, M. Yamazaki-

Nakashimada, D. Carrasco-Daza, Mexico City, DF,

Mexico.

A Patient With Neisseria Meningitidis Meningitis

After Receiving Appropriate Vaccination: Why We

Shouldn’t Always Blame the Immune System

S. Albin*, C. Cunningham-Rundles, New York, NY.

Successful Treatment of Exercise-Induced

Anaphylaxis With Omalizumab

M.L. Bandino*, M. Packer, M. Tankersley, San

Antonio, TX.

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

A Case of Monomac; Monocytopenia, B Cell and

NK Cell Lymphocytopenia in a Child With

Recurrent Infections

C.N. Spalding* 1 , A. Hersh 1 , M. Nassef 1 , A.P. Hsu 2 ,

C. Spalding 2 , S. Holland 2 , T. Mainardi 1 , 1. New York, NY;

2. Bethesda, MD.

Myocardial Infarction Following Intramuscular

Epinephrine for Anaphylaxis in a Year Old Male

E. Sarid*, A. Schneider, R. Joks, Brooklyn, NY.

A Case of Cystic Fibrosis With Immune

Dysregulation Characterized by Common Variable

Immunodeficiency, Transplant Tolerance, and

Autoimmunity

J.T. Abbott* 1 , J.D. Martinez 2 , S. Gierer 2 , 1. Olathe, KS;

2. Kansas City, KS.

A Case of Ethanol Induced Anaphylaxis

N. Lakhani* 1 , R. Borici-Mazi 2 , 1. Mississauga, ON,

Canada; 2. Kingston, ON, Canada.

Acute Attacks of Acquired Angioedema

Responding to Kallikrein Inhibitor (Ecallantide)

N. Vernon*, G. Ghaffari, Hershey, PA.

Angioedema Following Usage of a

Paraphynylenediamine-Free Hair Dye

P. Olson 1 , A. Kochin* 1 , J. Shliozberg 2 , 1. Bronx, NY;

2. Brooklyn, NY.

Autologous Seminal Fluid Allergy

S. Ho*, R.D. Divekar, R.S. Bonds, Galveston, TX.

Year Old Boy With X-HIGM Syndrome Due to a

Missense Mutation Manifested by Aplastic

Anemia, Crohn’s Disease and Recurrent Infections

A. Katta*, J. Hong, K. Convers, A. Knutsen,

St. Louis, MO.

A Case of IPEX Syndrome With Foxp Missense

Mutation

N.D. Schroeder*, A. Stallings, F. Saulsbury,

P. Heymann, Charlottesville, VA.

Progression of Kimura Disease Despite Treatment

With Cetirizine

K.A. von Elten*, P.B. Keiser, Bethesda, MD.

Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes

Mutation in a Father and Daughter

S. Bantz*, R. Herzog, New York, NY.

Immunoglobulin E Multiple Myeloma

Masquerading as Systemic Mastocytosis: A Case

Report

W.C. Anderson*, E. Choo, Denver, CO.

A Case of Relapsing Polychondritis and

Hypogammaglobulinemia

N. Okeke, T. Gavrilova*, E. Capitle, Newark, NJ.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Painless Proptosis in a Patient With Aspirin

Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

W. Stevens*, G. Lissner, L. Grammer, Chicago, IL.

Pre-Operative Patch Testing Successfully Predicted

Tolerance of a Titanium Metallic Implant in a Child

Who Had Previously Failed Insertion of Stainless

Steel Implants

A. Kochin*, M. Rasheed, J. Shliozberg, Bronx, NY.

Directly Observed Anaphylactic Reaction to

Acetaminophen

L. Li*, G.M. Sanders, Ann Arbor, MI.

Delayed Hypersensitivity to Nitrile and Synthetic

Polyisoprene Gloves in Health Care Workers

E. Kleiman* 1 , J.H. Moallem 1 , D.P. Erstein 1 , S. Kumar 2 ,

R. Joks 1 , 1. Brooklyn, NY; 2. Richmond, VA.

Delayed Diagnosis of Allergic Bronchopulmonary

Aspergillosis in an Asthmatic Patient on Xolair:

A Case Report

D. Hirsch*, J. Fagin, Great Neck, NY.

Premedication Protocol for the Prevention of Life-

Threatening Anaphylaxis From Protamine

N. Li*, P.A. Greenberger, Chicago, IL.

Tracheobronchomalacia Masquerading As

Asthma: Diagnosis by -D CT Scan

B. Hronek*, H.J. Wedner, St. Louis, MO.

Disseminated Blastomycosis in a Patient With

Idiopathic CD Lymphocytopenia

L. Zhou*, A. Hall, A. Morris, G.D. Marshall,

Jackson, MS.

Contact Hypersensitivity to Shea Butter

K.K. Brar*, R. Joks, H. Moallem, Brooklyn, NY.

Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome Severe Combined

Immunodeficiency Missed by T Cell Receptor

Excision Circles Newborn Screening

J. Chase* 1 , L.M. Randolph 1 , M.J. Matas-Aguilera 2 ,

J. Lopez-Siles 2 , J.A. Church 1 , 1. Los Angeles, CA;

2. Malaga, Spain.

Secretory Immunoglobulin a Deficiency in a

Pediatric Patient

J. Hochfelder*, Y. Lu, P. Ponda, New Hyde Park, NY.

Repeated Late-Onset Allergy-Like Reaction: A

Bullous Rash After IV Contrast Media

Administration in Spite of Pretreatment With

Steroids

D.A. Andreae*, M. Ramesh, C. Cunningham-Rundles,

New York, NY.

Ongoing Treatment of Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria

With Omalizumab: A Follow-Up Case Series

G. Bhargave*, A. Keswani, A.M. Ditto, C. Saltoun,

Chicago, IL.

P

P

P

Eosinophilic Fasciitis Associated With Medication

Use

R.J. Sporter*, Y. Kopyltsova, B. Kaplan, Great Neck, NY.

A Report of Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma in a

Patient With CVID

M.A. Slack*, N. Farooqui, P. Ogbogu, Columbus, OH.

Treatment of BOOP in CVID Patient

M. Abdalgani*, W. Zhao, Richmond, VA.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P73) recognize a pediatric case of

cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa following hepatitis B

vaccination; P74) identify Wells syndrome (eosinophilic

cellulitis) as a potential diagnosis in patients who

present with polymorphic skin lesions/cellulitis;

P75) discuss eosinophilic pneumonia in a smoker with

diffuse infiltrates and history of dust/soil exposure;

P76) discuss the different types of hereditary

angioedema (HAE), and summarize the pros and cons

of the available procedural prophylaxis options for

HAE; P77) discuss the role of PLE in SLE and summarize

the identification of AIHA and lupus nephritis in SLE as

well as treatment options; P78) describe a

desensitization protocol to drugs; P79) recognize that

in addition to anaphylaxis, mastocytosis and mast cell

activation syndromes, chronic urticaria and

angioedema may also present with elevated tryptase

levels; and discuss cyproheptadine as an additional

oral antihistamine used for management of chronic

urticaria and angioedema; P80) identify and properly

diagnose drug hypersensitivity to betalactam

antibiotic; P81) identify important differences in

clinical presentations of cryptosporidium infections in

nonimmunocompromised and immunocompromised

individuals and describe an atypical presentation of

cryptosporidium in an immunocompetent patient;

P82) discuss the pros and cons for treating secondary

immunodeficiency with immunoglobulin replacement;

P83) recognize the common and unusual

presentations of DRESS and discuss the available

treatment for DRESS; P84) recognize the possibility of

autoimmune complications, such as vasculitis, after

common vaccinations, including hepatitis B; P85)

identify the clincal symptoms of mastocytosis, and

their effect on the patients' quality of life and

recognize that IV fluid therapy might be a novel

therapeutic regimen in controlling symptoms of

mastocytosis; P86) recognize the clinical presentation

of trimethylaminuria and discuss the complex

pathophysiology of food-protein induced enterocolitis

syndrome and its possible interplay with metabolic

disorders; P87) identifiy the possible agents involved

in anaphylaxis following endoscopic procedures and

discuss a strategy for investigation of similar situations;

P88) recognize the need for all diagnosed HAE

patients to have acute action plans and rescue

medication at-hand and include HAE attack in the

differential diagnosis for an acute abdomen;

P89) interpret blood test results for hereditary versus


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center


acquired angioedema and discusss differential

diagnosis for underlying disorders presenting with

angioedema; P90) identify and discuss the features of

the rarely reported adverse reaction of hemolysis

secondary to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin

use and identify patients who are at increased risk for

developing hemolysis secondary to intravenous

immunoglobulin use; P91) identify symptoms of

NOMID and discuss the use of IL-1 receptor antagonist

as a treatment option for clinical improvement;

P92) discuss the differential diagnosis of eosinophilia

and describe the relationship between eosinophilia

and anaplastic large cell lymphoma; P93) recognize

that anaphylaxis may occur with administration of

brentuximab vedotin and discuss desensitization to

brentuximab vedotin using a protocol developed for

rituximab desensitization; P94) discuss the

presentation and evaluation of the potentially novel

cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis related to indigo

carmine; P95) recognize potential adverse reactions,

including anaphylaxis, in occupational workers in

contact with rodents and describe appropriate

treatment for anaphylaxis; P96) recognize that grapes

are a food that may be responsible for fooddependent

exercise induced anaphylaxis;

P97) recognize and diagnose acquired angioedema

secondary to lymphoproliferative disorders with

expanded consideration for splenic marginal zone

lymphoma as a possible cause; P98) discuss the

common presentation for delayed-type

hypersensitivity (DTH) to subcutaneously administered

heparin and its relative safety when administered

intravenously; P99) summarize the characteristics of

NS, its pathophysiology, as well as, the use of eyebrow

hair for diagnosis of NS and distinguish between

Netherton's syndrome and atopic dermatitis;

P100) make a clinical diagnosis of type 3 HAE and

select an appropriate treatment plan for patients with

type 3 HAE; P101) identify the paucity of data

regarding chronic isolated idiopathic angioedema of

the tongue and discuss the challenges associated with

its management; P102) discuss skin testing prior to

eATG administration and identify horse allergic

patients due to receive eATG, possibly with the use of

more in-depth pre-testing and describe the benefit of

further investigation to establish a robust preadministration

testing protocol for eATG; P103) discuss

allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in patients

with cystic fibrosis and make an early diagnosis and

utilize proper treatment to avoid pulmonary

complications; P104) identify early steroid

administration in IgG4-associated cholangitis and

evaluate this treatment for other IgG4 plasma cellmediated

disorders; P105) discuss current diagnostic

criteria for mast cell activation syndrome and other

mast cell disorders and discuss possible treatment

modalities for mast cell disorders; P106) recognize that

pruritic dermatitis that does not improve with

standard therapy should be evaluated for underlying

systemic conditions, including hypothyroidism;

P107) utilize tongue microabscess in the differential

diagnosis of tongue angioedema; P108) describe rare

clinical situations that may present with angioedema;

P109) expand their differential diagnosis lists for

eczema, urticaria, and angioedema by the context of

precipitating factors from a patient history;

P110) review ingredient content in determining the

specific triggering food allergen in order to

differentiate solid food FPIES from celiac disease,

allergic proctocolitis, food protein-induced

enteropathy, and allergic eosinophilic

gastroenteropathies that can be triggered by the same

allergens and describe the characteristic clinical

pattern of presentation of FPIES, including delayed

reactions 1-5 hours after food ingestion and symptom

remission after removal of specific food allergens;

P111) identify hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) and

discuss the underlying disorders in HES that may take

an indolent course and evolve over a long period of

time; P112) recognize that lymphadenopathy, rash,

and thrombophilia may occur with incomplete

DiGeorge syndrome patients and incomplete

DiGeorge syndrome with chromosome 22q11.2

deletion may initially present with symptoms similar to

autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS);

P113) recognize that type I, IgE, mediated allergic

reactions to warfarin are rare and that warfarin

remains the drug of choice for prophylaxis against

thromboembolic events in patients requiring

mechanical heart valve replacement and present a

step wise approach to skin testing for warfarin allergy

using both prick and intradermal skin testing along

with graded dose challenge; P114) discuss the clinical

symptoms of benign cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa

and describe the possible association between

inflammatory bowel disease and vasculitis, including

benign cutaneous PAN; P115) recognize the clinical

manifestations of dermatomyositis and discuss

dermatomyositis in the differential diagnosis of

angioedema; P116) recognize hepatoxicity as a rare

potential complication of treatment with cetirizine;

P117) discuss the possible role of oligosaccharides on

transplanted tissue in patients with pre-existing IgE

antibodies to oligosaccharides; P118) discuss

appropriate preoperative evaluation of suspected

drug allergies; P119) identify quinine in tonic water as

a possible agent in causing urticaria; P120) identify

onion as a rare but possible food allergen with the

potential to cause anaphylaxis; P121) recognize that

FPIES patients may convert to an IgE-mediated food

allergy, even after negative skin testing and food

challenge; P122) summarize the indications for steroid

skin testing, test dosing and desensitisation in the

context of the urgent indication for steroid

administration, i.e., a pulsed course of steroid required

for a demyelination flare-up; P123) define

malakoplakia and summarize possible treatment

modalities for malakoplakia; P124) discuss the workup

of idiopathic anaphylaxis; P125) recognize appropriate

work up and treatment of acute and chronic

angioedema; P126) describe the manifestation of

autoimmune progesterone dermatitis and the


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

diagnosis of this condition; P127) discuss therapeutic

options for idiopathic non-histaminergic angioedema;

P128) discuss a novel cause of recurrent upper

respiratory infections; P129) recognize and diagnose

honey allergy using serum specific IgE; P130) list the

potentially pathogenic fungi found in wind

instruments and discuss novel immunologicallyinduced

diseases caused by fungi; P131) recognize

antihistamine resistant DPUA and discuss use of

omalizumab for resistant DPUA; P132) recognize that

high resolution chest CT should be considered in

children with asthma refractory to conventional

treatment, as uncommon pulmonary disorders may

present with similar symptoms; P133) describe most

common clinical and histopathological features of

Kimura's disease; P134) differentiate acquired

angioedema from food and medication induced

angioedema based on laboratory findings;

P135) identify systemic reactions to formaldehyde;

P136) discuss the importance of sequencing cDNA

when gDNA sequencing fails to reveal a mutation and

summarize the value of flow cytometry in the

detection of XLA; P137) describe the association

between helminthic infections and atopy and atopic

diseases; P138) identify patients with autoimmunity

and hemophilia as having a common disease as well

as establish diagnosis of autoimmune hemophilia by a

diagnostic path and summarize new treatment

strategies for autoimmune haemophilia; P139) discuss

the treatment patients with bradykinin-mediated

medication, such as ecallantide and icatibant, who

have attacks of laryngeal angioedema that do not

respond to antihistamines, steroids or epinephrine;

P140) recognize that premedication and

desensitization to A-B may result in the successful

reintroduction and continuation of therapy to A-β,

after a life-threatening anaphylactic event;

P141) discuss the IL-12/INF-γ axis as well as the

differential for immunodeficencies associated with

fungal diseases and recognize histoplasmosis as a

presentation for IL-12 receptor pathway defect;

P142) identify possible association of DRESS syndrome

with strongyloides infection, as several viral and other

infectious agents predispose patients to DRESS

syndrome through complex immune mechanisms;

P143) identify clinical and laboratory findings

consistent with various forms of urticarial vasculitis

and concomitant C1q deficiency and identify first line,

second line and adjunctive treatment available for

urticarial vasculitis; P144) discuss the natural history of

food allergies and recognize that a food aversion can

be the initial clinical presentation for a patient with an

unmasked food allergy; P145) identify the diagnosis of

HLH and consider testing in adult HLH patient for

chromosomal abnormalities to look for

immunodeficiencies; P146) identify the most common

cause of uvular edema; P147) identify signs and

symptoms of granulomatous CVID and recognize the

implications of a TACI mutation in the production of

the CVID phenotype and consider anti-TNF alpha

agents for treatment of granulomatous CVID;

P148) discuss immediate and delayed vaccine

reactions and recognize potential allergenic

components present in vaccines and discuss

management approaches to patients with a prior

vaccine reaction history; P149) recognize the

importance of immune evaluation in Turner's

syndrome patients; P150) discuss latex allergy as a

possible complication after multiple surgeries;

P151) discuss subclass deficiencies that may cause

lymphopenia in the presence of sepsis and recognize

that subclass deficiencies could be missed until later in

life; P152) identify the complexities of management of

refractory thrombocytopenia in patients with

DiGeorge syndrome; P153) recognize the different

presentations of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis

and discuss the differential diagnosis of dermatitis and

how to properly test for autoimmune progesterone

dermatitis; P154) recognize unusual presentations of

chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and maintain a

high degree of suspicion regarding CGD; P155) discuss

nurse-administered home treatment of HAE patients

with ecallantide as a potentially convenient and costeffective

method; P156) discuss the different

treatment options available for common adverse

reactions of BCG treatment for bladder carcinoma;

P157) discuss the various types of dialyzer reactions

and recognize the limitations of reaction

classifications; P158) describe a treatment method for

hemophiliacs who have developed anaphylaxis to

factors; P159) discuss a rare case of mast cell leukemia;

P160) discuss the various presentations of Good

syndrome and how the definitive diagnosis is made

and discuss the management and long-term

complications of this disease; P161) recognize that

interstitial lung disease may be associated with

Crohn's disease and discuss the medications used in

the treatment of Crohn's, such as TNF inhibitors, that

may be associated with interstitial lung disease;

P162) recognize an autoimmune pancreatitis and

summarize its differential diagnosis, work-up and

treatment; P163) identifiy diffuse cutaneous

mastocytosis vs macularpapular mastocytosis and

escalate approprate medical therapy when needed;

P164) discuss common causes of

agammaglobulinemia and the use of clinical and

genetic markers to determine etiology; P165) discuss

active fungal airway infection and its possible

contribution to the expression of asthma;

P166) describe the differential diagnosis and

evaluation of a patient with episodic peripheral

eosinophilia; P167) discuss STAT3, the only gene

known to cause AD-HIES to date; P168) characterize

different types of aspirin hypersensitivity and

recognize differing indications for aspirin

desensitization protocols; P169) identify the clinical

symptoms and diagnostic criteria of macrophage

activation syndrome; P170) recognize that

hypersomnia disorders, such as Kleine-Levin

syndrome, may be triggered by recurrent sinusitis;

P171) identify the features of mast cell activation

disorder; P172) identify the potential benefit of


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center


managing angioedema symptoms with ketotifen, in

conjunction with other agents; P173) recognize the

association between chronic urticaria and fungal

infections and treat dermatophytid reactions that

present as chronic urticaria; P174) discuss the

diagnosis of Churg Strauss syndrome and recognize

the common presentations as well as the atypical and

multisystem manifestations that are not often

described; P175) discuss small vessel vasculitis and

immunosuppressive therapy at an early stage;

P176) identify the serotypes of Neisseria meningitidis

that are covered by commercially available vaccines

and summarize the scenarios in which a person with

invasive meningococcal disease should be evaluated

for an immunodeficiency; P177) discuss possible

alternative treatment of exercise induced anaphylaxis

with omalizumab and discuss application of this

treatment for refractive EIA patients; P178) identify the

clinical presentation of a patient with MonoMAC

syndrome and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of

MonoMAC; P179) discuss possible adverse cardiac

outcomes of standard therapy in anaphylaxis;

P180) discuss the possible benefit to initiating an

immunodeficiency work-up early on in cystic fibrosis;

P181) recognize the presentation of an IgE-mediated

reaction to ethanol; P182) discuss safe and effective

treatment options for acute attacks of acquired

angioedema; P183) discuss the presentation and

possible cause of angioedema and discuss the PATCH

test and the utility of testing for the causative agents;

P184) identify signs and symptoms of possible allergy

to autologous seminal fluid; P185) diagnose and treat

patients of XHIGM syndrome; P186) identify patients in

whom IPEX syndrome should be considered in the

differential diagnosis to promote earlier diagnosis and

treatment and summarize key diagnostic methods in

IPEX syndrome patients; P187) identify Kimura disease

and describe modalities available for its treatment;

P188) describe the clinical features of Muckle-Wells

syndrome and the mutations that contribute to

different phenotypes and discuss the diagnosis and

treatment Muckle-Wells syndrome; P189) evaluate a

case of IgE multiple myeloma presenting atypically

with symptoms highly suggestive of, but lacking

sufficient diagnostic criteria for, systemic mastocytosis;

P190) discuss a new association between

hypogammaglobulinemia and systemic autoimmune

phenomenon, specifically relapsing polychondritis;

P191) generate a differential diagnosis of painless

proptosis and/or orbital mass in a patient with sinus

disease; P192) describe the utility of PATCH testing in

the setting of determining a possible allergy to a metal

and recognize identifying symptoms and

manifestations of a possible metal allergy;

P193) include allergic reaction to acetaminophen as

part of the differentials in similar clinical scenarios;

P194) recognize the possibility of type IV sensitivity in

patients who present with cutaneous findings when

exposed to nitrile or polyisoprene gloves;

P195) identify diagnostic criteria for allergic

bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), make an early

diagnosis for ABPA and recognize the potential

consequences of undiagnosed ABPA and skin test

patients with difficult to control asthma for ABPA, as

appropriate; P196) identify a premedication protocol

for the prevention of life-threatening anaphylaxis from

protamine; P197) discuss 3-D CT scans in the diagnosis

of tracheobronchomalacia; P198) identify the

disseminated blastomycosis in idiopathic CD4

lymphocytopenia and monitor lymophocyte counts in

idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia and use antibiotic

prophylaxis when indicated; P199) identify shea butter

as a commonly used emollient in topical products and

recognize that shea butter can cause allergic contact

dermatitis; P200) identify a type of severe combined

immunodeficiency that may be missed by T cell

receptor excision circles newborn screening (TREC

NBS); P201) describe the symptoms and presentation

of patients with secretory IgA deficiency;

P202) recognize the potential for repeated severe

reactions to contrast media despite pretreatment with

steroids and discuss the role played by T-cell mediated

reactions; P203) identify potential chronic idiopathic

urticaria patients who may benefit from omalizumab

treatment; P204) recognize the presentation of

eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) and discuss possible causes

of EF; P205) recognize the occurence of a rare

malignancy in patient's with CVID and discuss the

possibility of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma in

patients with CVID; and P206) discuss the role of

steroid treatment for bronchiolitis obliterans in a

patient with common variable immunodeficiency

(CVID).

Clinical Immunology, Immunodeficiency

P

P

P

P

A Mother-Daughter Case of NK Cell Deficiency

Suggesting Autosomal Dominant Inheritance

S.C. Reznick*, R. Hostoffer, L. Chernin, D. Swender,

H. Tcheurekdjian, Cleveland, OH.

A “Good” History Gives the Diagnosis

C.S. Bauer*, R.N. Rao, J.M. Routes, Milwaukee, WI.

Identification of the TLR LF Variant in a

Patient With Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis

S. Gendelman*, Y. Han, C. Isada, F.H. Hsieh,

Cleveland, OH.

Good’s Syndrome Associated With Lichen Planus

and Selective IgM Deficiency

R.R. Vatti* 1 , B.T. Ryhal 2 , 1. Granite Bay, CA; 2. Roseville,

CA.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Tolerability and Safety of Recombinant Human

Hyaluronidase-Facilitated Subcutaneous Infusion

of Human Immune Globulin G, %, in Patients

With Primary Immunodeficiencies: A Study From

North America

R. Kobayashi* 1 , M.R. Stein 2 , A. Darter 3 , K. Paris 4 ,

S. Gupta 5 , A. Testori 6 , W. Engl 7 , H. Leibl 7 , K. Filhauer 7 ,

R.I. Schiff 8 , 1. Los Angeles, CA; 2. North Palm Beach, FL;

3. Oklahoma City, OK; 4. New Orleans, LA; 5. Irvine, CA;

6. Thornton, CO; 7. Vienna, Austria; 8. Westlake

Village, CA.

Efficacy of C-Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) for

the Treatment of Peripheral Attacks of Acute

Hereditary Angioedema Compared to Untreated

Historical Controls

K. Bork* 1 , P. Staubach 1 , H. Feuersenger 2 , T. Machnig 2 ,

T.J. Craig 3 , 1. Mainz, Germany; 2. Marburg, Germany;

3. Hershey, PA.

Long-Term Safety and Pharmacokinetics of

Facilitated-Subcutaneous Infusion of Human

Immune Globulin G, %, and Recombinant

Human Hyaluronidase: Phase Extension Study in

Patients With Primary Immunodeficiencies

I. Melamed* 1 , R. Wasserman 2 , M.R. Stein 3 ,

A. Rubinstein 4 , J. Puck 5 , S. Gupta 6 , W. Engl 7 , H. Leibl 7 ,

D.M. Gelmont 8 , R.I. Schiff 8 , 1. Centennial, CO; 2. Dallas,

TX; 3. North Palm Beach, FL; 4. Bronx, NY; 5. San

Francisco, CA; 6. Irvine, CA; 7. Vienna, Austria;

8. Westlake, CA.

Pancytopenia, Splenomegaly and

Hypergammaglobulinemia in an -Year Old Male

C.T. Quezada-Chalita*, D.R. Pietropaolo Cienfuegos,

B.E. Del Río Navarro, L. Berrón, Mexico City, DF,

Mexico.

Lymphoid Neogenesis in Common Variable

Immunodeficiency Chronic Lung Disease

P.J. Maglione*, M. Ko, J.A. Strauchen, M.B. Beasley,

C. Cunningham-Rundles, New York, NY.

Efficacy and Safety of C Esterase Inhibitor

Concentrate (Berinert®) for the Treatment of Acute

Hereditary Angioedema in Obese Versus Non-

Obese Patients

J.A. Bernstein* 1 , T.J. Craig 2 , H. Keinecke 3 , T. Machnig 3 ,

1. Cincinnati, OH; 2. Hershey, PA; 3. Marburg, Germany.

A Fatal Good’s Syndrome With Pure Red Cell

Aplasia

U. Musabak, O. Kartal, F. Demirel*, M. Gulec, M. Safali,

B. Battal, O. Nevruz, A. Baysan, S. Yesillik, M. Karaman,

O. Sener, Ankara, Turkey.

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Case Report: Intravenous Immunoglobulin Halts

Progression of Granulomatous Disease Associated

With Common Variable Immunodeficiency

K.J. Lim*, M. Riedl, Los Angeles, CA.

Atypical Case of Hypogammaglobulinemia

R. Patel*, M. Jawairia, M. Frieri, East Meadow, NY.

Mycosis Fungoides in an Adult Referred for

Chronic Urticaria

S. Min*, K. Zakarian, S. Thobani, M. Li, L. Scott, Los

Angeles, CA.

Experience With Subcutaneous Loading of

Vivaglobin® or Hizentra® in Primary

Immunodeficiency Patients Naive to

Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy

A. Koterba*, K. Farnan, C. Sierra, D. Eufrasio,

M.R. Stein, North Palm Beach, FL.

Trisomy p and Monosomy q Associated With

Immunodeficiency

J.M. Welch*, H.J. Wedner, St. Louis, MO.

Atypical Presentation of X-Linked

Agammaglobulinemia and Its Inherent Difficulty

in Assessment of Response to IVIG

Y.W. Khan 1 , M. Hicar 2 , D.S. Hummell* 1 , 1. Nashville, TN;

2. Buffalo, NY.

Phellinus Tropicalis Abscess in a Patient With

Chronic Granulomatous Disease

M. Ramesh*, E. Resnik, V. La Bombardi, N. Bouvier,

Y. Hui, P.J. Maglione, H. Mehta, C. Cunningham-

Rundles, New York, NY.

A New Syndrome of Allergy, Recurrent Infection,

NK Deficiency and Adaptive Immune Dysfunction

J. Mendez* 1 , Y. Luna 1 , J.A. Bellanti 2 , 1. Mexico City, DF,

Mexico; 2. Washington, DC.

Disseminated Tuberculosis in Infant With Inborn

Defect in IFN-γ/Il-/Il- Axis

E. Sandoval-Ramirez*, B.E. Del Rio-Navarro,

D.R. Pietropaolo-Cienfuegos, L. Blancas-Galicia,

A. Zamora-Chávez, N. Ramírez Alejo, Mexico City, DF,

Mexico.

Biochemical Comparison of Commercially

Available C Esterase Inhibitor Concentrates for

Treatment of Hereditary Angioedema

A. Feussner* 1 , U. Kalina 1 , D. Schuermann 1 ,

T. Machnig 1 , W. Kreuz 2 , T.J. Craig 3 , 1. Marburg,

Germany; 2. Frankfurt, Germany; 3. Hershey, PA.

Diffuse Eczema and Staphylococcus Aureus in Two

Patients With X- Linked Agammaglobulinemia

(XLA)

S. Culverhouse*, C. Mesolella, G. Shear,

R. Damrongwatanasuk, J. Sleasman, R.F. Lockey,

Tampa, FL.


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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Classical Natural Killer Deficiency: Description of a

Rare Case in a Year Old Female

A. Ghazi* 1 , R. Divekar 2 , R. Bonds 2 , 1. League City, TX;

2. Galveston, TX.

Immunodeficiency in Rett Syndrome

S.B. Sindher*, A. Djukic, J. Shliozberg, Bronx, NY.

Importance of the Histological Findings in the

Diagnosis of Chronic Granulomatous Disease:

Report of Cases With the Family Approach

L.O. Hernandez-Mondragon*, R.D. Pietropaolo-

Cienfuegos, A. Zamora, B.E. DelRio-Navarro,

L. Blancas-Galicia, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

CMV Retinitis in Good Syndrome

K. Zakarian* 1 , S. Min 2 , S. Thobani 2 , L. Scott 2 , T. Kimia 2 ,

M. Li 2 , 1. Glendale, CA; 2. Los Angeles, CA.

Blood Dendritic Cell Immunophenotype in

Patients With Severe Multiple Drug Resistant

Pulmonary Tuberculosis

A.Y. Hancharou* 1 , L.P. Titov 1 , I.V. Ramanava 1 ,

V. Solodovnikova 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Minsk, Belarus;

2. Gardner, MA.

Brothers With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

(XLA): An Argument for Expanded Newborn

Screening

J.S. Tam*, M.K. Hintermeyer, T. Dasu, J.M. Routes,

J.W. Verbsky, Milwaukee, WI.

Level of Serum Th (Il-) and Th (Il-) Cytokines in

Patients With Oral Mucosal Lichen Planus

G.N. Drannik* 1 , A.I. Kurchenko 1 , R.A. Rehuretska 1 ,

L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Kiev, Ukraine; 2. Gardner, MA.

Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis With

Eosinophilic Infiltrates

T.A. Kamdar*, K. McGrath, Chicago, IL.

Lupus-Like Syndrome in C Deficiency

P. Beerelli*, V. Dimitriades, New Orleans, LA.

Hyper-IgM Variant Due to a Thrmet Missense

Mutation

P. Patel* 1 , N. Mazer 1 , M. Eisenfeld 1 , T. Torgerson 2 ,

H. Ochs 2 , A. Rubinstein 1 , J. Shliozberg 1 , 1. Bronx, NY;

2. Seattle, WA.

Complement C Deficiency

T. Nguyen* 1 , L. Lim 2 , 1. Riverside, CA; 2. Hayward, CA.

Combined T and B Cell Defect Associated With

Jacobsen Syndrome

Y. Luo*, P. Ponda, Great Neck, NY.

A Case of Acquired C Esterase Inhibitor

Deficiency in a Female With IBD

K.J. Garg* 1 , R. Khanal 2 , S.R. Ayyappan 2 , T. Sher 2 ,

1. Cleveland Heights, OH; 2. Cleveland, OH.

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Primary Immunedeficiency Diseases at Reference

and High Specialty Hospitals in Guanajuato State,

Mexico

E. Guaní-Guerra*, U.N. García-Ramírez, A.I. Jiménez-

Romero, J.M. Velázquez-Ávalos, F.J. Mendoza-

Espinoza, G. Gallardo-Martínez, León, GT, Mexico

Lps-Receptor Expression and Elevated C-Reactive

Protein Levels in Diabetes Mellitus Type Patients

May Induce Chronic Inflammation

V.A. Beloglazov* 1 , I.J. Dynaev 1 , A.I. Gordienko 1 ,

L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Simferopol, Ukraine; 2. Gardner, MA.

The Effect of Cyclosporine on Cytokine Levels in

Ocular Fluids of Patients With Uveitis

R. Khanferyan* 1 , S. Adgavi 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 ,

1. Krasnodar, Russian Federation; 2. Gardner, MA.

The Inhibitory Effects of Fullerene C on the

Immunopathology of Experimental Adjuvant

Arthritis

I.P. Kaidashev* 1 , T.V. Mamontova 1 , L.E. Vesnina 1 ,

M.V. Mikityuk 1 , N.A. Bobrova 1 , L.A. Kutsenko 1 ,

I.L. Gordinskaya 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Poltava, Ukraine;

2. Gardner, MA.

IPEX “Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy,

Enteropathy, X-Linked” Like Syndrome With

Reduced Foxp Expression in CD+T-Regulatory

Cells Without Foxp Mutation

S. Gierer*, M. Dasouki, O. Almadhoun, M. Le, Kansas

City, KS.

Gram Negative Sepsis in Children Leads to

Deficient Anti-Endotoxin Immunity

L.F. Pritulo 1 , Y.A. Bisyuk* 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 ,

1. Simferopol, Ukraine; 2. Gardner, MA.

Dextrans As Ligands of Mannose Receptor and

DC-Sign Family Receptors: A Novel Means of

Modulating Th/Th Immune Responses

S.V. Pustylnikov*, T.I. Petrenko, Novosibirsk, Russian

Federation.

Acquired Cold Urticaria: A Case Report

K. Mejia*, S. Gonzalez, A. Arias, J. Buenfil, C. Gallego,

V. Yañez, L. Dominguez, M. Calva, L. Rangel,

H. Hernandez, Monterrey, Mexico.

Heterozygous Artemis Mutation Resulting in a

Combined Immunodeficiency

T. Dy*, P. Patel, A. Rubinstein, Bronx, NY.

Seasonality in Initial Presentation of Systemic

Lupus Erythematosus in a Pediatric Cohort

A. Mathew*, S. Panupattanapong, M. Kim,

J. Moallem, Brooklyn, NY.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Associated

With Epstein Barr Virus Infection in a Patient With

Common Variable Immune Deficiency

N. Kalra*, P. Bajaj, M. Bayerl, T. Craig, Hershey, PA.

Atypical Clinical Manifestations in Patients With

Agammaglobulinemia

K.L. Miro*, L. Geng, H. Jyonouchi, Newark, NJ.

Upper Respiratory Cytokine Production in

Children Infected With Novel Versus Seasonal

HN Influenza a Infection

H. Kobayaa* 1 , J. Domachowske 2 , E. Secord 1 ,

C. Bonville 2 , P. Lephart 1 , B. Asmar 1 , 1. Detroit, MI;

2. Syracuse, NY.

Recalcitrant Warts Secondary to Non-HIV Related

T- Cell Deficiency

S. Yee* 1 , C. Kirkpatrick 2 , 1. Denver, CO; 2. Aurora, CO.

Functional Natural Killer Cell Deficiency in An

Infant With Crohn’s: A Case Report

M. Relan*, Y. Khan, H. Lehman, Buffalo, NY.

Heterogeneous Pneumococcal Antibody Titers in

Patients With Antibody Deficiency Receiving

Subcutaneous Hizentra®

H. Niebur* 1 , D. Nguyen 2 , M. Dorsey 1 , T. Alberdi 1 ,

C. Duff 1 , S. Lukas 1 , J. Sleasman 1 , 1. St. Petersburg, FL;

2. Houston, TX.

Is It Really Crohn’s Disease

P. Lall*, L. Kobrynski, Atlanta, GA.

Atopic Disease Among Patients With Chromosome

q. Deletion Syndrome

M. Morsheimer* 1 , H. Hernandez-Trujillo 2 ,

D. McDonald-McGinn 1 , E. Zackai 1 , K. Sullivan 1 ,

T. Brown-Whitehorn 1 , 1. Philadelphia, PA; 2. West

Hartford, CT.

Severe T Cell Lymphopenia Identified Via TREC

Assay in a Patient With q Deletion Syndrome

(Jacobsen Syndrome)

H. Shah*, K. Paris, New Orleans, LA.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P207) recognize that NK cell deficiency

likely has a genetic component with both recessive,

and now dominant, inheritance patterns reported;

P208) recognize the features commonly associated

with Good's syndrome; and state the importance of a

thorough history, including surgical history, when

evaluating a patient for immunodeficiency;

P209) identify mutations that are associated with

familial chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis other than

the AIRE mutation and identify different clinical

phenotypes associated with chronic mucocutaneous

candidiasis; P210) identify and manage immune

defects that are associated with thymomas;

P211) summarize safety and tolerability outcomes

from an interim analysis of a phase 2/3 study following

treatment with human hyaluronidase-facilitated

subcutaneous infusion of human immune globulin G

in patients with primary immunodeficencies;

P212) discuss the benefit of treatment of peripheral

attacks with C1-INH; P213) summarize safety and

pharmacokinetics outcomes following up to 3 years of

treatment with human hyaluronidase-facilitated

subcutaneous infusion of human immune globulin G

in patients with primary immunodeficencies;

P214) identify autoimmune lymphoproliferative

syndrome in patients with autoimmune phenomena,

splenomegaly and hypergammaglobulinemia;

P215) discuss the presence of lymphoid neogenesis in

CVID lung disease and its potential impact upon

disease pathogenesis; P216) discuss the benefit of

C1-INH in obese vs. non-obese patients; P217)

recognize that recurrent, atypical and drug-resistant

infections may be related to diseases of the immune

system and affect the appropriate selection of

antibiotic treatment, as well as, recognize that

autoimmune, allergic or malign diseases may be

associated with immune deficiency diseases and

examine patients with thymoma in terms of immune

deficiency diseases, as these can accompany their

clinical situation both before and after thymectomy;

P218) identify differences between sarcoidosis and

granulomatous disease in common variable

immunodeficiency and discuss possible management

options for granulomatous disease in common

variable immunodeficiency; P219) discuss selective

IgA deficiency and discuss progression to possible

common variable immunodeficiency (CVID); P220)

identify when to refer a patient to dermatology for

biopsy given atypical history of eczema or chronic

urticaria; P221) discuss the advantages/disadvantages

of subcutaneous vs intravenous immunoglobulin

replacement; P222) identify a novel genetic mutation

associated with an immunodeficiency; P223) describe

the utility of measurement of specific antibody titers

to serotypes of Streptococcus pneumonia as an

appropriate means of determining efficacy of IVIG

therapy in certain patients; P224) recognize Phellinus

tropicalis as a pathogen in chronic granulomatous

disease; P225) discuss the two major groups of

quantitative and functional types of NK deficiency and

the two major mechanisms of action of NK cell

function in direct cellular cytotoxicity and indirect

immunoglobulin-linked ADCC reactions and recognize

the association of NK cell dysfunction with

abnormalities of the adaptive immune system in

patients who present with recurrent infection and

allergic disease; P226) recognize defects in te IFNgamma-IL12-IL23

axis; P227) discuss the biochemical

differences between different C1-INH concentrates

regarding their impurity profile; P228) discuss

characteristics of X-linked agammaglobulinemia and

discuss the role of Staphylococcal aureus in eczema;

P229) discuss various differential diagnosis of

recurrent viral infections and maintain a high clinical

suspicion of Natural Killer (NK) cell deficiency disorder;

P230) identify that immunodeficiency may be a


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center


concern in patients with Rett syndrome; P231) identify

typical histologic findings in a chronic granulomatous

disease (CGD); P232) identify characteristics of Good

syndrome and possible rare complications;

P233) discuss blood dendritic cell immunophenotype

in patients with severe multiple drug resistant

pulmonary tuberculosis; P234) discuss available

techniques not yet utilized for newborn screening

(NBS) for immunodeficiency and summarize the

advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of NBS;

P235) discuss level of serum Th1 (IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4)

cytokines in patients with oral mucosal lichen planus;

P236) recognize the presentation of urticarial vasculitis

and that histopathologic findings can include

eosinophils and describe the various treatment

options available for urticarial vasculitis;

P237) recognize the autoimmune manifestations of

complement deficiency; P238) discuss differences

between classical and rare phenotypes of hyper-IgM

syndromes; P239) recognize the role of complement

studies in evaluation of patients with possible

immunodeficiency; P240) identify humeral or cellular

immunodefiency associated with Jacobsen syndrome;

P241) identify the challenges associated with

diagnosis and treatment of patients with C1 esterase

inhibitor deficiency and IBD; P242) identify the

frequency and clinical spectrum of primary immune

deficiency (PID) and promptly diagnosis and treat PID;

P243) discuss LPS-receptor expression and elevated

C-reactive protein levels in diabetes mellitus type 1

patients that may induce chronic inflammation;

P244) describe the effect of cyclosporine on cytokine

levels in ocular fluids of patients with uveitis; P245)

describe the inhibitory effect of fullerene C60 on

immunopathology in experimental adjuvant arthritis;

P246) recognize that there may be variations in FOXP3

abnormalities; P247) recognize that gram negative

sepsis in children leads to deficient anti-endotoxin

immunity; P248) recognize that application of

dextrans may provide a new mechanism of treatment

of intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV,

viral hepatitis and influenza, as well as, in other future

uses in medicine as a means of immune modulation;

P249) discuss the diagnosis and treatment of acquired

cold urticaria; P250) summarize the clinical

manifestations of severe combined immunodeficiency

as well as identify mutations in ARTEMIS as a cause of

B- and T- lymphocyte radiosensitivity and discuss

subcutaneous gammaglobulin as a potential

treatment for patients with heterozygous ARTEMIS

mutations and resultant hypogammaglobulinemia;

P251) discuss environmental factors that have been

proposed to cause flares of systemic lupus

erythematosus (SLE) and discuss seasonality in the

initial presentation of SLE in this pediatric cohort;

P252) identify the clinical presentation of EBV

associated HLH syndrome and suspect and

appropriately manage this rare complication early in

adult CVID patients; P253) discuss the early diagnosis

and proper treatment of patients with

agammaglobulinemia, as late diagnosis can often lead

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to atypical clinical manifestations and identify the

absence of tonsils on physical exam as an important

clinical tool in the early diagnosis of

agammaglobulinemia; P254) compare local upper

respiratory inflammatory pattern between novel and

seasonal H1N1 influenza A infection; P255) recognize

the presentation of a patient with immunodeficiency/

lymphocytopenia; P256) discuss functional Natural

Killer (NK) cell deficiencies and discuss how to

clinically approach a patient who presents with

abnormal NK cell function, including initial laboratory

testing; P257) recognize antibody titers required for

protection against pneumococcal disease in patients

with antibody deficiency and discuss the limitations of

inferring protection for pneumococcal disease from

steady state total IgG levels; P258) identify symptoms

and laboratory tests for chronic granulomatous

disease (CGD) and differentiate CGD from Crohn's

disease; P259) recognize that patients with

chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome would

benefit from proactive screening for atopic disease;

and P260) recognize the newborn screening T-cell

receptor excision circle (TREC) assay's ability to identify

lymphopenia in clinical entities other than severe

combined immune deficiency (SCID).

Food Allergy

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

Triggered by Orange Juice

T. Federly*, P. Ryan, C. Dinakar, Kansas City, MO.

Performance of Skin Prick Testing and Serum

Specific IgE Testing in Pediatric Oral Food

Challenges to Cows Milk, Egg, and Peanut Allergy

M. Nanda*, P. Windom, J. Khoury, M. Lierl, A. Assa’ad,

Cincinnati, OH.

Late onset of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis

Syndrome After Food Challenge in a Boy With

Gastroschisis

C.T. Quezada-Chalita* 1 , R.T. Quezada Medrano 2 ,

1. Mexico City, DF, Mexico; 2. Tepic, NA, Mexico.

Epinephrine Auto-Injector and Medical Alert

Bracelet Preparedness in Pediatric Food Allergy

J. Shih*, K. Demuth, Atlanta, GA.

A Case of Concurrent Eosinophilic Esophagitis and

Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting With

Upper GI Bleed

D.R. Sun* 1 , J. Ko 2 , M.T. Nguyen 2 , 1. San Francisco, CA;

2. Oakland, CA.

Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Educational

Curriculum in Urban Child Care Centers

B.J. Lanser*, J.A. Bird, A.T. Tang, Dallas, TX.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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Outgrowing IgE Food Allergy to Milk and

Developing Eosinophilic Esophagitis

S.M. Maggadottir*, J.M. Spergel, T.F. Brown-

Whitehorn, Philadelphia, PA.

Heiner Syndrome Masquerading as an Immune

Deficiency

J.A. Sigua* 1 , M. Zacharisen 2 , 1. Milwaukee, WI;

2. Bozeman, MT.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Triggered by

Pork: A Case Report

G. Ram*, J. Heimall, S.P. DaVeiga, Philadelphia, PA.

Engineered Osmotin Variant Demonstrates

Reduced Allergenic Potency With Hypersensitive

Patients’ Sera and Mice

P. Sharma*, S.N. Gaur, N. Arora, Delhi, India.

Food Hypersensitivity Presenting as Protein-

Losing Enteropathy Without Gastrointestinal

Symptoms

N. Farooqui*, R. Scherzer, D.W. Hauswirth,

Columbus, OH.

Current Food Allergy Diagnosis and Management

Practices of Pediatricians

R. Gupta* 1 , A. Dyer 1 , C.H. Lau 1 , M.W. Sohn 1 ,

B. Altshuler 2 , J.A. Brown 3 , J. Necheles 1 , 1. Chicago, IL;

2. Crystal Lake, IL; 3. Barrington, IL.

A Case of Delayed Anaphylaxis to Beef in Central

Florida

S.A. Aljubran*, R. Lockey, M. Glaum, Tampa, FL.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis in South Dakota

M.E. Bubak, L.R. Peterson*, Sioux Falls, SD.

Buckwheat Allergy- New Allergen to Watch in

the US

C. Radojicic, D. Mlinarik*, Independence, OH.

Safety of Multiple Allergen Oral Immunotherapy

With and Without Adjunct Omalizumab Therapy

A.K. Mehrotra*, T.L. Dominguez, L. Winterroth,

A. Sciancalepore, D. Pineda, A. Blakemore, M. Woch,

K. Sampson, K. Nadeau, Stanford, CA.

Pectin Anaphylaxis Associated With Cashew and

Pistachio Allergy

M. Rafeeq*, Oregon, OH.

Peanut Sensitization: A Circumstance of Affluence

in Children

S.K. Yip*, G.K. Yamane, T.S. Rans, J.M. Quinn,

J.L. Butler, San Antonio, TX.

Potential Unreliability of RAST Testing for

Diagnosis of Food Allergy

D.E. Riester*, Burlington, MA.

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A Cohort Study of Peanut, Tree Nut Allergy:

Sensitization and Correlations With Clinical

Manifestations

L. Yang* 1 , R. Joks 2 , 1. Millburn, NJ; 2. Brooklyn, NY.

Serum Specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) Levels of

Common Food Allergens in Children Presenting

With Food Allergy

M. Amin*, J.C. Khoury, A.H. Assa’ad, Cincinnati, OH.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) to Unsuspected

Food Allergens

S.K. Mane*, P. Jordan, S.L. Bahna, Shreveport, LA.

Prevalence of Peanut Allergy in Children of Peanut

Farmers

A. Jagdis* 1 , G. Liss 1 , S. Maleki 2 , P. Vadas 1 , 1. Toronto,

ON, Canada; 2. New Orleans, LA.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P261) discuss food protein-induced

enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) induced by unusual

agents, such as oranges or other citrus fruits;

P262) identify the shortcomings of current skin prick

testing and serum specifiic IgE testing for clinically

relevant food allergy; P263) identify the possibility of a

late onset of food protein-induced enterocolitis

syndrome after a food challenge; P264) discuss the

reality of allergy preparedness in food allergic

pediatric patients; P265) differentiate between

different eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases as well

as various diagnostic and treatment options;

P266) recognize the need for an educational

curriculum regarding food allergy and anaphylaxis

among child care center workers and discuss the

results of the pilot program, and goals of future

research; P267) discuss cases where apparent true IgE

mediated food allergy evolves or changes into

eosinophilic esophagitis and describe the plasticity of

food allergies.P268) identify common manifestations

of Heiner syndrome as well as discuss a differential

diagnosis of chronic pulmonary infiltrates and

summarize an appropriate diagnostic evaluation of

Heiner syndrome; P269) identify patients with FPIESmediated

food allergy and recognize mammalian

meats as a possible trigger for FPIES; P270) discuss the

reduction of allergenic potency with hypersensitive

patients’ sera and mice as demonstrated by an

engineered osmotin variant; P271) recognize

uncommon symptoms presenting as food

hypersensitivity; P272) summarize current trends in

management of food allergy among pediatricians and

compare current practices to the NIAID food allergy

management guidelines; P273) discuss delayed food

allergy and recognize allergy to alpha gal as possible

cause for delayed food allergy and anaphylaxis;

P274) discuss the current methods used for the

diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis by

allergists and gastroenterologists in the state of South

Dakota; P275) differentiate wheat allergy from

buckwheat wheat allergy and recognize potential


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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allergens in 'gluten-free food'; P276) discuss the

possible safety issues with multiple allergen oral

immunotherapy; P277) review presentation of pectin

allergy and anaphylaxis and discuss association of

pectin allergy with cashew and pistachio allergy;

P278) identify socioeconomic status as a potential risk

factor for peanut sensitization primarily in children

and not adults; P279) discuss the potential limits of

serological testing for food allergy; P280) discuss a

possible correlation between peanut and tree nut

sensitization and clinical allergic manifestations;

P281) interpret serum food specific IgE levels in

children for the common food allergens and recognize

that the rise of serum food specific IgE over time is an

expected finding; P282) obtain esophageal biopsy

even if the mucosa appears grossly normal and

conduct a detailed food allergy evaluation in spite of

lack of food suspicion by history; and P283) discuss

the prevalence of peanut allergy in children of peanut

farmers in comparison to the general population.

Immunotherapy, Immunizations

Evaluation of Systemic Reactions in Subcutaneous

Immunotherapy Patients

H. DelasAlas*, C. Stokes, J. Stokes, Omaha, NE.

Allergy Immunotherapy Quality of Life and

Perceived Efficacy Opinion Survey

P. Buddiga*, M. Baz, Fresno, CA.

Cost Benefit and Patient Satisfaction of Allergen

Immunotherapy

M.L. Vandewalker*, T. Vandewalker, Columbia, MO.

Cross-Reactivity Between Human Seminal Plasma

Fluid and Dog Dander: Possible Therapeutic

Implication

T.M. Nsouli* 1 , C.D. Schluckebier 2 , S.T. Nsouli 2 ,

C.M. Davis 2 , J.A. Bellanti 2 , 1. Burke, VA; 2. Washington,

DC.

Initiation of Specific Immunotherapy (SCIT & SLIT)

Among AR Patients in a US Allergy Practice

R. Anolik* 1 , F. Allen-Ramey 2 , A. Schwartz 1 ,

P. Lupinacci 3 , 1. Blue Bell, PA; 2. West Point, PA; 3. East

Norriton, PA.

Quality of Life (RQLQ(S)) During a Course of an

Ultra Short-Term Ragweed Immunotherapy

H.B. Kaiser* 1 , K.J. Fischer von Weikersthal-

Drachenberg 2 , L.M. DuBuske 3 , 1. Miinneapolis, MN;

2. Munich, Germany; 3. Gardner, MA.

Ragweed Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin IgE

and IgG During a Course of Ultra Short-Term

Ragweed Immunotherapy

L.M. DuBuske* 1 , K.J. Fischer von Weikersthal-

Drachenberg 2 , H.B. Kaiser 3 , 1. Gardner, MA; 2. Munich,

Germany; 3. Minneapolis, MN.

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Clinical Effects of Immunotherapy in Patients With

Allergic Disease in the National Institute of

Respiratory Diseases

G.G. Ma del Rosario*, M.H. Garcia Cruz, K. Ruiz

Cervantes, C. Najera Villatoro, F. Ramirez, Mexico City,

DF, Mexico.

The Safety and Efficacy of the United Allergy

Services Immunotherapy Protocol

L. Garner* 1 , L. Whelchel 1 , M. Ryals 1 , M. Ebeling 2 ,

T. Hulsey 2 , F.M. Schaffer 2 , 1. San Antonio, TX;

2. Charleston, SC.

The Safety of Home Immunotherapy Utilizing the

United Allergy Services Immunotherapy Protocol

F.M. Schaffer* 1 , L. Whelchel 2 , H. Soliz 3 , T. Crimmins 2 ,

M. Ebeling 1 , T. Hulsey 1 , L. Garner 2 , 1. Charleston, SC;

2. San Antonio, TX.

Th , Th and Th Cytokine Profiles in Pollen

Allergic Patients Before Treatment and After Two

Years of Sublingual Immunotherapy

L.P. Titov* 1 , L. Maslova 1 , A. Hancharou 1 ,

L.M. DuBuske 2 , 1. Minsk, Belarus; 2. Gardner, MA.

Rare Skin Manifestation Following Smallpox

Vaccination With ACAM

S. Dickson*, K.S. Johnson, Lackland AFB, TX.

Polymerization of Recombinant Allergens Modify

Allergenicity and IgE-Regulatory Cytokine Profile

R. Khanferyan* 1 , A. Aminian 2 , 1. Krasnodar, Russian

Federation; 2. Fresno, CA.

An Algorithm for Assessment of Pollen Allergen

Specific Immunotherapy

L.I. Romaniuk* 1 , O.P. Nazarenko 1 , L.M. DuBuske 2 ,

1. Kiev, Ukraine; 2. Gardner, MA.

Comparison of the Safety of Cluster Versus

Conventional Immunotherapy Schedules in a

Community Based Allergy Clinic

J. Jacobs, S. Somani*, R. Turner, Walnut Creek, CA.

Two-Day Ultra-Rush Insect Venom Immunotherapy

in Patients With Multiple Venom Allergies

T.J. Owens* 1 , T. Baker 2 , T. Rans 1 , 1. Lackland Air Force

Base, TX; 2. Joint Base Andrews, MD.

Seasonal Administration of Rush Immunotherapy

Is Not a Risk Factor for Systemic Reactions

M.E. Sunny*, M.L. Alvares, K. Hilton, T. Walton,

D.A. Khan, Dallas, TX.

Successful Immunotherapy in Skin Test Induced

Anaphylactic Reaction to Venom: Case Report

M. Ansstas*, M.B. Hammami, J. Temprano, St. Louis,

MO.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P284) recognize the World Allergy


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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P

Association classificaiton of systemic reaction to

immunotherapy and identify potential risk factors for

developing these reactions and recognize

management options for these reactions as well as the

benefit/risk implicated by each; P285) discuss the

efficacy of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy

from a patient perpspective; P286) use the Rhinitis

Outcomes Questionnaire to assess patient

improvement from immunotherapy and discuss

patient satisfaction and cost-benefit ratio of

immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis; P287) discuss the

possible beneficial role of dog dander immunotherapy

in patients suffering from human seminal plasma

allergy due to cross-reactivity between dog dander

and human prostatic specific antigen; P288) identify

factors that may influence a patient’s decision to

initiate immunotherapy, overall and for specific

modalities of SCIT and SLIT; P289) discuss quality of life

[RQLQ(S)] during a course of an ultra short-term

ragweed immunotherapy; P290) discuss ragweed

allergen-specific immunoglobulin IgE and IgG during a

course of an ultra short-term ragweed

immunotherapy; P291) identify the clinical effects of

immunotherapy in patients with allergic diseases;

P292) discuss differences in immunotherapy protocols

and their effects on the frequency of adverse systemic

reactions; P293) discuss and summarize issues

pertaining to safety, efficacy, and advantages/

disadvantages of home-based immunotherapy;

P294) describe Th2, Th1 and Th17 cytokine profiles in

pollen allergic patients before treatment and after two

years of sublingual immunotherapy; P295) identify the

various cutaneous rashes that can occur following

smallpox vaccine, in particular, generalized, selflimited

rashes; P296) discuss the possibility of

modifying recombinant allergens as a tool for possible

future specific immunotherapy; P297) utilize an

algorithm for assessment of pollen allergen specific

immunotherapy; P298) compare risks between

conventional and cluster immunotherapy schedules;

P299) describe an alternative ultra-rush venom

protocol with multiple flying hymenoptera extracts;

P300) identify the relationship between the seasonal

administration of pollens and the incidence of

systemic reactions during immunotherapy; and

P301) discuss the safe administration of

immunotherapy, even if anaphylactic shock occurs

secondary to skin testing.

Other

Stable IgA Nephropathy Post-Renal Transplant on

Immune Suppressive Therapy

S. Akkina*, M. Frieri, East Meadow, NY.

Clinical Trial Experience of Pediatric Patients

Treated With Ecallantide for Acute Attacks of

Hereditary Angioedema

A.J. MacGinnitie* 1 , M. Davis-Lorton 2 , L.E. Stolz 3 ,

R. Tachdjian 4 , 1. Boston, MA; 2. Mineola, NY;

3. Burlington, MA; 4. Los Angeles, CA.

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Treatment Preferences in Patients With Moderate-

Severe Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis: Findings of a

Discrete Choice Experiment

S. Acaster* 1 , W. Carr 2 , P. Lieberman 3 , C. Bachert 4 ,

D. Price 5 , 1. Somerset, NJ; 2. Mission Viejo, CA;

3. Memphis, TN; 4. Ghent, Belgium; 5. Aberdeen, United

Kingdom.

Treatment of Abdominal Attacks of Hereditary

Angioedema With Ecallantide

A.L. Sheffer 1 , A.J. Lembo 1 , L.E. Stolz 2 , C. Stevens* 1 ,

1. Boston, MA; 2. Burlington, MA.

Management of Hereditary Angioedema in

Children: Clinical Symptoms and Treatment

Response

I. Martinez-Saguer*, E. Rusicke, E. Aygören-Pürsün,

T. Klingebiel, W. Kreuz, Frankfurt, Germany.

Formal and Computable Representations of

Allergic Diseases in the Electronic Health Record:

An Approach Based on the Ontology of General

Medical Science

A. Yu*, S. Schwartz, Buffalo, NY.

Mobile Technology and Social Media in the Care of

Adolescents With Asthma

A. Varadhi*, A. Nickels, R. Wolf, V. Dimov, Chicago, IL.

Rapid Growth of Twitter Use by Allergists and

Immunologists for Professional Purposes

N. Fenny*, R. Wolf, V. Dimov, Chicago, IL.

Exploring Physician-Patient Relationships With

Leader-Member Exchange Theory

S.K. Saini* 1 , K. Allgaier 1 , H. Huynh 2 , K. Sweeny 2 ,

1. Upland, CA; 2. Riverside, CA.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P302) discuss IgA nephropathy, a common

form of idiopathic glomerulonephritis which can lead

to chronic kidney disease and summarize genetic

factors that can promote the overproduction of an

aberrant form of IgA pathogenesis and describe the

advantages of treatments for these patients;

P303) discuss use of ecallantide and its outcomes in

pediatric patients with HAE; P304) discuss an approach

to cost/effectiveness of therapeutic agents using a

discrete choice model that is widely accepted;

P305) describe the natural history of abdominal

hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and discuss

outcomes following ecallantide treatment for

abdominal HAE attacks; P306) discuss the importance

of early screening of pediatric patients with a known

family history of HAE; P307) discuss the use of defined

terms in electronic medical record systems as well as

the relevance to reusing encoded data in allergy/

immunology and describe techniques used in

representing medical knowledge in computer-based

systems; P308) review available modes of technology

that can be used for managing the health of

Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center


adolescents with asthma and discuss the advantages,

disadvantages, and possible future studies of using

mobile technology and social media in the care of

adolescents; P309) discuss the rapid increase of Twitter

use by allergists and immunologists and its potential

for use in professional development and patient

education and identify best practices of Twitter use for

patient and physician education; P310) relate the

correlation between patients’ ratings of relationship

quality with their physician and adherence behavior in

an asthma/allergy clinic; and P311) discuss the

similarities and differences between manifestation and

management of HAE in adult and pediatric patients

and summarize the benefits of self-administration of

C1-INH.

Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics

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Manifestation and Management of Hereditary

Angioedema in Children and Adults

I. Martinez-Saguer*, E. Rusicke, E. Aygören-Pürsün,

T. Klingebiel, W. Kreuz, Frankfurt, Germany.

Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Activation Inhibits

Human Eosinophil Chemotaxis and Reduces

Murine Allergic Inflammation

L. Baldissera-Jr*, D.M. Squebola, M.C. Calixto, G. De

Nucci, E. Antunes, Campinas, SP, Brazil.

The Prescribing Patterns of Prednisone in the US

T. Lee*, G. Lee, M. Smith, Louisville, KY.

Device and Integrated Dose Counter Performance

of Beclomethasone Dipropionate Nasal Aerosol

During Daily Use

E.O. Meltzer* 1 , P.E. Korenblat 2 , B.Q. Lanier 3 , L. Kelley 4 ,

S.A. Dunbar 4 , S.K. Tantry 4 , 1. San Diego, CA; 2. St. Louis,

MO; 3. Fort Worth, TX; 4. Frazer, PA.

Allergy and Ménière’s Disease: Is There a

Relationship

T.M. Nsouli* 1 , S.T. Nsouli 2 , C.D. Schluckebier 2 ,

J.A. Bellanti 2 , 1. Burke, VA; 2. Washington, DC.

Adverse Outcomes Associated With Reported

Penicillin Allergy in Patients With Pneumonia and

Bacteremia

V. Reddy*, N. Baman, F.T. Ishmael, Hershey, PA.

Self Intravenous (IV) Administration of C-INH

Concentrate for Hereditary Angioedema: A

Retrospective Analysis of Patient Outcomes

R. Shapiro*, Plymouth, MN.

Sustained Duration of Action of Icatibant for the

Treatment of Acute Hereditary Angioedema

Attacks: Findings From a Predictive Clinical Model

Applied to the FAST- , - and - Phase III Clinical

Trials

K. Leach* 1 , C. Olivier 2 , T.G. McCauley 1 , 1. Lexington,

MA; 2. Eysins, Switzerland.

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Use of a % Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin

Solution (Hizentra®) Allows for Lower Total Dosing

Volumes and Fewer Treatment Days Per Week

Compared to a % Subcutaneous Solution

R. Shapiro*, Plymouth, MN.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P312) discuss the available

pharmacological theraphies used in allergic asthma

and compare with the experimental pharmacological

approach presented in this study, summarizing the

new contributions to asthma treatment strategies;

P313) discuss the prescribing patterns of prednisone

from 2000 to 2009 and the possible impact on current

and future practices; P314) critically evaluate the

performance of the BDP nasal aerosol device with

integrated dose counter and discuss how use of this

BDP device may impact disease control in patients

with perennial allergic rhinitis; P315) describe the

possible role of atopy in patients with Ménière’s

disease and discuss how treatment of allergic rhinitis

may have a potentially beneficial effect in patients

suffering from this clinically perplexing condition;

P316) identify possible adverse outcomes that can

result from documented penicillin allergies in patients

hospitalized for infections and discuss whether

penicillin allergy skin testing should be routinely done

in these patients prior to initiation of alternative

antibiotics; P317) discuss the concept of training

patients with HAE to self-administer C1-INH therapy at

home and evaluate data on the feasibility of this

management strategy; P318) describe data showing

bradykinin challenge data and the clinical duration of

action of icatibant; and P319) discuss the increased

dosing efficiency afforded with the use of 20% SCIG

versus 16% SCIG, as evidenced by lower weekly

product volume and fewer days per week

administration.

Rhinitis, Other Upper Airway and

Ocular Disorders

Comparison of Tolerability Between Two Allergy

Drops

M.M. Hom*, Azusa, CA.

An Alternative Aspirin Desensitization Protocol for

AERD Patients That Failed Standard Aspirin

Desensitization Protocol

D. Patel, J. Riar, S. Sekhsaria*, Baltimore, MD.

An Open-Label, Randomized, Pharmacokinetic

Comparison of Triamcinolone Acetonide HFA and

CFC Nasal Inhalers

K. Newman* 1 , B. Hafkin 2 , 1. Marlborough, MA;

2. Austin, TX.


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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A Randomized, Placebo Controlled, Double-Blind,

Parallel Group Therapeutic Equivalence

Comparison of Triamcinolone Acetonide HFA and

CFC Nasal Inhalers in Patients With Seasonal

Allergic Rhinitis

K. Newman 1 , E. Schenkel* 2 , 1. Marlborough, MA;

2. Bethlehem, PA.

Human Nasal Deposition of Mometasone Furoate

Aqueous Nasal Spray

S. Shah* 1 , R. Berger 1 , P. Gupta 1 , D. Monteith 1 ,

J. McDermott 2 , A. Connor 2 , W. Li 2 , 1. Whitehouse

Station, NJ; 2. Ruddington, United Kingdom.

Nasal Deposition of Beclomethasone Dipropionate

Nasal Aerosol Versus Fluticasone Propionate and

Mometasone Furoate Aqueous Nasal Sprays

C. Leach*, P. Kuehl, R. Chand, J. McDonald,

Albuquerque, NM.

Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of MP- (Novel

Intranasal Formulation of Azelastine

Hydrochloride and Fluticasone Propionate) in

Patients With Chronic Rhinitis

W. Berger* 1 , S. Shah 2 , D. Price 3 , J. Hadley 4 , L. Gever 1 ,

S. Bhatia 5 , 1. Somerset, NJ; 2. Collegeville, NJ;

3. Aberdeen, United Kingdom; 4. Naples, FL; 5. Mumbai,

India.

MP- Compared to Commercially Available

Azelastine Hydrochloride and Fluticasone

Propionate for the Treatment of Nasal and Ocular

Symptoms of Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis (SAR)

P. Ratner* 1 , F.C. Hampel 2 , W. Howland 3 , D. Ginsberg 1 ,

P. Lieberman 4 , 1. Somerset, NJ; 2. New Braunfels, TX;

3. Albuquerque, NM; 4. Memphis, TN.

Efficacy of Mp- (Intranasal Azelastine/

Fluticasone Propionate) Compared to Commercial

and Non-Commercial Formulations of Azelastine

Hydrochloride and Fluticasone Propionate for the

Treatment of Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis (Sar)

W. Carr* 1 , C. LaForce 2 , J. Hadley 3 , L. Gever 1 ,

E.O. Meltzer 4 , 1. Somerset, NJ; 2. Raleigh, NC; 3. Naples,

FL; 4. San Diego, CA.

Nasal Symptom Improvement Following once-

Daily Treatment With Beclomethasone

Dipropionate Nasal Aerosol ( ug or ug) in

Children With Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

W.W. Storms* 1 , N.A. Nayak 2 , L. Kelley 3 , Y. Ding 3 ,

S.K. Tantry 3 , 1. Colorado Springs, CO; 2. Normal, IL;

3. Frazer, PA.

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Efficacy, Safety, and Optimal Dose Selection of

Beclomethasone Dipropionate Nasal Aerosol for

the Treatment of Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

W.E. Berger* 1 , G. Raphael 2 , D.S. Pearlman 3 , L. Kelley 4 ,

S.A. Dunbar 4 , S.K. Tantry 4 , 1. Mission Viejo, CA;

2. Bethesda, MD; 3. Denver, CO; 4. Frazer, PA.

Evaluation of Ocular Safety Following Long-Term

Treatment With Beclomethasone Dipropionate

Nasal Aerosol in Subjects With Perennial Allergic

Rhinitis

S.F. Weinstein* 1 , E.J. Schenkel 2 , J.A. Bardelas 3 ,

L.T. Chylack 4 , A. Tankelevich 5 , Y. Ding 5 , S.K. Tantry 5 ,

1. Huntington Beach, CA; 2. Bethlehem, PA; 3. High

Point, NC; 4. Duxbury, MA; 5. Frazer, PA.

Lower Symptom Severity Scores in Cetirizine-

Treated Patients With Moderate-Severe Perennial

Allergic Rhinitis

M.K. Patel* 1 , E.R. Urdaneta 1 , K.B. Franklin 2 , P. Du 3 ,

M. Wu 4 , 1. Fort Washington, PA; 2. Phoenixville, PA;

3. Shanghai, China; 4. Morris Plains, NJ.

Dentomaxillofacial Disorders in Children With

Allergic Rhinitis

C.I. Gallego* 1 , S.N. Gonzalez 1 , M. Hernandez 1 ,

A. Arias 1 , D. Garcia 2 , K.Y. Mejia 1 , M. Calva 1 ,

L.A. Dominguez, R. Carrillo, H.H. Torre, A. Venegas,

Monterrey, NL, Mexico.

Lower Symptom Severity Scores in Cetirizine-

Treated Patients With Moderate-Severe Seasonal

Allergic Rhinitis

E.R. Urdaneta* 1 , M.K. Patel 1 , K.B. Franklin 2 , P. Du 3 ,

M. Wu 1 , 1. Fort Washington, PA; 2. Phoenixville, PA;

3. Shanghai, China

Analysis of Improvement in Nasal and Ocular

Symptoms in the Morning Following Once-Daily

(Morning) Treatment With Ciclesonide Nasal

Aerosol in Patients With Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

P.H. Ratner 1 , R. Jacobs 1 , D. Mohar* 2 , H. Huang 3 ,

S.Y. Desai 3 , 1. San Antonio, TX; 2. Kerrville, TX;

3. Marlborough, MA.

An Evaluation of the Effect of Ciclesonide

Hydrofluoroalkane Nasal Aerosol on Hypothalamic

Pituitary Adrenal Axis in Pediatric Patients With

Perennial Allergic Rhinitis

G. Berman* 1 , F. Hampel 2 , B. Wang 3 , M.R. Edwards 3 ,

1. Minneapolis, MN; 2. New Braunfels, TX;

3. Marlborough, MA.

Allergic Rhinitis-Induced Postnasal Drip and

Chronic Nausea: Is There a Relationship

T.M. Nsouli* 1 , C.D. Schluckebier 2 , S.T. Nsouli 2 ,

J.A. Bellanti 2 , 1. Burke, VA; 2. Washington, DC.


Posters


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

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Investigation of the Laryngopharyngeal Mucosal

Distribution of Hydroxypropylmethyl Cellulose

(HPMC) Powder After Transnasal Aerosol

Application in Vivo

A. Seifalian 1 , M. Birchall 1 , L. Bielory* 2 , 1. London,

United Kingdom; 2. Springfield, NJ.

A Scintigraphy Study Evaluating the Nasal and

Pulmonary Deposition of a Radiolabeled Solution

of Ciclesonide Hydrofluoroalkane Nasal Aerosol

and a Radiolabeled Suspension of Ciclesonide

Aqueous Nasal Spray in Healthy Subjects

E.O. Meltzer* 1 , J. Karafilidis 2 , 1. San Diego, CA;

2. Marlborough, MA.

Objective Responses to External Nasal Dilators in

Normal Children

E.O. Meltzer* 1 , W. Becker 2 , G. Shanga 2 , 1. San Diego,

CA; 2. Parsippany, NJ.

Subjective Responses to External Nasal Dilators in

Normal Children

E.O. Meltzer* 1 , W. Becker 2 , G. Shanga 2 , 1. San Diego,

CA; 2. Parsippany, NJ.

Clinical Efficacy of Surfactants in the Treatment of

Chronic Rinosinusitis in Adult Patients

A.L. Burbano-Cerón*, A.A. Velasco-Medina,

A. González-Carsolio, G. Velázquez-Sámano, Mexico

City, DF, Mexico.

Dose Ranging of Sublingual Tablets of House Dust

Mite Allergen Extract: Results of an Environmental

Exposure Chamber Rhinitis Study

W.H. Yang* 1 , G.L. Sussman 2 , M. Roux 3 , A. Viatte 3 ,

V. Cadic 3 , R.K. Zeldin 3 , 1. Ottawa, ON, Canada;

2. Toronto, ON, Canada; 3. Antony, France.

Reduced Likelihood of Multiple Asthma-Related

Hospitalizations in Patients Newly Diagnosed With

Allergic Rhinitis Who Receive Intranasal

Corticosteroids

C.S. Hankin 1 , L. Cox 2 , A. Bronstone 1 , Z. Wang 1 ,

P.O. Buck* 3 , M.S. Lepore 3 , 1. Moss Beach, CA; 2. Fort

Lauderdale, FL; 3. Horsham, PA.

Efficacy of Timothy Grass Allergy Immunotherapy

Tablet in European and North American Patients

With Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

M. Blaiss* 1 , H. Nelson 2 , A. Bufe 3 , R. Dahl 4 , K. Murphy 5 ,

J. Maloney 6 , A. Kaur 7 , H. Nolte 7 , 1. Memphis, TN;

2. Denver, CO; 3. Bochum, Germany; 4. Aarhus,

Denmark; 5. Boys Town, NE; 6. Whitehouse Station, NY;

7. Whitehouse Station, NJ.

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Assessing the Efficacy of Allergy Immunotherapy

Tablet Treatment: Are Local Application-Site

Reactions Unblinding the Trials and Confounding

Efficacy Measurements

K. Murphy* 1 , D. Bernstein 2 , G. Berman 3 , P. Creticos 4 ,

S. Gawchik 5 , J. Maloney 6 , A. Kaur 6 , N. Liu 6 , H. Nolte 6 ,

1. Boys Town, NE; 2. Cincinnati, OH; 3. Minneapolis,

MN; 4. Baltimore, MD; 5. Upland, PA; 6. Whitehouse

Station, NJ.

Efficacy of Ragweed Allergy Immunotherapy

Tablet on Ocular Symptoms Caused by Ragweed

Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

J. Maloney 1 , G. Berman 2 , P. Creticos 3 , S. Gawchik 4 ,

D. Bernstein 5 , K. Murphy 6 , A. Kaur 1 , N. Liu 1 , H. Nolte* 1 ,

1. Whitehouse Station, NJ; 2. Minneapolis, MN;

3. Baltimore, MD; 4. Upton, PA; 5. Cincinnati, OH;

6. Boys Town, NE.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P320) describe the differences in

tolerability between two allergy drops; P321) discuss

the prevalence, diagnosis and management of aspirin

exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) with a focus on

aspirin desensitization; P322) summarize the

pharmacokinetics of a new nasal steroid formulation;

P323) describe the efficacy and the dose response

curve for an aerosol formulation of a nasal steroid;

P324) discuss the deposition and nasal clearance of

mometasone furoate; P325) describe the difference in

deposition of BDP nasal aerosol (QNASLTM) compared

with fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray and

mometasone furoate aqueous nasal spray in patients

with allergic rhinitis; P326) evaluate the long-term

safety and efficacy of azelastine 137 mcg / fluticasone

propionate 50 mcg per spray; P327) discuss the results

of treating ocular as well as nasal symptoms with a

nasal spray combination of azelastine and fluticasone;

P328) discuss the difference in efficacy between

commercial vs. non-commercially available azelastine

and fluticasone propionate as well as the impact of

this difference; P329) discuss the favorable efficacy

profile of beclomethasone dipropionate nasal aerosol

for the treatment of nasal symptoms in children with

seasonal allergic rhinitis; P330) critically evaluate 3

doses of BDP nasal aerosol to determine the optimally

safe and effective dose for adolescents and adults

(12 years or older) with seasonal allergic rhinitis;

P331) discuss the ocular safety profile of

beclomethasone dipropionate nasal aerosol in

subjects with perennial allergic rhinitis; P332) evaluate

the efficacy of OTC cetirizine therapy for the treatment

of ARIA-consistent moderate-severe perennial allergic

rhinitis symptoms; P333) recognize the most frequent

dentomaxillofacial alterations in children with mouth

breathing and allergic rhinitis; P334) evaluate the

efficacy of OTC cetirizine therapy for the treatment of

ARIA-consistent moderate-severe seasonal allergic

rhinitis symptoms; P335) describe the effect of

ciclesonide nasal aerosol on improvement of the


Poster Session

12:30 – 1:30 pm, Saturday and Noon – 1:00 pm, Sunday

Hall C (1st Floor) • Anaheim Convention Center

morning nasal and ocular symptoms of seasonal

allergic rhinitis; P336) discuss the systemic safety of

the ciclesonide hydrofluoroalkane nasal aerosol 74

mcg once daily dose in pediatric patients 6-11 years

old with perennial allergic rhinitis; P337) discuss the

improvement of chronic nausea in patients presenting

with allergic-induced postnasal drip after treatment of

allergic rhinitis; P338) discuss the impact of a barrier

based therapeutic agent on mucosal surface of the

lung; P339) discuss the nasal and lung deposition of a

radiolabeled solution of the ciclesonide nasal aerosol

and a radiolabeled suspension of the ciclesonide

aqueous nasal spray; P340) explore the effect of 2

different mechanical external nasal dilators on nasal

patency as measured by peak nasal inspiratory flow in

normal children ages 6-12 years, in both the seated

and supine positions; P341) explore the effect of 2

different mechanical external nasal dilators on

perceived reduction of obstruction in normal children

ages 6-12 years, in both the seated and supine

position; P342) evaluate different treatments for

chronic rhinosinusitis and discuss bacterial biofilms as

a pathogenic mechanism for the persistence of this

condition; P343) discuss the latest data on efficacy and

safety of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust

mite-associated allergic rhinitis; P344) describe the link

between control of allergic rhinitis and asthma

morbidity and discuss the potential benefits of

intranasal corticosteroids in preventing severe asthma

exacerbations in patients with newly diagnosed

allergic rhinitis; P345) describe the consistency of

treatment effect of grass allergy immunotherapy

tablet between European and North American studies;

P346) explain the relevance of local application-site

reactions in the assessment of treatment effect of

ragweed allergy immunotherapy tablet; and

P347) describe the effect of ragweed allergy

immunotherapy tablet on ocular symptoms of allergic

rhinoconjunctivitis.

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Type III Hereditary Angioedema: Clinical

Characteristics and Treatment Response With

Berinert* in a French Cohort

L. Bouillet* 1 , I. Boccon-Gibod 1 , D. Launay 2 , J. Laurent 3 ,

B. Floccard 4 , L. Martin 5 , F.A. Allaert 6 , H. Catovic 3 ,

O. Fain 7 , A. Gompel 3 , 1. Grenoble, France; 2. Lille,

France; 3. Paris, France; 4. Lyon, France; 5. Angers,

France; 6. Dijon, France; 7. Bondy, France.

Metoprolol-Induced Pustular Psoriasis

A. Keswani*, A.T. Peters, Chicago, IL.

Systemic Contact Dermatitis After Patch Test With

Hair Dye Containing Paraphenylenediamine

J. Kuryan*, A.M. Jongco, P. Ponda, S. Farzan, Great

Neck, NY.

Chronic Dyshydrotic Eczema Ultimately Diagnosed

as Contact Dermatitis Caused by the Resin in the

Stems of Alstomeria Species Flowering Plants

R.M. Harris*, Beverly Hills, CA.

Upon completion of this session, participants should

be able to: P348) discuss the clinical phenotype of

subjects with chronic urticaria and identify an

association of vitamin D and chronic urticaria;

P349) discuss type III hereditary angioedema and

describe the experience of a French centre where

patients are currently successfully treated with a

human plasma-derived C1-Inhibitor [C1 esterase

inhibitor (C1-INH), Human]; P350) discuss the

differential of a diffuse pustular skin eruption;

P351) recognize the potency of

paraphenylenediamine (PPD) as a contact allergen and

use caution in applying hair dye samples as a patch

test; and P352) identify the rate of response of chronic

urticaria patients to antihistamines and name several

immunomodulatory therapies for antihistamine

resistant chronic urticaria.

Posters

P

Skin Disorders

Role of Vitamin D in Chronic Urticaria and

Angioedema Treatment Study: Enrollment

Characteristics

W. Goldner, E. Lyden, J.A. Poole*, Omaha, NE.


Plenary & Symposia Faculty

Seema S. Aceves, MD, PhD

Associate Professor, Pediatrics and

Medicine, University of California, San

Diego, Rady Children's Hospital,

San Diego, CA

Amal H. Assa'ad, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Pediatrics, Cincinnati

Children's Hospital Medical Center,

Cincinnati, OH

Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI

Professor of Pediatrics & Medicine; Chief

of Allergy & Immunology Section;

Louisiana State University Health

Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA

Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI

SUNY Buffalo, Division of Allergy &

Immunology, Buffalo, NY

Aleena Banerji, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine,

Harvard University, Boston, MA

Donald V. Belsito, MD

Leonard C. Harber Professor of Clinical

Dermatology, Columbia University

Medical Center, New York, NY

William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

Clinical Professor, Department of

Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and

Immunology, University of California,

Irvine, CA

David I. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI

Division of Immunology, Allergy and

Rheumatology University of Cincinnati

College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH

Leonard Bielory, MD

Director, STARx Allergy and Asthma

Center, LLC; Attending, Robert Wood

Johnson University Hospital; Professor,

Rutgers University, Center for Environmental

Prediction, Springfield, NJ

Michael S. Blaiss, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and

Medicine, University of Tennessee

Health Science Center, Memphis, TN

Vincent R. Bonagura, MD

Associate Chair, Department of

Pediatrics; Chief, Division of Allergy and

Immunology; Jack Hausman Professor

of Pediatrics; Professor of Molecular

Medicine; Feinstein Institute for Medical

Research; Hofstra-NS-LIJ School of

Medicine, Manhasset, NY


Larry Borish, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine, University

of Virginia Health System,

Charlottesville, VA

Kevin Brown, MD

Professor and Vice Chair, Department of

Medicine, National Jewish Health,

Denver, CO

A. Wesley Burks, MD, FACAAI

Curnen Distinguished Professor and

Chair, Department of Pediatrics, The

University of North Carolina, Chapel

Hill, NC

Warner W. Carr, MD, FACAAI

Allergy & Asthma Associates of

Southern California, Mission Viejo, CA

Mark L. Corbett, MD, FACAAI

Private Practice-Allergy Care,

Louisville, KY

William W. Crawford, MD

Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine,

David Geffen School of Medicine at

UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

Richard D. deShazo, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics,

University of Mississippi Medical Center,

Jackson, MS

William K. Dolen, MD, FACAAI

Professor, Pediatrics and Medicine,

Georgia Health Sciences University,

Augusta, GA

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor of Medicine, George

Washington University School of

Medicine, Washington, DC

Mark S. Dykewicz, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Internal Medicine; Director,

Allergy and Immunology; Allergy and

Immunology Fellowship Program

Director; Wake Forest University School

of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC

Mary Beth Fasano, MD, FACAAI

Professor Clinical Medicine & Pediatrics,

University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

Adjunct Associate Professor,

Department of Pediatrics, Emory Univ

School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Alessandro Fiocchi, MD, FACAAI (SC)

Director of Pediatrics, Melloni Hospital,

Milan, Italy

Michael B. Foggs, MD, FACAAI

Chief of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology,

Advocate Medical Group, Advocate

Health Care, Chicago, IL

Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Clinical Medicine, State

University of New York at Stony Brook,

Head of Allergy and Training Program

Director, Winthrop University Hospital,

Mineola, NY

Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Chief, Allergy Immunology,Nassau Univ.

Medical Center, Dept of Medicine,

Professor of Medicine & Pathology,

State Univ. of N.Y. at Stony Brook, Stony

Brook, NY

Sandra M. Gawchik, DO, FACAAI

Co-Director, Division of Allergy and

Immunology, Crozer Chester Medical

Center, Chester PA; Clinical Associate

Professor, Pediatrics Thomas Jefferson

Medical School, Upland, PA

Richard G. Gower, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine,

University of Washington, Spokane, WA

Mitchell H. Grayson, MD, FACAAI

Associate Professor of Pediatrics,

Medicine, Microbiology and Molecular

Genetics, The Medical College of

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI

Vivian Hernandez-Trujillo, MD, FACAAI

Director, Division of Allergy and Clinical

Immunology, Miami Children’s Hospital,

Miami, FL; Clinical Assistant Professor,

Herbert Wertheim School of Medicine,

Florida International University,

Miami, FL

Milton Hom, OD

Private Practice, Azusa, CA

Neal Jain, MD, FACAAI

Department of Pediatrics, Maricopa

Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ

Rohit K. Katial, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine and Program

Director, University of Colorado,

National Jewish Health, Division of

Allergy/Immunology, Denver, CO

John M. Kelso, MD, FACAAI

Division of Allergy, Asthma and

Immunology, Scripps Clinic, San

Diego, CA

Stephen F. Kemp, MD, FACAAI

The University of Mississippi Medical

Center, Jackson, MS


Plenary & Symposia Faculty

David A. Khan, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine, University of

Texas Southwestern Medical Center,

Dallas, TX

Hirohito Kita, MD

Professor of Immunology, Mayo Clinic,

Rochester, MN

David M. Lang, MD, FACAAI

Head, Allergy/Immunology Section,

Department of Pulmonary, Allergy, and

Critical Care Medicine, Division of

Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation,

Cleveland, OH

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor Pediatrics/

Immunology North Texas University

Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX

Teofilo Lee-Chiong, MD

National Jewish Health, University of

Colorado Denver School of Medicine,

Denver, CO

Kristin M. Leiferman, MD

Professor of Dermatology, Univ of Utah,

Health Sci Ctr, Dept Dermatology,

Immunoderm Lab, Salt Lake City, UT

James T. Li, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine and Chair,

Division of Allergy and Immunology,

Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor Pediatrics and

Medicine, University of Tennessee

College of Medicine, Memphis, TN

Michael Littner, MD

Emeritus Professor of Medicine, David

Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los

Angeles, CA

William R. Lumry, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor of Internal

Medicine/Allergy Division, University of

Texas Southwestern Medical School,

Dallas, TX

Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor of Pediatrics,

University of Wisconsin School of

Medicine Public Health, Madison, WI

Gailen D. Marshall, MD, PhD, FACAAI

The R Faser Triplett Sr MD Chair of

Allergy and Immunology, Professor of

Medicine and Pediatrics, Director,

Division fo Clinical Immunology and

Allergy, University of Mississippi

Medical Center, Jackson, MS

Anthony Montanaro, MD, FACAAI

Professor and Chair, Division of Allergy

and Immunology; Vice Chair Department

of Medicine, Oregon Health and

Science University, Portland, OR

Maria Antonella Muraro, MD

Head of the Veneto Region Food Allergy

Diagnosis and Treatment Centre,

Pavlova, Italy

Richard A. Nicklas, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor of Medicine, The

George Washington University School

of Medicine, Washington, DC

Mark T. O'Hollaren, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine and Vice-

President, Oregon Health and Science

University, Portland, OR

Jordan S. Orange, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Chief, Immunology Allergy and

Rheumatology, Texas Children’s

Hospital, Houston, TX

Lanny J. Rosenwasser, MD, FACAAI

Dee Lyons/Missouri Endowed Chair in

Pediatric Immunology Research;

Professor of Pediatrics, Allergy-

Immunology Division, Children's

Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO and

Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and

Basic Science, University of Missouri-

Kansas City School of Medicine,

Kansas City, MO

Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Director, Division of Allergy and

Immunology, Director, Cincinnati

Center for Eosinophilic Disorders;

Professor of Pediatrics, Cincinnati

Children's Hospital Medical Center,

University of Cincinnati College of

Medicine, Cincinnati OH

Charles J. Siegel, MD, FACAAI

Assoc Clinical Prof, Univ. of Missouri @

Kansas City, School of Medicine, Dept of

Peds, Kansas City, MO

William S. Silvers, MD, FACAAI

Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division

of Allergy Clinical Immunology,

University of Colorado School of

Medicine

F. Estelle Simons, MD, FACAAI, FRCPC

Professor, Department of Pediatrics &

Child Health Sciences Centre, Professor,

Department of Immunology, The

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg,

MB, Canada

Joshua Solomon, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine,

National Jewish Health, Denver, CO

Jonathan M. Spergel, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Chief, Allergy Section, The Children's

Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman

School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

James L. Sublett, MD, FACAAI

Managing Partner, Family Allergy &

Asthma, Louisville, KY; Clinical Professor

& Chief, Section of Pediatric Allergy,

University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

James Verbsky, MD, PhD

Medical College of Wisconsin,

Madison, WI

Gerald W. Volcheck, MD, FACAAI

Associate Professor of Medicine,

Program Director Allergy and

Immunology Fellowship, Division of

Allergy and Immunology, Mayo Clinic,

Rochester, MN

Dana V. Wallace, MD, FACAAI

Associate Clinical Professor, Nova

Southeastern University, Davie, FL

Julie Wang, MD

Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New

York, NY

Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

Professor of Medicine, National Jewish

Health, Denver, CO

Sally E. Wenzel, MD, FACAAI

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Myron J. Zitt, MD, FACAAI

Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine,

State University of New York, Stony

Brook, NY

Faculty


Faculty Index

Aaronson, Donald W. . . . . . . . .27, 29, 30

Abramson, Stuart L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Aceves, Seema S. . . . . . . . .29, 33, 71, 72

Aquino, Marcella R. . . . . . . . . .26, 27, 31

Arnold, Jeannette L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72

Assa'ad, Amal H. . . . . . . . . . . . .33, 51, 54

Bahna, Sami L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 33

Ballow, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32, 47, 60

Banerji, Aleena . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 54, 70

Belsito, Donald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

Berger, William E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 50

Bernstein, Cheryl K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Bernstein, David I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 60

Bernstein, Jonathan A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Bhatt, Anand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Bielory, Leonard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50, 74

Blackwell, Cheryl A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Blaiss, Michael S. . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 51, 59

Boggs, Peter B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Boguniewicz, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Bonagura, Vincent R. . . . . . . . . . . .47, 60

Borish, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 46, 51

Bossard, Mary Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71, 73

Brown, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Bukstein, Don A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Burks, A. Wesley . . . . . . . . . . . . .29, 33, 51

Carlton, Gwen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70, 73

Carr, Warner W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 67

Chipps, Bradley E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31, 60

Cho, Seong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Chojnacki, K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

Clay, K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Conrad, Steven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Corbett, Mark L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

Crawford, William W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Creticos, Peter S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 51

Dalan, Dan A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Davis, R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

DeMuth, Karen A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

deShazo, Richard D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Dinakar, Chitra K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 60

Dolen, William K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Drake, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74

DuBuske, Lawrence M. . . . . . . . . . .29, 43

Dykewicz, Mark S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

El Sanadi, Nabil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Fasano, Mary Beth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

Finegold, Ira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Fineman, Stanley M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Fiocchi, Alessandro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Fleisher, Thomas A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116

Foggs, Michael B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 59

Fonacier, Luz S. . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 33, 52

Freeman, Theodore M. . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

Frieri, Marianne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Gawchik, Sandra M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

George, Maureen . . . . . . . . . . .71, 72, 73

Gleich, Gerald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Goldsobel, Alan B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 51

Gower, Richard G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32, 54

Graft, David F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

Grayson, Mitchell H. . . . . . . . . . . . .46, 51

Gregory, Karen L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Gross, Gary N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 30

Hanson, I. Celine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Hayden, Mary Lou . . . . . . . . . .71, 72, 73

Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian . . . . . . . . . . .38

Hom, Milton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31, 50

Honsinger, Richard W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Hopper, G. David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 28

Jain, Neal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 60, 67

Katial, Rohit K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 51

Kelkar, Pramod S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 51

Kelso, John M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28, 38

Kemp, Stephen F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Kennedy, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Khan, David A. . . . . . . . . . . .38, 61, 72, 74

Kita, Hirohito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

Koepke, Jerald W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Lang, David M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

Lanier, Bobby Q. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59, 61

Lape, Brooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Le, Tao T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Ledford, Dennis K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Lee-Chiong, Teofilo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Leiferman, Kristin M. . . . . . . . .28, 52, 60

Levetin, Estelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

Li, James T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Lieberman, Phillip L. . . . . . . . .28, 39, 46

Littner, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Long, Aidan A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Lumry, William R. . . . . . . . . . . .32, 54, 60

Mahr, Todd A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 37, 43

Marshall, Gailen D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Martin, Bryan L. . . . . . . . . . . . .28, 31, 116

McKnight, A. Sean . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28, 31


Faculty Index

Meadows, J. Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 29

Meltzer, Eli O. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Montanaro, Anthony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Muraro, Maria Antonella . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Murphy, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Nelson, Michael R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Nicklas, Richard A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Nsouli, Talal M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

O'Hollaren, Mark T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Olson, Grant C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Oppenheimer, John J. . . . . . . .28, 31, 60

Orange, Jordan S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Phipatanakul, Wanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Portnoy, Jay M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 32, 60

Pulver, Donald W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Rosenwasser, Lanny J. . . . . . . . . . . .31, 54

Rothenberg, Marc E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Sanders, Deidra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Segall, Nathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Sheikh, Javed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Shroba, J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

Shulan, David J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29, 31

Siegel, Charles J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 62

Silvers, William S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Simons, F. Estelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Solensky, Roland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Solomon, Joshua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Spector, Sheldon L. . . . . . . . . .51, 60, 72

Spergel, Jonathan M. . . . . . . . .29, 33, 51

Sublett, James L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Sullivan, Timothy J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Tanner, David D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Tilles, Stephen A. . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 60, 74

Tolomeo, Concettina . . . . . . . . . . . .71, 73

Tracy, James M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Verbsky, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47, 51

Volcheck, Gerald W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Wagner, C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74

Wallace, Dana V. . . . . . . . . . . . .29, 31, 37

Wang, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Wasserman, Richard L. . . . . . . . . . .27, 31

Weber, Richard W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 45

Weldon, David R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 70

Wenzel, Sally E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Westley, C. Ross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Williams, P. Brock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Williams, P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

Windom, Hugh H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Zacharisen, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Zitt, Myron J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 67

Noga Askenazi, MD, FACAAI

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI

Don A. Bukstein, MD, FACAAI

Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

Adrian M. Casillas, MD, FACAAI

Christina G. Ciaccio, MD, FACAAI

Linda Susan Cox, MD, FACAAI

Chair: Tao T. Le, MD, MHS, FACAAI

CME/CPD Committee

Vice Chair: Charles J. Siegel, MD, FACAAI

Vesselin Dimov, MD, FACAAI

Pinkus Goldberg, MD, FACAAI

Bret R. Haymore, MD, FACAAI

Curtis L. Hedberg, MD, FACAAI

Vivian Hernandez-Trujillo, MD, FACAAI

Charles J. Lane, MD

Gerald B. Lee, MD

Advisor: Kathleen R. May, MD

Please see Disclosures section for additional information.

Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI

Lyndon E. Mansfield, MD, FACAAI

Bryan L. Martin, DO, FACAAI

Michael R. Nelson, MD, FACAAI

Myngoc T. Nguyen, MD, FACAAI

Joram S. Seggev, MD, FACAAI

David R. Weldon, MD, FACAAI

Faculty


Disclosures

ACAAI 2012 Annual Scientific Meeting

November 8-13, 2012, Anaheim, California

Disclosure Policy and Disclosures

As required by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and in accordance with the American

College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) policy, all educational planners, presenters, instructors, moderators, authors,

reviewers, and other individuals in a position to control or influence the content of an activity must disclose all relevant financial

relationships with any commercial interest that have occurred within the past 12 months. All identified conflicts of interest must

be resolved and the educational content thoroughly vetted for fair balance, scientific objectivity, and appropriateness of patient

care recommendations. It is required that disclosure be provided to the learners prior to the start of the activity. Individuals with

no relevant financial relationships must also inform the learners that no relevant financial relationships exist. Learners must also

be informed when off-label, experimental/investigational uses of drugs or devices are discussed in an educational activity or

included in related materials. Disclosure in no way implies that the information presented is biased or of lesser quality. It is

incumbent upon course participants to be aware of these factors in interpreting the program contents and evaluating

recommendations. Moreover, expressed views do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the ACAAI.

All identified conflicts of interest have been resolved.

Seema S. Aceves, MD, PhD

Stocks: Meritage Pharma

§Marcella R. Aquino, MD, FACAAI

Research Grant: Baxter, Dyax, Genentech,

Novartis, Roche, ViroPharma

Noga Askenazi, MD, FACAAI

Employee (spouse): Johnson and Johnson

§Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Abbott, Pharming

§Mark Ballow, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Baxter, CSL Behring,

Grifols; Speaker: Baxter, CSL Behring;

Honorarium: Baxter, CSL Behring, Data & Safety

Monitoring Board: Green Cross

Aleena Banerji, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: CSL Behring, Dyax,

Shire; Research Grant: Shire

§William E. Berger, MD, MBA, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Alcon, AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, Meda, Novartis, Sunovion,

Teva; Speaker: Alcon, AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, Meda, Novartis, Sunovion,

Teva; Honorarium: Alcon, AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, Meda, Novartis, Sunovion,

Teva; Research Grant: Alcon, AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, Meda, Novartis, Sunovion,

Teva

Cheryl K. Bernstein, RN, BSN, CCRC

Consultant/Advisory Board: Gerson-Lehrman,

Guidepoint Global, Merck, Sanofi; Research

Grant: Amgen, GlaxoSmithKline, Greer, Merck,

Novartis, Pfizer, Stallergenes, Teva

§David I. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Gerson-Lehrman,

Guidepoint Global, Merck, Sanofi; Research

Grant: Amgen, GlaxoSmithKline, Greer, Merck,

Novartis, Pfizer, Stallergenes, Teva

Jonathan A. Bernstein, MD, FACAAI

Medical Director: Flint Hills Resources

§Leonard Bielory, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Allergan, Bausch &

Lomb, Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Meda,

Merck, Novartis, Ocusense, Otsuka, Pfizer,

Sanofi, Shire; Speaker: Meda, Merck, Sanofi;

Honorarium: Allergan, Meda, Merck; Research

Grant: Allergan, Genentech, Merck, Novartis,

Otsuka

Michael S. Blaiss, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Alcon, Allergan,

ISTA, JDP Therapeutics, Merck, Pfizer, Proctor &

Gamble, Sanofi, Sunovion; Speaker: Alcon,

Allergan, AstraZeneca, Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck, Sunovion, Takeda,

Teva; Honorarium: Alcon, Allergan, AstraZeneca,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck, Pfizer,

Sanofi, Sunovion, Takeda, Teva; Stocks: JDP

Therapeutics, Pfizer

Peter B. Boggs, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Aerocrine; Speaker:

Aerocrine; Honorarium: Aerocrine; Research

Grant: Aerocrine

§Mark Boguniewicz, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Unilever, Valeant;

Data & Safety Monitoring Board: ApoPharma

Vincent R. Bonagura, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: Baxter, CSL Behring;

Speaker: Baxter, CSL Behring: Honorarium:

Baxter, CSL Behring; Research Grant: CSL

Behring

Rana Bonds, MD, FACAAI

Stocks: General Electric

Larry Borish, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Sanofi; Honorarium:

Merck; Research Grant: National Institutes of

Health

Mary Kay Bossard, BS, RRT, AE-C

Speaker: Pharmaxis; Honorarium: Pharmaxis

Don A. Bukstein, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Teva; Speaker:

Alcon, AstraZeneca, Genentech, Merck, Meda,

Novartis, Teva; Research Grant: Genentech

A. Wesley Burks, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Dannon Probiotics,

Exploramed Development; Intelliject; McNeil

Nutritionals, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Portola;

Research Grant: Food Allergy Initiative, National

Peanut Board, National Institutes of Health,

Wallace Research Foundation; Stocks: Allertein,

Mast Cell

§Betty Gwen Carlton, DNP, AE-C

Consultant/Advisory Board: Speaker: Asthma &

Allergy Foundation of America, Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, Pharmaxis; Honorarium:

Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Pharmaxis

Warner W. Carr, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Alcon, Meda,

Sunovion; Speaker: Alcon, GlaxoSmithKline,

Meda, Merck; Honorarium: Alcon, Meda;

Research Grant: Alcon, Meda

§Adrian M. Casillas, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: CSL Behring, Merck;

Speaker: Merck; Research Grant: CSL Behring

§Helen H. Chan, MD, FACAAI

CEO: Vita Green Health

§Bradley E. Chipps, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck,

Mylan Specialty, Novartis, SRxA, Sunovion;

Speaker: AstraZeneca, Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck, Novartis,

Sunovion; Honorarium: AstraZeneca,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck,

Mylan Specialty, Novartis, SRxA, Sunovion

Mark L. Corbett, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: ISTA; Speaker:

AstraZeneca, ISTA, Teva

= Planner


§ = Moderator


Disclosures

Linda Cox, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Genentech,

Stallergenes; Speaker: Baxter, Thermo Fisher

Scientific

Peter S. Creticos, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: Circassia, Greer,

Merck; Honorarium: Circassia, Greer, Merck;

Research Grant: Agency for Healthcare Research

and Quality (AHRQ), Circassia, Greer, Merck

Karla Davis, MD, FACAAI

Stocks: Pfizer

Ray S. Davis, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Alcon, Meda,

Sunovion; Speaker: Alcon, Meda, Merck, Mylan

Specialty; Honorarium: Alcon, Meda, Merck,

Mylan Specialty

§Chitra Dinakar, MD, FACCAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca;

Speaker: Aerocrine, AstraZeneca, Honorarium:

Aerocrine, AstraZeneca

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Allergy

Therapeutics, GlaxoSmithKline, Lypanosys,

Novartis, Sunovion; Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline,

Merck, Novartis, Sunovion: Honorarium: Allergy

Therapeutics, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis,

Sunovion; Research Grant: Boehringer

Ingelheim, Genentech, Merck, Novartis, Rigel,

Sunovion

§Mark S. Dykewicz, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Merck; Honorarium:

Merck

Anne Ellis, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: Paladin Labs;

Speaker: Pfizer; Research Grant: Circassia

Mary Beth Fasano, MD, MSPH, FACAAI

Research Grant: Genentech, Green Cross Corp,

Grifols

§Stanley M. Fineman, MD, MBA, FACAAI

Speaker: AstraZeneca; Research Grant:

Genentech, Sunovion

§Michael B. Foggs, MD, MBA, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, Hycor, Merck; Speaker:

AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Hycor, Merck;

Honorarium: AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline,

Merck

§Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Baxter; Research Grant: Baxter, Dyax,

Genentech, Mylan Specialty

Theodore M. Freeman, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: McKesson

§Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Speaker: Nutricia, Thermo Fisher Scientific;

Honorarium: Nutricia, Thermo Fisher Scientific;

Research Grant: Merck

Sandra M. Gawchik, DO, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Merck; Speaker:

Johnson & Johnson, Merck; Honorarium:

AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, Merck;

Research Grant: Amphastar, AstraZeneca,

Boehringer Ingelheim, Genentech,

MedImmune, Merck, Novartis, Sanofi, Sunovion,

Takeda, Teva; Stocks: AstraZeneca, Merck, Mylan

Specialty, Teva

§Maureen George, PhD, RN, AE-C

Consultant/Advisory Board: Novartis, Teva;

Speaker: Merck, Pharmaxis, Sunovion

Gerald Gleich, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: Beiersdorf (spouse),

GlaxoSmithKline, MBL International (spouse);

Honorarium: Dyax; Research Grant: Dyax:

Stocks: Immune Design; Founder Patents:

ImmViz; Royalty: Mayo Foundation, Teva

Pinkus Goldberg, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Genentech, Meda;

Speaker: Baxter, Genentech, Merck, Mylan

Specialty; Honorarium: Baxter, Genentech,

Mylan Specialty, Merck; Research Grant: Array,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck

Rebecca Goldberg, RN

Speaker, Genentech, Merck, Mylan Specialty;

Honorarium: Genentech, Merck, Mylan

Specialty; Research Grant: Array, Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis

Alan B. Goldsobel, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Merck, Teva; Research Grant:

AstraZeneca, Amphastar, Forest, Genentech,

Merck, Mylan Specialty, Novartis, Sanofi, Teva

Richard G. Gower, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: CSL Behring,

Genentech, ISTA, Mylan Specialty, Novartis,

Roche, Shire, Teva, ViroPharma; Speaker: CSL

Behring, Genentech, ISTA, Mylan Specialty,

Novartis, Roche, Shire, Teva, ViroPharma;

Honorarium: CSL Behring, Genentech, ISTA,

Mylan Specialty, Novartis, Roche, Shire, Teva,

Viropharma; Research Grant: Boehringer

Ingelheim, CSL Behring, Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Novartis, Pharming,

Roche, Shire, Teva, ViroPharma; Stocks: Merck

David F. Graft, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Mylan Specialty, Teva

Mitchell Grayson, MD, FACAAI

Research Grant: Merck

Linda D. Green, MD, FACAAI

Stocks: Merck, Pfizer

Matthew Greenhawt, MD, MBA, MSc

Consultant/Advisory Board: Thermo Fisher

Scientific; Speaker: Nurticia, Sunovion, Thermo

Fisher Scientific; Honorarium: Thermo Fisher

Scientific

Karen L. Gregory, DNP, APRN, CNS, RRT,

AE-C, FAARC

Speaker: Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline,

Monaghan, Novartis; Honorarium: Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, Monaghan, Novartis

Gary N. Gross, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Sunovion, Teva;

Speaker: Merck, Novartis, Teva; Research Grant:

Amgen, AstraZeneca, Forest, Merck, Novartis,

Sunovion, Teva

§Mary Lou Hayden, RN, MS, APRN, FNP-BC, AE-C

Consultant/Advisory Board: Genentech, Teva;

Speaker: Genentech, Mylan Specialty, Teva;

Honorarium: Genentech, Mylan Specialty, Teva

Curtis L. Hedberg, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: US Healthrecord

§Vivian Hernandez-Trujillo, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Baxter; Speaker:

Baxter, CSL Behring, Merck

Jeff Hester, PhD

Research: ViraCor- IBT Laboratories

Douglas Hogarth, MD, FCCP

Consultant/Advisory Board: CSL Behring;

Speaker: Baxter, CSL Behring, Grifols

Milton M. Hom, OD, FAAO, FACAAI (SC)

Consultant/Advisory Board: Allergan, Bausch &

Lomb, ISTA; Speaker: Allergan, Bausch & Lomb,

ISTA; Honorarium: Allergan, Bausch & Lomb,

ISTA; Research Grant: Allergan, Bausch & Lomb,

ISTA

Neal Jain, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Aerocrine; Speaker:

Aerocrine, GlaxoSmithKline; Honorarium:

Aerocrine, GlaxoSmithKline

Rohit K. Katial, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Teva; Honorarium:

Teva; Research Grant: Teva

Kevin Kennedy, CIEC

Speaker: Healthy Housing Solutions;

Honorarium: Healthy Housing Solutions

David A. Khan, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Genentech, Merck; Honorarium:

Genentech, Merck

Hirohito Kita, MD

Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, MSD

Pharmaceuticals; Honorarium: GlaxoSmithKline,

MSD Pharmaceuticals, Novartis

Charles J. Lane, MD

Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, Mylan Specialty;

Honorarium: ISC Communications

David M. Lang, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Hycor, Merck;

Speaker: Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,

Novartis, Teva; Honorarium: Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis, Teva;

Research Grant: Genentech, Novartis

Disclosures

= Planner

§ = Moderator


Disclosures

Bob Lanier, MD, FACAAI

Research Grant: Genentech, Merck, Novartis

Brooks Lape

Employee: Reingold

Dennis K. Ledford, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Genentech;

Speaker: Genentech, Teva; Honorarium:

Genentech; Research Grant: Forest, Genentech,

Merck, Teva, ViroPharma

Teofilo Lee-Chiong, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: CareCore National,

Elsevier, Philips Respironics; Research Grant:

Philips Respironics; Stocks: Philips Respironics

Kristin M. Leiferman, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: Beiersdorf,

GlaxoSmithKline, MBL International; Research

Grants: Novartis; Stocks: Immune Design, Teva

Mitchell R. Lester, MD, FACAAI

Partner: New England Food Allergy Treatment

Center

§James T. Li, MD, FACAAI

Stocks: Abbott, Novartis

§Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Baxter, Genentech,

Meda, Mylan Specialty, Sanofi; Speaker: Baxter,

Meda, Mylan, Sanofi

William R. Lumry, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: CSL Behring, Dyax,

Shire HGT, ViroPharma; Speaker: CSL Behring,

Dyax, Shire HGT, ViroPharma; Honorarium: CSL

Behring, Dyax, Shire HGT, ViroPharma; Research

Grant: CSL Behring, Dyax, Pharming, Shire HGT,

ViroPharma

§Todd A. Mahr, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: ISTA; Speaker:

Aerocrine, Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA,

Merck, SRxA; Honorarium: Aerocrine,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck, SRxA

§Lyndon Mansfield, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Aerocrine, ISTA,

Thermo Fisher Scientific; Speaker: Aerocrine,

Alcon, ISTA, Thermo Fisher Scientific; Research

Grant: GlaxoSmithKline

§Gailen D. Marshall, Jr., MD, PhD, FACAAI

Research Grant: National Institutes of Health,

Health Resources and Services Administration

A. Sean McKnight, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, Mylan Specialty

§J. Allen Meadows, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Alcon, ISTA;

Speaker: Alcon, GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA,

Sunovion

Issac Melamed, MD

Speaker: Baxter BioScience, CSL Behring

Eli O. Meltzer, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory: Alcon, Alexza,

AstraZeneca, Bausch & Lomb, Boehringer

Ingelheim, Frost, ISTA, Johnson & Johnson,

Kalypsys, Meda, Merck, Mylan Specialty, ONO,

OptiNose, Proctor & Gamble, Rigel, Sanofi,

Stallergenes, Sunovion, Teva; Speaker: Alcon,

Allergies for Israel, American College of Allergy,

Asthma & Immunology, Florida Allergy Asthma

& Immunology Society, ISTA, Merck, Mylan

Specialty, Sunovion, Teva; Research Grant:

Alcon, Amgen, Apotex, AstraZeneca,

Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, HRA,

MedImmune, Merck, Novartis, Proctor &

Gamble, Sunovion, Teva

§Travis A. Miller, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: ISTA, Meda,

Sunovion; Speaker: Alcon, AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck, Novartis,

Sunovion; Honorarium: Alcon, AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Merck, Novartis,

Sunovion

B. Mitchell

Research Grant: Shaw Inc.

Anthony Montanaro, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Baxter, Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline,

Merck

Kevin R. Murphy, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca,

Genentech, Merck, Mylan Specialty, Novartis;

Speaker: AstraZeneca, Genentech, ISTA, Merck,

Mylan Specialty, Novartis, Sunovion;

Honorarium: AstraZeneca, Genentech, ISTA,

Merck, Mylan Specialty, Novartis, Sunovion;

Research Grant: AstraZeneca, Merck

§Michael R. Nelson, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Stocks: Amgen

Michael J. Noonan, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca;

Speaker: AstraZeneca; Research Grant:

Amphastar, AstraZeneca, Merck, Novartis,

Sanofi, Teva

Talal M. Nsouli, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Sunovion, Teva,

Thermo Fisher Scientific; Speaker: Sunovion,

Teva, Thermo Fisher Scientific

§Maeve E. O’Connor, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Thermo Fisher

Scientific; Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, Sunovion,

Teva, Thermo Fisher Scientific; Honorarium:

GlaxoSmithKline, Sunovion, Teva, Thermo Fisher

Scientific

§John J. Oppenheimer, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, Merck; Research

Grant: AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim,

GlaxoSmithKline, MedImmune, Novartis

Jordan S. Orange, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Baxter Healthcare,

CSL Behring, Cangene, Grifols, ViraCor-IBT:

Reviewer: Octapharma USA

Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, FACAAI

Research Grant: National Institutes of Health

Thomas AE Platts-Mills, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: ViraCor-IBT,

Speaker: Thermo Fisher Scientific; Honorarium:

Thermo Fisher Scientific; Research Grant:

Thermo Fisher Scientific, National Institutes of

Health/National Institute of Allergy and

Infectious Disease; Patent: University of Virginia

Patent Foundation

§Jay M. Portnoy, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Thermo Fisher

Scientific

Christopher C. Randolph, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline; Speaker: AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Meda, Merck, Mylan

Specialty; Honorarium: AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA, Meda, Merck; Mylan

Specialty; Research Grant: AstraZeneca,

GlaxoSmithKline, Merck

Lanny J. Rosenwasser, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: AstraZeneca,

Genentech, Novartis, Regeneron, Sanofi;

Honorarium: AstraZeneca, Genentech, Novartis,

Regeneron, Sanofi; Research Grant: Novartis

Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Immune

Pharmaceuticals; Stocks: Immune

Pharmaceuticals; Ownership Interest: Teva

§Deidra Sanders, MSN, FNP-BC

Consultant/Advisory Board: Sunovion; Speaker:

Genentech, Novartis; Honorarium: Genentech,

Novartis, Sunovion; Stocks: Allergy Zone

Nathan Segall, MD, FACAAI

Research Grant: Forest, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,

Novartis, Sanofi, Sunovion

Joram S. Seggev, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: ISTA

§James M. Seltzer, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Indoor Hygienic

Technologies Corp; Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline;

Honorarium: GlaxoSmithKline; Research Grant:

Merck; Stocks: Indoor Hygienic Technologies

Corp

Russell Settipane, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Sunovion, Teva;

Speaker: Alcon, ISTA, Merck, Novartis, Sunovion,

Teva; Research Grant: Genentech, Merck,

Sunovion, Teva; Stocks: Oceanside Publications

= Planner


§ = Moderator


Disclosures

Javed Sheikh, MD

Consultant/Advisory Board: CSL Behring

Ketan Sheth, MD, MBA

Consultant/Advisory Board: GlaxoSmithKline,

ISTA, Teva; Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA;

Honorarium: GlaxoSmithKline, ISTA; Stocks:

Merck

David J. Shulan, MD, FACAAI

Stocks: Apple, Cisco, General Electric, Google,

Hewlett Packard, IBM, Microsoft

Charles J. Siegel, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Meda, Teva;

Speaker: Alcon, Meda, Teva; Honorarium: Alcon,

Meda, Teva

William S. Silvers, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Teva Respiratory

F. Estelle Simons, MD, FACAAI

Medical Advisory Board: ALK-Abello, Mylan

Specialty, Sanofi

Roland Solensky, MD

Research Grant: Merck

§Sheldon L. Spector, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Novartis, Honorarium: Novartis;

Research Grant: Amgen, Array, Boehringer

Ingelheim, Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,

Mylan Specialty, Novartis, Sanofi, Teva; Stocks:

GlaxoSmithKline, Merck

Jonathan M. Spergel, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: DBV Technologies,

Dannone; Speaker; Nutricia; Research Grant:

Nutricia; Teva; Stocks: DBV Technologies

§James L. Sublett, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: GlaxoSmithKline,

Teva; Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,

Sunovion, Teva; Honorarium: GlaxoSmithKline,

Merck, Sunovion, Teva; Research Grant:

GlaxoSmithKline, Merck; Stocks: AllergyZone

LLC

§Timothy J. Sullivan, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Baxter, Genentech, Novartis;

Honorarium: Baxter, Genentech, Novartis

James Thompson, MD

Speaker: Thermo Fisher Scientific

Stephen A. Tilles, MD FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Hycol, ISTA,

Strategic Pharmaceutical Advisors; Research

Grant: Amphastar, Astellas, Aventis, Bohringer

Ingelheim, Forest, Genentech, MedImmune,

Merck, National Institutes of Health, Novartis,

Nutricia, Sunovion, Teva

§Janna M. Tuck, MD, FACAAI

Stocks: Cel-Sci Corporation

§Mark L. Vandewalker, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Boehringer

Ingelheim; Speaker: Alcon, AstraZeneca, Boston

Scientific, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck; Research

Grant: Alcon, AstraZeneca, Boehringer

Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Greer, Merck,

Stallergenes, Teva

James Verbsky, MD, PhD

Speaker: Baxter

Christine Wagner, MSN, CPNP, FNP-BC, AE-C

Consultant/Advisory Board: Sunovion, Teva;

Speaker: Mylan Specialty, Teva; Honorarium:

Mylan Specialty, Sunovion, Teva

Dana V. Wallace, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Mylan Specialty;

Speaker: Mylan Specialty; Honorarium: Mylan

Specialty

Richard L. Wasserman, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Meditab

§Richard W. Weber, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: AstraZeneca, Genentech; Research

Grant: Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,

Novartis

Andrew Weinstein, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Merck; Speaker:

Merck, Honorarium: Merck, Research Grant: NIH;

Stocks: Asthma Management Systems

§David R. Weldon, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Scott & White

Healthcare

Sally E. Wenzel, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Actelion, Gilead,

Merck, Novartis; Research Grant: Amgen, Array,

Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, MedImmune,

Merck, Sanofi

Hugh H. Windom, MD

Research Grant: Forest, Genentech, Novartis,

Teva

Michael C. Zacharisen, MD, FACAAI

Speaker: Merck, Teva

Myron J. Zitt, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Aerocrine, ISTA,

Merck, Sunovion; Speaker: Integrity, ISTA,

Merck, Sunovion; Honorarium: Aerocrine,

Integrity, ISTA, Merck, Sunovion

The following have no relevant financial relationships to disclose:

Donald W. Aaronson, MD, JD, MPH, FACAAI

§Joseph A. Bellanti, MD, FACAAI

Asriani Chiu, MD, FACAAI

§Stuart L. Abramson, MD, PhD

Donald V. Belsito, MD

Seong H. Cho, MD

Charles Andrew, MD

Neeti Bhardwaj, MD, MS

Kathy Chojnacki, RN, MSN, CPNP-AC

Kristyn Anthony, MD

Anand Bhatt, MD

Eugene Choo, MD

Jeanette L. Arnold, CFNP

Cheryl A. Blackwell, RN

Akhilesh Chouksey, MD

Rajiv Arora, MD, FACAAI

Amy Boyd, MD

Christina Ciaccio, MD, FACAAI

Noga Askenasi, MD, FACAAI

§Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI

Susan R. Bailey, MD, FACAAI

Puneet Bajaj, MD

Kevin K. Brown, MD

Mariana Castells, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Rabia Chaudhry, MD

Katherine Chiong-Manaysay, MD

§Kimberly G. Clay, NP

Christopher D. Codispoti, MD

Steven A. Conrad, MD, PhD

William W. Crawford, MD

Disclosures

= Planner

§ = Moderator


Disclosures

Dan A. Dalan, MD, FACAAI

§Karen A. DeMuth, MD, FACAAI

Richard D. deShazo, MD, FACAAI

A. DeZure, MD, MBA, MSc

Vesselin Dimov, MD

§William K. Dolen, MD, FACAAI

Paul J. Dowling, MD, FACAAI

Karen Drake, MA, SLP

Nabil El Sanadi, MD

Robyn Epstein, MD

Tolly Epstein, MD, MS

§Ira Finegold, MD, FACAAI

§Alessandro Fiocchi, MD

Thomas A. Fleisher, MD, FACAAI

Irene Fung, MD

Jackie Garrett, MD

Radoslaw Gawlik, PhD

Bob Geng, MD

Gisoo Ghaffari, MD

§J. Andrew Grant, MD

Dave Gupta, MD

Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH

Maria Gutierrez, MD

Imelda C. Hanson, MD

Jill Hanson

Bret R. Haymore, MD, FACAAI

Mary Beth Hogan, MD

§Richard Honsinger, MD, MACP, FACAAI

G. David Hopper, MD

Joseph Inglefield, MD

§Charlotte Jacobsen, RN, MSN

§Mansi Kanuga, MD

Eric Karlin, MD

Jacob Kattan, MD

§Paul B. Keiser, MD

§Pramod S. Kelkar, MD

John M. Kelso, MD, FACAAI

Stephen F. Kemp, MD, FACAAI

Josh Kennedy, MD

Barzin Khalili, MD, FACAAI

Bilal Khan, MD

§Jerald W. Koepke, MD, FACAAI

Karoline Krause, MD

James Kuhlen, MD

Radoslaw Kumar, PhD

Raj Kumar, MD

§Tao T. Le, MD, MHS, FACAAI

Gerald B. Lee, MD

Donald N. Leibner, MD, FACAAI

Estelle Levetin, PhD

Michael Littner, MD

Bradley Locke, DO

Aidan Long, MD

Jun Lu, MD

Alnoor A. Malick, MD, FACAAI

§Bryan L. Martin, DO, FACAAI

Kathleen May, MD, FACAAI

Jennifer Mbuthia, MD

§Kevin P. McGrath, MD, FACAAI

Archana Mehta, MD

Irene Mikhail, MD

Cecilia Mikita, MD, MPH, FACAAI

R. Joseph Mittel, MD

Tania Mucci, MD

M Antonella Muraro, MD

Jack Mutnick, MD

Maya Nanda, MD

Anjuli S. Nayak, MD, FACAAI

Richard A. Nicklas, MD, FACAAI

Myngoc T. Nguyen, MD, FACAAI

§Mark T. O’Hollaren, MD, FACAAI

Grant C. Olson, MD, FACAAI

Ryon Parker, MD

§Ruby U. Pawankar, MD, PhD

Donald W. Pulver, MD, FACAAI

Daniel Ramirez, MD

David Rose, MD

John M. Routes, MD, FACAAI

Stuart Rusnak, MD, FACAAI

Geetika Sabharwal, MD

Shubhayu Saha, PhD

Rushani Saltzman, MD

§John R. Seyerle, MD

§Meagan Shepherd, MD

Jodi Shroba, RN, MSN, CPNP

Jerome Sigua, MD

Joshua Solomon, MD

Christine Song, MD

Alice Sottile

Jenny Stitt, MD

Nithya Swamy, MD

Jessica Tan, MD

David D. Tanner, MD, FACAAI

Michael S. Tankersley, MD, FACAAI

John W. Tole, DO, FACAA

Concettina Tolomeo DNP, AE-C

James M. Tracy, DO, FACAAI

Anubha Tripathi, MD

Timothy Trojan, MD

Gerald W. Volcheck, MD, FACAAI

Julie Wang, MD

C. Ross Westley, MD FACAAI

P. Brock Williams, PhD

Paul V. Williams, MD, FACAAI

§Brian G. Wilson, MD, FACAAI

Hugh Windom, MD

Robert Wood, MD

Yesim Yilmaz Demirdag, MD

Education Staff/Committee have no relevant financial relationships to disclose, except as may be listed above.

= Planner


§ = Moderator


Disclosures

Recommendations for the Management of Patients With Anaphylaxis: A Consensus Update

November 9, 2012 • Anaheim, California

Jointly Sponsored by the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the

American Association of Certified Allergists (AACA)

Disclosure Policy and Disclosures

As required by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and in accordance with the American

College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) policy, all educational planners, presenters, instructors, moderators, authors,

reviewers, and other individuals in a position to control or influence the content of an activity must disclose all relevant financial

relationships with any commercial interest that have occurred within the past 12 months. All identified conflicts of interest must

be resolved and the educational content thoroughly vetted for fair balance, scientific objectivity, and appropriateness of patient

care recommendations. It is required that disclosure be provided to the learners prior to the start of the activity. Individuals with

no relevant financial relationships must also inform the learners that no relevant financial relationships exist. Learners must also

be informed when off-label, experimental/investigational uses of drugs or devices are discussed in an educational activity or

included in related materials. Disclosure in no way implies that the information presented is biased or of lesser quality. It is

incumbent upon course participants to be aware of these factors in interpreting the program contents and evaluating

recommendations. Moreover, expressed views do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the ACAAI.

All identified conflicts of interest have been resolved.

Lawrence M. DuBuske, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Allergy

Therapeutics, GlaxoSmithKline, Lypanosys,

Novartis, Sunovion; Speaker: GlaxoSmithKline,

Merck, Novartis, Sunovion: Honorarium: Allergy

Therapeutics, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis,

Sunovion; Research Grant: Boehringer

Ingelheim, Genentech, Merck, Novartis, Rigel,

Sunovion

Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD, FACAAI

Speaker: Nutricia, Thermo Fisher Scientific;

Honorarium: Nutricia, Thermo Fisher Scientific;

Research Grant: Merck

Phillip L. Lieberman, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Genentech, Meda,

Merck, Mylan, Sanofi, Stallergenes; Speaker:

Meda, Mylan

§Sheldon L. Spector, MD, FACAAI

Consultant/Advisory Board: Johnson & Johnson,

Merck, Novartis, Sanofi, Takeda, Teva, Vectura;

Speaker: Merck; Research Grant: Array,

AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Genentech,

GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck,

Mylan, Novartis, Sanofi, Sunovion, Takeda, Teva,

Vectura

Education Staff/Committee have no relevant financial relationships to disclose, except as may be listed above.

Disclosures

= Planner

§ = Moderator


Special Events

21st Annual FIT Bowl Competition

: – : pm, Saturday

Grand Ballroom EF • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Complimentary

NOT FOR

CREDIT

All physicians, young and old, are invited to participate in this fun-filled learning

experience. It’s the 21st Annual FIT Bowl Competition. This entertaining program –

patterned after the old “College Bowl”TV quiz show – will pit various allergy training

program teams against each other as they answer serious and not-so-serious questions

about their specialty. Refreshments and snack will be served.

Supported by Sanofi U.S.

Alliance International Reception

: – : pm, Saturday

Platinum Ballroom 1-2 • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

International attendees are cordially invited to attend the International Reception hosted

by the ACAAI Alliance on Saturday.

President’s Welcome Reception & Awards

Ceremony

: – : pm, Saturday

Marquis Ballroom • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

This event begins at 7:30 pm with drinks and light appetizers, and will be followed by a

short program where we will honor our new Fellows for their accomplishments and

recognize the recipients of the Distinguished Fellow, International Distinguished

Fellow, Distinguished Service, Woman in Allergy, Young Faculty Support and the Clemens

von Pirquet Awards.

Finally, we will introduce this year’s winner of the prestigious Gold Headed Cane Award,

Rufus E. Lee, Jr., MD, FACAAI, and invite him on stage to accept the award and address

the audience.

Plan to join us for this fun-filled event.

Supported in part by Merck

Women in Medicine Luncheon

Noon – : pm, Monday

Grand Ballroom E • Anaheim Marriott Hotel

Pre-registration Required

Complimentary

This year’s luncheon will pay tribute to Kathleen R. May, MD, FACAAI, who will be

recognized for her place in the forefront of women in the specialty and for her

contributions to the national organization. All women allergists are invited.

Supported by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.


2012 Named Lectures

Each year, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology presents several named lectures during its annual

scientific meeting. The “Bela Schick” and “John P. McGovern” lectures are presented annually. The “Daniel J. Goodman” and

“Lester Mittelstaedt” lectures are presented on alternate years. This is the first year for the Anjuli S. Nayak Lecture.

The allergists selected to present named lectures embody the high standards and achievements of the physicians for whom

the lectures are named. The College is proud to present the following named lectures at its 2012 Annual Meeting.

General Information

Luisa Businco

Memorial Lecture

Thursday, November 8, 1:15 pm

Ballroom A (3rd Floor)

Anaheim Convention Center

Predicting the Natural History of

Food Allergy

Amal H. Assa’ad, MD, FACAAI

Cincinnati, OH

The Businco Lecture is named in honor

of Professor Luisa Businco of Rome,

Italy. Her hard work in providing

excellent patient care, effective

teaching and quality research, led to

significant advances in understanding

several aspects of pediatric food

allergy. Her clinical and laboratory

research was focused on the

development, prediction and

prevention of allergy in children.

Dr. Businco worked with dedication in

promoting the specialty of pediatric

allergy and is widely survived in the

careers of the many physicians and

scientists taught and trained by her.

This lecture is presented during the

International Food Allergy Conference.

Daniel Goodman Lecture

Saturday, November 10, 8:15 am

Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor)

Anaheim Convention Center

Asthma Heterogeneity: Phenotypes

and Endotypes

Sally E. Wenzel, MD, FACAAI

Pittsburgh, PA

The biennial Goodman Lecture is

supported by a grant from Dr. Daniel

Goodman. His purpose in establishing

this lectureship was to leave a legacy to

honor individuals who have

demonstrated outstanding scholarship

and clinical abilities in the field of

allergy/immunology.

John P. McGovern

Lecture

Sunday, November 11, 8:35 am

Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor)

Anaheim Convention Center

Definining Contact Dermatitis:

More Than Just a Rash

Luz S. Fonacier, MD, FACAAI

Great Neck, NY

This annual lectureship is supported by

a grant from the John P. McGovern

Foundation. The Foundation sought to

establish a lectureship that would

recognize eminent physicians and

scientists, both clinicians and

researchers, who have contributed

meritoriously to the advancement of

knowledge in the specialty of allergyimmunology.

Lecturers receive the

prized John P. McGovern medallion,

created especially for the lectureship.

Dr. McGovern was a past president of

the College and a strong leader in the

field of patient care.

Bernard Berman

Memorial Lecture

Monday, November 12, 9:00 am

Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor)

Anaheim Convention Center

Evaluation and Management of

Pruritus Without Rash

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD, FACAAI

Fort Worth, TX

The Annual Bernard Berman Memorial

Lecture recognizes a kind, caring

clinician allergist with interests in the

various aspects of clinical allergy and a

passion for teaching. The Memorial

Lecture is a testament to Dr. Berman’s

caring nature, unique skills as a gifted

teacher and unselfish compassion for

his patients. He was a past president of

the College and one of the founders of

the American Board of Allergy and

Immunology.

Bela Schick Lecture

Tuesday, November 13, 9:00 am

Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor)

Anaheim Convention Center

The Future of Allergy:

What Would Bela Do

James L. Sublett, MD, FACAAI

Louisville, KY

The annual Bela Schick lecture is named

in honor of one of medicine’s most

respected scientists. Bela Schick was

born in Hungary and attended medical

school in Austria. After serving as

Extraordinary Professor of Children’s

Diseases at the University of Vienna, he

immigrated to the United States in 1923.

He was a pediatrician at Mt. Sinai in New

York for many years, loved by his

patients, and respected by his fellows.

Dr. Schick is best known for his work with

Clemens von Pirquet on anaphylaxis and

for the test he developed to assess

immunity to diphtheria.

Anjuli S. Nayak Lecture

Tuesday, November 13, 10:25 am

Ballroom B-E (3rd Floor)

Anaheim Convention Center

Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine in

Food Allergy

Julie Wang, MD

New York, NY

The Anjuli S. Nayak Lecture is

supported by a grant from the Nayak

Foundation and was established to

honor outstanding allergists focusing

on advances in allergy/immunology

research. Dr. Nayak is in private practice

and continues her dedication to

research in the specialty.


Tribute to Our Past Presidents

Past Presidents

• Bernard J. Efron, MD 1942–43 ACA

• French K. Hansel, MD 1943–45 ACA

• Harry L. Rogers, MD 1945–46 ACA

• Leon Unger, MD 1946–47 ACA

• Hal M. Davison, MD 1947–48 ACA

• George E. Rockwell, MD 1948–49 ACA

• Johnathan Forman, MD 1949–50 ACA

• John H. Mitchell, MD 1950–51 ACA

• Harold A. Abramson, MD 1951–52 ACA

• J. Warrick Thomas, MD 1952–53 ACA

• M. Murray Peshkin, MD 1953–54 ACA

• Homer E. Prince, MD 1954–55 ACA

• Lawrence J. Halpin, MD 1955–56 ACA

• Ethan Allan Brown, M.R.C.S. 1956–57 ACA

• Orval R. Withers, MD 1957–58 ACA

• Merle W. Moore, MD 1958–59 ACA

• Cecil M. Kohn, MD 1959–60 ACA

• Giles M. Koelsche, MD 1960–61 ACA

• Philip M. Gottlieb, MD 1961–62 ACA

• Mayer A. Green, MD 1962–63 ACA

• Morris A. Kaplan, MD 1963–64 ACA

• Boen Swinny, Sr., MD 1964–65 ACA

• Stanislaus H. Jaros, MD 1964–67 AACIA

• M. Coleman Harris, MD 1965–66 ACA

Lowell L. Henderson, MD 1966–67 ACA

• Howard G. Rapaport, MD 1967–68 ACA

• James E. Stroh, MD 1967–68 AACIA

• John P. McGovern, MD 1968–69 ACA

• Johnny A. Blue, MD 1968–69 AACIA

• Paul F. deGara, MD 1969–70 ACA

• Mason I. Lowance, MD 1969–70 AACIA

• G. Frederick Hieber, MD 1970–71 ACA

• Alex S. Friedlaender, MD 1970–71 AACIA

• Ralph Hale, MD 1971–72 ACA

Boen Swinny, Jr., MD 1971–72 AACIA

• Lamar B. Peacock, MD 1972–73 ACA

• Richard H. Jackson, MD 1972–73 AACIA

• Wm. Sawyer Eisenstadt, MD 1973–74 ACA

• Robert J. Brennan, MD 1973–74 AACIA

• Bernard A. Berman, MD 1974–75 ACA

• John L. Dewey, MD 1974–75 AACIA

• Ben C. Eisenberg, MD 1975–76 ACA

• Lester W. Mittelstaedt, MD 1975–76 AACIA

• Nathan Ernest Silbert, MD 1976–77 ACA

• Alexander McCausland, MD 1976–77 AACIA

• Orville C. Thomas, MD 1977–78 ACA

Gustav J. Beck, MD 1977–78 AACIA

Albert E. Hensel, Jr., MD 1978–79 ACA

Stanley L. Goldman, MD 1978–79 AACIA

• T. Reed Maxson, MD 1979–80 ACA

William H. Wilson, MD 1979–80 AACIA

• Solomon D. Klotz, MD 1980–81 ACA

• Walter R. MacLaren, MD 1980–81 AACIA

Robert J. Dockhorn, MD 1981–82 ACA

• Warren J. Raymer, MD 1981–82 AACIA

Gilbert D. Barkin, MD 1982–83 ACA

• Sidney Friedlaender, MD 1982–83 AACIA

Rufus E. Lee, Jr., MD 1983–84 ACA

Burton M. Rudolph, MD 1983–84 AACIA

• John G. Leonardy, MD 1984–85 ACA

• Albert G. Corrado, MD 1984–85 AACIA

Charles H. Banov, MD 1985–86 ACA

Donald L. Unger, MD 1985–86 AACIA

Peter B. Boggs, MD 1986–87 ACA

Donald C. McLean, MD 1986–87 AACIA

• Robert J. Becker, MD 1987 ACA

• R. Faser Triplett, MD 1987–88 ACAI

Donald W. Aaronson, MD, JD, MPH 1988–89 ACAI

Dale B. Sparks, MD 1989–90 ACAI

Edward J. O’Connell, MD 1990–91 ACAI

Joseph A. Bellanti, MD 1991–92 ACAI

• John C. Selner, MD 1992–93 ACAI

• Robert T. Scanlon, MD 1993–94 ACAI

Diane E. Schuller, MD 1994–95 ACAAI

Ira Finegold, MD 1995–96 ACAAI

Betty B. Wray, MD 1996–97 ACAAI

• Jean A. Chapman, MD 1997–98 ACAAI

Robert M. Miles, MD 1998-99 ACAAI

Don Q. Mitchell, MD 1999-00 ACAAI

Emil J. Bardana, Jr., MD 2000-01 ACAAI

Bobby Q. Lanier, MD 2001-02 ACAAI

William E. Berger, MD, MBA 2002-03 ACAAI

Michael S. Blaiss, MD 2003-04 ACAAI

Myron J. Zitt, MD 2004-05 ACAAI

William K. Dolen, MD 2005-06 ACAAI

Daniel Ein, MD 2006-07 ACAAI

Jay M. Portnoy, MD 2007-08 ACAAI

Richard G. Gower, MD 2008-09 ACAAI

Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH 2009-10 ACAAI

Dana V. Wallace, MD 2010-11 ACAAI

• Deceased


2012 Distinguished Fellows

ACAAI will award its “Distinguished Fellow” title to Myron J. Zitt, MD, FACAAI, and “International Distinguished Fellow” title

to Bee Wah Lee, MD and Revaz Sepiashvili, MD, FACAAI, during the President’s Welcome Reception and Awards Ceremony,

7:30 pm, Saturday, in the Marquis Ballroom at the Anaheim Marriott Hotel.


John P. McGovern, MD


M. Coleman Harris, MD


Howard Rapaport, MD


J. Warrick Thomas, MD


William Browning, MD

Jerome Glaser, MD

French K. Hansel, MD

Merle W. Moore, MD

M. Murray Peshkin, MD

Leon Unger, MD

Orval R. Withers, MD


Eloi Bauers, JD

Paul F. deGara, MD

John D. Gillaspie, MD

Giles A. Koelsche, MD

Stephen D. Lockey, MD

Homer E. Prince, MD


Harold Abramson, MD

Bernard A. Berman, MD

Ethan Allan Brown, MD

Ben C. Eisenberg, MD

Sawyer Eisenstadt, MD

Philip M. Gottlieb, MD

Mayer A. Green, MD

Ralph Hale, MD

Lowell Henderson, MD

G. Frederick Hieber, MD

Lamar B. Peacock, MD

George E. Rockwell, MD

Distinguished Fellow Recipients

Nathan E. Silbert, MD

Boen Swinny, Sr., MD


Susan C. Dees, MD

William C. Grater, MD

Frank Perlman, MD

Frederick Speer, MD


Cecil Collins–Williams, MD

Meyer B. Marks, MD

Orville C. Thomas, MD


Albert E. Hensel, Jr., MD

Melvin Newman, MD


Joseph A. Bellanti, MD

T. Reed Maxson, MD


Robert J. Becker, MD

G. Everett Gaillard, MD

Solomon D. Klotz, MD


Robert J. Dockhorn, MD

William T. Kniker, MD


Gilbert D. Barkin, MD

James C. Breneman, MD


Joseph E. Ghory, MD

Rufus E. Lee, Jr., MD

Roland B. Scott, MD


Robert Hamburger, MD

John G. Leonardy, MD

Harold S. Nelson, MD


Charles H. Banov, MD

Peter B. Boggs, MD

Robert J. Brennan, MD

Lloyd V. Crawford, MD

Joel D. Teigland, MD

Gerald Vanderpool, MD


Donald C. McLean, MD

Robert Moore, MD

Warren Richards, MD


Jean A. Chapman, MD

Bernard T. Fein, MD

R. Faser Triplett, MD


Donald Aaronson, MD

Martin J. Kaplan, MD

Betty B. Wray, MD


Burton M. Rudolph, MD

Sheldon L. Spector, MD

Dale B. Sparks, MD


Emil J. Bardana, Jr., MD

Allan T. Luskin, MD

Edward O’Connell, MD

Warren Raymer, MD


Herbert Mansmann, Jr., MD

Eli O. Meltzer, MD

R. Michael Sly, MD


Arnold A. Gutman, MD

John C. Selner, MD


Hyman Chai, MD

Bob Q. Lanier, MD

Robert M. Miles, MD

Stuart L. Rusnak, MD

Robert T. Scanlon, MD


Michael S. Blaiss, MD

Douglas S. Heiner, MD

Don Q. Mitchell, MD

Diane E. Schuller, MD


Ira Finegold, MD

John M. O’Loughlin, MD


Susan Rudd Bailey, MD

William E. Berger, MD

Alexander McCausland, MD

William W. Storms, MD


Linda B. Ford, MD

Bettina C. Hilman, MD

Richard Nicklas, MD


Stanley M. Fineman, MD

Lawrence S. Mihalas, MD


William K. Dolen, MD

Jay Portnoy, MD

Nathan Segall, MD


Phillip Lieberman, MD

Anthony Montanaro, MD

Suellyn S. Rossman, MD


Charles J. Siegel, MD

Richard W. Weber, MD


Sami L. Bahna, MD, DrPH

Lawrence DuBuske, MD

Jorge A. Quel, MD


John Andrew Grant, MD

Mark T. O’Hollaren, MD


Richard D. de Shazo, MD

Marianne Frieri, MD, PhD


Ernest Charlesworth, MD


John E. Moffitt, MD


Michael B. Foggs, MD

Gailen D. Marshall, Jr., MD, PhD


Kathleen R. May, MD

James L. Sublett, MD


Bryan L. Martin, DO


Myron J. Zitt, MD

General Information


Jose Luis Cortes, MD

Angel Marchand, MD


Felicidad Cua–Lim, MD

Jose Huerta Lopez, MD


Israel Glazer, MD

Samuel Malka, MD


Sami Bahna, MD, DrPH

Attilio Boner, MD

Luisa Businco, MD


Antero Palma–Carlos, MD

Sten Dreborg, MD

International Distinguished Fellow Recipients


Julio Croce, MD

Moises Zebede, MD


Charles K. Naspitz, MD


Mario La Rosa, MD

Hugo E. Neffen, MD


Giuliana Baldini, MD

Natalio Salmun, MD


Giovanni Cavagni, MD

Cassim Motala, MD


Sebastiano Guarnaccia, MD

João Ferreira Mello, MD


Sergio Bonini, MD


Anthony Frew, MD

Maurizio Miraglia

Del Giudice, MD

Marek Kowalski, MD


Alessandro Fiocchi, MD

Constance Katerlaris, MD


Helen Hei-ling Chan, MD

Pakit Vichyanond, MD


Daniel Aguilar, MD

Kamal M. Hanna, MD

S.G.O. Johansson, MD, PhD


Carlos Baena-Cagnani, MD

Todo A. Popov, MD

Paul van Cauwenberge, MD


Ruby U. Pawankar, MD

Daphne Tsitoura, MD, PhD


Ignacio Ansotegui, MD

Desiree L. Larenas-

Linnemann, MD

Noel Rodriguez Perez, MD


Alejandro Escobar-Gutierrez, MD


G. Walter Canonica, MD

Yehia M. El-Gamal, MD, PhD


Yin Jia, MD

Sang-Il Lee, MD, PhD


Giovanni Pajno, MD

Fares Zatoun, MD


Bee Wah Lee, MD

Revaz Sepiashvili, MD


ACAAI Foundation

ACAAI Foundation “10K Club”

The following donors have met or exceeded their pledge of $10,000 to the ACAAI Foundation:

Sami L Bahna, MD, DrPH

Emil J Bardana, Jr., MD, MACP

Joseph A Bellanti, MD

Bradley E Chipps, MD

Lawrence M DuBuske, MD

David B Engler, MD

Stanley M Fineman, MD, MBA

Linda B Ford, MD, AE-C

Richard G Gower, MD

J. Andrew Grant, MD

Bobby Q Lanier, MD

Phillip L Lieberman, MD

Alnoor A Malick, MD