Brochure Fall05 spread - CCSDS

public.ccsds.org

Brochure Fall05 spread - CCSDS

The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems

2005 • 2006

www.CCSDS.org

CCSDS


A Note from CCSDS

This booklet contains information about the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems

(CCSDS), an international organization dedicated to the development of space communications

standards.

Getty Images

The CCSDS Secretariat regularly searches for current implementations of CCSDS Recommendations

for Space Data System Standards as part of an ongoing effort to understand the influence of CCSDS

standards development activities. We have included this information in this booklet.

Implementation information may appear with contact information for commercial entities. The presence

of such information here, on the CCSDS web site or in any material published by the CCSDS is

not an endorsement of these entities by CCSDS or any of its members or member agencies. CCSDS

is not responsible for the information you may receive by contacting these entities directly.

Thank you for your interest in CCSDS.

Cover images

Clockwise from top:

Background Image - NASA/JPL/UMD - Artist Pat Rawlings gives us a look at the moment of impact

and the forming of the crater.

Comet Tempel 1 about 50 minutes after Deep Impact’s probe smashed into its surface - NASA/JPL/

UMD - The impact site is located on the far side of the comet in this view. The image was taken by the

mission’s flyby spacecraft as it turned back to face the comet for one last photo opportunity.

XMM-Newton detects water on Tempel 1 - ESA - One of six images taken by the XMM-Newton Optical

Monitor on 3 and 4 July 2005, that show a comparison between the states of the comet before and

just after impact.

False-colour representation of comet brightness (still) - ESA/OSIRIS consortium - A still from the

sequence taken by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera on board Rosetta, shows how the brightness of

Comet 9P/Tempel 1 develops after impact.

Welcome to CCSDS

Established in 1982 by the world’s most influential space agencies, the Consultative Committee

for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) provides well-engineered international space data handling

standards that enhance government and commercial interoperability and cross-support, while also

reducing risk, project cost and development time.

A pioneer in international cooperation in space, the CCSDS is made up of leading space communications

experts representing 28 countries, its founding Member space agencies, 25 Observer space agencies

and over 100 private companies. CCSDS national member space agencies include Japan, the United

Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Brazil, Russia, Canada, the United States, as well as the multi-national

European Space Agency.

To date, more than 300 missions to space have chosen to fly with CCSDS protocols and the number

continues to grow. For more information on participation or to access CCSDS standards and protocols

free of charge, please visit http://www.CCSDS.org.

Tempel alive with light - NASA/JPL/UMD - This image of comet Tempel 1 was taken 13 seconds after

it met with Deep Impact’s impactor spacecraft. The image was taken by the high-resolution camera on

board the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft.

i


Saturn’s Rings, Cassini-Huygens (ESA)

Participation

Table of Contents

Welcome

Page i

CCSDS

DATA

Bit

Currently, space data

communications experts

representing 28 countries

participate in CCSDS

standards development

activities.

CCSDS participating agencies and organizations are classified in one

of four categories: Member Agency, Observer Agency, Liaison and

Commercial Associate.

The following Participation area of this booklet describes each category

and how to contact us so that perhaps you too can participate in producing

the most well-engineered space data communications standards in the

world.

Participation Page 1

Structure & Development Page 4

Current Blue Books Page 6

Missions Page 13

Compatible Products - Space Domain Page 18

Compatible Products - Ground Domain Page 21

Media Notes Page 28

CCSDS Member Agency is a governmental or quasi-governmental organization

A that fully participates in all CCSDS activities and provides a commensurate level of

support to the organization. Only one agency representing a given country or multinational

organization may participate as a CCSDS Member Agency.

In becoming a Member Agency, the agency adopts the CCSDS Charter and agrees

to make best efforts to ensure that their agency’s internal standards adhere to the

applicable CCSDS Recommended Standards. Each Member Agency is expected to name

participants to all CCSDS technical Working Groups. Member Agencies are also invited

and encouraged to submit concept or position papers for discussion within the Working

Groups.

Perhaps most importantly, Member Agencies have CCSDS voting rights, which are exercised through

Member Agency Representatives. Member Agency Representatives make up the CCSDS Management

Council (CMC), and meet twice a year to decide on the business and direction of the CCSDS.

For more information about becoming a CCSDS Member Agency, please contact us at

Secretariat@mailman.ccsds.org .

Members

CCSDS - More than 20 years of the best-engineered space data communications recommendations

in the world • for the world • free of charge

CCSDS

Member

Agencies

Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) / Italy

British National Space Centre (BNSC) / United Kingdom

Canadian Space Agency (CSA) / Canada

Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) / France

Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR) / Germany

European Space Agency (ESA) / Europe

Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) / Brazil

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) / USA

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) / Japan

Russian Space Agency (RSA) / Russian Federation

ii Content updated October 2005

1


Participation

Observers

CCSDS Observer Agency is a governmental or quasi-governmental organization that participates in

A CCSDS activities at a reduced level of support than that of a Member Agency.

Observer Agencies are encouraged but not expected to make best efforts to ensure that their agency’s

internal standards adhere to the applicable CCSDS Recommended Standards. Observer Agencies are

also encouraged to contribute resources to the Working Groups. Individuals from Observer Agencies

are invited to participate in the Working Groups as technical experts. There is no limit on the number of

national or multinational agencies that may participate as Observer Agencies.

For more information about becoming a CCSDS Observer Agency, please contact the Member Agency

Representative associated with your agency’s home country listed at

http://public.ccsds.org/participation/member_agencies.aspx or the CCSDS Secretariat via e-mail at

Secretariat@mailman.ccsds.org .

Austrian Space Agency (ASA) / Austria

Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BelSPO) / Belgium

Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex (CDSCC) / Australia

Central Research Institute of Machine Building (TsNIIMash) / Russian Federation

Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA) / Brazil

Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) / China

Danish Space Research Institute (DSRI) / Denmark

European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) / Europe

European Telecommunications Satellite Organization (EUTELSAT) / Europe

Federal Service of Scientific, Technical & Cultural Affairs (FSST&CA) / Belgium

Hellenic National Space Committee (HNSC) / Greece

Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) / India

Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) / Japan

Institute of Space Research (IKI) / Russian Federation

KFKI Research Institute for Particle & Nuclear Physics (KFKI) / Hungary

MIKOMTEK: CSIR (CSIR) / Republic of South Africa

Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) / Korea

Ministry of Communications (MOC) / Israel

National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) / Japan

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) / USA

National Space Program Office (NSPO) / Taipei

Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO) / Pakistan

Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) / Sweden

United States Geological Survey (USGS) / USA

CCSDS

Observer

Agencies

Liaisons

CCSDS Liaison organization is a governmental or private activity with developmental programs in the

A areas of space-related data and information systems. Liaison participation in the Working Groups is

encouraged and will usually focus on a particular subject of interest to the Liaison organization.

For more information about becoming a CCSDS Liaison, please contact us via e-mail at

Secretariat@mailman.ccsds.org .

CCSDS Liaison

Organizations

Participation

American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics

Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)

Interagency Operations Advisory Group (IOAG)

International Council for Science, Committee on Space Research (COSPAR)

International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing

ISO/IEC JTC 1 SC 2

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

U.S. National Information Standards Organization

Norwegian Technology Standards Institution

Object Management Group Inc.

World Meteorological Organization

Commercial Associates

CCSDS Commercial Associate is a scientific and/or industrial entity desiring a more formal tie with

A CCSDS that allows it to better monitor and possibly influence technical document development

activity. Many have created the CCSDS compatible products listed later in this booklet.

Commercial Associates may participate in the Working Groups and in the document development

process with the explicit approval of a sponsoring CCSDS Member or Observer Agency. Commercial

Associates may also submit concept or position papers through their sponsoring Member or Observer

Agency. Generally, the sponsoring agency and the CCSDS Commercial Associate must be from the

same country; however, multinational organizations (e.g., ESA) can sponsor Commercial Associates

provided that the candidate is from a country affiliated with the sponsoring agency.

To apply for a CCSDS Commercial Associate membership, please complete the appropriate application

found on our web site at http://public.ccsds.org/participation/default.aspx or contact us via e-mail at

Secretariat@mailman.ccsds.org .

2 3


Structure & Development

The Basic Organizational Structure

The CCSDS is made up of two major structural components: the management component focused

within the CCSDS Management Council (CMC), and the engineering or technical component focused

within the CCSDS Engineering Steering Group (CESG).

The CMC manages the business and overall direction of the organization and is comprised of one

delegate named by each Member Agency to represent its interests within the organization.

The CESG is where the technical work of the organization happens. Technical experts representing

various agencies and organizations are named by their supporting Member Agency to participate in any

of the approximately 40 Working Groups exist in the six main CCSDS technical areas.

Although sometimes referred to as the front lines of the organization, the CCSDS Working Groups are

where cultural and political differences are set aside, so that the work of the organization, developing

space communications standards, can be accomplished.

Twice a year, CCSDS Working Groups meet face-to-face at co-located meetings in order further

standardization development activity and also to maximize opportunities for the cross-pollination of ideas.

The collaborative environments that emerge during the week long series of meetings allow participants to

exchange information regarding space communications standards on a global scale.

A model of international collaboration for over twenty years, today’s CCSDS has extended the idea of

its highly successful co-located meetings to its web site. Visitors to CCSDS.org will now find an online

Collaborative Work Environment (CWE) for each Working Group located in a larger CWE home site.

Each CWE has a public area where a Working Group may showcase its current development activities or

offer its work for review.

Document Development

Structure & Development

The principle products of the CCSDS are Recommended standards for space data communications.

These CCSDS Recommended standards serve as baseline documents for standards. The process by

which CCSDS Recommended Standards are developed is through an iterative process that begins among

the Working Group experts and then moves through the CCSDS Member Agencies. Final approval is by

consensus of CCSDS voting Member Agencies.

CCSDS Recommendations are routinely submitted to the International Organization for Standardization

(ISO) through ISO Technical Committee 20 (Aircraft and Space Vehicles) / Subcommittee 13 (Space Data

and Information Transfer Systems). Many CCSDS Recommendations have been adopted as international

standards, and many others are currently in the ISO review process.

CCSDS also produces other types of documents in addition to its Recommended standards, including

Recommended Practices, Informational Reports, Experimental Documents, Record Documents and

Historical Documents.

To access and download all of the current CCSDS publications free of charge, please visit our Publications

Area at http://public.ccsds.org/publications/default.aspx .

Below is an Interactive Space Data System Reference Model which shows how CCSDS

Recommendations help enhance space communications end-to-end. On our web site, the same model

becomes interactive in another way: by allowing users to click on an element of the space data system to

find the associated CCSDS Documents.

To use this model to access documents online, please visit http://public.ccsds.org/publications/default.aspx .

To visit the CCSDS CWE Area and to view the latest CCSDS organizational chart, please visit http://

public.ccsds.org/sites/cwe/default.aspx or simply go to our home page at CCSDS.org and click on this

CWE logo:

CWE

CCSDS

Technical

Areas

Systems Engineering Area (SEA)

Mission Operations and Information Management Services Area (MOIMS)

Cross Support Services Area (CSS)

Spacecraft Onboard Interface Services Area (SOIS)

Space Link Services Area (SLS)

Space Internetworking Services Area (SIS)

4 5


Structure & Development

From Concept Paper to Draft Recommendation

Blue Book is a CCSDS Recommendation. It reflects the resolution

A of official comments from Member Agencies during formal

reviews, and, as such, represents the concurrence of the appropriate

implementing organizations within each Member Agency. Member

Agency approval of a Blue Book implies an intent to reflect its

provisions in future data systems standards developed through internal

mechanisms.

For the latest Blue Books, and for access to all CCSDS publications

free of charge, please visit our Publications area at http://public.ccsds.

org/publications/default.aspx .

Current Blue Books

CCSDS

DATA

Bit

To date, CCSDS has produced

more than thirty ISO standards,

with another sixteen currently

under review.

CCSDS 101.0-B-6 Telemetry Channel Coding. Blue Book. Issue 6. October 2002.

This Recommendation establishes a common framework and provides a common basis for the coding

schemes used on spacecraft telemetry streams. ISO Number : 11754

CCSDS 102.0-B-5 Packet Telemetry. Blue Book. Issue 5. November 2000.

This Recommendation establishes a common framework and provides a common basis for the data

structures of spacecraft telemetry streams. ISO Number : 13419

CCSDS 103.0-B-2 Packet Telemetry Service Specification. Blue Book. Issue 2. June 2001.

This Recommendation defines the services of a packet telemetry system. ISO Number : 17433

CCSDS 121.0-B-1 Lossless Data Compression. Blue Book. Issue 1. May 1997.

This Recommendation defines a source-coding data-compression algorithm and specifies how data

compressed using the algorithm are inserted into source packets for retrieval and decoding.

ISO Number : 15887

The chart above reflects the development process from Concept Paper to Draft Recommendation.

The basic flow is as follows:

CCSDS 131.0-B-1 TM Synchronization and Channel Coding. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2003.

This Recommendation contains specifications for synchronization and channel coding to be used on

synchronous data channels. These specifications correspond with those contained in Telemetry Channel

Coding. (Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

• A Birds of a Feather group (BOF) presents a Concept Paper (CP) to the CESG.

• Upon acceptance of the CP, a Working Group (WG) is chartered by the CESG and approved by

the CMC.

• Through a consensus process, the WG agrees on the content of a Proposed Recommendation,

and a technical editor is assigned to draft the Proposed Recommendation.

• The WG develops the Proposed Recommendation to maturity through multiple iterations: the

WG Chair determines when each draft issue is published; every draft issue clearly states the status of

the Proposed Recommendation and indicates the risks associated with implementing it in its current

state.

• When the WG has determined that the Proposed Recommendation is mature, the WG Chair

petitions the CESG via the Area Director for permission to designate it as a Draft Recommendation, and

demonstrates that its content represents the true consensus of the group.

• Upon acceptance of the petition, the CESG asks the CMC to authorize formal Agency review.

• Authorization of formal Agency review marks the transition in status from Proposed

Recommendation to Draft Recommendation.

(From CCSDS A00.0-Y-9 Page 6-1 November 2003.)

CCSDS 132.0-B-1 TM Space Data Link Protocol. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2003.

This Recommendation specifies the Data Link layer protocol, services, and procedures pertaining to the

CCSDS Version-1 Synchronous Transfer Frame. (Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

CCSDS 133.0-B-1 Space Packet Protocol. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2003.

This Recommendation specifies the protocols, services, and procedures pertaining to the CCSDS Packet.

(Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

CCSDS 135.0-B-1 Space Link Identifiers. Blue Book. Issue 1. January 2002.

This Recommendation documents the identifiers that are defined or reserved by CCSDS as part of the

specification of the CCSDS space link protocols, and it shows how these identifiers are managed at the

CCSDS level.

CCSDS 201.0-B-3 Telecommand Part 1—Channel Service. Blue Book. Issue 3. June 2000.

This Recommendation was developed within the layered architectural framework and embraces the

standard data structures and data communication procedures that may be used by conventional missions

within the lowest telecommand system layers.

ISO Number : 12171

6 7


Current Blue Books

Current Blue Books

Current Blue Books

CCSDS 202.0-B-3 Telecommand Part 2—Data Routing Service. Blue Book. Issue 3. June 2001.

This Recommendation for Telecommand Data Routing Service was developed within the layered

architectural framework and embraces the standard data structures and data communication procedures

that may be used by conventional missions within the intermediate telecommand system layers. ISO

Number : 12172

CCSDS 202.1-B-2 Telecommand Part 2.1—Command Operation Procedures. Blue Book. Issue 2.

June 2001.

The Command Operation Procedure forms a subpart of the Data Routing Service, which is described in

CCSDS 202.0-B-3. This Recommendation contains the definition of the Command Operation Procedure

in the form of state tables at the level of detail necessary to allow cross support. ISO Number : 12173

CCSDS 203.0-B-2 Telecommand Part 3—Data Management Service. Blue Book. Issue 2. June 2001.

This Recommendation was developed within the layered architectural framework and embraces the

standard data structures and data communication procedures that may be used by conventional missions

within the highest telecommand layers. ISO Number : 12174

CCSDS 211.0-B-3 Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol—Data Link Layer. Blue Book. Issue 3. May 2004.

This Recommendation details Space Data System Standards in the area of Proximity space links.

CCSDS 211.1-B-2 Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol—Physical Layer. Blue Book. Issue 2. May 2004.

This Recommendation defines the Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol Physical Layer.

CCSDS 211.2-B-1 Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol—Coding and Synchronization Sublayer. Blue

Book. Issue 1. April 2003.

This Recommendation specifies Proximity space links. This Recommendation contains the Coding and

Synchronization Sublayer specification originally published as part of CCSDS 211.0-B-1, Proximity-1

Space Link Protocol.

CCSDS 231.0-B-1 TC Synchronization and Channel Coding. Blue Book. Issue 3. September 2003.

This Recommendation contains specifications for synchronization and channel coding to be used by

space missions on asynchronous communications links. (Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

CCSDS 401.0-B-15 Radio Frequency and Modulation Systems--Part 1: Earth. Blue Book. Issue 15.

September 2005.

These recommendations are developed for conventional near-Earth and deep-space missions having

moderate communications requirements.

CCSDS 502.0-B-1 Orbit Data Messages. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2004.

This Recommendation specifies two standard message formats for use in transferring spacecraft orbit

information between space Agencies: the Orbit Parameter Message (OPM) and the Orbit Ephemeris

Message (OEM).

CCSDS 620.0-B-2 Standard Formatted Data Units — Structure and Construction Rules. Blue Book.

Issue 2. May 1992.

This Recommendation defines Standard Formatted Data Unit (SFDU) structures that will handle some

of the problems of digital data interchange and several construction rules that will limit the SFDUs to a

practical set that can exist in an open data system environment. ISO Number : 12175

CCSDS 622.0-B-1 Standard Formatted Data Units—Referencing Environment. Blue Book. Issue 1.

May 1997.

This Recommendation defines multiple standard “file pointer” mechanisms that can be embedded into

other data structures for the purpose of identifying and annotating a collection of files. ISO Number :

15888

CCSDS 630.0-B-1 Standard Formatted Data Units — Control Authority Procedures. Blue Book. Issue

1. June 1993.

This Recommendation defines the responsibilities that must be assumed and the services that must

be provided by the participating CCSDS Agencies in order to facilitate the creation and operation of the

Control Authority organization. ISO Number : 13764

CCSDS 632.0-B-1 Standard Formatted Data Units — Control Authority Data Structures. Blue Book.

Issue 1. November 1994.

This Recommendation extends the standardization of the Standard Formatted Data Unit (SFDU) concept

in support of the digital transfer of space-related information. ISO Number : 15395

CCSDS 232.0-B-1 TC Space Data Link Protocol. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2003.

This Recommendation specifies the protocol, services, and procedures pertaining to the CCSDS Version-

1 Asynchronous Transfer Frame. (Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

CCSDS 232.1-B-1 Communications Operation Procedure-1. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2003.

This Recommendation specifies the Communications Operation Procedure-1 used by the TC Space Data

Link Protocol. (Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

CCSDS 301.0-B-3 Time Code Formats. Blue Book. Issue 3. January 2002.

This Recommendation establishes a common framework and provides a common basis for the formats of

time code data. ISO Number : 11104

CSDS 320.0-B-3 CCSDS Global Spacecraft Identification Field Code Assignment Control Procedures.

Blue Book. Issue 3. April 2003.

This Recommendation specifies the procedures for obtaining and relinquishing CCSDS Global Spacecraft

Identifiers for use in CCSDS Transfer Frames.

CCSDS 641.0-B-2 Parameter Value Language Specification (CCSD0006 and CCSD0008).. Blue Book.

Issue 2. June 2000.

The Parameter Value Language (PVL) Recommendation defines a human-readable, machineprocessable

language for naming and expressing data values.

ISO Number : 14961

CCSDS 643.0-B-1 ASCII Encoded English (CCSD0002). Blue Book. Issue 1. November 1992.

This Recommendation defines the usage of ASCII Encoded English and its representation as a data

description language. ISO Number : 14962

CCSDS 644.0-B-2 The Data Description Language EAST Specification (CCSD0010). Blue Book. Issue

2. November 2000.

This update to the original Data Description Language EAST Recommendation extends EAST ability to

handle repeated data items where repetition is terminated by a marker. ISO Number : 15889

8 9


Current Blue Books

Current Blue Books

Current Blue Books

CCSDS 647.1-B-1 Data Entity Dictionary Specification Language (DEDSL)—Abstract Syntax

(CCSD0011). Blue Book. Issue 1. June 2001.

The Recommendation for DEDSL—PVL Syntax (CCSDS 647.2-B-1) provides a standard method to

represent the attributes and their values, as defined by the Recommendation for DEDSL—Abstract

Syntax, using the Parameter Value Language for the construction and interchange of data entity

dictionaries.

ISO Number : 21961

CCSDS 647.2-B-1 Data Entity Dictionary Specification Language (DEDSL)—PVL Syntax (CCSD0012).

Blue Book. Issue 1. June 2001.

This Data Entity Dictionary Specification Language (DEDSL) Recommendation provides the Parameter

Value Language (PVL) (CCSDS 641.0-B-2) implementation for the DEDSL—Abstract Syntax

Recommendation (CCSDS 647.1-B-1) in order to provide a standardized computer processable

expression of the semantic information which to be carried with data. The Recommendation for PVL

Syntax provides a standard method to represent the attributes and their values, as defined by the

Recommendation for Abstract Syntax, using the Parameter Value Language for the construction and

interchange of data entity dictionaries.

ISO Number : 21962

CCSDS 647.3-B-1 Data Entity Dictionary Specification Language (DEDSL)—XML/DTD Syntax

(CCSD0013). Blue Book. Issue 1. January 2002.

This Recommendation provides a standard method to represent attributes and their values, as has been

defined by the Abstract Syntax of the Data Entity Dictionary Specification Language (DEDSL) (CCSDS

647.1-B-1), using the Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0 Document Type Declaration (DTD) for the

construction and interchange of data entity dictionaries.

ISO Number : 22643

CCSDS 713.5-B-1 Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS)—Security Protocol (SCPS-

SP). Blue Book. Issue 1. May 1999.

This Recommendation defines the SCPS** security protocol and services.

ISO Number : 15892

CCSDS 714.0-B-1 Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS)—Transport Protocol (SCPS-

TP). Blue Book. Issue 1. May 1999.

This Recommendation defines the SCPS** transport-layer protocols and services. SCPS-TP is also known

as “TCP Tranquility.”

ISO Number : 15893

CCSDS 717.0-B-1 Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS)—File Protocol (SCPS-FP).

Blue Book. Issue 1. May 1999.

This Recommendation defines the SCPS** file transfer protocol and services.

ISO Number : 15894

CCSDS 727.0-B-3 CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). Blue Book. Issue 3. June 2005.

This Recommendation defines a protocol suitable for the transmission of files to and from spacecraft data

storage and capable of operating in a wide variety of mission configurations.

CCSDS 732.0-B-1 AOS Space Data Link Protocol. Blue Book. Issue 1. September 2003.

This Recommendation specifies the protocol, services, and procedures pertaining to the CCSDS Version-

2 Transfer Frame. (Note: This is a restructured Recommendation*.)

CCSDS 650.0-B-1 (F) Modèle de référence pour un Système ouvert d’archivage d’information (OAIS).

Blue Book. Issue 1. Mars 2005.

CCSDS 650.0-B-1 Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). Blue Book.

Issue 1. January 2002.

The Recommendation identified above defines the ISO Reference Model for an Open Archival Information

System (OAIS). ISO Number : 14721

CCSDS 651.0-B-1 Producer-Archive Interface Methodology Abstract Standard. Blue Book. Issue 1.

May 2004.

This Recommendation identifies, defines, and provides structure to the relationships and interactions

between an information Producer and an Archive.

CCSDS 701.0-B-3 Advanced Orbiting Systems, Networks and Data Links: Architectural Specification.

Blue Book. Issue 3. June 2001.

This Recommendation extends the previous set of CCSDS Recommendations for conventional missions

to accommodate extra services needed by Advanced Orbiting Systems. ISO Number : 13420

CCSDS 713.0-B-1 Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS)—Network Protocol (SCPS-

NP). Blue Book. Issue 1. May 1999.

This Recommendation defines the SCPS** network-layer protocol and services. ISO Number : 15891

CCSDS 910.4-B-1 Cross Support Reference Model—Part 1: Space Link Extension Services. Blue

Book. Issue 1. May 1996.

This Recommendation establishes a common framework and provides a common basis for the

specification of data services that extend the space-to-ground communication services previously defined

by CCSDS. ISO Number : 15396

CCSDS 911.1-B-2 Space Link Extension – Return All Frames Service Specification. Blue Book. Issue

2. November 2004.

This Recommended Standard defines the Space Link Extension (SLE) Return All Frames (RAF) service in

conformance with the SLE Reference Model.

CCSDS 911.2-B-1 Space Link Extension – Return Channel Frames Service Specification. Blue Book.

Issue 1. November 2004.

This Recommended Standard provides a basis for the development of real systems that implement the

RCF service.

CCSDS 911.5-B-1 Space Link Extension – Return Operational Control Fields Service Specification.

Blue Book. Issue 1. November 2004.

This Recommended Standard defines the Space Link Extension (SLE) Return Operational Control Fields

(ROCF) service in conformance with the SLE Reference Model.

10 11


Current Blue Books

CCSDS 912.1-B-2 Space Link Extension – Forward CLTU Service Specification. Blue Book. Issue 2.

November 2004.

This Recommended Standard defines the Communications Link Transmission Unit (CLTU) service in

conformance with the transfer services specified in CCSDS 910.4-B-1, Cross Support Reference Model—

Part 1: SLE Services.

CCSDS 912.3-B-1 Space Link Extension – Forward Space Packet Service Specification. Blue Book.

Issue 1. November 2004.

This Recommended Standard defines the Forward Space Packet (FSP) service in conformance with the

transfer services specified in CCSDS 910.4-B-1, Cross Support Reference Model―Part 1: SLE Services.

Mars Rover Spirit “Independence” panorama, acquired on martian days, or

sols, 536 to 543 (July 6 to 13, 2005), from a position in the “Columbia Hills”

near the summit of “Husband Hill.” (Photo credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell )

The table below lists missions known to be using CCSDS-recommended protocols. For the missions

listed, CCSDS protocol use ranges from CCSDS Version 1 Transfer Frames for telemetry (early

missions) to the full suite of conventional and/or Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) telemetry and

telecommand protocols. Many of these missions also follow CCSDS Recommendations for data archiving,

Space Link Extension (SLE) services, Time Code Formats, and Lossless Data Compression; the majority

conform to CCSDS Recommendations for Radio Frequency and Modulation Systems.

The table contains information compiled from several sources. In many cases, information was obtained

from requirements, design, and interface-control documents prepared for individual missions. Reports

and technical papers discussing use of CCSDS-recommended standards in particular missions,

mission-related Web pages, and CCSDS agency reports to the CCSDS Management Council were also

consulted. Where no documents were available, information was obtained through discussions with

mission personnel. To see the most up to date list of CCSDS missions, please visit our missions list

online at http://public.ccsds.org/application/missions.aspx .

2014 Agora CNES

2011 METOP-3 JAXA

2011 HTV-09 JAXA

2011 GEC NASA/GSFC

2011 LISA NASA/JPL

2011 JWST NASA

2011 Constellastion-x NASA/GSFC

2011 HTV-08 JAXA

2010 METOP-2 EUMETSAT

2010 Magnetospheric Constellation NASA

2010 Bepi Colombo ESA

2010 RBM NASA/APL

2010 HTV-07 JAXA

2010 HTV-06 JAXA

2009 POES NOAA, NASA GSFC

2009 Mars Netlander FMI, ASI, CNES, DLR,IKI

2009 MMS NASA

2009 ITM NASA/APL

2009 SIM NASA/JPL

2009 ATV-6 ESA

2009 HTV-05 JAXA

2009 HTV-04 JAXA

2009 Pleiades HR 1B CNES, ASI

2008 ZX 9 (Chinasat)

2008 Spirale 1/2 CNES

2008 Eddington ESA

2008 Chandrayaan-1 ISRO

2008 Skynet 5C ESA

2008 VCL (ESSP-01) NASA/GSFC

2008 Europa Orbiter NASA/JPL

2008 MSG-3 ESA

2008 ATV-5 ESA

2008 SST CNSA

2007 Planck ESA

2007 Herschel Space Observatory ESA

Missions

2007 ADM-Aelous ESA

2007 OCO NASA/GSFC

2007 GOSAT JAXA

2007 Aeolus-S Sim ESA

2007 Aeolus-X ESA

2007 Orbview 5 GSFC

2007 Star-One C-2 ESA

2007 SDO NASA/GSFC

2007 Kepler NASA Ames

2007 SMOS ESA/CNES/SNP

2007 Megha-Tropiques CNES/ISRO

2007 Solar Probe NASA/JPL

2007 Mars Premier Orbiter CNES

2007 ACCESS NASA/GSFC

2007 ATV-4 ESA

2007 H-II (HTV-01) JAXA

2007 H-II (HTV-DM) JAXA

2007 Phoenix NASA

2007 COSMO-SkyMed4 ASI

2007 THEOS GISTDA

2007 Orbview-5 ORBIMAGE

2006 NPOESS NASA/GSFC

2006 AIM NASA/GSFC

2006 SBIRS-High DoD

2006 New Horizon NASA/APL

2006 Dawn JPL, UCLA

2006 THEMIS 5 NASA/SSL

2006 THEMIS 4 NASA/SSL

2006 THEMIS 3 NASA/SSL

2006 THEMIS 2 NASA/SSL

2006 THEMIS 1 NASA/SSL

2006 Solar-B ISAS

2006 GLAST NASA

2006 COROT CNES

2006 INMARSAT 4F 3 INMARSAT

12 13


Missions

Missions

2006 Starlight (ST3) NASA

2006 GOCE ESA

2006 ATV-3 ESA

2006 CRM PCRF, MIT/CSR

2006 RascomStar-Qaf 1 RascomStar-QAF

2006 ARABSAT4B ARABSAT

2006 ARABSAT4A ARABSAT

2006 SKYNET 5B British Ministry of Defence

2006 SKYNET 5A British Ministry of Defence

2006 HOTBIRD 8 Eutelsat

2006 Anik F3 Telesat Canada/ESA

2006 Galaxy 17 PanAmSat/ESA

2006 COSMO-Skymed3 ASI

2006 COSMO-Skymed2 ASI

2005 STEREO-Behind NASA/APL

2005 Venus Express ESA

2005 STEREO-Ahead NASA/APL

2005 AMS 02 CERN

2005 COSMO-Skymed1 ASI

2005 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) JAXA

2005 COF DLR

2005 Kibo (ISS) JAXA

2005 SUZAKU / ASTRO-E2 ISAS

2005 METOP-1 EUMETSAT

2005 CALIPSO NASA/APL

2005 CloudSat (ESSP-4) NASA

2005 FORMOSAT-3 / COSMIC UCAR, NSPO

2005 Shuttle-OV103 NASA/KSC

2005 JASON-2 CNES

2005 Selene JAXA

2005 MTSAT-2 JAXA

2005 GIFTS (EO3) NOAA, ONR, NASA

2005 INMARSAT 4F1 INMARSAT

2005 MRO NASA/JPL

2005 SERVIS-2 JAXA

2005 AmeriStar WorldSpace

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 6 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 5 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 4 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 3 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 2 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 1 NSPO

2005 Anik F1R Telesat Canada

2005 Syracuse 3B Min. de la Defence (France)

2005 TerraSar-X DLR

2005 Proba 2 ESA

2005 HOTBIRD 7A Eutelsat

2005 Koreasat 5 KT/ADD

2005 WINDS JAXA

2004 GSTB-V2 ESA

2004 Syracuse 3A Min. de la Defence (France)

2004 Lunar-A ISAS

2004 APSTAR IV APT Satellite Holding LTD

2004 Double Star Polar CAST/CSSAR, ESA

2004 MTSAT-1R JAXA

2004 SWIFT (MIDEX 3) NASA

2004 W3A Eutelsat

2004 MESSENGER NASA/APL

2004 C/NOFS AFRL

2004 ASTRO-F ISAS

2004 Aura NASA/GSFC

2004 ATV-2 ESA

2004 Rosetta ESA

2004 KOMPSAT-2 KARI

2004 DEMETER CNES

2004 AMC-12 SES Americom

2004 Amazonas Amazonas

2004 Jules Verne (ATV-1) ESA

2004 NEMO NLR

2004 CATSAT (STEDI 3) NLR

2004 Triana NASA

2004 ETS-VIII JAXA

2004 Radarsat-2 CSA

2004 ALOS JAXA

2004 Deep Impact NASA/U. of Maryland

2004 FAME (MIDEX 4) NASA

2004 PARASOL CNES

2004 MICROSCOPE CNES

2004 FBM CNES, INPE

2004 CryoSat ESA

2004 INMARSAT 4F2 INMARSAT

2004 ST5 NASA

2004 ARIES-1 CSIRO

2004 MSG-2 ESA

2004 ESSAIM French Ministry of Defence

2004 AMC-13 SES Americom

2004 AGILE ASI

2004 TopSat BNSC

2004 Star One C1 Star One

2003 GP-B NASA/GSFC

2003 Double Star Equatorial CAST/CSSAR, ESA

2003 ROCSAT-2 NSPO

2003 SERVIS-1 JAXA

2003 SMART-1 ESA

2003 SIRTF (SPITZER) NASA/JPL

2003 SCISAT-1 CSA

2003 Opportunity NASA/JPL

2003 HellasSat 2 HSCL

2006 Starlight (ST3) NASA

2006 GOCE ESA

2006 ATV-3 ESA

2006 CRM PCRF, MIT/CSR

2006 RascomStar-Qaf 1 RascomStar-QAF

2006 ARABSAT4B ARABSAT

2006 ARABSAT4A ARABSAT

2006 SKYNET 5B British Ministry of Defence

2006 SKYNET 5A British Ministry of Defence

2006 HOTBIRD 8 Eutelsat

2006 Anik F3 Telesat Canada/ESA

2006 Galaxy 17 PanAmSat/ESA

2006 COSMO-Skymed3 ASI

2006 COSMO-Skymed2 ASI

2005 STEREO-Behind NASA/APL

2005 Venus Express ESA

2005 STEREO-Ahead NASA/APL

2005 AMS 02 CERN

2005 COSMO-Skymed1 ASI

2005 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) JAXA

2005 COF DLR

2005 Kibo (ISS) JAXA

2005 SUZAKU / ASTRO-E2 ISAS

2005 METOP-1 EUMETSAT

2005 CALIPSO NASA/APL

2005 CloudSat (ESSP-4) NASA

2005 FORMOSAT-3 / COSMIC UCAR, NSPO

2005 Shuttle-OV103 NASA/KSC

2005 JASON-2 CNES

2005 Selene JAXA

2005 MTSAT-2 JAXA

2005 GIFTS (EO3) NOAA, ONR, NASA

2005 INMARSAT 4F1 INMARSAT

2005 MRO NASA/JPL

2005 SERVIS-2 JAXA

2005 AmeriStar WorldSpace

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 6 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 5 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 4 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 3 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 2 NSPO

2005 ROCSAT-3/COSMIC 1 NSPO

2005 Anik F1R Telesat Canada

2005 Syracuse 3B Min. de la Defence (France)

2005 TerraSar-X DLR

2005 Proba 2 ESA

2005 HOTBIRD 7A Eutelsat

2005 Koreasat 5 KT/ADD

2005 WINDS JAXA

2004 GSTB-V2 ESA

2004 Syracuse 3A Min. de la Defence (France)

2004 Lunar-A ISAS

2004 APSTAR IV APT Satellite Holding LTD

2004 Double Star Polar CAST/CSSAR, ESA

2004 MTSAT-1R JAXA

2004 SWIFT (MIDEX 3) NASA

2004 W3A Eutelsat

2004 MESSENGER NASA/APL

2004 C/NOFS AFRL

2004 ASTRO-F ISAS

2004 Aura NASA/GSFC

2004 ATV-2 ESA

2004 Rosetta ESA

2004 KOMPSAT-2 KARI

2004 DEMETER CNES

2004 AMC-12 SES Americom

2004 Amazonas Amazonas

2004 Jules Verne (ATV-1) ESA

2004 NEMO NLR

2004 CATSAT (STEDI 3) NLR

2004 Triana NASA

2004 ETS-VIII JAXA

2004 Radarsat-2 CSA

2004 ALOS JAXA

2004 Deep Impact NASA/U. of Maryland

2004 FAME (MIDEX 4) NASA

2004 PARASOL CNES

2004 MICROSCOPE CNES

2004 FBM CNES, INPE

2004 CryoSat ESA

2004 INMARSAT 4F2 INMARSAT

2004 ST5 NASA

2004 ARIES-1 CSIRO

2004 MSG-2 ESA

2004 ESSAIM French Ministry of Defence

2004 AMC-13 SES Americom

2004 AGILE ASI

2004 TopSat BNSC

2004 Star One C1 Star One

2003 GP-B NASA/GSFC

2003 Double Star Equatorial CAST/CSSAR, ESA

2003 ROCSAT-2 NSPO

2003 SERVIS-1 JAXA

2003 SMART-1 ESA

2003 SIRTF (SPITZER) NASA/JPL

2003 SCISAT-1 CSA

2003 Opportunity NASA/JPL

2003 HellasSat 2 HSCL

14 15


Missions

Missions

2003 OrbView-3 ORBIMAGE

2003 Mars Express ESA

2003 Spirit NASA/JPL

2003 Beagle 2 BNSC

2003 GALEX (SMEX-7) NASA/GSFC

2003 MUSES-C ISAS

2003 AMC-9 SES Americom

2003 SORCE NASA/LASP

2003 ICESat NASA/GSFC

2003 Coriolis (P98-2) NRL/ONR

2003 Pleiades CNES/ASI

2003 Picard CNES

2003 NI-Alpha-2 Intelsat

2003 NI-Alpha-1 Intelsat

2003 Roue Interferometrique CNES

2003 CESAR INTA, CONAE

2003 HypSEO ASI

2003 Romer DSRI

2002 STENTOR CNES

2002 FedSat-1 CRCSS

2002 ADEOS-II JAXA

2002 HOTBIRD-7 Eutelsat

2002 Eutelsat W5 Eutelsat

CCSDS

DATA

Bit

More than 300 missions to space use

CCSDS recommendations to enhance

their space data communications, including

NASA’s Deep Impact mission, ESA’s

Rosetta, and every spacecraft associated

with the exploration of Mars.

Greenhouse Gases Observing SATelllite “GOSAT”

JAXA - Launch date: Japanese Fiscal Year 2007

2002 Astra 1K SES/Astra

2002 INTEGRAL ESA

2002 USERS JAXA

2002 Hispasat 1D Hispasat S.A.

2002 MSG-1 ESA

2002 Atlantic Bird 1 Eutelsat

2002 HOTBIRD-6 Eutelsat

2002 Eurobird ESA

2002 CONTOUR (Discovery 6) NASA/JPL

2002 Stellat 5/Atlantic Bird 3 Eutelsat

2002 Aqua NASA/GSFC

2002 ENVISAT-1 ESA

2002 GRACE-2 NASA

2002 RHESSI (SMEX-6) NASA/GFSC

2002 Shuttle CS Gateway NASA/KSC

2001 Turksat 2A Eurasiasat

2001 Meteor-3M/SAGE III RSA, NASA

2001 JASON CNES

2001 Bird DLR/GSOC

2001 QuickBird-2 EarthWatch

2001 OrbView-4 ORBIMAGE

2001 Atlantic Bird 2 Eutelsat

2001 QuikTOMS NASA

2001 PROBA ESA

2001 TIMED NASA/APL

2001 Genesis (Discovery 5) NASA

2001 Eurobird Eutelsat

2001 ARTEMIS ESA

2001 GOES SXI NOAA

2001 WMAP (MIDEX 2) NASA/GSFC

2001 Mars Odyssey NASA/JPL

2001 SICRAL Italian Ministry of Defence

2001 Eurasiasat 1 Eurasiasat

2000 QuickBird-1 Earthwatch

2000 STRV-1 D BNSC

2000 STRV-1 C BNSC

2000 Hispasat 1C Hispasat S.A.

2000 ASTRA 2B SES/ASTRA

2000 Eutelsat W1 Eutelsat

2000 EO-1 (NMP-2) NASA/GSFC

2000 NileSat 102 NileSat

2000 Rumba Cluster FM5 ESA

2000 Tango Cluster FM8 ESA

2000 Samba Cluster FM7 ESA

2000 Salsa Cluster FM6 ESA

2000 CHAMP DLR/GSOC

2000 Eutelsat W4 EutelSat

2000 SESAT Eutelsat-Intersputnik

2000 IMAGE (MIDEX 1) NASA/GSFC

2000 Asiastar WorldSpace

2000 X-38 NASA

2000 ULDB NASA/GSFC

2000 MTI DOE

2000 MITA ASI

2000 ASTRO-E ISAS

1999 SWAS (SMEX-3) NASA/GSFC

1999 Terra NASA/GSFC

1999 KOMPSAT-1 KARI JAXA

1999 XMM-Newton ESA

1999 MTSAT JAXA

1999 Telstar 12 Loral Skynet

1999 Chandra X-Ray Observatory NASA/MSFC

1999 QuikScat NASA/LASP

1999 FUSE NASA/GSFC

1999 EutelsatW3 Eutelsat

1999 LandSat-7 NASA/GSFC

1999 ABRIXAS DLR/GSOC

1999 WIRE (SMEX-5) NASA/GSFC

1999 Orsted DSRI, CNES, NASA

1999 Stardust NASA/JPL

1999 Arabsat 3A Arabsat

1999 ROCSAT-1 NSPO

1999 Mars Surveyor 1998 Lander NASA/JPL

1999 DS-2 NASA/JPL

1998 Mars Surveyor 1998 Orbiter NASA/JPL

1998 Eutelsat W2 Eutelsat

1998 HotBird-5 Eutelsat

1998 DS-1 (NMP) NASA/JPL

1998 AfriStar WorldSpace

1998 Spartan 201-5 NASA

1998 ACE NASA/GSFC

1998 Planet-B ISAS

1998 AMS 01 CERN

1998 NileSat 101 NileSat

1998 TRACE (SMEX-4) NASA/GSFC

1998 SNOE NASA/LASP

1998 Hotbird-4 ESA

1998 Lunar Prospector NASA/ARC

1998 ISS Multinational

1997 “KIKU-7” ETS-VII NASA/NASDA(JAXA)

1997 TRMM NASA/JAXA

1997 Sirius 2 Nordiska Satellit AB

1997 Cassini NASA/JPL

1997 TEAMSAT ESA

1997 YES ESA

1997 Huygens ESA

1997 Hotbird-3 ESA

1997 ACE NASA/GSFC

1996 MFP NASA/JPL

1996 MGS NASA/JPL

1996 HotBird-2 ESA

1996 FAST (SMEX-2) NASA/GSFC

1996 TOMS-EP NASA/GSFC

1996 Cluster ESA

1996 Beppo SAX ASI, NIVR, ESA

1996 NEAR Shoemaker NASA/APL

1996 ARIANNE 5 CNES

1995 SOHO ESA

1995 ROSSI XTE NASA/GSFC

1995 ISO ESA/ISAS/NASA

1995 Radarsat-1 CSA

1995 ERS-2 ESA

1995 MIR-18 and follow-on missions NASA/RKA

1994 STRV-1 B BNSC

1994 STRV-1 A BNSC

1993 Spacelab-Deutsche 2 DLR

1992 Mars Observer NASA/JPL

1992 SAMPEX (SMEX-1) NASA/GSFC

1992 EURECA ESA

1991 ERS-1 ESA

1991 CGRO NASA/GSFC

16 17


Compatible Products - Space Domain

The following is a list of CCSDS-compatible products known to the CCSDS Secretariat Support Team.

Although many of these products have been produced by CCSDS Commercial Associate Members,

the presence of a product on these pages implies only that the CCSDS Secretariat has evidence of that

product’s availability; it does not imply an endorsement of that product by CCSDS or any CCSDS Member

Agency. The absence of a product from this list indicates only that the Secretariat does not have sufficient

information to include it.

If you know of a CCSDS-compatible product and would like for us to include it on our CCSDS-compatible

Products list, please contact us at Secretariat@mailman.CCSDS.org . For the latest list, please visit our

Products page at http://public.ccsds.org/industry/products.aspx .

Space Domain -

Spacecraft Platforms

Proteus Multimission Platform

Spacebus

Alcatel Space Industries

100 boulevard du Midi BP99

06322 Cannes La Bocca France

http://www.alcatel.com/space/

Phone: +33 (0) 4 92 92 71 05

Fax: +33 (0) 4 92 92 33 10

BCP 2000

BCP 600

Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp.

1600 Commerce St.

Boulder, CO 80301 USA

http://www.ball.com/aerospace/

Phone: +1 303 939 6100

Fax: +1 303 939 6104

E-mail: info@ball.com

Flexbus

EAD Astrium (formerly Matra Marconi Space)

Gunnels Wood Road

Stevenage SG1 2AS UK

Point of Contact:

Eckard Settelmeyer - Astrium GmbH

An der Bundesstrasse 31

D-88039 Friedrichshafen Germany

Phone: +49 7545 8 9084

E-mail: eckard.settelmeyer@astrium-space.com

Lockheed Martin Space Systems

12999 Deer Creek Canyon Road

Littleton, CO 80127-5146 USA

http://www.ast.lmco.com

Phone: +1 303 977 3000

Spartan Platform

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Mailstop Code 860

Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA

http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/spartan/spacecraft.html

Point of Contact:

Donald Carson

Phone: +1 301 286 4968

Fax: +1 301 286 1694

E-mail: Donald.E.Carson.1@gsfc.nasa.gov

T100 Spacecraft

T200A Spacecraft

Northrop Grumman

One Space Park

Redondo Beach, CA 90278 USA

http://www.northropgrumman.com/

FUSE Satellite Platform

LEOStar Satellite Platform

MidStar Satellite Platform

PegaStar Satellite Platform

PicoStar Satellite Platform

StarBus Satellite Platform

Orbital Sciences Corporation

Space Systems Group

21829 Atlantic Blvd.

Dulles, VA 20166 USA

http://www.orbital.com

Phone: +1 703 948 8600

E-mail: satellites@orbital.com

Orbital Maneuvering and Transfer Vehicle (MTV)

SpaceDev

13855 Stowe Drive

Poway, CA 92064 USA

http://www.spacedev.com

Phone: +1 858 375 2000

Fax: +1 858 375 1000

E-mail: info@SpaceDev.com

SA-200B Spacecraft

SA-200HP Spacecraft

SA-200S Spacecraft

Spectrum Astro

1440 N. Fiesta Blvd.

Gilbert, AZ 85233 USA

http://www.spectrumastro.com

Phone: +1 480 892 8200

Fax: +1 480 892 2949

E-mail: ProgramDevelopment@Specastro.com

Phone: +1 480 892 8200

Fax: +1 480 892 2949

E-mail: ProgramDevelopment@Specastro.com

Minisatellite Platform

Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL)

Surrey Space Centre

University of Surrey

Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH

United Kingdom

http://www.sstl.co.uk/

Phone: +44 (0)1483 259 278

Fax: +44 (0)1483 259 503

E-mail: sstl@sstl.co.uk

Space Domain -

Onboard Systems

8PSK/QPSK X-band Transmitter

Optical Data Handling Subsystem

Alcatel Space Industries

Telecommunication Sales Division

Industrial site: 26, Avenue JF Champollion

BP 1187 - 31037 Toulouse Cedex France

http://www.alcatel.com/space/obeqpt/

Phone: +33 (0) 5 34 35 36 37

Fax: +33 (0) 5 61 44 49 90

E-mail: cecile.ha-minh-tu@space.alcatel.fr

AMITC Multiplexer

Apogee Labs, Inc.

210 South Third Street

North Wales, PA 19454 USA

http://www.apogeelabs.com/

Phone: +1 215 699 2060

Fax: +1 215 699 2061

Compatible Products - Space Domain

Integrated Spacecraft Controller (ISC)

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems

100 Ferguson Drive, P.O. Box 7188

Mountain View, CA 94039-7188 USA

http://www.gd-ais.com/

Point of Contact:

Doyle Lahti

Phone: +1 952 921 6874

Fax: +1 952 921 6823

E-mail: doyle.lahti@gd-ais.com

T²C² (Telemetry, Timing, Command, &

Control)

Goodrich Aerospace

Optical & Space Systems

6600 Gulton Court, N.E.

Albuquerque, NM 87109 USA

http://www.sfs.goodrich.com/

Phone: +1 505 938 5091

E-mail: sfs@goodrich.com

Central Data Management Unit

Laben S.p.A.

S.S Padana Superiore, 290

I-20090 Vimodrone (Milano) ITALY

http://www.laben.it/onboard_set.html

Phone: +39 02 250751

Fax: +39 02 2505515

E-mail: bus@laben.it

Command & Telemetry Processors

Space Qualified Avionics

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)

SwRI Main Office

6220 Culebra Road

P.O. Drawer 28510

San Antonio, Texas 78228-0510 USA

http://www.SwRI.org/default.htm

Point of Contact:

Mike McLelland

Phone: +1 210 522 3360

E-mail: MMcLelland@swri.edu

18 19


Compatible Products - Space Domain

Compatible Products - Ground Domain

Command & Data Handling

Uplink/Downlink Board (ULDL)

Spectrum Astro

1440 N. Fiesta Blvd.

Gilbert, AZ 85233 USA

http://www.spectrumastro.com/

Point of Contact:

Dan Toomey

Phone: +1 480 892 8200

E-mail: dan.toomey@specastro.com

On-Board Software

Software Validation Facilities

TERMA Elektronic AS

Hovmarken 4

DK-8520 Lystrup Denmark

http://www.terma.com/

Phone: +45 87 43 60 00

Fax: +45 87 43 60 01

E-mail: space@terma.com

Flight Software

The Hammers Company

7474 Greenway Center Drive, Suite 710

Greenbelt, MD 20770 USA

http://www.hammers.com/

Phone: +1 301 345 5300

Fax: +1 301 345 6892

E-mail: info@hammers.com

C/TT-505

CMC Electronics Cincinnati

7500 Innovation Way

Mason, OH 45040-9699 USA

http://www.cinele.com

Phone: +1 513 573 6282

Fax: +1 513 573 6767

E-mail: blampe@cmccinci.com

WBC 921 Satellite TM/TC Unit

WBC 941 Lander Transponder

WBC 961 Orbiter Transceiver

WBC 981 Satellite TT&C Transponder

Warberry Communications

1 Alexandra Lane

Torquay, Devon, UK TQ1 1JD

http://www.warberrycommunications.com

Phone: +44(0) 1803 296116

E-mail: warbcomm@lineone.net

Space Domain -

Space qualified ASICs

Reed-Solomon Encoder

Universal Source Encoder for Space (USES)

Center for Advanced Microelectronics and

Biomolecular Research

721 Lochsa Street Suite 8

Post Falls, ID 83854 USA

http://www.cambr.uidaho.edu/

Phone: +1 208 262 2000

Fax: +1 208 262 2001

E-mail: cambr@uidaho.edu

On-board Components

ESA/European Space Technology Center

Keplerlaan-1, Box 299

2200 A.G. Noordwijk

The Netherlands

http://www.estec.esa.nl/microelectronics

E-mail: microelectronics@esa.int

Imaging/Time Distribution

Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC)

Kapeldreef 75

B-3001 Leuven Belgium

http://www.imec.be

Phone: +32 (0) 16/28 12 11

Fax: +32 (0) 16/22 94 00

E-mail: info@imec.be

AOS Frame Formatter

Lockheed Martin Missles & Space Company

1111 Lockheed Martin Way

Santa Cruz, CA 80301 USA

http://lmms.external.lmco.com

Point of Contact:

Vince Lopez

Phone: +1 408 756 9337

E-mail: vince.lopez@LMSO.com

AOS Frame Formatter

Packet Telecommand Decoder

Virtual Channel Assembler and

Multiplexer

Mitsubishi Electric Corporation

2-2-3 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku

Tokyo, Japan 100

Point of Contact:

JAXA CCSDS Secretariat

Tsukuba Space Center

2-1-1, Sengen

Tsukuba-city, Ibaraki 305-8505 JAPAN

Phone: +81 298 59 2978

Fax: +81 298 50 1916

Ground Domain -

Commercial Ground

Networks

DataLynx TT&C and Mission Operations

Services

Honeywell Technology Solutions, Inc.

7000 Columbia Gateway Drive

Columbia, MD 21046 USA

http://www.honeywell-tsi.com/DataLynx/

Phone: +1 800 638 6417 x7908

Fax: +1 410 964 7265

E-mail: datalynx@honeywell.com

Point of Contact:

Monica DeShong

E-mail: Monica.deshong@honeywell-tsi.com

Multi-user Satellite Commercial Ground

Network

Universal Space Network (USN)

1501 Quail Street, Suite 103

Newport Beach, CA 92660 USA

http://www.uspacenetwork.com

Phone: +1 949 476 3432

Fax: +1 949 851 9485

Ground Domain -

Command & Telemetry

Data Processing

TDP 2200V and 2222V

Acroamatics, Inc.

70 South Kellogg Ave, Suite A

Goleta, CA 93117 USA

http://www.acroamatics.com/

Point of Contact:

Patricia Johnson

Phone: +1 805 967 9909

Fax: +1 805 967 8375

E-mail: sales@acroamatics.com

Forward Error Correction Products

Advanced Hardware Architectures, Inc.

2365 NE Hopkins Court

Pullman, WA 99163-5601 USA

http://www.aha.com

Phone: +1 509 334 1000

Fax: +1 509 334 9000

E-mail: sales@aha.com

Integrated Baseband Equipment for TT&C

Stations

Telemetry/Telecommand Front End Satellite

Test System

Alcatel Bell Space

Berkenrodelei 33

2660 Hoboken Belgium

www.alcatel.be/space

Phone: +32 3 829 50 50

Fax: +32 3 829 55 02

Point of Contact:

Marketing Department

Phone: +32 3 829 54 18

E-mail: fabienne.lebreton@alcatel.be

Reed-Solomon Compiler

Altera Corporation

101 Innovation Drive

San Jose, CA 95134 USA

http://www.altera.com

Phone: +1 408 544 7000

20 21


Compatible Products - Ground Domain

Compatible Products - Ground Domain

SLE Services Implementation Software

VEGA Informations-Technologien GmbH

Robert-Bosch-Str. 7

D-64293 Darmstadt Germany

http://www.vega-group.com

Point of Contact:

Bob Rouse

Phone: +49 6151 872 5100

E-mail: Robert.Rouse@vega.de

VMEwindow (Software)

AP Labs

16868 Via Del Camp Ct.

San Diego, CA 92127 USA

http://www.aplabs.com

Phone: +1 858 674 2850

E-mail: info@aplabs.com

Data Multiplexer/Demultiplexer System

Apogee Labs, Inc.

210 South Third Street

North Wales, PA 19454 USA

http://www.apogeelabs.com

Phone: +1 215 699 2060

Telemetry Processing

ASRC Aerospace Corp.

6301 Ivy Lane, Suite 300

Greenbelt, MD 20770 USA

http://www.akspace.com

Phone: +1 301 345 4500

Fax: +1 301 345 9274

E-mail: busdev@akspace.com

Frame Synchronizer/PCM Simulator

TDM Telemetry Simulator—VM 6140

TLM/TC System/Programmable TLM

Processor

TDM Telemetry Processor

Avtec Systems

14432 Albemarle Point Place

Chantilly, VA 20151 USA

http://www.avtec.com

USA Toll Free 1-877-288-3205

Phone: +1 703 488-2500

Fax: +1 703 488-2555

Integrated TT&C Modem, Receiver and Ranging

System (IFMS)

BAE Systems

West Hanning Field Road

Great Baddow

Chelmsford

Essex. CM2 8N UK

Phone: +44 - 1245 242505

Point of Contact:

Chris French, Marketing Support

BAE SYSTEMS

Advanced Technology Centre

Great Baddow, Essex CM2 8HN UK

Phone: +44 (0) 1245 242398

E-mail: chris.french@baesystems.com

Andy Baslington, IFMS Project Manager

E-mail: andy.baslington@baeystems.com

Universal Source Decoder for Science Data

Center for Advanced Microelectronics and

Biomolecular Research

721 Lochsa Street Suite 8

Post Falls, ID 83854 USA

http://www.cambr.uidaho.edu/

Phone: +1 208 262 2000

Fax: +1 208 262 2001

E-mail: cambr@uidaho.edu

Command and Control Toolkit

Command and Control Technologies Corporation

1425 Chaffee Dr., Suite 1

Titusville, FL 32780 USA

http://www.cctcorp.com/

Phone: +1 321 264 1193

Fax: +1 321 383 5096

E-mail: info@cctcorp.com

OPEN 2000 Ground Station

Datron Advanced Technologies Incorporated

200 West Los Angeles Ave.

Simi Valley, CA 93065 USA

http://www.dtsi.com/dat.html

Phone: +1 805 584 1717

Fax: +1 805 526 3690

CCSDS Telemetry Generator and Recorder

Telecommand CCSDS Interface Card

Telemetry CCSDS Interface Card

ELTA (TECHNICATOME GROUP)

BP 48

14, Place Marcel DASSAULT

31702 BLAGNAC Cedex France

http://www.elta.fr

Point of Contact:

Christophe Chatain

Phone: +33 (0)534 36 10 00

Fax: +33 (0)534 36 10 01

E-mail: +33 (0)534 36 10 01

TT&C Ground Stations

Baseband Processors

Downlink/Uplink Acquisition/Transmission

Units

Enertec

185 Avenue de Général de Gaulle - B.P. 316

92143 Clamart Cedex France

http:// www.enertecgroup.com

Phone: +33 (0) 1 41 28 87 87

Fax: +33 (0) 1 41 28 87 00

Point of Contact:

Olivier Riberon, Space Division Senior Manager

Phone: +33 (0) 6 07 37 60 72

E-mail: o.riberon@enertecgroup.com

William C. White, Regional Sales Manager

12725 Morris Rd. Ext.

100 Deerfield Point, Suite 180

Alpharetta, GA 30004 USA

Phone: +1 770 753 4017

E-mail: wcwhite@earthlink.net

Ground Segment Spacecraft Command

Interface Software

ESYS Limited

1 Occam Court

Occam Road

Surrey Research Park

Guilford, Surrey

GU2 7HJ UK

http://www.esys.co.uk

Phone: +44 (0) 1483 304545

Fax: +44 (0) 1483 303878

Telemetry Data Processing

GATS, Inc

11864 Canon Blvd., Suite 101

Newport News, VA 23606 USA

http://www.gats-inc.com

Phone: +1 757 873 5920

Fax: +1 757 873 5924

E-mail: gats@gats-inc.com

WIN-TEL WindowsTM- Based Telemetry

System

GDP Space Systems

A Division of Delta Information Systems

300 Welsh Road, Bldg. 3

Horsham, PA 19044 USA

http://www.gdpspace.com

Phone: +1 215 657 5270

E-mail: sales@gdpspace.com

Point of Contact:

Steve Nicolo

Phone: +1 215 657 5270 x122

Fax: +1 215 657 5273

E-mail: snicolo@gdspace.com

Serial Data Recorder

General Dynamics Advanced Information

Systems

44417 Pecan Court

California, MD 20619 USA

www.gd-ais.com

Point of Contact:

Tim Gatton

Phone: + 1301 863 1600

Fax: +1 301 737 1564

E-mail: tim.gatton@gd-ais.com

SkipWare

Global Science & Technology

7855 Walker Drive

Suite 200

Greenbelt, MD 20770 USA

http://www.skipware.com

Phone: +1 301 474 9696

Fax: +1 301 474 5970

Point of Contact:

Nick Yuran

Phone: +1 866 754 9273

22 23


Compatible Products - Ground Domain

Compatible Products - Ground Domain

hifly® Satellite Control System

GMV Space Systems Inc.

1 Research Court, Suite 450

Rockville, MD 20850 USA

http://www.gmvspacesystems.com/

Phone: +1 301 216 3840

Fax: +1 301 519 8001

Point of Contact:

Mr. Gonzalo Garcia

Phone: +1 301 216 3840

Fax: +1 301 519 8001

E-mail: ggarcia@gmvspacesystems.com

GMV S. A.

C/Isaac Newton, 11

Parque Tecnologico de Madrid

Tres Cantos

28760 Madrid Spain

http://www.gmv.com

Phone: +34 91 807 21 00

Point of Contact:

Mr. Jorge Potti

Phone: +34 91 807 21 00

Fax: +34 91 807 21 99

E-mail: jpotti@gmv.es

OS/COMET

Harris Corporation

1225 Evans Road

Melbourne, Florida 32904 USA

http://www.govcomm.harris.com/

Phone: +1 800 442 7747

Fax: +1 407 676 4510

E-mail: bstultz@harris.com

Mag-200 Telemetry Acquisition System

High Tech Systems

Route d’Elne

66200 Montescot France

http://www.magali.com/

Phone: +33 4 68 37 36 35

Fax: +33 4 68 37 36 34

E-mail: magali@htsys.com

Bandwidth Turbo Booster

Hotlens

Empire State Building

350 5th Ave Suite 6804

New York, NY 10118

http://www.hotlens.com

Phone: +1 212 465 1700

E-mail: sales@hotlens.com

Packet Telecommand and Telemetry

Simulator

Telecommand Decoder Shell

Telecommand Encoder Shell

Telemetry Decoder Shell

Telemetry Encoder Shell

I.B. + M.A. de Lande Long Software +

Consultancy

Im Weingarten 13

D-64342 Seeheim Germany

http://www.delandelong.com

Point of Contact:

Ian de Lande Long

E-mail: ian@delandelong.com

Phone: +49 6151 54926

Fax: +49 6151 595701

Command, Ranging and Telemetry Unit

- Cortex CRT

Telecommand Unit/Telemetry Simulator

IN-SNEC

5 Av. Des Andes

BP 101

91943 Les Ulis Cedex A France

http://www.in-snec.com

Phone: +33 1 69 82 78 00

Fax: + 33 1 69 07 39 50

Point of Contact:

Philippe Elkouby-Frydman, Sales and

Marketing Manager Phone: +33 1 69 82

79 06

E-mail: pfrydman@zodiac.com

Nicolas Pasternak, Cortex NT expert

Phone: +33 1 6982 7865

E-mail: npasternak@wanadoo.fr

EPOCH 2000

Integral Systems

5000 Philadelphia Way

Lanham, MD 20706-4417 USA

http://www.integ.com

Phone: +1 301 731 4233

Fax: +1 301 731 9606

E-mail: sales@integ.com

Command and Control Center

Interface & Control Systems

8945 Guilford Road Suite120

Columbia, MD 21046

USA

http://www.interfacecontrol.com/

Phone: +1 410 290 7600

Phone: +1 877 808 2668 (toll free)

Fax: +1 410 290 7737

E-mail: info@interfacecontrol.com

Direct Ingestion Server

Kongsberg Spacetec

P.O. Box 6244

N-9292 Tromso Norway

http://www.spacetec.no

Phone: +47 77 66 08 00

Fax: +47 77 65 58 59

E-mail: marketing@spacetec.no

Impact CCSDS Telemetry and

Telecommand Processing System

L-3 Communications - Telemetry West

9020 Balboa Avenue

San Diego, CA 92123 USA

http://www.L-3Com.com/tw

Phone: +1 800 351 8483

Fax: +1 858 279 0693

Point of Contact:

Michael Jones

Phone: +1 858 694 7929

E-mail: Michael.Jones@tw.L-3Com.com

Telemetry Toolbox for MATLAB

Ledin Engineering

965 Camino Concordia

Camarillo, CA 93010 USA

http://www.ledin.com

Phone: +1 805 482 3109

Fax: +1 805 484 1670

E-mail: info@ledin.com

Parallel Integrated Frame Synchronizer (PIFS)

Chip

Return Link Processor Board

Service Processor (SP) Chip

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Goddard Space Flight Center

Office of Commercial Programs

Code 750

Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA

E-mail: techtransfer@tco.gsfc.nasa.gov

Telemetry and Command Data Processing H/W

& S/W Software

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Microelectronics Systems Branch

Code 702

Office of Commercial Programs

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA

E-mail: techtransfer@tco.gsfc.nasa.gov

Packet Telecommand Encoder (TCE)

ND Satcom

Postbox 1420

D - 88039 Friedrichshafen Germany

http://www.ndsatcom.com/

Point of Contact:

Dieter Dreizler, Head of Sales, Ground Stations

Phone: +49 7545 968620

Fax: +49 7545 968111

E-mail: Dieter.Dreizler@NDSatcom.com

CCSDS Telemetry and Telecommand Systems

NetAcquire Corporation

733 7th Ave.

Kirkland, WA 98033 USA

http://www.netacquire.com/ccsds.htm

Phone: +1 888 675 1122 (toll-free)

E-mail: info@netacquire.com

Point of Contact:

Steve Proudlock

733 7th Ave Suite 214

Kirkland, WA 98033 USA

Phone: +1 425 576 0822 x148

E-mail: stevep@netacquire.com

24 25


Compatible Products - Ground Domain

Compatible Products - Ground Domain

TDS1000 Telemetry Decommutation

System

Pacific Instruments, Inc.

4080 Pike Lane

Concord, CA 94520 USA

http://www.pacificinstruments.com

Phone: +1 925 827 9010

Fax: +1 925 827-9023

E-mail: info@pacificinstruments.com

Point of Contact:

Tom Abramovic

Phone: +1 760 295 4538

Fax: +1 760 295 4539

E-mail: tabramovic@pacificinstrument

s.com

Eclipse Satellite Command and

Control Software

Raytheon Company

Aurora Operations

16800 East CentreTech Parkway

Aurora, CO 80011 USA

http://www.raytheon.com

Phone: +1 303 344 6729

E-mail: sales@redwood.rsc.raytheon.

com

Spacelink NGT TTC & TM/TC

Systems

Satellite Services B.V.

Scheepmakerstraat 40

2222 AC Katwijk aan Zee

The Netherlands

http://www.spacelinkngt.com/

Phone: +31 (0) 71 402 8120

Fax: +31 (0) 71 402 7934

E-mail: info@SpacelinkNGT.com

CCSDS Reed Solomon Processor

SBS Technologies, Inc.

2400 Louisiana Blvd. NE

Suite 5-600

Albuquerque, NM 87110 USA

http://www.sbs.com

Phone: +1 505 875.0600

Fax: +1 505 875.0400

E-mail: info@sbs.com

Monitor and Control Software

Scisys

Clothier Road

Bristol

BS4 5SS UK

http://www.scisys.co.uk

Phone: +44 (0) 117 971 7251

Fax: +44 (0) 117 972 1846

E-mail: marketing@scisys.co.uk

SnapGear SE—SkipWare Enhanced

SnapGear, Inc

7984 South Welby Park Drive #101

West Jordan, UT 84088 USA

http://www.snapgear.com

Phone: +1 801 282 8492

Fax: +1 801 282 8496

E-mail: contact@snapgear.com

Satellite Ground Segment

Space Applications Services

Leuvensesteenweg 325

B-1932 Zaventem Belgium

http://www.spaceapplications.com

Phone: +32 (0) 2 721 54 84

Fax: +32 (0) 2 721 54 44

E-mail: marketing@spaceapplications.com

AstroRT Data Acquisition and Control

System

Spectrum Astro

1440 N. Fiesta Blvd.

Gilbert, AZ 85233 USA

http://www.spectrumastro.com

Point of Contact:

Dan Toomey

Phone: +1 480 892 8200

Fax: +1 480 892 2949

E-mail: dan.toomey@specastro.com

SCOS-2000 Spacecraft Control System

TERMA AS Space Division

Hovmarken 4

DK-8520 Lystrup Denmark

http://www.terma.com

Phone: +45 87 43 60 00

Fax: +45 87 43 60 01

E-mail: space@terma.com

Integrated Test and Operations System (ITOS)

The Hammers Company, Inc

7474 Greenway Center Drive, Suite 710

Greenbelt, MD 20770 USA

http://www.hammers.com/

Point of Contact:

Stephen Hammers

Phone: +1 301 345 5300

Fax: +1 301 345 6892

E-mail: shammers@hammers.com

CCSDS Service Processing Software

SimGen CCSDS Software

TSI Telsys, Inc.

7100 Columbia Gateway Drive, Suite 150

Columbia, MD 21046 USA

http://www.tsi-telsys.com/

Phone: +1 410 872 3900; +1 800 346 3282

Fax: +1 410 872 3901

E-mail: info@tsi-telsys.com

Point of Contact:

Martin Cunningham

Phone: +1 410 872 2787

E-mail: mcunningham@tsi-telsys.com

SLE Service Management Software

VEGA Group plc

2 Falcon Way

Shire Park

Welwyn Garden City

Herts

AL7 1TW UK

http://www.vega.co.uk/

Point of Contact:

Paula Quintela

Phone: +44 1707 391999

Fax: +44 1707 393909

E-mail: paula.quintela@vega.co.uk

Ground Station Telemetry and Command Data

Processing System

Vertical Circuits, Inc.

19951 Mariner Avenue

Torrance, CA 90503 USA

http://www.verticalcircuits.com/

Phone: +1 310 214 5622

Fax: +1 310 214 7452

ArcLight

ViaSat, Inc.

4356 Communications Drive

Norcross, GA 30093 USA

http://www.viasat.com/

Phone: +1 678 924 2713

Fax: +1 678 924 2480

Point of Contact:

Rick Joyce

E-mail: rick.joyce@viasat.com

Eddie Payne

E-mail: eddie.payne@viasat.com

PC-based Telemetry Server Suite

Voss Scientific

418 Washington St., SE

Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA

http://www.vosssci.com/vs609.html

Phone: +1 505 255 4201

Fax: +1 505 255 4294

E-mail: info@vosssci.com

XipLink Gateways

Xiphos Technologies Inc.

3981 St-Laurent Blvd.

Suite 800

Montréal, QC

H2W 1Y5 Canada

http://www.xiphos.ca/xiplink/index.html

Phone: +1 514 848 9640

Fax: +1 514 848 9644

E-mail: xiplink@xiphos.ca

26 27


Media Notes

For the past year, CCSDS has ramped up its public presence by targeting scientific, technical and

general media with a series of press releases and article placements. In preparation for the spotlight,

CCSDS also adopted a new organizational “look and feel”, the centerpiece of which is a new diversified

logo suite and its revamped web site at CCSDS.org .

Below you find sample CCSDS press releases, one of two articles by the Secretariat that appeared in ISO

Focus Magazine, as well as Industry press releases that highlight successful CCSDS-based commercial

solutions.

Press Release

August 10, 2005

Special Delivery: NASA’s MESSENGER Sends Flyby Data to Earth Using CCSDS File

Delivery Protocol Developed for Deep Space

WASHINGTON, Aug. 10 (CCSDS) – NASA’s MESSENGER team is using the CCSDS File

Delivery Protocol (CFDP), a highly specialized protocol designed to overcome space operations

communications challenges, to download data captured during a successful flyby of Earth last

week.

A team of international space data communications experts, collaborating through the

Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), developed CFDP to reliably and

efficiently downlink files from a spacecraft even in the strenuous environment of deep space.

Since the MESSENGER spacecraft’s launch a year ago, it has successfully used CFDP to

enable mission communications and will use it throughout its 7.9-billion kilometer journey to

Mercury.

In using CFDP, MESSENGER communications represents a change in the standard

method of storing science and housekeeping data on spacecraft built by the Johns Hopkins

University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). MESSENGER is also the first U.S. space

flight mission to use CFDP in mission operations.

Prior to MESSENGER, JHU/APL missions used a raw storage model of storing data, but

new mission and operational requirements meant that MESSENGER would have to incorporate

a file system of data storage into its spacecraft software architecture. A reliable method of

downlinking files to the ground had to be found and CFDP was chosen by mission planners to

do the job.

CFDP is included in the MESSENGER software architecture through a reuse of a NASA

Jet Propulsion Lab (NASA JPL) implementation on the ground and a JHU/APL “CFDP-lite”

implementation on the flight side. The NASA JPL implementation is also used on NASA’s highly

successful Deep Impact mission.

“JHU/APL engineers integrated CFDP software developed by NASA JPL into the

MESSENGER mission’s ground system, which communicates with a CFDP flight software

implementation developed by JHU/APL on the spacecraft,” said Christopher Krupiarz, senior

professional staff member, JHU/APL Space Department Embedded Systems Group in Laurel,

Maryland (USA). “Being able to use an international standard like CFDP was a key factor in

getting two systems developed by two different organizations to work for one Mercury bound

spacecraft.”

CFDP is designed to function reliably despite the long data propagation delays and

frequent, lengthy interruptions in connectivity found in deep space. It uses powerful forward

error correction coding that minimizes data loss in communication across deep space, and also

supports optional “acknowledged” modes of operation in which data loss is automatically

detected and a retransmission of the lost data is automatically requested.

28

Media Notes

Some of the world’s leading space communications experts working within CCSDS

collaborated at bi-annual working group sessions (similar to those scheduled to take place next

month in Atlanta, Georgia) to first standardize CFDP. They defined the protocol according to

space file transfer requirements articulated by CCSDS participating space agencies,

including NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), the British National Space Centre (BNSC),

the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

(JAXA).

The protocol’s ability to maintain a high level of data transfer reliability even across

interplanetary distances makes it critical to successful communications on deep space missions

like the MESSENGER mission to Mercury and is expected to have a high level of applicability to

future Lunar exploration missions.

CFDP also benefits space flight missions in another important way: cost savings.

CFDP allows an instrument to record an observation in a file and transmit the file to

Earth without having to consider whether or not physical transmission is possible at that time.

Sequestering outbound data management and transmission planning functions within CFDP

can simplify flight and ground software, which reduces mission costs - an important benefit to

lower cost missions like MESSENGER.

CCSDS will continue to foster global scale technical cooperation to develop

recommendations for space communication like CFDP that increase interoperability, as well as

reduce risk and mission operation costs. Currently, the organization is investigating extending

the use of CFDP in emerging delay-tolerant networking technology to Interplanetary Internet

operations, and specifically to the use of CFDP in complex mission configurations, which should

further enhance the usefulness and value of CFDP to space exploration missions in the future.

Scott Burleigh, CCSDS working group chair and lead CFDP system engineer at NASA

JPL in Pasadena, Calif. commented, “The successes of CFDP on MESSENGER and the Deep

Impact mission bring us closer to having an automatic interplanetary communication fabric that

can support deep space science and exploration the way the Internet supports science on

Earth.”

# # #

After deep impact,

Image taken by Hubell Space Telescope (ESA/NASA)

29


Media Notes

Developments and Initiatives

Media Notes

committee 20 (TC 20, Aircraft and

Space Vehicles) was formed to address

the global standardization of data/

information systems associated with

space instruments, vehicles and supporting

ground facilities.

Cooperation on a global

scale

Making history at Mars :

Proximity-1, key to Mars

communications

by Dr. John D. Kelley,

Chief of Staff, Transformational

Communications Office at NASA

Headquarters, Office of Space

Communications, and

Secretariat of ISO TC 20 /SC 13,

Space data and information

transfer systems

28 ISO Focus January 2005

Cooperation in space is nothing

new, but it has grown and matured

over recent decades. The Consultative

Committee for Space Data Systems

(CCSDS) is one of several foundational

elements that led to international cooperation

in space. Founded more than 20

years ago by 10 of the world’s largest

space agencies, the CCSDS has grown to

include space communications experts

from 28 countries, all committed to the

standardization of space-related information

technologies.

Over the years, this commitment

at the CCSDS has led to the development

of well engineered standards and

protocols that have enabled communications

on more than 300 space missions,

and the number continues to

rise.

As international cooperation in

space communications and operations

has grown, so has the need for international

standards. Subcommittee 13 (SC

13, Space Data and Information

Transfer Systems) of ISO technical

Photo courtesy of ESA-D. DUCROS

About the author

Dr. John D.

Kelley is the

Chief of Staff in

he Transformaonal

Commuications

Office

t NASA Headuarters,

Office

f Space Communications.

With decades of

leadership experience in the development

of information systems and operations

programmes for scientific data, communications

and engineering, Dr. Kelley serves

in dual roles within the Consultative Committee

for Space Data Systems (CCSDS)

as both the Chairperson of its Management

Council and as Secretariat. In addition,

Dr. Kelley is the Secretary of ISO/TC

20/SC 13. As the NASA and United States

representative for data and information

standards, he heads a delegation focused

on space communications standards that

enhance interoperability, reduce costs and

promote the use of shared space applications.

Most recently, Dr. Kelley was elected

to the board of directors of the Object

Management Group.

Photo courtesy of NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Today, the CCSDS is considered

the technical arm of ISO TC 20/

SC 13 and the subcommittee meets

every six months in conjunction with

the CCSDS Management Council

meeting, in part to consider CCSDSdeveloped

recommendations that have

been submitted for approval as ISO

International Standards. The meeting

also provides a mechanism for

international information sharing that

ensures cooperation on space communications

technologies occurs regularly

on a global scale. Its success is measured

by a rise in the worldwide acceptance

of CCSDS standards, as well as

by an increase in the development of

CCSDS-compatible products by the

commercial space industry.

“ Proximity-1 was … the

first working international

communications network

around a planet other

than Earth.”

This successful partnership

between ISO and the CCSDS is also

evidenced at Mars, where all spacecraft

have implemented standard data

communications protocols developed

by the CCSDS and accepted by ISO on

their long-haul links back to Earth. Last

month, during the CCSDS bi-annual

meeting being held in Toulouse, ISO

TC 20/SC 13 considered CCSDS’s latest

newsmaker at Mars, a specialized

communications protocol called Proximity-1.

During demonstrations sponsored

by NASA and the European

Space Agency (ESA) in February 2004,

Proximity-1 was instrumental in establishing

the first in-orbit communication

between NASA and ESA spacecraft, as

well as the first working international

communications network around a

planet other than Earth.

Above – Artist’s concept of Rover on Mars.

Preceeding page – Mars Express, artist’s view.

Prior to the development of

Proximity-1, earlier missions like Mars

Pathfinder had to transmit data directly

from the Martian surface millions of

miles to Earth. Because of the great

distance between the two planets, as

well as the rover’s limited transmitter,

transmission signals using this communications

path were weak and data

reliability was limited.

Mars mission planners had long

recognized the advantage of transmitting

data from rover to orbiter, then

sending the data from orbiter back to

Earth using the orbiter’s more powerful

transmitter. Until early last year,

however, the path was largely untested

and mission planners cautiously

refrained from making it the primary

path of communication.

Helping to make history

In February, using Proximity-1,

a short-haul delivery protocol

developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion

Laboratory (JPL) along with its international

partners within the CCSDS,

researchers were able to establish a

communications link, negotiate data

rate and communications mode, and

ISO Focus January 2005 29


Media Notes

32

Developments and Initiatives

reliably deliver data during short

rover-to-orbiter link opportunities.

Proximity-1 not only helped make

history during this international demonstration

at Mars, it gave researchers

a more reliable, efficient and proven

communications path.

Soon afterwards, Proximity-1

was enabling Mars Exploration

Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity

to send data to the Mars Odyssey

orbiter at a transmission rate twice as

fast as the planned maximum. Scientists

began receiving an average of

three times more data than originally

expected and relay links enabled by

Proximity-1 became responsible for

over 90 percent of all the data returned

from the rovers.

More Proximity-1 successes

followed throughout the year. As part

of a series of interplanetary networking

demonstrations in August, ESA’s

Mars Express flew over NASA’s

MER Opportunity and successfully

received data that had been previously

collected and stored by the rover.

ESA’s Mars Express relayed pictures

from one of NASA’s Mars rovers for

the first time. NASA orbiters Mars

Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor

have relayed much of the data produced

by the rovers since they landed

last January and transmission rates

have continued to set new records for

international networking around a

planet other than Earth.

The success of these internationally

sponsored demonstrations

has been credited to the fact that both

rover and orbiter use the same communications

protocol, Proximity-1.

We expect that Proximity-1, the first

space communications protocol to

operate reliably in the proximate environment

between a Mars-bound asset

and an orbiter, will be the next ISOaccepted

CCSDS standard and the

next sign of an era of successful international

cooperation in space.

30 ISO Focus January 2005

New possibilities

for cooperation

The CCSDS became

a pioneer in international

cooperation in space by

providing an environment

that fosters collaboration

and information sharing

among the world’s space

agencies. New possibilities

for cooperation will

continue to emerge as delegates

to both SC 13 and

the CCSDS Management

Council remain committed

to growing strong relations

between their respective

national space agencies

and government organizations

and those of other

delegates.

By continuing its

partnership with ISO,

CCSDS will move forward

in supporting the efforts

of NASA, ESA and other

space agencies to use joint

communications assets in

future missions like the

mission to Mars. And, as it

has for more than 20 years,

the CCSDS will continue

to develop new protocols to

advance both commercial

and governmental interoperability

in space.

Press Release

November 24, 2004

CCSDS Gives SMART-1’s Data Transmissions a Turbo Boost at the Moon

Media Notes

TOULOUSE, France (CCSDS) – November 24, 2004 – The Consultative Committee for Space Data

System’s (CCSDS) Turbo Codes recently passed a series of deep space communications tests performed

by SMART-1 and could be used in the future to enable the reliable transfer of large amounts of scientific

data that researchers hope will shed light on the origins of the Moon. The European Space Agency (ESA)

launched SMART-1 late last year making it the first satellite to have data transmissions powered by Turbo

Codes, specifically designed for use in space by the CCSDS.

As SMART-1 was making its first orbit around the Moon last week, the CCSDS, of which ESA

is a founding member, was also holding its bi-annual working group sessions in Toulouse, France. The

meeting series continues this week. Turbo Codes are a class of high performance error correction codes

that achieve maximum information transfer over a limited-bandwidth communication link in the presence of

data-corrupting noise.

Initially developed over a decade ago by two French electrical engineers, Turbo Codes were

revolutionary because they allowed the design of systems able to get extremely close to the Shannon

Limit, or in information theory, the maximum amount of information transmitted over a communication

link with a specified bandwidth in the presence of noise. Turbo Codes overcome noise and increase

transmission reliability by using long, random codes arbitrarily spaced from each other.

Currently being investigated for use in 3G mobile technologies, they have a potential use in many

near-Earth and on-Earth applications, although the decoding delay that results might prove unacceptable

for some. Turbo Codes have remained a viable option for space applications, since deep space

communication systems can tolerate decoding delays that other systems might not,

International partners within the CCSDS developed Turbo Codes for space at working group

sessions similar to those being hosted in Toulouse by le Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES),

the national space agency of France and another founding member of the CCSDS. Although sometimes

referred to as the frontlines of the organization, the CCSDS working groups are where cultural and

political differences are set aside, so that the work of the organization, developing space communications

standards, can be accomplished. The collaborative environments that emerge during these sessions allow

participants to exchange information regarding space communications standards on a global scale.

“I think people assume that the CCSDS purposely operates under a shroud of mystery because

so many are familiar with our work, yet few really know who we are,” said Andy Dowen of NASA’s Jet

Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. and NASA’s representative to CCSDS’ Management

Council (CMC). NASA sponsors the CCSDS and is one of ten founding member agencies of the

organization along with ESA and CNES. “Instead, we’re producing space communications standards that

we hope the world will adopt, thus we encourage open, international collaboration from as many qualified

participants as possible.”

Prior to its first successful orbit of the Moon, ESA’s SMART-1 began testing new space

technologies, including miniaturized instrumentation and a highly efficient jet propulsion system. CCSDS

Turbo Codes were tested during deep-space communication tests called the KaTE experiments that

involved sending turbo coded radio transmissions at very high frequencies and comparing them to radio

transmissions sent at traditional frequencies.

The Turbo Codes were a success, transmitting data with increased reliability at even the highest

frequencies. It is expected that this advance will allow SMART-1 and future spacecraft to transfer the everincreasing

volumes of scientific data from deep space more reliably than ever before.

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Media Notes

Media Notes

“The fact that CCSDS-developed space communication Turbo Codes were able to successfully

optimize data transmission reliability for SMART-1 is great news for CCSDS,” said Gian Paolo Calzolari

of ESA’s European Space Operation Center in Darmstadt, Germany and one of the leaders in the

development of CCSDS Turbo Codes for space. “We anticipate further validation of other code rates and

for more missions in the near future to take advantage of standardized CCSDS coding schemes.”

Indeed, other missions are already using CCSDS turbo codes successfully in space. NASA / JPL’s

Messenger Mercury orbiter, launched in August 2004, advanced the use of turbo codes to flight proven

technology. ESA’s Rosetta mission, launched in March 2004 and to date the agency’s most demanding

mission in terms of ground station requirements, will test CCSDS Turbo Codes to see if they improve

return-link margins. Currently, SMART-1, Messenger and Rosetta all use traditional coding developed by

the CCSDS.

The recent success of Turbo Codes in space has also turned attention to the possibility of reviving

other capacity approaching codes for use in space communications. For example, the Low-density Parity

Check code (LDPC), first invented in the 1960’s at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is now

being considered for space application by the CCSDS. Using an iterative decoding process, LDPC’s may

allow engineers to actually design systems that get even closer to the Shannon Limit than Turbo Codes

and with lower implementation cost. Similarly, Serial Concatenated Convolutional Codes (SCCC) are also

currently under investigation by the CCSDS.

The series of CCSDS meetings that began earlier this month with working group sessions

will culminate in December with a meeting of the CCSDS Management Council (CMC), attended

by representatives from each of the ten founding member space agencies. This week, the CCSDS

Engineering Steering Group is meeting at CNES to summarize and formalize the work done at the

working group level for presentation to the CMC.

# # #

Note from CCSDS: CCSDS Space Communications Protocol helps deliver success during Combined

Endeavor, sponsored by U.S. European Command (EUCOM), a 13-day exercise involving over 43

nations and 1200 military and civilian personnel. Combined Endeavor was the world’s largest and most

complex Communications and Information Systems (CIS) military exercise.

Expand Networks’ Leading Government Integrator LTI Datacomm Contributes to Successful

Combined Endeavour

8Mbps Accelerated Data Transfers over 1Mbps Pipe

ROSELAND, N.J. & Washington, D.C. — June 22, 2005 – LTI DataComm, leading provider of data

communications solutions to the federal government and Expand Networks, leading provider of

Application Traffic Management solutions for the branch office, today announced that both companies

delivered outstanding WAN optimization performance during Combined Endeavor ’05 (CE-05), the world’s

largest and most complex Communications and Information Systems (CIS) military exercise.

This was the second year that LTI DataComm, a veteran-owned small business actively supported

the international exercise, due to its expertise in network application acceleration and bandwidth

optimization.

“LTI DataComm allowed us to project services from our test management application (CEPTR)

to our forward operating site in Romania,” said LtCol Jerry Schlabach, the Officer in Charge of the Joint

Interoperability Test Command (JITC) support to the exercise. “Without LTI DataComm, our central

database would not have been accessible from our forward operation. We are very appreciative of their

efforts in supporting the exercise this year.”

The Joint Inter-Operability Test Command (JITC) is documenting the interoperability test results

in CEPTR as they are completed. Since the first Combined Endeavor exercise in 1995, over 15,000

interoperability tests have been completed with an additional 1,400 tests being conducted this year.

LTI DataComm deployed the company’s flagship Mini-Accelerator, powered by Expand’s patented

WAN Optimization technology, to increase bandwidth throughput, eliminate latency and reduce bandwidth

abuse on tactical communications networks. The LTI/Expand solution achieved mission success by

extending the CEPTR database to forward deployed elements via a 1Mbps satellite connection. The

severe performance degradation and latency caused by the 550 msec Round Trip Time (RTT), an inherent

problem of satellite communications, was eliminated by the Space Communications Protocol (SCPS),

a DoD standard for optimizing Transport Control Protocol (TCP) over satellite links. Running on the LTI

DataComm’s Mini-Accelerator, the Expand Networks’ operating system employed Caching, Compression,

TCP Acceleration (SCPS) and Quality of Service (QOS) to achieve an effective throughput of up to 8Mbps

over a 1Mbps satellite circuit.

“It was an honor to once again be invited to take part in such a complex multi-national test exercise

and we are very proud to be associated with the successful execution of such a daunting task,” said Dave

Muirhead, LTI DataComm manager for EMEA operations. “These partnership events are a terrific means

for US Forces, NATO and Partnership for Peace countries to work together toward the common goal of

Joint Interoperability,” he added.

“The Accelerators’ performance in Combined Endeavor ‘05 vividly demonstrates Expand’s

leadership in fixed, as well as, mobile satellite markets. The US military is using Expand’s acceleration

technology to support the transformation of mobile command and control communications systems,”

commented Howard Teicher, Expand Networks Vice President of Federal and Strategic Markets.

“Accelerators are being installed in a growing range of mobile platforms – ground, sea and air – as well as

civilian agencies trying to enhance application performance over their existing network infrastructure.”

Remote-sensing instruments on SMART-1 scan the Moon’s surface (ESA)

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Media Notes

Media Notes

About Combined Endeavor

Combined Endeavor, sponsored by U.S. European Command (EUCOM), is a 13-day exercise involving

over 43 nations and 1200 military and civilian personnel. Combined Endeavor began in 1995 as a

simple effort to bring NATO and former Warsaw-pact countries together under the auspices of NATO’s

Partnership for Peace, and has since taken place annually. Since 1995, nations have been involved in

military operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq as well as the recent support of humanitarian

operations in the area affected by the Tsunami. During the past 11 years, Combined Endeavor has

grown to 43 participating nations and has responded to the ever-changing CIS requirements of its

militaries by setting and revising standards to enable communications interoperability.

Note from CCSDS: This IBM DIAS solution based on CCSDS 650.0-B-1 Reference

Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS) allowed the National Library of

the Netherlands to realize an estimated savings of US $5 million per year.

About LTI DataComm

LTI DataComm has been a leader in providing state-of-the-art technology solutions and engineering

services to the Federal Government since 1981. A veteran-owned small business headquartered in

Sterling, VA, LTI provides individual product and integrated turnkey solutions for maximizing wireless,

fiber optic or copper infrastructures for the secure transport of voice, video and data applications. With

offices throughout the United States and in Brussels, Belgium, LTI DataComm is able to provide focused

support for the needs of the U.S. Government, as well as Multi-National Forces within CONUS and the

world over. For more information, visit http://www.ltidata.com/

About Expand Networks

Expand Networks is a leading provider of Application Traffic Management solutions for the branch office.

The company’s Accelerators take Application Traffic Management to the next level by employing a

modular and intelligent application architecture that eliminates complexities associated with traditional

traffic management solutions. The Accelerators automatically adapt to changes in traffic, remove WAN

inefficiencies and maximize the performance of distributed enterprise applications. The Accelerators

combine many unique features including next-generation WAN compression, application-specific

acceleration, Layer 7 QoS and sophisticated monitoring and reporting. Expand has shipped over 20,000

Accelerator devices to more than 1,000 customers including Motorola, Continental Airlines and the

United States Department of Defense. Expand Networks is headquartered in Roseland, New Jersey with

offices in Australia, Germany, Israel, Italy, Singapore, South Africa, United Kingdom and throughout the

United States.

IBM helps Die Deutsche Bibliothek to develop digital long-term archives

KOPAL project aims at preserving the German cultural heritage for future generations

La Gaude, France, October 13th, 2004 - The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

(BMBF) has selected IBM together with Die Deutsche Bibliothek (DDB), the Göttingen State and

University Library (SUB), the Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung (GWDG) to develop

a long-term digital archive. The aim of this project, named ‘KOPAL’, is to create a long-term preservation

archive to allow better access to digital publications and the preservation of cultural heritage, in a system

designed to adhere to international and open standards.

The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is contributing EUR 4 million

towards project ‘KOPAL’, which will allow the partners DDB and SUB to preserve digital documents

into the future. KOPAL will be based on the IBM DIAS solution (Digital Information Archiving System)

which IBM has set up jointly with the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the National Library of The Netherlands.

In a development project scheduled to take three years, IBM will ensure a professional adoption of the

software components and will provide long-term support.

“KOPAL integrates from the start several partners at different locations”, says Dr. Elisabeth

Niggemann, Director General of Die Deutsche Bibliothek. “The project offers an opportunity for academic,

business and administrative use that extends beyond libraries. IBM’s proven experience and capabilities

in existing long term preservation projects will be essential to the success of our partnership”, Dr.

Niggemann concludes.

In recent years the number of ‘born-digital’ publications, where no paper copy exists, has increased

rapidly, creating new and different data formats. Each format may need specific programs that run only on

a specific hardware and a specific operating environment. As a consequence, older digital files run the risk

of being no longer accessible or readable by the latest programs. The KOPAL Project is aimed at creating

the necessary new procedures, based on international and open standards, to ensure future generations’

access to culture and data over the long term.

“Digital preservation is an area that needs attention in all industry with requirements to maintain

information for fiscal or commercial reasons over long periods”, Eberhard Armbruster, Partner, IBM

Business Consulting Services, Public Sector Central Region, says. “Many companies are not aware of

the fact that they already have difficulties in accessing digital information which is not even five years old”,

Armbruster adds.

IBM’s high quality digital media solution, DIAS, is based on IBM Content Manager as well as

Websphere application server and Tivoli storage management software, using IBM disk and tape storage

products. KOPAL will allow flexible data import and export based on the USA’s Library of Congress

“METS” (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard). The archive will be operated by the computing

centre partner Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung Göttingen (GWDG), enabling other

institutions to use the archive in the near future.

36 37


Media Notes

The IBM DIAS solution is already deployed at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library

of The Netherlands), which has recently launched a comprehensive digital media system for storing

and protecting millions of electronic documents, including digitised historic books and papers. The

National Library of The Netherlands estimates savings of US $5 million per year, and the solution

helps ensure large-scale storage and long-term accessibility of electronic documents, publications

and images, thereby helping to preserve the country’s cultural heritage. IBM DIAS is based on the

Open Archival Information System (OAIS) standard, and is designed specifically to store, preserve

and make available digital content over the long term.

Other industries with the need for long term preservation of born-digital data and document

include the Pharmaceutical Industry, Insurance, Finance, Medical and Health industries.

About Die Deutsche Bibliothek

Die Deutsche Bibliothek (DDB) serves as the German national archival library and the

national bibliographic center. DDB ensures a secure archive and the availability of all publications

in Germany. The DDB’s legal mandate covers all hand-held publications (including publications

on floppy disc, CD-Rom, DVD, etc.). Networked electronic publications today are collected on a

voluntary basis, a new legal deposit law is being prepared.

About IBM Business Consulting Services

With consultants and professional staff in more than 160 countries globally, IBM Business

Consulting Services is the world’s largest consulting services organization. IBM Business Consulting

Services provides clients with business process and industry expertise, and the ability to translate

that expertise into integrated, adaptive, on demand business solutions that deliver bottom-line

business value. For more information visit www.ibm.com/bcs.

About IBM Public Sector

IBM is the world’s leading information technology company, with over 90 years of leadership

in helping businesses innovate. Working with Public Sector clients around the globe, IBM provides

on demand e-Government solutions to assist government agencies respond with speed to citizen

demands, business needs, changing economic conditions and legislative priorities and policies. For

more information about IBM Public Sector, visit www.ibm.com/industries/government

Story URL - http://www.ibm.com/software/success/cssdb.nsf/cs/mcag-65veux

# # #

For all of the latest information related to CCSDS space data communications products and missions,

please visit our web site at http://www.CCSDS.org .

38


About the cover

On July 4th, 2005, individuals on the ground, a fleet of

space telescopes, and dozens of ground observatories

located worldwide scanned the heavens hoping to

catch a glimpse of NASA’s Deep Impact, the kind of

action-packed event in space that most of us here on

Earth have only seen in a movie theater.

Observers with communications enhanced by

ISO-CCSDS standards included the Deep Impact

spacecraft, space telescopes Hubble, Chandra,

Spitzer, and SWAS, as well as NASA’s Deep Space

Network (DSN), and the European Space Agency’s

own comet chaser Rosetta.

The use of CCSDS-developed standards on these

missions, and on others recording the event, meant

Deep Impact was not only one of the world’s largest

astronomical observation campaigns ever, it was also

the most standardized, CCSDS-intensive event in

space to date.

For more informaton about CCSDS, pleace visit our

web site at http://www.CCSDS.org or contact us at

Secretariat@mailman.ccsds.org .

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