18.2M - Hong Kong Shipowners Association

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18.2M - Hong Kong Shipowners Association

The Hong Kong Shipowners Association


Patron: Mr. Tung Chee Hwa, GBM


The Hong Kong Shipowners Association was incorporated

in 1957 by 11 local shipowners with the purpose of

creating a forum for shipowners resident in Hong Kong.

Over the past 54 years, the Association has grown into one of the

world’s largest Shipowner Associations, its members owning,

managing and operating a fl eet with a combined carrying capacity

of over 114 million deadweight tonnes.

The Association welcomes into Associate membership Hong Kong

resident companies supplying services to the shipping industry.

The composition of membership has enhanced the credibility of

the Association within the local community and has given breadth

and experience to its international status and relationships.

Hong Kong is a vibrant city, where the entrepreneurial nature

and individual initiative of its residents are allowed to blossom

in an exciting business environment, encouraged by the

Government’s business friendly policies. Hong Kong has always

been a thoroughly international city, its geographically central

location in Asia, its world class communications, legal system and

support services being some of the reasons why an increasing

number of organisations have chosen the city as the location

of their head office in the Asian region. Its status as a Special

Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China

allows the international nature of Hong Kong to develop

due to the autonomy given to the Region by Beijing,

while allowing Hong Kong enviable and unparalleled

close links with the mainland and its business sectors.

The Association arranges forums in which members are

able to meet and discuss issues of concern, informs

the membership of important changes in the shipping

environment through educational seminars and circulars,

and represents the interests of members in national and

international committees. The Association is a member

of the Asian Shipowners Forum (ASF), the International

Shipping Federation (ISF), the International Chamber

of Shipping (ICS) and INTERTANKO, and cooperates

closely with, amongst others, the International Maritime

Organisation (IMO) through the Hong Kong Marine

Department, the International Labour Organisation

(ILO), BIMCO, INTERCARGO, the International Maritime

Industries Forum (IMIF), and the International Chamber

of Commerce (ICC) through the International Maritime

Bureau (IMB).

The Association’s chief purpose is to promote and protect the

interests of the Hong Kong domiciled shipowners and ship managers

as well as the increasing number of local professions and services

upon whom they rely in the performance of their business.

1957 11


54


1.14






















ASF

ISF

ICS

INTERTANKO

IMO


ILO

BIMCO

INTERCARGO

IMIFICC

IMB




HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

1


Appreciations


We would like to thank the following member companies and

individuals who kindly supplied us with photographs

Bocimar Hong Kong Ltd

Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement

(Hong Kong) Ltd Partnership

Chellaram Shipping (HK) Ltd

China Navigation Co Ltd, The (Swire Group)

COSCO (H.K.) Shipping Co Ltd

Far East Shipmanagement Ltd

Greathorse Shipping Holdings Ltd

HUD Group

KC Maritime Ltd

Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd

Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd

Seaspan Corporation

Tai Chong Cheang Steamship Co (H.K.) Ltd

Univan Ship Management Ltd

Wah Kwong Shipping Holdings Ltd (Front Cover)



Bocimar Hong Kong Ltd



Chellaram Shipping (HK) Ltd




Greathorse Shipping Holdings Ltd


KC Maritime Ltd



Seaspan Corporation




We would also like to record our deep appreciation to the following

member companies who kindly placed advertisements in this Year Book

Arrow Asia Shipbrokers Ltd

Baybridge Services (Far East) Ltd

Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement (Hong Kong) Ltd Partnership

Bureau Veritas

Clarkson Asia Ltd

Department of Logistics & Maritime Studies,

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Deutsche Schiffsbank AG

Fairmont Shipping (H.K.) Ltd

Griffi n Travel (HK) Ltd

Gulf Oil Marine Ltd

International Maritime Carriers Ltd

Island Navigation Corporation International Ltd

Mayer Brown JSM

KC Maritime Ltd

Noble Group Ltd

Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd

Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd

Pricewaterhouse Coopers

Radio Holland Hong Kong Company Ltd

Richards Hogg Lindley

Rodskog Shipbrokers Ltd

Seaspan Corporation Ltd

Sinotrans Shipping Ltd

Tai Chong Cheang Steamship Co (H.K.) Ltd

Thomas Miller (Hong Kong) Ltd

Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Wah Kwong Shipping Holdings Ltd

Wallem Group Ltd

Wartsila China Ltd












Griffi n Travel (HK) Ltd

Gulf Oil Marine Ltd




KC Maritime Ltd

Noble Group Ltd






Rodskog Shipbrokers Ltd

Seaspan Corporation Ltd








2 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Contents


The Hong Kong Shipowners Association

1


Appreciations

2


Chairman’s Report

5


Managing Director’s Review

13


Previous Chairmen and Secretary/Director

30

/

Executive Committee 2010/2011

32

2010 2011

International Shipping – the Next 10 Years

35


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

39

2010

List of Seminars 2010

49

2010

Asian Shipowners Forum

50


19th Asian Shipowners Forum

52

19

Maritime Awareness Week

57


Sub-Committees

60


Representation on Government Committees and Statutory Boards

61


New Members Corner

62


HKSOA 30 Year Club

63


Membership List

64


Fleet Statistics

70


Seafarers Employed by Owners and Managers

72


Promotion within the Association

73


Membership Requirements & Secretariat Contact Details

74


Membership Application Form

75


HKSOA is committed to protecting the environment.

This year book is printed on FSC TM certified paper with soy ink.


FSC TM

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

3


THE VALLES GROUP

www.vallesgroup.com

HONG KONG

CANADA

JAPAN

CHINA

Valles Steamship Co., Ltd.

Valles Steamship (Canada) Ltd.

Valles Steamship Co., Ltd.

Valles Steamship Co., Ltd.

61st Floor Room 6111-12 The Center

#1160 Guinness Tower

4-16-7 Nakameguro

Shanghai Representative Office

99 Queen’s Road Central

1055 West Hastings Street

Meguro-Ku

Suite 402, Jin Tai Building

Hong Kong

Vancouver B.C. V6E 2E9

Tokyo 153-0061

58 Mao Ming South Road

Telephone: (852) 2877-9189

Canada

Japan

Shanghai 200020, China

Facsimile: (852) 2868-4014

Telephone: (604) 687-3288

Telephone: (81-3) 5721-8981

Telephone: (86-21) 6445-9993

E-Mail: hongkong@vallesfleet.com

Facsimile: (604) 687-0833

Facsimile: (81-3) 5721-8983

Facsimile: (86-21) 6472-0893

E-Mail: vancouver@vallesfleet.com

E-Mail: tokyo@vallesfleet.com

E-Mail: shanghai@vallesfleet.com


Chairman’s Report


The Markets

We certainly live in interesting times. It

would appear that the industry is well

divided in its prospects for the markets;

the bulls could not be more bullish and the bears

could not be more bearish. While it is clear that

we have a major overhang of newbuildings being

delivered in nearly all market segments, it is also

clear that markets for many ship types have held

up remarkably, and perhaps surprisingly, well over

the year.

This could be due to Chinese imports causing

congestion, in the dry bulk trades, or restocking

of finished goods to fill the shelves after a better

holiday season last year than expected, and in anticipation of

a relatively good holiday season this year in the United States

and Europe, for the container trades. It could also be due to

the effect of the massive printing of money in some developed

economies resulting in higher prices for second hand ships than

justifi ed by current rates but, as a result, we do have some who

believe that a future downturn will be long and diffi cult, and others

who believe that after a minor dip, we will see good markets

once again.

Of course, the volatility that results from such divergent opinions

benefi ts those who engage in the paper trades, while others who

need to rely on stable forward rates tend to be left with no clear

direction on future trends and great diffi culty in pricing their forward

commitments. But I believe we do need to take careful note of the

massive increase in newbuilding capacity, which experience tells us

will be used no matter how many cancellations or postponements

are reported and, while predicting timing is almost always

impossible, extreme volatility and a high risk to the downside are

possibly likely to remain important facets of our business for a long

time to come.

In this respect, we will plan to hold several ‘commercial’ events

over the next year, in order to better prepare ourselves for

both the predictable and unpredictable future changes in our

various markets.

The shipping industry is changing, and, to my mind, the ‘ship’

is being taken out of ‘shipping’. Freight markets have become

commoditized, ships are ‘fl ipped’ like real estate, and the barriers to

entry, especially to the dry bulk markets, become lower and lower.

New players in the industry are banks and even courier companies,

whose speculative spending spree now includes shipyards! The

emphasis being projected seems no longer on shipping, but

shipping derivatives. Shipping derivatives that would appear to

be founded on China’s continuing and increasing demand for

raw materials.







































HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

5


Some things in life

are just as reliable

as the sunrise

www.oocl.com

Ship Owner

Ship Operator

Ship Agent

ISLAND NAVIGATION CORPORATION

INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Tokyo

Tel: 2833-3222

Fax: 2827-0001

E-mail: incil@isnav.com


Chairman’s Report


The commoditization of shipping has several consequences.

One is the question of sustainability, both of the unprecedented

newbuilding orderbooks and the total dependence on China’s

physical demand for raw materials, especially with the new players

declaring that volatility is the name of the game. This results

in unprecedented challenges that are poised to knock out the

platform that traditional owners operate on; sustainability, long term

cashfl ow, partnership and emphasis on quality of management.

Secondly, the commoditization of shipping reduces ships to the

status of a commodity, where the only variable is price. There is no

premium, particularly again in the dry bulk markets, for ships that

are operated to a higher standard than that required by regulation.

What this results in is the need for more and more regulation, to

ensure that the ‘commodity’ does not slip below an acceptable

standard. We can no longer rely on ethical behavior to ensure high

standards – human ingenuity knows no bounds in the discovery

or creation of loopholes. It is our need, if we wish to continue to

operate to a desired level of quality management, to ensure that

the regulations that determine the status of the commodity are

practical, achievable and help eventually to raise the barriers to

entry to exclude all those who are not interested in maintaining the

‘ship’ in ‘shipping’.

The Association

Our Association is now 53 years old; not young, but not exactly

antiquated either. While we are mature, we are still growing and

continuing to reinvent ourselves. We are keen not to use the

success of our predecessors as laurels to rest upon, but rather as a

springboard to new levels of value-added strengths.


















53




HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

7


Chairman’s Report


I started my Chairmanship of the Association almost exactly one

year ago, and immediately engaged the Executive Committee in

a process of soul-searching and benchmarking, to discover where

we have been, where we are now and where we would want the

Association to go in the future. Your Association has long been

recognized as a knowledgeable, proactive and very respected

voice of Asian shipping. From the Asian Shipowners Forum to

BIMCO to Intertanko and the International Chamber of Shipping

and the International Shipping Federation, we are often seen as a

balancing infl uence to harmonise the regulatory demands that tend

to originate in the ‘West’, with the well-considered and ‘sharp-end’

response from the ‘East’.

Your Association’s voice within Hong Kong has also grown in

a similar fashion. The challenges and trials that arise in our

relationship with the Hong Kong maritime cluster and the HKSAR

Government have been a test in collaboration, education and

partnership. These, together with a mutual dose of patience,

have been very apparent and necessary, as we have spearheaded

numerous initiatives intended to preserve Hong Kong’s status as a

premier maritime centre amidst increasing competition from our

regional neighbours, each striving to wrest our sceptre from us.

In this respect, we fully appreciate the strength of impatience and

frustration that has built up in our maritime community, as other

regional centres seem to dominate media coverage with expensive

and very well prepared promotional campaigns. In the face of this

onslaught, it might be perceived by those with little knowledge

and insight that Hong Kong has lost its way, but this is clearly not

the case. We might not have the promotional budgets that others

are given, but we do have our inherent strengths, and because of

these your Association and the maritime community is stronger

and remains more competitive than ever, and shines as a beacon

to those who admire us and who would wish to follow us.

And your Association continues to build its strong relationship

with the Chinese government, which is based on a similar spirit of

collaboration, education and partnership. We have led the way in

establishing a close relationship with Shanghai, and we are working

together with the Shanghai shipping and fi nancial sectors to build

Shanghai’s development into an international maritime centre; a

collaborative and complimentary development that can only enable

Hong Kong and Shanghai to grow to the clear benefi t of China as

a whole.

Over the past few months, your Association has been recognized

by the Ministry of Transport in Beijing as being a bridge towards

promoting dialogue and understanding with international

organisations, in particular the International Group of P&I Clubs

and Intertanko in the specifi c areas of the China Ocean Protection

Law, P&I Letters of Guarantee, etc. We have also campaigned to

become a primary partner for the Central Government to consult

with and discuss future maritime regulations.





BIMCO

Intertanko ICS

ISF































HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

9


Chairman’s Report


For some years now, the Association has been playing a very

important environmental role in Hong Kong, which culminated

this year in steering the Hong Kong maritime industry onto the

forefront of environmental protection and sustainability. Working

mainly behind the scenes, we encouraged and helped to develop

the Fair Winds Charter, a voluntary initiative for ships at berth or

at anchor in Hong Kong to switch to low sulphur fuel. We greatly

appreciate the commitment made by the members of the Hong

Kong Liner Shipping Association, the China Navigation Company

Ltd and the various cruise lines and others, who have adopted the

Charter. The Charter will take effect from 1 January 2011 to 31

December 2012, and during this time, the Hong Kong Government

is encouraged to develop suitable legislation for Hong Kong, and to

work with its Guangdong counterparts to reduce air pollution from

ships and port related facilities in the Pearl River Delta.

The past year has also been very busy with the organization and

promotion of other major events. Hong Kong’s chairmanship and

hosting of the 19th Asian Shipowners Forum achieved its usual

spectacular results, with a very envious attendance by the captains

of the Asian maritime industry. Of perhaps more importance, Hong

Kong has also led an effort to develop and define ‘deliverables’

for the ASF, so that it will grow out of its ‘ceremonial’ identity and

bring value-added strengths to its members and the wider global

maritime community. Asian shipping is increasingly the depositary

of ‘sharp-end’ technical and operational knowledge, and it is very

necessary that this information is fed back into the legislative

mechanisms that determine how our industry is regulated.

Maritime Awareness Week, held in October, turned Hong Kong’s

maritime focus inwards towards educating its general public on

the importance of the maritime industry, as both the foundation

and engine of Hong Kong’s long-term growth. MAW also focused

on educating the student population of Hong Kong towards the

importance of our maritime industry and the career opportunities

that it contains. It is essential that we nurture and promote the

next generation of leaders and stakeholders for our industry.

Conclusion

I would like to thank our very hard-working team at the Secretariat,

who continue to manage the impossible with very few people.

Their dedication to the Association is tremendous, and their quietly

effi cient work has not only made my life easier, but promotes Hong

Kong at home and in the international community.




Fair Winds Charter



2011 1 1

2012 12 31




19







10











2010/2011


54 2010

Kenneth Koo

Chairman 2010/2011

(An extract from the Chairman’s 2010 Annual Report, presented

to the 54th Annual General Meeting)

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

11


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Tel +852 2861 3511

Fax +852 2527 0282

www.thisisnoble.com


Managing Director’s Review


One aspect of Hong Kong that seems to

surprise visitors, especially those living in

other places in Asia or those who have

recently visited those other places, is the relatively

high degree of criticism and adverse comment

we have in our media. Some see this as being a

negative indicator; wouldn’t it be better if everybody

seemed happy and content But after consideration,

which really doesn't seem to take very long, our

visitors recognize this to be good and healthy, and an

excellent indicator of the strength and robustness of

Hong Kong society.

While the freedom of speech in Hong Kong would

appear to give doomsayers ample opportunity to

spread their depressing messages, it clearly stirs

discussion and debate. Of course, it does make life much more

difficult for those in Government or those whose positions in

society puts them in the public eye. It is essential, however, for

Government not to become paralysed by criticism, or to reverse

policies as a result of loud adverse comment from vocal minorities.

It is necessary to realize that it is a human failing to concentrate

on the bad news rather than celebrate the good, but this should

be seen as a refl ection of the fact that bad news is unusual, which

frankly is a good message to give.

Free speech and a willingness to speak out are Hong Kong’s

strengths, and we use them to the full both in Hong Kong as well

as in the debate about legislation and regulation of our shipping

industry. Because of our willingness to express intelligent, well

thought out and sometimes contrary but fully justified opinions,

the Hong Kong shipping industry continues to punch well above its

weight, and is frequently asked to represent the Asian voice, both

in regional and international fora.




























HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

13


Managing Director’s Review


The National 12th Five-Year Plan, promulgated in March 2011, is

of great signifi cance to Hong Kong and its shipping industry. The

Plan contains a Dedicated Chapter (Chapter 57) on Hong Kong

and Macau, unofficially translated as “Maintaining the long-term

prosperity and stability of Hong Kong and Macau”.

Premier Wen Jiabao has said that the Plan will in no way replace

Hong Kong’s own development plan, and that the purpose of

the Plan is to support Hong Kong and Macau’s development. Of

relevance to our sector is the Plan’s specifi c intent to reinforce and

enhance Hong Kong’s status as an international centre for shipping,

which demonstrates the clear intent of Central Government to

continue to support the growth and development of Hong Kong’s

maritime service industries, and to maintain Hong Kong as one

of the major international maritime centres in China, in Asia and

globally.

In order to support the further development of Hong Kong’s

maritime industry, the Association has formed very close links

over the past few years with central government, particularly with

the Ministry of Transport and the Maritime Safety Administration,

and also with our counterparts in Shanghai and other mainland

maritime cities. We work closely with the Commissioner of Foreign

Affairs in Hong Kong and with the Liaison Office of the Central

People’s Government in Hong Kong SAR, and have developed a

strong relationship with the local offi ce of the PLA Navy.

Peter Hinchliffe, the new Secretary General of the International

Chamber of Shipping and International Shipping Federation, has

very kindly written the guest article for this Year Book. In his article,

Peter points to the avalanche of regulation that will hit our industry

in the next few years.

As I pointed out in my Annual Review, presented to the Annual

General Meeting in November 2010, this Association has been and

remains involved, deeply involved in many cases, in the discussions

being held in the industry on potential and existing regulation, in

order to discover and develop suitable and practical advice to our

members. We will continue to be involved through the avalanche

that will swamp us, offering all our members some measure of

protection, a lifeboat perhaps, through being forewarned, forearmed

and well prepared.

2011 3


57














Peter

Hinchliffe


2010 11












Some time ago, this Association realized that while handling all

issues to a greater or lesser extent, always for the benefi t of our

members, seafarers and the environment were the two areas

that required the majority of our attention. This review mainly

concentrates on these two areas, but by doing so, rest assured

that we do not ignore the many other issues that affect our

industry, and which we are also currently handling on behalf of our

members.

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

15


Managing Director’s Review


The Shipping Industry

The international shipping

industry is the servant

of world trade, and our

fortunes therefore rise and

fall in line with the growth or

contraction in world trade.

But our fortunes are also

hugely dependent on our

readiness to order new ships,

a readiness that sometimes

seems to be determined

more by the current market

than any well thought-out

long-term prognosis. It is

now clear that our overenthusiasm

for the builder’s

yard has caught up with us. Our new ships are now being

delivered, and even the 2010 increase in seaborne trade after the

sharp contraction in 2009 is not suffi cient to employ all the ships

now on the water, never mind those that are still to be delivered.

The world fl eet of all ships over 300 gross tons (gt) at 1 January

2011 consisted of 47,833 ships of 1.349 billion deadweight or

909 million gt, an increase of 885 ships on the year before. The

world fl eet of all ships over 300 gt has expanded by 3,230 ships,

or 7.24%, over the past three years.

World seaborne trade increased year-on-year by 7.3% in 2010, to

8,367 million tonnes. Over the last three years, world seaborne

trade has increased by 2.68%.

By country of domicile, the Hong Kong fl eet of ships over 1,000 gt

as of 1 January 2011 was 674 ships of 37.3 million deadweight

with an average age of 9.7 years, which puts it in the position

of being the world’s 8th largest owning centre (2010, 7th).

The average age of the world fleet of ships over 1,000 gt as of

1 January 2011 was 15.6 years.

In terms of the Gross Tonnage of vessels of over 300 gt at

1 January 2011, Hong Kong was the 5th largest ship register,

coming after Panama, Liberia, the Marshall Islands and Bahamas

but very closely followed by Greece and Singapore. In terms of

Deadweight, Hong Kong was the 4th largest ship register, behind

Panama, Liberia and the Marshall Islands.

(All statistics taken from Shipping Statistics and Market Review,

Volume 55, No 1/2 - 2011, Institute of Shipping Economics and

Logistics.)







2010 2009



2011 1 1 300

47,833 13.49 9.09

885

300 3,230

7.24%

2010 7.3% 8,367


2.68%

2011 1 1

1,000 674 3,730

9.7

2010 7 2011 1 1

1,000 15.6

2011 1 1 300





2011

55

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

17


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Managing Director’s Review


Piracy

Piracy is the issue that is at the top of the industry’s agenda. The

situation off Somalia has become unbearable, and the risk to

seafarers and their ships unacceptable. The industry has come

together to speak out about the situation, and various proposals

have been made; to amend SOLAS to allow armed guards on board

ship, to reclassify acts of piracy to allow

navies to pre-empt attacks rather than

act defensively, to use the carriage of

piracy-related equipment as reason to

arrest potential pirates, amongst others.

What is clear, at least to the industry, is

that Governments still do not see piracy

and attacks on ships as being particularly

serious – the rather lame UN Security

Council Resolutions are proof of this

lack of will. The situation at sea would now appear to be totally

out of control, adherence to the recommendations of the Best

Management Practices 3 seemingly no more than applying a bandaid

to serious trauma, and there is a defi nite risk of piracy spreading

beyond the already vast area of the Arabian Sea and Western Indian

Ocean. An area that accommodates the movement of the major

proportion of world trade.

The solution, as this Association has continually repeated, must

be on land. This is a United Nations responsibility, not the job

of privately or government funded private security companies.

Finding a solution to the political situation in Somalia will be

incredibly diffi cult, but a concerted and well-funded start must be

made. The time for endless and multiple committee meetings that

seem to produce very little must be drawn to an end, and must be

replaced by a very strong indication of willingness to do something

about the situation.

The IMO has published the theme for World Maritime Day 2011

(Thursday, 29 September 2011) as “Piracy: orchestrating the

response”. The industry has to continue its campaign to urge

Governments to realise the gravity of the situation, and to bring the

awful situation facing seafarers, their families and shipowners to a

rapid end.






SOLAS






















2011 9 29




HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

19


Managing Director’s Review


Maritime Labour Convention

It is perhaps clear by now that the initial objective of the ILO to

bring the MLC into force within 5 years of its adoption will not go

as planned; the current estimate for entry into force is now second

half 2012. The delay is probably due to the enormous amount

of work that Governments have had to undertake to incorporate

the very different provisions of the Convention into their local laws

and regulations. This was never going to be an easy task, and the

economic upheaval of the last few years has probably made it

more diffi cult.

As an indicator of our commitment to the tripartite ILO process, the

Managing Director of the Association is now the maritime employer

spokesperson for MLC and other ILO maritime sector meetings.

We will continue this essential work, and also continue to promote

the Convention, both within and outside the ILO, to encourage its

proper and full adoption, which will greatly assist our goal of decent

work for all seafarers.

Shore Access for Seafarers

Shore access for seafarers seems to be becoming more and more

diffi cult, resulting in a situation that one member has commented

as seafarers being ‘imprisoned on their ships’. Obtaining visas for

seafarers in a reasonable period of time prior to their being sent

to join a ship is notoriously diffi cult in many of the seafarer supply

countries, and in any event, it would be impossible to know the

nature of the visa required at the port where the seafarer would be

due to sign off many months later at the end of his contract.

The situation is made even worse for seafarers joining or leaving

ships at ports in the European Union. The Schengen Borders Code

was meant to make the situation clearer and easier to comply with,

but differing interpretations by different European States, lengthy

visa application periods and common disregard of the guidance

intended to assist seafarers that has been issued by the European

Commission, has made the process almost impossible to

work with.




2012






















108 185




Brazil is one country that has made its position clear. Seafarers

holding a Seamen’s Book or Seafarer’s Identifi cation issued by a

State under the provisions of ILO Convention 108 or Convention

185, are permitted visa free access ashore. Obviously, if more

States would ratify the Conventions, visa-free access or at the very

least preferential treatment for seafarers, would become possible.

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

21


Managing Director’s Review


ILO Convention 185 (Seafarers Identity Documents Convention

(Revised) 2003) was adopted in 2003 by 392 votes, 20

abstentions and none against. The Convention came into force

in February 2005, but still has only 18 ratifications. Convention

108, which preceded it, has 59 ratifi cations, but is now closed to

ratification. With the unanimous adoption of Convention 185, it

is diffi cult to understand why so many States have decided not to

ratify it or follow its guidance.

Seafarers are a very special category of global worker, workers that

must be given special treatment. It is contrary to the over riding

principle of the ILO to ensure Decent Work that in this day and

age, seafarers still are not able to obtain shore leave in many ports

around the world.

Cadet Training

In any maritime centre, there is a need for ex-seafarers for specifi c

occupations. It is not always necessary to have ex-seafarers in

positions that have traditionally been held by ex-seafarers, but

there are specific occupations for which a person with seafaring

experience is necessary. These

include pilots, marine department

surveyors, superintendents, etc.

In 2002, the Association began to

seek its members’ support to place

Hong Kong cadets on their ships.

A retired ship’s master, Captain

Tommy Lam, volunteered to assist

the Association to persuade owners

and managers to take Hong Kong

cadets and to interview potential

cadets and their families. We

felt that it was very necessary to fi nd the berths before recruiting

cadets; we didn’t want potential cadets becoming disillusioned with

the industry because they were unable to fi nd employment.

In 2004, the Hong Kong Government launched the Sea-going

Incentive Scheme, to be monitored by the Maritime Industry

Council and administered by the Marine Department, under which

Hong Kong cadets would be given a monthly payment, paid in full

in arrears on the successful completion of their contract.

The initiative has been an unqualified success. Thanks to Capt.

Lam’s stringent interviewing of potential candidates and the

generosity of our members in offering cadet berths, a total of 93

deck and 43 engine cadets have been employed, nearly all of

whom have stayed either at sea or ashore in the maritime industry.

Many of our members have commented on how well the cadets

have performed, fi tting in well with crews of different nationalities

and showing a very good dedication to the job at sea.

185

2003 2003 392 20

0 2005 2

18 108

59

185












2002













2004







93 43





HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

23


Managing Director’s Review


Fair Treatment

We have commented extensively on this issue in the past, but it is

necessary to maintain industry awareness because very little has

changed.

The issue is several; fair treatment immediately post-accident in

the way seafarers are treated by shore-based authorities, and fair

treatment in cases of criminalization, where the criminal courts are

used as punishment or apparent revenge rather than as a response

to intentional acts.

A step forward is perhaps the Draft IMO Assembly Resolution of

the 98th session of the IMO’s Legal Committee, which encourages

Governments to implement the Guidelines on the Fair Treatment

of Seafarers following a maritime accident. But it is clear that many

Governments underestimate the political pressure that follows a

maritime accident, and the wish of the public to see strong action

and fi nd someone liable.

We will continue to work on this essential issue, and highlight

instances of unfair treatment when and wherever they occur.

Air Pollution

The Association has been heavily engaged in the both the local

and global debate about air pollution for the last 6 or so years.

We have spent time engaged with think tanks and environmental

groups, explaining to them how the shipping industry works and

how it is regulated. We have been fully engaged with global

industry work on the revision to MARPOL Annex VI and subsequent

discussions. And we have been working with other organisations

around the world on local initiatives they have developed to reduce

air pollution from shipping related activities.









98








6



MARPOL



HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

25


Managing Director’s Review


We were therefore very pleased when the China Navigation Co Ltd

decided to switch to low sulphur fuel on their ships calling in Hong

Kong. And we were also very pleased when the Hong Kong Liner

Shipping Association then decided to work with Civic Exchange to

develop a voluntary Charter, the ‘Fair Winds Charter’, to switch to

low sulphur fuel when alongside berth or at anchor in Hong Kong.

There are now 14 container carriers, 3 cruise lines and one car carrier

line that have so far agreed to join the Charter. This represents at

least 80% of the port calls in Hong Kong, and we greatly appreciate

the very large financial commitment made by these companies

towards reducing air pollution in Hong Kong. There are more

companies that are considering joining the Charter, and we hope to

be able to welcome them onboard in the near future.

We continue to urge the Hong Kong Government to follow

this industry effort with further initiatives that include incentive

measures designed to encourage industry participation and working

with the relevant authorities on the Mainland for cross boundary

emission cooperation that will encompass the entire Delta.

Reducing ship related air pollution in Hong Kong alone will have

a limited and very local effect on air quality; the goal has to be to

reduce all industrial and transport emissions in the entire Pearl

River Delta. Any initiative, however, needs to take into account the

practical realities of the shipping industry, and similar ship emission

policies of other regions in Mainland China.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

It is clear that there is an unfortunate stalemate in the Greenhouse

Gas discussion that affects both the IMO and UNFCCC decisionmaking

processes. There are many reasons for this, which are

not for the Association to debate (although we do have our

opinions!). But what we can debate are the challenges and

potential drawbacks of introducing the Energy Efficiency Design

Index for newbuilding ships, and the validity and potential effect of

the introduction of a Market Based Mechanism.

The shipping industry shipowners, managers and operators), has

an exemplary record of reducing emissions by increasing effi ciency.

Ships have become many times more effi cient over time, and on a

‘carbon intensity’ measure (carbon emitted against tonne-miles of

cargo carried) the shipping industry has excelled at reducing carbon

emissions. While there is economic benefit and technological

potential in increasing efficiency, the efficiency of ships will

continue to increase, with or without regulation. What we need to

be aware of is regulation that seeks to do the right thing, but ends

up threatening the safety of ships.

Maritime and aviation are also being fi ngered to provide the funds

promised in Copenhagen by developed countries to the developing

countries. The reason is that maritime and aviation have apparently

been ‘left out’ of the Kyoto Treaty, which is not entirely correct. If

maritime and aviation are to be used as funding sources, then

we must ensure, as far as we can, that this is the only charge on

shipping for GHG emissions, that we are not double charged, and

that any regulation is developed by the IMO.




Fair Winds Charter


14 3

80%

































HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

27


Managing Director’s Review


There are currently 10 MBM options being considered by the IMO

working group, and it is interesting that while economists seem

to prefer an Emission Trading MBM, many shipping associations,

including this Association, clearly prefer an MBM based on a levy

on bunker fuel. Such a system would be simple to administer

and would make it easier to pass the additional costs on to the

consumer.

Ballast Water Management

In response to concerns that ship’s ballast water contained

organisms that were foreign to the waters where the ballast

water was discharged, upsetting the natural order of marine life,

and in an effort to ensure that ballast water regulations were

globally consistent, the IMO developed and adopted in 2004

the International Convention for the Control and Management

of Ship’s Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention). It is

expected that the Convention will achieve the necessary number of

ratifi cations to enter into force in the near future.

The Convention was developed with fi xed entry into force dates,

both as a response to the urgency of application expressed by

some States, and also to encourage the fast development of

suitable technology to meet the requirements of the Convention.

Ballast Water Management systems are approved by either the

Administration or, if they make use of active substances, by

the IMO.

In response to the lack of suitable treatment systems, the IMO

recommended that the application of the Convention to ships built

in 2009 should be postponed until their second annual survey,

but no later than December 2011. A later review determined that

sufficient systems were available and that the application of the

Convention requirements to ships built in 2010 would stand.

But the approval of ballast water systems is only to approve the

technology, and is not an indicator as to whether systems have

been developed and are available for all sizes of ship. Also,

the large number of systems that will be required combined

with limited manufacturing capacity mean that some ships are

unable to fit the required systems in the time laid down in the

Convention. And furthermore, it is obvious that the fi rst systems to

be developed might not be the best or the most suitable, and are

probably also the most expensive, giving owners encouragement to

delay fi tting the necessary equipment until the last moment.

The Association is assisting its members to comply with

the requirements of the Convention, but it is incumbent on

Governments to realise that fixed entry into force dates for

legislation that deals with issues for which the technology does not

exist, are quite simply not a good idea.

10









2004










2009

2011 12


2011













Arthur Bowring

Managing Director

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

29


Previous Chairmen and Secretary/Director

/

Year Chairman Secretary / Director

1957 – 61 Jebshun Shipping Co Ltd

Mr. Andrew Lam

Mr. P.C. Chen

1962 – 63 Great Southern Steamship Co Ltd

Mr. James C.H. Lu

Mr. P.C. Chen

1964 – 65 Shun Cheong S.N. Co Ltd

Mr. C.K. Hui

Mr. P.C. Chen

1966 – 67 World-Wide Shipping Agency Ltd

Mr. Y.S. Zee

Mr. P.C. Chen

1968 – 69 Island Navigation Corporation Ltd

Mr. Y.S. Kung

Mr. P.C. Chen

1970 – 71 Wallem & Co Ltd Mr. Sam Chang (Jan-Jun 70)

Mr. Anthony J. Hardy Mr. Garfi eld Chao (Jul-Oct 70)

Mr. P.R. Walton (Nov 70 ~)

1972 – 73 Wallem & Co Ltd

Capt. C.A.J. Vanderperre

Mr. Anthony J. Hardy

Mr. P.R. Walton

1974 – 75 Wah Kwong & Co (HK) Ltd

Dr. Frank S.B. Chao, JP

Mr. P.R. Walton

1976 – 77 Island Navigation Corporation Ltd

Mr. C.H. Tung

Mr. P.R. Walton

1978 – 79 Wheelock Marden & Co Ltd

Mr. John L. Marden

Mr. P.R. Walton

1980 – 81 Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Mr. K.M. Koo

Mr. P.R. Walton

1982 – 83 Jardine Shipping Co Ltd

Mr. D.D.B. McLeod

Mr. P.R. Walton

(Due to Mr. McLeod’s retirement, Mr. J.M. Collins of Jardine Shipping was appointed Chairman effective September 1983 for the remaining term of Chairmanship)

McLeodJ.M. Collins19839

30 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Previous Chairmen and Secretary/Director

/

Year Chairman Secretary / Director

1984* - 85 Mr. M.H. Liang Mr. P.R. Walton

Island Navigation Corporation Ltd Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE (Dec 84 ~)

1986 – 87 Mr. Kenneth K.W. Lo

Teh-Hu Cargoocean Management Co Ltd

Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE

1988 – 89 Dr. Helmut Sohmen

World-Wide Shipping Agency Ltd

Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE

1990 – 91 Mr. David C.C. Koo

Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE

1992 – 93 Mr. Peter J. Cowling

Wallem Group Ltd

Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE

1994 – 95 Mr. C.C. Tung

Island Navigation Corporation Int’l Ltd

Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE

1996 – 97 Mr. George S.K. Chao, JP Mr. Michael Farlie, MBE

Wah Kwong Shipping Holdings Ltd Mr. Arthur Bowring (Jul 97 ~)

1998 – 99 Mr. James Hughes-Hallett

John Swire & Sons (HK) Ltd

Mr. Arthur Bowring

2000 – 01 Mr. Andrew Y. Chen

Grand Seatrade Shipping Agency Ltd

Mr. Arthur Bowring

2002 – 03 Mr. K.H. Koo

Tai Chong Cheang Steamship Co (HK) Ltd

Mr. Arthur Bowring

2004 – 05 Mr. Frank Tsao

International Maritime Carriers Ltd

Mr. Arthur Bowring

2006 – 07 Mr. David C.C. Koo

Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Mr. Arthur Bowring

2008 – 09 Mr. Peter Cremers

Anglo-Eastern Ship Management Ltd

Mr. Arthur Bowring

Note : * With the adoption of the New Articles of Association in 1984, the appointment of corporate bodies (members) as offi cers of the Association was

discontinued in favour of the election of individual persons.

* 1984

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

31


Executive Committee 2010/2011

20102011

Chairman

Mr. Kenneth Koo

Tai Chong Cheang Steamship

Co (HK) Ltd



Member

Mr. Rajaish Bajpaee

Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement

(Hong Kong) Ltd Partnership




Deputy Chairman

Mr. Alan L.S. Tung

Island Navigation Corporation

International Ltd



Member

Mr. Harry Banga

Noble Group Ltd


Vice Chairman

Mr. Sham Chellaram

KC Maritime Ltd

Member

Ms. Sabrina S.M. Chao

Wah Kwong Shipping Holdings Ltd



Vice Chairman

Mr. Wang Futian

COSCO (H.K.) Shipping Co Ltd



Member

Mr. Rob Grool

Wallem Group Ltd



Vice Chairman

Mr. Alastair MacAulay

Mayer Brown JSM



Member

Mr. Jack Hsu

Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd



Hon. Treasurer

Ms. Rose W.M. Lee

The Hongkong and Shanghai

Banking Corporation Limited



Member

Mr. Huang Shao-jie

Hong Kong Ming Wah Shipping Co Ltd



32 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Executive Committee 2010/2011

20102011

Member

Mr. Vishal Khurana

Member

Mr. John H. Lau

Parakou Shipping Ltd



Member

Mr. Edward Lee

Member

Mr. Alan Ng

PricewaterhouseCoopers



Member

Mr. William Peng

Chinese Maritime Transport

(Hong Kong) Ltd



Member

Mr. J.B. Rae-Smith

The China Navigation Company Ltd

Chellaram Shipping (Hong Kong) Ltd

Steamship Mutual Management

(Hong Kong) Ltd



Member

Mr. Martin Rowe

Clarkson Asia Ltd



Member

Mr. John Rowley

Lloyd’s Register Asia


Member

Mr. Tian Zhongshan

Sinotrans Shipping Ltd



Member

Mr. Wang Chunlin

Pacifi c Basin Shipping (HK) Ltd



Member

Mr. Raymond T.C. Wong

Richards Hogg Lindley



HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

33


International Shipping – the Next 10 Years


Much has been written about the impact of

the global recession on the international

shipping industry and about the slow

recovery and how that may shape the future of

the industry. However in the background there is

another dynamic which has yet to be adequately

considered, the ultimate infl uence of which on the

conduct of world trade may be equally signifi cant.

It is a matter not simply of regulation but of the

combined impact of a number of barely related

pieces of legislation that will most likely become

effective in the next 5 to 10 years.

It is a reflection of society’s demands that almost

all pending regulation of shipping is in some way

related to the impact of ships on the environment

in local or global terms. The industry has faced squarely up to its

environmental impact over many years becoming in the process

not only the world’s most environmentally friendly transport mode

but also its most effi cient in terms of cargo carried per kilometre.

Industry fully supports the development of regulatory means to

reduce yet further its impact on the environment with an ultimate

objective of zero pollution. This objective recognises that safety

regulation, through its accident prevention role, contributes much

to the prevention of environmental damage.

Consider now recent environmental regulation, and in particular, the

provisions of MARPOL Annex VI on air pollution. The regulation,

which has already entered into force, mandates a stepped reduction

in the permitted sulphur content of marine fuel with significant

steps in 2015 (0.1% in ECAs) and globally in 2020 (possibly

2025) when the permitted maximum sulphur content drops to

0.5%. This means that by 2025, at the latest, all ships will be

burning distillate fuel instead of the current heavy fuel oil. This is a

much more expensive fuel and at current prices probably implies

a price increase of around 170%. This fi gure takes no account of

the expected shortage of distillate fuel in the transitional period as

60,000 ships start to create a new market for distillate fuel causing

a price increase for all other current users of this type of fuel ashore.

MARPOL Annex VI also bears down strongly on the permitted level

of NOx emissions over a similar timeframe. NOx emissions cannot

be reduced by a fuel change and instead technical adjustments must

be made to marine engines. These adjustments imply a reduction

in the overall effi ciency of the engine and some commentators talk

about a 2% loss in effi ciency to meet the NOx requirements. Loss

of effi ciency immediately brings an increase in the fuel bill.

There are a number of international conventions whose text has

been adopted at IMO and ILO but which have yet to enter into

force simply because insuffi cient States have given the necessary

parliamentary time to adoption into national law and to ratifi cation.










5-10












MARPOL


2015 ECAs

0.1% 2020 2025

0.5% 2025



170%


6


MARPOL





2%






HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

35


International Shipping – the Next 10 Years


In a sense, these conventions are out of control; nobody can

determine when they will enter into force and consequently

planning for outfitting the compliant technologies is a difficult

commercial decision. Often the required equipment is costly to

buy and costly to operate. The most compelling example of these

conventions is the Ballast Water Convention which has been in a

state of limbo since the text was adopted in 2004. The indications

appear to suggest that it will achieve its entry into force criteria in

the not too distant future. At its adoption, the Convention was

innovative in two respects; fi rstly, it required equipment to be fi tted

to achieve a standard of cleanliness in ballast water that simply did

not exist in 2004 and secondly it set compulsory dates for ballast

water treatment regardless of the date of entry into force of the

Convention. The net result of this innovation has been extremely

costly ballast water treatment equipment with high energy

demands that deplete the ship’s innate efficiency standard. It is

also worrying that the required dates for some specifi c ship types

to be fi tted have already passed and will be subject to retrospective

application in some States.

Another such Convention is the Hong Kong Ship Recycling

Convention. This Convention matches the industry’s aspiration

to ensure that ships are recycled to the maximum extent possible

when they reach the end of their commercially viable life. The

Convention places an obligation on the owner, inter alia, to obtain

an inventory of hazardous material from the builder (or to put a

slightly simpler one in place on existing ships) and to maintain

it throughout the ship’s life before obtaining a ‘ready to recycle’

certificate prior to sale of the ship to the recycling facility. The

Convention has complex ratifi cation criteria including a requirement

for a proportion of the world recycling capacity to be represented.

It has yet to achieve a single State signatory and it is impossible to

begin to predict when it will become enforceable. This situation

makes it diffi cult for owners to decide when and how to complete

the inventory but nevertheless ICS recommends completion of the

inventory early as a demonstration of self regulation.

It is worth drawing attention to the ILO’s Maritime Labour

Convention. The Convention is likely to achieve its ratification

criteria within the next few years and there is going to be enormous

pressure on administrations and on recognised organisations to

inspect and certify ships in the period before the Convention

becomes enforceable. The Convention places significant

administrative burdens on existing ships for compliance and on

new ships in terms of design and construction. There is a clear

need to ensure that ship’s staff are trained in the requirements

of the Convention in order to correctly and adequately address

compliance and port State control inspections.

The current situation can thus best be characterised by uncertainty;

uncertainty over compliance requirements and uncertainty over

operational cost juxtaposed with the dramatic certainty that fuel

prices are going to increase.



2004



2004

















ICS












36 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


International Shipping – the Next 10 Years


Finally we need to consider the greatest uncertainty of all; the

matter of ensuring that shipping’s CO 2 emissions are reduced or in

other words that ships demonstrate a marked increase in what is

already an impressive measure of effi ciency. IMO is working hard

to deliver into regulation a package of technical and operational

measures that will continuously improve the effi ciency of individual

ships. Whether IMO can in fact complete this task hangs in the

balance as the high level political debate continues to be polarised

between those States that already have an obligation to pay for and

deliver efficiency improvement (the so called developed States)

and those States that have been excused such an obligation

regardless of their CO 2 inventory. It is unsatisfactory for the

shipping industry to have its quest for effi ciency and its will to make

a contribution to climate change mitigation thwarted by politics

that rightly belong at UNFCCC and not at IMO. Hopefully at the

eleventh hour, shipping will be given the chance to adopt effi ciency

measures to a known timetable. The last thing that is required in

the present climate is any more uncertainty. Unfortunately one

more source of uncertainty still remains to be considered.

The Copenhagen Accord creates a mechanism whereby funds

should be raised to pay for CO 2 mitigation in the developing

world. Among the sources identified for an annual contribution

to an overall fi gure of $100 billion per annum are the two global

transport modes, shipping and aviation. The precise magnitude of

this additional burden on shipping is not known although a fi gure

of around US$ 7 billion has been mooted in some quarters. There

has also been debate in the IMO on a market based mechanism

(MBM) that could be used to incentivise shipowners to be more

efficient in their operations and thus assist in addressing climate

change. The industry needs to be wary that it does not end up

with two parallel but independent economic measures; one at IMO

and the other under the Copenhagen Accord.

What does all this mean for the future of the shipping industry

Uncertainty is never good for commercial decision making.

Some of the pending regulation will bring requirements for

new equipment and other regulation will require administrative

measures and additional crew training. All of these imply expense.

The magnitude of the expense is unknown but it has the potential

to change the face of shipping.

If the impact of uncertainty is to be so far-reaching then there is an

urgent need to ensure that future regulation does not compound

the problem. This in turn suggests that some procedural measures

should be taken now. Not least is that every new piece of

regulation must be accompanied by a cost-benefi t analysis which

considers not just the measure itself but also its inter-relationship

with other regulation. Finally it is unhelpful and unproductive to

have adopted legislative text pending for years until the text is

ratified. Perhaps it would concentrate the minds of government

delegations if a draft Convention had a fi nite shelf life of perhaps

fi ve years, after which if it had not been ratifi ed it would be deleted.











UNFCCCI






1000


70





















Peter Hinchliffe

Peter Hinchliffe

Secretary General

International Chamber of Shipping

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

37


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

22 Jan

Executive Committee Lunch for Capt. Pottengal Mukundan,

Director of the ICC International Maritime Bureau

29 Jan

Association Luncheon for Mr. Mark Long, Head of Global

Shipping, HSBC

19 Mar

Joint HKSOA/Marine Department Luncheon and Awards

Ceremony (Guest of Honour : Captain David Roger Llewellyn,

Serving Master, OOCL)

16 April

Executive Committee Lunch for Mr. Dong Qiang, Deputy

President of China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC)

28 Jun

Executive Committee Lunch for Capt. Kuba Szymanski,

Secretary General of InterManager

30 Jun

Association Luncheon for Mr. Graham Peachey, Chief

Executive Offi cer, Australian Maritime Safety Authority

9 Sept

Association Luncheon and Amver Awards Ceremony

(Guest of Honour : Mr. Richard A. Lidinsky, Jr., Chairman of

Federal Maritime Commission

17 Dec

Association Luncheon for Mr. Steve Vickers, Chairman of

FTI-International Risk

Association Annual Analyst Luncheon for Mr. Mark Long,

Head of Global Shipping, HSBC on 29 January 2010.

2010 1 29

Mark Long

Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman and senior officers of the

Association paid a Chinese new year visit to Mdm. Guo Li

(L5), Deputy Director of Central Government Liaison Office

in HKSAR on 8 March 2010. Picture (L-R): Arthur Bowring

(Managing Director), Alan Tung (Deputy Chairman), Wang

Futian (Vice Chairman), Mdm. Guo Li, Wang Binxing (Director

of Economic Department of Liaison Offi ce), Mr. Liu Changyu

(Chief of Economic Department of Liaison Office) and

Mr. Ye Zhixiong (Liaison Offi ce).

2010 3 8


5




HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

39


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

Mr. Kenneth Koo (Chairman) paid a Chinese New Year visit to

Mr. Zhan Yongxin, Deputy Commissioner of the Commissioner

Offi ce of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Hong Kong. Picture

(L-R): Arthur Bowring (Managing Director), Mr. Kenneth Koo,

Mr. Zhan Yongxin (Deputy Commissioner), Mr. Alan Tung

(Deputy Chairman), Mr. Gilbert Feng (Assistant Director).

2010 3 9




Joint HKSOA/Marine Department Luncheon and Awards Ceremony on 19 March 2010 (Guest of Honour : Captain David Roger

Llewellyn, Serving Master, OOCL)

2010 3 19

David Roger Llewellyn

6 6


Mr. Kenneth Koo (Chairman) hosted a dinner in the China Club

for the visiting Shanghai Hongkou District delegation led by

Mr. Ying Mingyong, Deputy Mayor of Hongkou District,

Shanghai on 30 March 2010. Picture (L-R): Mr. Lu Qingdong

(Director of Shipping Centre Office, Hongkou Municipal

District Government), Mr. Kenneth Koo (Chairman), Mr. Ying

Mingyong (Deputy Mayor), Mr. Alan Tung (Deputy Chairman)

and Mr. M.H. Liang (Island Navigation).

2010 3 30




40 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman paid a visit to the PLA garisson

in Hong Kong on 14 April 2010 and conveyed the industry's

heartfelt appreciation to Senior Colonel Xu Jingcai (Deputy

Chief of Staff and Chief of Navy Staff of PLA garrison in Hong

Kong), for Chinese navy's escort to Hong Kong ships in the

Gulf of Aden.

2010 4 14




Mr. Kenneth Koo, HKSOA Chairman hosted a lunch for the

visiting delegation of China State Shipbuilding Corporation

(CSSC) in the China Club on 16 April 2010. Picture:

Mr. Kenneth Koo exchanging souvenir with Mr. Dong Qing

(left), Deputy President of CSSC.

2010 4 16



Mr. Arthur Bowring, Managing Director of HKSOA, receiving

a visiting Hubei provincial government delegation led by

Mr. Duan Lunyi, Deputy Governor of Hubei Province in the

HKSOA secretariat. Picture (from left to right): Mr. Zhang Lin

(Party Secretary of Xin Zhou Districit of Wuhan), Mr. Gilbert

Feng (Assistant Director), Mr. Arthur Bowring (Managing

Director), Mr. Duan Lunyi (Deputy Governor), Mr. Peng

Yong (Deputy Secretary of Hubei Provincial Government),

Mr. Huang Qiang (Party Secretary of Changjiang Waterway

Bureau).

2010 5 10






HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

41


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

Mr. Kenneth Koo, HKSOA Chairman and members of the China Sub Committee hosted a lunch for Ms. Doris Cheung, Deputy

Secretary, Transport and Housing Bureau on 19 May 2010 to exchange ideas on strengthening and developing Hong Kong as

an international shipping centre. Picture (L-R): Capt. Cui Li Xin (North China Shipping), Mr. C.C. Liu (Parakou), Mr. Wang Futian

(COSCO HK), Mr. Kenneth Koo (Chairman), Ms. Doris Cheung, Mr. Gao Yanming (North China Shipping), Mr. Joseph Poon

(Tai Chong Cheung), Capt. Francis Li (Ocean Longevity).

2010 5 19 5



Mr. Sham Chellaram, Association Vice Chairman (right)

presented a souvenir to Mr. Graham Peachey, Chief

Executive Officer, Australian Maritime Safety Authority at

an Association luncheon on 30 June 2010.

2010 6 30

Graham Peachey

Sham Chellaram

Mr. Kenneth Koo, the Association Chairman (right)

presented a souvenir to Mr. Richard A. Lidinsky, Jr.,

Chairman of Federal Maritime Commission at the

Association Luncheon and Amver Awards Presentation,

jointly hosted by the Association Luncheon and the US

Consulate, HKSAR on 9 September 2010.

2010 9 9

2010


Richard A. Lidinsky, Jr.

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

43


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman led a HKSOA study mission

to Shanghai to learn about the development of Shanghai

International Shipping Centre. His delegation was warmly

received by Mr. Shen Jun, Deputy Mayor of Shanghai

(right) on 12 September 2010.

2010 9 12



Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman led a HKSOA

study mission to visit Shanghai International

Shipping Institute (SISI) on 12 September

2010 to learn about the development of

Shanghai as an international shipping centre.

2010 9 12



Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman led a HKSOA study

mission to visit Hongkou District Government

of Shanghai on 16 September 2010 to learn

about the development of North Bund as

an important part of Shanghai International

Shipping Centre.

2010 9 16



44 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

Mr. David Koo (5th left), the Association Past Chairman toasting together with the other VIP guests at a joint

National Day Cocktail party with other local shipping associations on 21 September to celebrate China’s 61st

Founding Anniversary.

2010 9 21 5

61

Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman and Mr. Alan Tung, Deputy

Chairman paid a visit to Mr. Xu Zuyuan, Deputy Minister

of Transport in Beijing on 13 October 2010. Picture

(L-R): Mr. Kenneth Koo (Chairman), Mr. Xu Zuyuan

(Deputy Minister of Transport) and Mr. Alan Tung

(Deputy Chairman).

2010 10 13



Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman and Mr. Alan Tung, Deputy

Chairman paid a visit to Mr. Chen Aiping, Deputy Director of

Maritime Safety Administration (MSA) in Beijing on 13 October

2010. Picture (L-R): Mr. Alan Tung (Deputy Chairman),

Mr. Chen Aiping (Deputy Director of MSA) and Mr. Kenneth

Koo (Chairman).

2010 10 13



HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

45


Luncheons and Other Events in 2010

2010

Group photo taken at a lunch hosted by Mr. Kenneth Koo, Chairman for the visiting Minister of Transport on 22 November

2010. Namely:

1st row (from left to right): Mr. Wang Futian (Vice Chairman), Mr. Kenneth Koo (Chairman), Mr. Frank Tsao (IMC), Mr. Li Shenglin

(Minister of Transport), Mr. C.C. Liu (Parakou), Mr. Zhang Zhirong (Chairman of Rongsheng Heavy Industry)

2nd row (from left to right): Mr. Fu Xiao (IMC), Mr. Jack Hsu (Oak), Mr. Tian Zhongshan (Sinotrans Shipping), Mr. Ju Chengzhi

(Director General of International Cooperation Dept. MOT), Ms Li Nan (Deusche Bank), Ms Zhang Hongbin (MOT), Mr. Han

Jun (China Shipping Group), Mr. Joseph Poon (TCC), Mr. Chen Qiang (Rong Sheng Heavy Industry), Mr. Gilbert Feng (Assistant

Director, HKSOA).

2010 11 22





Photo taken at the 54th Annual General Meeting Cocktail

on 24 November 2010. Mr. Kenneth Koo (1st right), the

Association Chairman and Mr. Alan Tung (1st left), the

Association Deputy Chairman toasting together with the

Association’s Patron Mr. C.H. Tung (Middle), Ms. Eva Cheng

(2nd right), Secretary for Transport and Housing Bureau,

and Ms. Miriam Lau (2nd Left), Legislative Councilor.

2010 11 24 54

1

1

2

2

Association Luncheon for Mr. Steve Vickers, Chairman of

FTI-International Risk on 17 December 2010.

2010 12 17

FTI-International Risk Steve Vickers

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

47


United we sail

Partner of the maritime community since 1918

Deutsche Schiffsbank AG

Domshof 17 28195 Bremen Germany

Domstraße 18 20095 Hamburg Germany

photo: www.michaellange.de

www.schiffsbank.com


List of Seminars 2010

2010

17 Mar

Half day Conference “Adapting to a Different Future:

Things to think about when planning future strategy” by

various speakers from HK Maritime Industry

18 Mar

Joint HKSOA/Wartsila Seminar

12 Apr

Joint HKSOA / HKMLA / HK Shippers Council

“The Rotterdam Rules”

15 Jun

Joint HKSOA/Marine Department/Rina Seminar

“A Discussion Forum on the Maritime Labour Convention”

24 Jun

“Adopting Centrifugal Oil Cleaners for Engine Protection,

Cost Savings and a Better Environment” by Mann +

Hummel Group

28 Jun

Joint HKSOA/InterManager Seminar

6 Jul

Joint HKSOA/Lloyd’s Register Seminar on “FOBAS/IBIA

Update”

13 Jul

Joint HKSOA/Blank Rome Seminar on “Deep Water

Horizon Incident”

14 Jul

“Marine Nanotechnology“ by Rewitec GmbH and

Adelco France

21 Sep

“Hamworthy Environmental: Ballast Water Treatment &

Exhaust Gas Cleaning” by Hamworthy Water Systems and

Hamworthy Krystallon

26 Oct

Joint HKSOA/HK Seamen’s Union Conference on “MLC

2006, PRC Marine Pollution Regulations and Maritime

Security”

29 Oct

“Reducing Ship Source Emissions by Improving the

Combustion Process of Marine Diesel Engines“ by

members of the Research Group, University of Southern

California, Los Angeles

12 Nov

“A100L The New Benchmark for 2-Stroke Engine“ by ABB

Turbo Systems AG

30 Nov

“Navgard – Your cost effective, Type Approved & Simple

BNWAS solution” by Martek Marine

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

49


Asian Shipowners Forum


The Association, through its Sub-committees, plays

a major part in the work of the Asian Shipowners

Forum (ASF).

The members of the ASF are 8 Shipowner Associations in the Asian

region, being those from Australia (ASA), China (CSA), Chinese

Taipei (NACS), Hong Kong (HKSOA), India (INSA), Japan (JSA),

Korea (KSA) and the Federation of ASEAN Shipowner Associations

(FASA), which comprises the Shipowner Associations of Indonesia,

Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

The ASF normally meets once a year. In 2010, the 19th meeting

was hosted by the HKSOA and held in Hong Kong from 24 to 26

May 2010, and in 2011, the 20th meeting will be hosted by FASA

and held in Bali, Indonesia.

The 16th meeting of the Forum agreed to establish a permanent

office in Singapore and Mr. Wang Cheng was appointed the first

Secretary General of the Asian Shipowners Forum in July 2007.

Mr. Wang Cheng retired from the post in 2009, and Mr. Yuichi

Sonoda was appointed acting Secretary General in late 2009, his

appointment reconfi rmed at the 19th ASF in 2010. The setting up

of a permanent offi ce and appointment of the Secretary General

are essential steps in building the influence and participation of

Asian shipowners in global maritime affairs.

The on-going work of the ASF is carried out by the 5 ‘S’

Committees; the Seafarer’s Committee (SC), the Shipping

Economics and Review Committee (SERC), the Ship Insurance and

Liability Committee (SILC), the Safe Navigation and Environment

Committee (SNEC), and the Ship Recycling Committee (SRC).

The Association is active in the work of the ASF; Mr. George Chao

is Chairman of the Ship Insurance and Liability Committee, and the

Association secretariat acts as secretary for this Committee as well

as the Seafarer’s Committee. Members of the Association sit on all

5 Committees.

The ASF Seafarers Committee (SC) held its 16th Interim

meeting in Qingdao, China, 21 to 22 October 2010. The main

objectives of the Committee are to ensure and maintain common

standards of training, to promote the stability of employment

and competitiveness of Asian seafarers and to monitor, consider

and comment on any new international maritime legislation on

Seafarer’s Welfare, and Manning and Training. Subjects discussed

included Piracy and its effect on Seafarers and their families,

Seafarers Recruitment and Training, Shore leave for seafarers, the

Review of STCW ’95 Convention and the ILO Maritime Labour

Convention 2006.

The ASF Shipping Economics and Review Committee (SERC)

held its 23rd Interim meeting in Okinawa, Japan on 29 to 30

November 2010. The purpose of the Committee is to promote

the continuous and healthy development of the Asian shipping

industry through a frank exchange of views, which is also designed








2010

19 2010

5 24 26 20

2011


16

2007 7

2009

2010

19



5 S









2010 10 21 22

16






STCW 95 2006


2010 11 29 30

23




50 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Asian Shipowners Forum


to foster fair competition, mutual trust and cooperation amongst

Asian carriers. Subjects discussed include the World Economy, the

Dry Bulk, Tanker and Liner Shipping Markets, Anti-Trust Immunity for

Liner Shipping and Security and Environmental concerns.

The ASF Ship Insurance and Liability Committee (SILC) held its 16th

Interim meeting in Hong Kong on 22 March 2011. The Committee

discussed the potential liabilities in carrying armed guards to protect

against piratical attacks, the PRC Regulation on the Prevention and

Control of Marine Pollution from Ships, the proposed United States

sanctions against Iran, and the Fair Treatment and Criminalization of

seafarers, amongst other issues.

The ASF Safe Navigation and Environment Committee

(SNEC) held its 19 and 20 Interim meetings in Singapore on

17 September 2010 and 18 March 2011 respectively. The

objective of the Committee is to discuss topics and issues relating

to the enhancement of security, safe navigation of ships and

protection of the marine environment. Subjects discussed include

Piracy and Armed Robbery, Safety of Navigation, Air Pollution, and

Greenhouse Gas Emissions, amongst other issues.

The ASF Ship Recycling Committee (SRC) held its 14th Interim

meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam on 25 March 2011. Subjects discussed

included the IMO draft Convention on Ship Recycling and its

related Guidelines, and environmental concerns related to the

recycling of ships.



2011 3 22





2010 9

17 2011 3 18 19

20




2011 3 25

14



HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

51


19th Asian Shipowners Forum

19

The 19th Asian Shipowners Forum was held in Hong

Kong 24 to 26 May 2010 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel,

Wanchai.

In a break with recent tradition, the plenary meetings were

preceeded by the welcome cocktail and formal dinner, which were

held at the Aberdeen Marina Club with the extremely generous

support of Wah Kwong Maritime Transport Holdings Ltd. The

HKSAR Chief Executive, Mr. Donald Tsang GBM, was the guest of

honour at the welcome cocktail. Our guests enjoyed an evening

of good food and company, with background music by Allen

Youngblood during the cocktail and by a string trio and harp during

the dinner.

The five Standing Committees held morning meetings the next

day, which were followed by the fi rst Plenary session and Annual

General Meeting. Mr. Francis Ho, Permanent Secretary, Transport

and Housing (Transport), The Government of the HKSAR, gave the

welcome address, which was followed by the AGM report and the

reports of the fi ve Standing Committees.

Mr. Yau Shing-mu, Acting Secretary for Transport and Housing, gave

an address to the delegates at the Luncheon.

Also, in a break with tradition, the afternoon Plenary session was

held in the manner of a discussion forum with representatives

of the international organisations. Several topical issues were

discussed in depth during the debate at the forum. The formal

business of the day completed with the finalization of the press

release and a well-attended press conference.

An afternoon seminar was also held for Young Shipping Executives

on the topic of “Shipping’s Role in a Greener Supply Chain”,

presented by Ms. Veronica Booth, a researcher from Civic Exchange.

The informal dinner that evening was held at Café Deco on the

Peak, and guests were treated to clear weather and good views,

a sumptuous dinner buffet and an evening of jazz with the Allen

Youngblood band. Bill Yim, the well-known Hong Kong caricaturist,

once again joined us to sketch the delegates and their partners,

and a magician gave a close-up magic performance. A golf putting

game was set up on the roof terrace, but the windy conditions

made accurate putting diffi cult!

The traditional golf day was held the next day at the Eden Course

at the Hong Kong Golf Club, a keenly contested event in glorious

weather. While the various meetings were taking place, various

excursions to various different areas of Hong Kong were arranged

for the partners of the delegates and also, on the final day, for

non-golfers.

19 2010 5 24-26







Allen Youngblood

















Allen Youngblood


Bill Yim








52 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


19th Asian Shipowners Forum

19

The Association would like to thank the many

sponsors for their extremely generous support of

the event:



Sponsors: :

Anglo-Eastern Ship Management Ltd


Arrow Asia Shipbrokers Ltd

Bank of China (Hong Kong)

Bureau Veritas

Chellaram Shipping (HK) Ltd

Chugoko Marine Paints (HK) Ltd

Fairmont Shipping (HK) Ltd

Grand Seatrade Shipping Company Ltd

Hempel (China) Ltd

Ince & Co

International Maritime Carriers Ltd

KC Maritime Limited

Keesal Young & Logan LLP

Nippon Kaiji Kyokai

Noble Group Ltd

Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd

OSRO China Ltd

Seatrade




Chellaram Shipping (HK) Ltd





Ince & Co


KC Maritime Limited



Noble Group Ltd



Seatrade

Simpson Spence & Young Hong Kong Ltd

Steamship Mutual Management (Hong Kong) Ltd

Tai Chong Cheang Steamship Co (HK) Ltd

Teh Hu Cargocean Management Co Ltd

Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Wah Kwong Maritime Transport Holdings Limited

Simpson Spence & Young Hong Kong Ltd

Steamship Mutual Management (Hong Kong) Ltd





HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

53


19th Asian Shipowners Forum

19

54 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


19th Asian Shipowners Forum

19

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

55


19th Asian Shipowners Forum

19

56 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Maritime Awareness Week


25 - 31 October 2010

MAW aims to promote career opportunities

in the maritime industry for young people,

as well as to mark Hong Kong’s commitment

to the International Maritime Organization’s

“Year of the Seafarer”.

Co-organised by:

Hong Kong Maritime Industry Council

Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Supported by:

Marine Department

Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce

Hong Kong Institute of Marine Technology

Hong Kong Joint Branch of

RINA and IMarEST

Hong Kong Maritime Museum

Hong Kong Seamen’s Union

Institute of Seatransport

Nautical Institute

Sailors’ Home & Missions to Seamen

Women’s International Shipping & Trading (HK) Association (WISTA)

2010 10 25 - 31



















Opening Ceremony and Reception


Seminar on Maritime Labour Convention, China

Oil Pollution Regulation and Maritime Security


HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

57


Maritime Awareness Week


“Think Maritime”Day: Career Talks and Tree-planting

Ceremony at Vocational Training Council’s Maritime

Services Training Institute (VTC’s MSTI)



Seafarer’s Day - Commemoration of IMO’s Year of the Seafarer


Grand Opening of the Study Centre at the Study Centre,

Hong Kong Seamen’s Union


Church Service of Thanksgiving for Seafarers at the Mariners’ Club


Charity Dinner with Auction hosted by the Port

Welfare Committee at the Mariners’ Club


58 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Maritime Awareness Week


Luncheon to commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the

Shipping Register in Hong Kong


Hong Kong Shipowners Association’s seminar on fi ndings of

research on ship-sourced pollution


Maritime Fair cum Open Day in

Government Dockyard


Beach Cleaning Day


HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

59


Sub-Committees


The Association’s fi ve Sub-committees work through meetings as

well as increasingly by debate through correspondence in order

to advise the Executive Committee and the Secretariat on the

response that the Association should make on current issues of

importance to the maritime industry.




China Sub-committee

Chairman : Mr. Wang Futian, COSCO (H.K.) Shipping Co Ltd

The China Sub-committee advises the Executive Committee

on issues relating to China and Chinese Taipei and assists the

Committee in its relations with Central Government.

Nautical Sub-committee

Chairman : Capt. Pradeep Chawla, Anglo-Eastern Ship

Management Ltd

The Nautical Sub-committee advises on current operational issues,

including e-Navigation, ECDIS, Maritime Security and LRIT, ISM

Code, Lifeboat release hooks and other On-board Safety issues.

Insurance and Liability Sub-committee

Chairman : Mr. George Chao, Wah Kwong Shipping

Holdings Ltd

The Insurance and Liability Sub-committee discusses current legal

and insurance issues, including international and regional sanctions,

the UNCITRAL Convention on Contracts for the International

Carriage of Goods Wholly or Partly by Sea, the HNS Convention

and its Protocol, and the relevant EU proposed directives.








Pradeep Chawla













Manning Sub-committee

Chairman : Mr. Biraj Tracy, New Asian Shipping Co Ltd

The Manning Sub-committee discusses current Manning and

Training, Labour Affairs and other issues affecting seafarers and

their welfare. Current issues include the Fair Treatment and unfair

Criminalisation of seafarers, the ILO Maritime Labour Convention,

the IMO/ILO work on Abandonment and Crew Claims and the

revision of STCW, as well as the recruitment and retention of

seafarers.

Technical Sub-committee

Chairman : currently vacant

The Technical Sub-committee debates technical issues, including

ship construction and design, machinery and engine room layout,

and environmental issues. Current issues include Air Pollution,

Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Engine Room Oily Waste systems,

Ballast Water and various ship construction and design issues.


Biraj Tracy





STCW








60 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Representation on Government Committees and Statutory Boards


Hong Kong Maritime Industry Council (MIC)

Mr. Kenneth Koo, Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre -

HKIAC Arbitrator Appointment Board

Mr. Jack Hsu, Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd

Marine Department – Consultative Committee

Ship Personnel Management (CCSPM)

Mr. Arthur Bowring, Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Marine Department – Port Welfare Committee (PWC)

Mr. Kenneth Koo, Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Marine Department – Port Operations Committee (POC)

Capt. L.C. Chan, Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd

Marine Department – Pilotage Advisory Committee (PAC)

Capt. L.C. Chan, Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd

Marine Department – Seafarers’ Advisory Board (SAB)

Capt. William Medcalf, Pacifi c Basin Shipping (HK) Ltd

Capt. Biraj Tracy, New Asian Shipping Company Ltd

Marine Department – Shipping Consultative Committee (SCC)

Mr. Arthur Bowring, Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Vocational Training Council –

Maritime Services Training Board (MSTB)

Mr. Arthur Bowring, Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Capt. P.H. Lam, Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Vocational Training Council –

Transport Logistics Training Board (TLTB)

Mr. Emil Lai, Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd















William Medcalf

Biraj Tracy









HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

61


New Members Corner


The Bahamas Maritime Authority

Ship Registry


Beibu Gulf Ocean Shipping

(Group) Ltd


Dry Bulk Cargo Ship Operator


Economic & Commercial Office of

Panama in Hong Kong

Panama Ship Registration and

Maritime Services


Eversheds LLP


Legal Services


Fairweather Steamship Co Ltd


Bulk Carriers/Shipowning/Ship

Management

/ /

Far East Shipmanagement Ltd


Shipmanagement & Surveying Services


Hai Cheung Trading Co (HK) Ltd


Sales/Manufacturing of Marine Equipment


LOC (Hong Kong) Ltd

Marine Consultancy


MBS Logistics Limited


Supply Chain/Logistics/Freight Forwarding

/ /

MUR Shipping BV,

Hong Kong Branch

Operators of Handysize-Supermax

Dry Bulk Vessels


ORSO China Ltd


Marine Pollution Control


OSL Shipping Ltd

Shipowning


Seamaster Chartering Ltd


Shipbroker


Spectec Asia Pacific Pte Ltd

Planned Maintenance Systems for Vessels


Tiger Oil Marine Limited

Marine Lubricants and Fuel Additives


62 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


HKSOA 30 Year Club


A. Bilbrough & Co Ltd A. Bilbrough & Co Ltd

American Bureau of Shipping (HK) Ltd

Anglo-Eastern Ship Management Ltd

Aon Hong Kong Ltd

BNP Paribas Hong Kong Branch

Bureau Veritas

China Navigation Co Ltd, The (Swire Group)

Credit Agricole Asia Shipfi nance Limited

Det Norske Veritas AS

Fairmont Shipping (H.K.) Ltd

Feoso Oil Ltd

Germanischer Lloyd Hong Kong Ltd

Grand Seatrade Shipping Company Ltd

Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corpn Ltd,

The Transport Services and Infrastructure, Corporate Banking

HUD Group

International Maritime Carriers Ltd

Interocean Shipping Co Ltd

Island Navigation Corporation International Ltd

Lambert Brothers Insurance Brokers (Hong Kong) Ltd

Lloyd's Register Asia

MAN Diesel & Turbo Hong Kong Limited

Marsh (Hong Kong) Ltd

Mayer Brown JSM

New Asian Shipping Company, Limited

Nippon Kaiji Kyokai

Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Richards Hogg Lindley

RINA Hong Kong Branch Offi ce

Shun Tak - China Travel Shipping Investments Ltd

Taiship Development Ltd

Teh Hu Cargocean Management Co Ltd

Unique Shipping (H.K.) Limited

Univan Ship Management Ltd

Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Wah Kwong Shipping Holdings Ltd

Wallem Group Ltd

Wartsila China Ltd











Germanischer Lloyd Hong Kong Ltd









MAN Diesel & Turbo Hong Kong Limited


















HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

63


Membership List


Shipowners, Ship Managers, Ship Operators

Allocean (Hong Kong) Ltd

Anglo-Eastern Ship Management Ltd

Asia Maritime Pacifi c (Hong Kong) Ltd

Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement (Hong Kong) Ltd Partnership

Bocimar Hong Kong Limited

Chellaram Shipping (Hong Kong) Ltd

China LNG Shipping (International) Co Ltd

China Merchants Group Ltd

China Navigation Co Ltd, The (Swire Group)

China Shipping (H.K.) Marine Co Ltd

Chinese Maritime Transport (Hong Kong) Ltd

Cido Shipping (H.K.) Co Ltd

COSCO (H.K.) Shipping Co Ltd

Delphis HK Limited

Euronav Hong Kong Limited

Exmar Hong Kong Limited

Fairmont Shipping (H.K.) Ltd

Fairweather Steamship Co Ltd

Far East Shipmanagement Ltd

Fenwick Shipping Services Ltd

Feoso Oil Ltd

Flying Leaf Shipping Ltd

GMT Shipping (HK) Ltd

Grand Seatrade Shipping Company Ltd

Greathorse Shipping Holdings Ltd

Hong Kong Ming Wah Shipping Co Ltd

HUD Group

International Maritime Carriers Ltd

Interocean Shipping Co Ltd

Island Navigation Corporation International Ltd

Jinhui Shipping and Transportation Limited

(Member of the Jinhui Group)

KC Maritime Ltd

Maritime Capital Shipping (HK) Limited

MSC Ship Management (Hong Kong) Ltd

New Asian Shipping Company, Limited


Allocean (Hong Kong) Ltd




Bocimar Hong Kong Limited

Chellaram Shipping (Hong Kong) Ltd






Cido Shipping (H.K.) Co Ltd


Delphis HK Limited

Euronav Hong Kong Limited

Exmar Hong Kong Limited









Greathorse Shipping Holdings Ltd








KC Maritime Ltd

Maritime Capital Shipping (HK) Limited

MSC Ship Management (Hong Kong) Ltd


An up-to-date list of members and their contact details can be

found at www.hksoa.org.hk

www.hksoa.org.hk


64 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Membership List


Noble Group Ltd

North China Shipping Holdings Co Ltd

Oak Maritime (HK) Inc Ltd

Ocean Line Holdings Limited

Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd

OSL Shipping Ltd

OSM Maritime Services Ltd

Pacifi c Basin Shipping (HK) Ltd

Parakou Shipping Ltd

Santana Shipping Services Ltd

Seaspan Corporation

Shun Tak - China Travel Shipping Investments Ltd

Sinotrans Shipping Ltd

Star Cruises (HK) Ltd

Tai Chong Cheang Steamship Co (H.K.) Ltd

Taiship Development Ltd

Teh Hu Cargocean Management Co Ltd

Union Apex Mega Shipping Ltd

Unique Shipping (H.K.) Limited

Univan Ship Management Ltd

Valles Steamship Co Ltd

Wah Kwong Shipping Holdings Limited

Wallem Group Ltd

Wealth Ocean Services Ltd

Zest Ship Management Ltd

Noble Group Ltd





OSL Shipping Ltd

OSM Maritime Services Ltd



Santana Shipping Services Ltd

Seaspan Corporation















Classification Societies, Consultants, Surveyors

American Bureau of Shipping

Bureau Veritas

China Classifi cation Society Hong Kong Branch

Det Norske Veritas AS

Germanischer Lloyd Hong Kong Ltd

Korean Register of Shipping, Hong Kong Offi ce

Lloyd’s Register Asia

Nippon Kaiji Kyokai

Peter Cheng Naval Architect & Marine Consultant Ltd

RINA Hong Kong Branch Offi ce






Germanischer Lloyd Hong Kong Ltd

Korean Register of Shipping, Hong Kong Offi ce





An up-to-date list of members and their contact details can be

found at www.hksoa.org.hk

www.hksoa.org.hk


HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

65


Membership List


Marine Equipment Suppliers, Shipbuilders,

Repairers and Engine Builders

ABB Turbo Systems (Hong Kong) Ltd

China Shipbuilding & Offshore International (HK) Co Ltd

Chugoku Marine Paints (HK) Ltd

Hai Cheung Trading Co. (HK) Ltd

Hempel (China) Ltd

Jotun COSCO Marine Coatings (HK) Ltd

Kawasaki Heavy Industries (HK) Ltd

KCC Corporation

MAN Diesel & Turbo Hong Kong Limited

Marinequip China Co Ltd

Transas Hong Kong Ltd

Wartsila China Ltd

Wilhelmsen Ships Service Ltd



ABB Turbo Systems (Hong Kong) Ltd








MAN Diesel & Turbo Hong Kong Limited


Transas Hong Kong Ltd



Marine Insurance - Underwriters, P&I

Representatives, Average Adjusters and Brokers



A. Bilbrough & Co Ltd A. Bilbrough & Co Ltd

Aon Hong Kong Ltd

AXA Corporate Solutions Assurance,

Hong Kong Branch

China P&I Services (HK) Ltd

China United Shipbuilding Co Ltd

Cooper Gay (Hong Kong) Ltd

COSCO (Hong Kong) Insurance Brokers Ltd

CTX Special Risks Ltd

FP Marine Risks Ltd

Gard (HK) Ltd

Groupama Transport

Houlder Insurance Brokers Far East Ltd

HSBC Insurance Brokers (Asia-Pacifi c) Ltd

Lambert Brothers Insurance Brokers (Hong Kong) Ltd


AXA Corporate Solutions Assurance,

Hong Kong Branch



Cooper Gay (Hong Kong) Ltd




Gard (HK) Ltd

Groupama Transport




An up-to-date list of members and their contact details can be

found at www.hksoa.org.hk

www.hksoa.org.hk


66 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Membership List


Marsh (Hong Kong) Ltd

North of England P&I Association Ltd, The

QBE HongKong & Shanghai Insurance Ltd

Richards Hogg Lindley

Risk Exchange Ltd

Skuld (Far East) Ltd

Steamship Mutual Management (Hong Kong) Ltd

Sureness Marine Services Ltd

Exclusive Correspondents for The Britannia P & I Club

Swedish Club Hong Kong Ltd, The

Thomas Miller (Hong Kong) Ltd

West of England Insurance Services (Luxembourg) S.A.

Willis Hong Kong Ltd


North of England P&I Association Ltd, The



Risk Exchange Ltd

Skuld (Far East) Ltd

Steamship Mutual Management (Hong Kong) Ltd

Sureness Marine Services Ltd

Exclusive Correspondents for The Britannia P & I Club

Swedish Club Hong Kong Ltd, The




Marine Law - Lawyers, Arbitrators

and Claims Consultants

Blank Rome

Brenda Chark & Co

Clyde & Co

DLA Piper Hong Kong

Eversheds LLP

Holman Fenwick Willan

Ince & Co

Keesal, Young & Logan, LLP

Laracy & Co.

Mayer Brown JSM

Norton Rose Hong Kong

Philip Yang & Co Ltd

Reed Smith Richards Butler

Stephenson Harwood




Brenda Chark & Co



Eversheds LLP


Ince & Co





Philip Yang & Co Ltd



An up-to-date list of members and their contact details can be

found at www.hksoa.org.hk

www.hksoa.org.hk


HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

67


Membership List


Ship Finance - Bankers, Financiers

Bank of China (Hong Kong) Ltd

BNP Paribas Hong Kong Branch

Credit Agricole Asia Shipfi nance Limited

Credit Suisse AG, Hong Kong Branch

Deutsche Schiffsbank AG

DVB Group Merchant Bank (Asia) Ltd

Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corpn Ltd, The

Transport Services and Infrastructure, Global Banking

HSH Nordbank AG, Hong Kong Representative Offi ce

Mizuho Corporate Bank Ltd

NATIXIS Hong Kong Branch

Societe Generale Asia Ltd

Sumitomo Corporation (Hong Kong) Ltd

The Royal Bank of Scotland







DVB Group Merchant Bank (Asia) Ltd







The Royal Bank of Scotland

Ship Registration, Port Authorities

Director of Marine, Marine Department, HKSARG

Economic & Commercial Offi ce of

Panama in Hong Kong

International Registries (Far East) Ltd

LISCR (Far East) Ltd

The Bahamas Maritime Authority

/


Economic & Commercial Offi ce of

Panama in Hong Kong



The Bahamas Maritime Authority

Shipbrokers, Sale and Purchase Brokers

Arrow Asia Shipbrokers Ltd

Bancosta (Oriente) Ltd

Clarkson Asia Ltd

Cosmos Shipbroking (HK) Ltd

CPN International Ltd

Gibson (Asia) Ltd

HSBC Shipping Services Ltd

Maersk Broker Asia Ltd

Mitsui & Co (H.K.) Ltd

Rodskog Shipbrokers Ltd

Seamaster Chartering Limited

Simpson Spence & Young Hong Kong Ltd

South Express Ltd

/





CPN International Ltd

Gibson (Asia) Ltd




Rodskog Shipbrokers Ltd


Simpson Spence & Young Hong Kong Ltd


An up-to-date list of members and their contact details can be

found at www.hksoa.org.hk

www.hksoa.org.hk


68 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Membership List


Other Services to Shipping

Baybridge Services (Far East) Ltd

Beibu Gulf Ocean Shipping (Group) Ltd

BMT Asia Pacifi c Ltd

BP Hong Kong Ltd

Century Shipping Services Ltd

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Department of Logistics & Maritime Studies,

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Fratelli Cosulich (HK) Ltd

General Nice Development Ltd

Griffi n Travel (HK) Ltd

Gulf Oil Marine Ltd

Hong Kong Qianhe Shipping (Group) Co Ltd

ITOCHU Hong Kong Ltd

K Line (HK) Ltd

Lloyds List

LOC (Hong Kong) Ltd

LWJ Ship Engineering (Hong Kong) Co Ltd

Maersk Shipping Hong Kong Ltd

MBS Logistics Limited

Mitsubishi Corporation (Hong Kong) Ltd

MTI Network (Asia)

MUR Shipping BV, Hong Kong Branch

NS United Shipping (H.K.) Limited

NYK Line (H.K.) Ltd

OSRO China Ltd

Pacifi c Bulk Logistics Ltd

Penavico (HK) Ltd

Pole Star Space Applications Ltd

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Radio Holland Hong Kong Company Ltd

Seatrade Organisation, The

Shanghai Fisheries (Group) Hong Kong Co Ltd

SpecTec Asia Pacifi c Pte Ltd

Tiger Oil Marine Ltd

Total Lubricants Hong Kong Ltd

Unigas International Limited

Woodsford Shipping & Trading Co Ltd












Griffi n Travel (HK) Ltd





Lloyds List

LOC (Hong Kong) Ltd





MTI Network (Asia)

MUR Shipping BV, Hong Kong Branch






Pole Star Space Applications Ltd



Seatrade Organisation, The


SpecTec Asia Pacifi c Pte Ltd

Tiger Oil Marine Ltd


Unigas International Limited


An up-to-date list of members and their contact details can be

found at www.hksoa.org.hk

www.hksoa.org.hk


HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

69


Fleet Statistics


Vessels and Tonnage by Register

2010121

Owned, Managed and/or Operated by Members

as at 1 December 2010

Register Number of Ships Deadweight Gross Tonnage


Antigua 4 89,581 74,989

Bahamas 52 2,111,291 1,588,450

Barbados 5 170,948 104,185

Belgium 32 4,884,217 2,536,791

Belize 1 4,500 4,337

British (Bermuda) 22 1,047,918 972,422

British (Gibraltar) 7 98,471 135,345

British (Isle of Man) 9 242,314 176,335

British (UK) 17 984,450 640,456

Canada 1 28,418 20,236

China (PRC) 5 196,872 105,753

Chinese Taipei 2 66,991 44,059

Cyprus 9 1,099,787 577,216

Germany 1 3,180 3,150

Hong Kong 934 58,358,654 35,936,901

India 6 333,908 189,436

Indonesia 60 289,354 160,163

Italy 18 1,135,647 895,458

Liberia 112 10,922,600 6,254,851

Malaysia 10 511,992 324,442

Malta 17 866,942 510,627

Marshall Islands 60 4,240,569 2,595,150

Netherlands 20 785,671 595,537

Norway (NIS) 31 1,757,521 1,024,712

Panama 349 19,714,105 14,413,297

Philippines 11 289,772 363,544

Singapore 52 3,543,399 2,059,618

St. Vincent 1 23,257 18,360

Thailand 20 67,780 31,421

Vanuatu 1 8,937 8,483

Vietnam 4 347,990 195,841

Yemen 4 27,854 16,919

Grand Total : 1,877 114,254,890 72,578,484

70 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Fleet Statistics


Vessels and Tonnage by Ship Type

2010121

Owned, Managed and/or Operated by Members

as at 1 December 2010

Ship Type Number of Ships Deadweight Gross Tonnage


Barge 29 283,877 129,969

Bulk Carrier 764 55,501,797 30,231,972

Car Carrier 69 1,085,286 3,196,032

Cement Tanker 5 88,841 55,505

Chemical Tanker 111 3,493,334 2,140,591

Container Ship 337 15,021,506 12,791,894

Ferry 30 556 13,156

Floating Dock 6 145,242 106,456

Forest Products 10 481,328 402,781

Floating Storage and Offl oading 2 166,503 105,450

General Cargo 22 273,417 189,584

Heavy Lift 18 727,096 548,176

Hopper Dredger 1 4,500 4,337

LNG Ship 17 1,351,727 1,691,547

LPG Ship 62 1,841,711 1,496,460

Multi-Purpose 22 572,335 403,263

OBO 2 94,639 61,417

Ore Carrier 10 2,884,019 1,656,945

Passenger/Cruise 26 27,007 127,181

Product Tanker 102 5,159,705 3,053,829

Reefer 10 98,529 96,015

Research Ship 1 3,180 3,150

Ro-Ro 23 291,898 848,102

Self-Unloader 1 13,601 11,554

Silo Transhipper 1 64,643 35,716

Tanker 152 24,275,785 12,975,073

Tug 41 4,337 10,281

VLOC 1 278,380 154,644

Yacht Carrier 2 20,111 37,404

Grand Total : 1,877 114,254,890 72,578,484

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

71


Seafarers Employed by Owners and Managers


Nationality of Officers

The Nationality of Offi cers on Members’ ships shows an increase in

Indian offi cers, with a signifi cant decrease in Filipino offi cers. The

number of Hong Kong offi cers is almost insignifi cant.




December 2011

201112

1%

5%

9%

December 2010

201012

1% 7%

7%

13%

48%

22%

40%

24%

23%

Indian PRC Filipino Ukrainian Hong Kong Others

Nationality of Ratings

The Nationality of Ratings corrects the substantial increase

in Indian ratings seen last year, with an increase in PRC and

Filipino ratings. The number of Hong Kong ratings continues to

decline, and is now very close to zero.





December 2011

201112

1%

3%

6%

December 2010

201012

1%

5%

5%

13%

27%

34%

51%

29%

25%

Indian PRC Filipino Ukrainian Hong Kong Others

72

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Promotion within the Association


The opportunity to promote ideas, services or products to the

membership within the Association is made available as follows:

Informal Afternoon Seminars

These are arranged for members to attend cost-free and are held

at various hotel venues or conference centres, usually twice per

month. They last for about one hour and usually start at 4.30pm.

A wide variety of topics are covered and presentations by nonmembers

are also welcomed. To arrange such functions about

two months lead time is preferable. Our

staff welcome all suggestions regarding

topics and speakers.

The venue is able to be equipped with

a microphone, speaker’s lectern, video

projection equipment, and slide projector

if required. Seating can be varied for

groups of 50 to 200 people. Attendance

records are kept which will be made

available if requested afterwards. The

distribution of descriptive handout

materials is encouraged. For further

information, please contact the

Association’s Assistant Director.

Association Lunches

These are intended for attendance by as many members as

possible. Numbers vary from 100-150 people and a lunch-time

address is given by a Guest of Honour, frequently from overseas.

The functions are held almost every month and the cost is shared

by those who attend. A commitment with the Guest of Honour is

usually made many months in advance.

The Association’s staff are experienced in making all arrangements

for such major functions and these may even be hosted by nonmembers’

organizations for promotional purposes. The press and

other media are usually invited to a Press Conference afterwards,

and non-member guests are made welcome.

Executive Committee Lunches

These are exclusive and arranged as required for the Committee to

receive important overseas visitors or offi cials who are not seeking

full membership contact. A brief informal pre-lunch address from

such guests is always welcomed.

Casual Lunches

These can be arranged by our offi ce staff for the benefi t of nonmembers

upon request to make introductions in a neutral

environment to prospective contacts within the membership with a

view to fostering new business.




4 30








50-200







100

150















For further information about any of these functions and activities,

you are cordially invited to contact the Association’s Staff.

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

73


Membership Requirements & Secretariat Contact Details


Membership applications are considered from companies that

have a registered business in Hong Kong connected with shipping.

There are two categories of membership. Ordinary membership

for shipowners, shipmanagers and ship operators, and Associate

membership for all others.

Both categories of membership attend all Association functions

and receive all Association notices and material except for those in

which it is judged the Associate members may not be interested,

although they are welcome to have them upon request.

Associate members are not entitled to vote on resolutions at

general meetings - for example, on the election of the Chairman

they are invited to express their opinions but not to vote.

Every applicant must be sponsored by two members, of which one

must be an Ordinary member. The Executive Manager is glad to

assist applicants in completing their sponsorship arrangements.

On acceptance for membership there is an initial Entrance Fee of

HK$1,000, and monthly subscriptions for Ordinary members are

HK$4,800 and for Associate members HK$2,100.

Membership subscriptions for both Ordinary and Associate

members are to be paid annually in April.

Pro-rata refund of pre-paid annual payment can be arranged should

a member resign during the year (such refund will be based on

Article 11 - Resignation Requirement - of the Memorandum and

Articles of Association).

A Membership Application Form is printed on page 75-76 for

interested parties. Further information is available from the

Executive Manager.














1,000

4,800 2,100




11


75-76


Secretariat Contact Details

The Hong Kong Shipowners Association

Address:

12th Floor, Queen’s Centre

58 Queen’s Road East, Wanchai

Hong Kong

Telephone: (852) 2520-0206

Facsimile: (852) 2529-8246

E-mail: hksoa@hksoa.org.hk

Web Site: www.hksoa.org.hk

Secretariat:

Arthur Bowring, Managing Director

Gilbert Feng, Assistant Director

Peggy Kan, Executive Manager

Harry Chu, Communications Offi cer




58

12

: (852) 2520-0206

: (852) 2529-8246

: hksoa@hksoa.org.hk

: www.hksoa.org.hk






DESIGN GRAPHICAT LIMITED www.graphicat.com

74 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011


Membership Application Form


To The Executive Committee

The Hong Kong Shipowners Association

12th Floor, Queen’s Centre

58 Queen’s Road East, Wanchai

Hong Kong

This may be either mailed or

faxed to : (852) 2529-8246

Dear Sirs,

We desire to become an Ordinary/Associate* Member of the Hong Kong Shipowners Association Limited, and in the event of

our being elected to such membership we hereby agree to be bound by the Memorandum and Articles of Association, and to

abide by any rules and regulations of the Association for the time being in force.

We are a company registered in (place) in (year)

and our principal business is

we own/and or* manage vessels aggregating dwt.

We attach herewith brief introduction of our company, a copy of our Business Registration Certifi cate and a list of our Directors.

We nominate (1) Mr./Ms.* (2) Mr./Ms*.

and/or* (3) Mr./Ms.* (4) Mr./Ms*.

to represent us at any meeting called by the Association.

For future co-ordination, please address all your circulars and notices to our chief representative named as (1) above.

Our full name is : (English)

Address :

(Chinese)

Telephone** : Fax** :

Website : Email** :

Signature and company chop :

Title : Date:

We, the undersigned, are well acquainted with the above named Application Company and consider the same to be in every

respect eligible to become an Ordinary/Associate* Member of the Association.

Proposer

Seconder

* Please strike out that which does not apply.

** Please give general line numbers.

HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011

2010-2011

75


Membership Application Form




58

12


8522529-8246

/ *





1* / 2* /

3* / 4* /

1

:



:

** : ** :

: ** :

:

: :

/ *



*

**

76 HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION YEAR BOOK 2010-2011 2010-2011

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