Program Brochure (PDF) - SALT

salt.org

Program Brochure (PDF) - SALT

Update: 08/12/2013

@SALTLTI

#SALTMeet

Society for Applied Learning Technology ®


Table of Contents

About the Conference .................................................... 3

Conference Partnering Organizations ...................4-6

Session Room Location & Map...................................... 7

Pre-Conference Tutorials .............................................. 8

Keynote Address ........................................................... 9

Schedule at a Glance ............................................ 10- 12

Session Descriptions ............................................ 13 - 21

FGDLA Awards Info .................................................... 22

Exhibitors ..................................................................... 23

Registration Form ........................................................ 24

Meeting Location

Hyatt Regency Reston Hotel

1800 Presidents Street

Reston, VA 22090

Reservations: (888) 421-1442

Hotel Accommodations

A limited number of rooms have been set aside at the discounted

rate of $225.00 single/double at the Hyatt Regency Reston

Hotel. Room rates are subject to availability, so please make

your reservations as early as possible. Special room rates may

not be available after July 23, 2013. This room block may fill up

before this date, so book early. To receive the special conference

rate, call reservations at the Hyatt Regency Reston Hotel at 888-

421-1442 and reference the “SALT Conference.” You can also

make your hotel reservations online through our website

(www.salt.org) conference hotel section.

Registration

For earlybird registration rates, your registration submission

with payment must be completed by May 14, 2013, or faxed to

us by that date with credit card information included. For early

registration rates, your registration submission with payment

must be completed by July 31, 2013, or faxed to us by that date

with credit card information included. All registrations made

after July 31st OR requiring invoicing will be billed at the higher

rate. All foreign checks must be paid in US dollars.

One-Day/Two Day Registration

For those who prefer to attend only one or two days, there is a

one-day registration fee of $400 and a two-day fee of $600.

Cancellation Policy

Cancellations received by July 31, 2013 will be refunded after

the conference less a $50 processing fee. In the event of

cancellation we also accept attendee substitutions, or your fee

may be applied to the next SALT ® conference. No monetary

refunds will be made after July 31, 2013.

Registration Desk Hours (August 13-16, 2013)

Tuesday 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Wednesday 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Thursday 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Friday 8:00 AM - 12 NOON

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Exhibit Hours - Regency Ballroom

10:00 AM to 3:30 PM

10:00 AM to 3:30 PM

10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Program Topic Organization

Program headings are grouped by general categories for the

convenience of those who wish to focus on specific areas.

However, many presentations relate to more than one area and

attendees are encouraged to select those presentations of

greatest relevance to their needs. Schedules are arranged to

provide for attendees to change locations without disruption.

ADA Compliance

The Hyatt Regency Reston Hotel has warranted that it complies

with ADA requirements. Please indicate when making your hotel

reservations you would like assistance.

Program Changes

Learning Technology Institute ® reserves the right to make

necessary changes in this program. Every effort will be made to

keep presentations and speakers as represented. However,

unforeseen circumstances may result in the substitution or

cancellation of a presentation topic and/or speaker. For the

latest conference information, visit SALT's web site at www.salt.org.

Inquiries

Inquiries concerning this conference should be addressed to

the Society for Applied Learning Technology ® , 50 Culpeper

Street, Warrenton, Virginia 20186, (540) 347-0055 or fax at

(540) 349-3169.

Conference Sponsorship

This conference is being conducted by the Learning Technology

Institute ® (LTI ® ) in cooperation with the Society for Applied

Learning Technology ® (SALT ® ). However, SALT ® assumes no

responsibility for program content, facilities, schedules, or

operations. Learning Technology Institute ® programs are

educational in nature and are considered continuing professional

education. Attendees are advised that some presentations made

by representatives of the U.S. Government may be available at

little or no cost by making direct requests to those presenters.

While the Learning Technology Institute ® is an educational

organization, tax exempt under Section 501(c)3 of the Internal

Revenue Code, the fees for the program described in the

brochure are considered to be tuition expenses and not donations.

to the Institute. SALT Networking Reception

WEDNESDAY (AUG 14) - 5:00 PM TO 6:30 PM

The Society for Applied Learning Technology (SALT) is

sponsoring this reception for all conference participants. There

will be a cash bar and complimentary hors d'oeuvres. The

reception will be located in the exhibit hall (Regency Ballroom).

FGDLA Reception

THURSDAY (AUG 15) - 5:00 PM TO 6:30 PM

The Federal Government Distance Learning Association (FGDLA)

will be hosting an awards reception in the Exhibit Hall (Regency

Ballroom). There will be complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a

cash bar. All conference participants are welcome.


Conference Partnering Organizations

www.elearningexperts.net

About the SALT ® Conference

• Gaming & Simulation Applications

• Cloud Computing Solutions

• Training Technologies

• Learning Management Systems (LMS)

• Learning Content Management Systems (LCMS)

• E-learning Solutions

• Social Networks

Who Attends the SALT ® Conference

Decision makers involved in the selection and implementation of technology-based solutions for education, training, and

performance support.

Corporate and Industrial Trainers

Directors and managers seeking current information on E-learning, Mobile Computing Technology, and Content and Enterprise

Management Systems for their organizations’ training needs. Industry professionals who require training and communication

programs utilizing strategies which engage the learner. Corporations seeking to leverage current knowledge and investment in

online technologies.

Government and Military Professional

Military and government staff tasked with integrating the latest multimedia technologies into their training, compliance, and

logistics support programs. Courseware developers seeking SCORM compliant technologies to assist them in manpower

development, personnel training, and safety programs. Government agencies interested in Customizable Off The Shelf (COTS)

training solutions for their learners.

Educators

IT Managers and Curriculum Developers responsible for implementing technology based-systems now driving institutions of

higher education. Educators who want to know how the latest technologies (PDAs, LMS,) are being applied to improve the

learning experience. Instructional designers who need to be on top of the latest application technology to help them exploit

existing content and develop more accessible courseware.

• University and community college professionals

• Education/Training facilitators

• Hardware and software systems developers

• Consultants

• Training and Job Performance Support Professionals

• Technology-based systems manufacturers & integrators

• Human resource development managers

www.totaralms.com

www.asmr.com

The SALT ® Conference address the important issues that affect individuals and organizations who are involved in designing,

developing, or implementing technology based education and training systems. The conference provides unique opportunities

to obtain a cross-disciplinary exposure to technology applications in a concrete manner and to learn from speakers who are

practitioners of current technology applications. The conference experience should provide the potential for a broad exposure

to professionals from academia, government, industry, and the military who will be sharing their knowledge and experience.

Attendees will hear real-world and practical examples of how your peers came to recognize the challenges facing them and then

identified the technology-based solutions to address them. These solutions include:

• Enterprise Management Systems

• Industrial Training Systems and Courseware

• Online Professional Staff Development Systems

• Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs)

• Mobile Computing and Wireless Solutions

• Web-Based Training

• WiFi/Wireless Networking Technologies

• Corporate training managers

• Publishers and distributors of educational software

• Instructional design professionals

• Instructional systems professionals

• Training systems designers and developers

• Military and Homeland Security systems training

professionals

• Multimedia developers and distributors

SALT ® continues the practice of bringing together senior professionals from government, industry, academia, and the military

to present the latest developments in the field of learning and training technologies. Case studies are provided as well as the

results of recent research on the effectiveness and utilization of the latest learning and training technology applications.

The SALT ® Conference offers a cost-conscious method to stay up-to-date on the latest technologies for improving learning, reducing

training time and increasing employee effectiveness.

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 3


Conference Partnering Organization

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 4


Conference Partnering Organization

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 5


Conference Partnering Organization

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 6


Session Room Locations - Map

TUESDAY (AUG 13) - PRE-CONFERENCE TUTORIALS

A - Comparing Captivate and Storyline (8:30 am - 12:00 pm) ............Lake Fairfax A

B - Using HTML5 for Mobile Platforms (8:30 am - 5:00 pm) ............. Lake Fairfax B

C - Instructional Design (1:30 pm - 5:00 pm)......................................Lake Fairfax A

WEDNESDAY (AUG 14) - CONFERENCE

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 9:00 am - 10:00 am ..........Ballroom F-G

Mobile Learning ............................................. Ballroom G

Social Media ................................................ Lake Fairfax

e-Learning ................................................ Lake Thoreau

Training .......................................................... Ballroom F

Education .......................................................Ballroom E

THURSDAY (AUG 15) - CONFERENCE

Mobile Learning ............................................. Ballroom G

Design ......................................................... Lake Fairfax

Virtual Worlds ........................................... Lake Thoreau

Gaming ........................................................... Ballroom F

FGDLA............................................................Ballroom E

FRIDAY (AUG 16) - CONFERENCE

Learning Management Systems .................... Ballroom G

Simulation .................................................... Lake Fairfax

ROI ........................................................... Lake Thoreau

Training .......................................................... Ballroom F

Accessibility ....................................................Ballroom E

CORRIDOR 2

Ballroom E

Ballroom F

Ballroom G

Grand Ballroom Foyer

Stairs

LAKE

THOREAU

Robert E. Simon

REGENCY

BALLROOM

SALT

REG

Elevators

Men

A

LAKE

FAIRFAX

B

Women

SECOND FLOOR

Hyatt Regency Hotel Parking Fees:

$4 - up to 2 hours

$6 - 2 - 4 hours

$10 - Daily Maximum

$8 - Overnight Hotel Guests

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 7


TUTORIAL SESSIONS

TUESDAY 8/13/2013

A - 8:30-12:00 Comparing Captivate and Storyline: A Very Personal and Internal Shoot-out! - $175

Joseph Ganci, eLearning Consultant, eLearning Joe

Since Articulate Storyline was first released in May of 2012, Adobe Captivate has had a direct competitor in the marketplace.

They kind of look the same and share many features in common, but they also differ quite a bit. How do they really compare

The presenter has been using both this past year for different client projects and so has strong opinions on the strengths and

weaknesses of each. Remember that eLearning is a custom business and you want to choose the best tool for each project when

possible. Sure, not every organization will buy both tools, so you may need to choose one. This session will give you a side-byside

comparison of each tool's features and let you know when to use each, or at the very least, know which to choose for your

needs.

What you need to bring with you to this tutorial:

This is a hands-on workshop. Please bring your laptop and have both Captivate and Storyline installed, either a licensed or a

trial version. The trial version typically expires in 30 days, so it should not be installed until closer to the conference date.

B - 8:30-5:00 Using HTML5 for Mobile Platforms - $350

Phil Cowcill, Coordinator, Canadore College

There is a lot of hype and excitement for HTML5 and especially for mobile devices. It means you can now develop your training

material once and it will run on everything. However, technology isn’t consistent across the board. Remember when CSS first

came out Remember the look of your web content in Internet Explorer vs. Netscape Well, HTML5 can produce some unpredictable

results across mobile and desktop browsers.

So, you can wait until 2014 (or 15) when HTML5 becomes an official standard or you can look at some safe developing

techniques that you can use now. In this workshop, you’ll learn some new leading edge (not cutting edge) HTML5, CSS3 and

Javascript techniques that you can apply today. This workshop will also show you some of the best practices that many

professional web developers are using. Because mobile is such a big part of the Internet and training, the rules of development

are also changing. Learn how to build it right the first time and reduce or eliminate typing errors.

In this workshop, you’ll learn:

How to define a site for professional web development; Stop the browser from lying about its size; Create a template for a

consistent look; Apply new and safe HTML5 tags for the structure of your web page; Create a visually stunning navigation system

using HTML5 and CSS; Create CSS rules for DIV and HTML5 tags; Apply shiv code for older IE browsers; Realign objects based

on the device viewing the page; Apply simple Javascript functions to validate forms; Apply simple Javascript functions to animate

web objects.

What you need to bring with you to this tutorial:

This is a hands-on workshop. Please bring your own PC or Mac laptop. Please have Dreamweaver CS6 installed (trial version

is fine for this workshop). Earlier versions of Dreamweaver will work, but the code hinting won’t be as intuitive. Once you arrive

at the workshop, sample files, lessons, and a workbook for your review will be provided. The workbook will provide you with stepby-step

instructions on some of the lessons in the workshop. This will assist you as you develop your own training material after

the workshop.

C - 1:30-5:00 Instructional Design Seminar - $175

James Guilkey, Ph.D, President, S4 NetQuest

Today’s technologies (Internet, wireless, tablets, cell phones, etc.) provide nearly unlimited potential for digitally-based learning

(eLearning). But if the full potential of these technologies is going to be realized, they must be accompanied by innovative, highly

effective instructional design. Many of today’s online programs are limited to reading text on a screen and then completing an

assessment (e.g., PowerPoints put on the Internet). This approach is neither innovative nor effective.

This program will include:

A review of traditional learning method; A discussion of why those methods don’t work with digital learning; Introduction of the

M-PACT learning methodology; Examples of innovative, highly effective design.

What you need to bring with you to this tutorial:

This is a hands-on workshop. Each participant will need to bring their own laptop, and will actually be doing work – this is not a

lecture format. There may be time to work on individual projects, so please bring any associated material that will help with that

work.

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 8


Keynote Address - Wednesday, August 14, 2013

9:00 am to 10:00 am - Ballroom F/G

SALT is pleased to announce that Grant Rickets will be the keynote speaker at the Interactive

Learning Technologies 2013 SALT Conference.

Grant Ricketts

CEO and Co-Founder

Tripos Software, Inc.

Grant is Co-Founder and CEO at Tripos Software. Tripos Software provides content,

training, a SaaS-based platform, tools, and services to engage people in sustainability

initiatives, track and measure results, and provide visibility into sustainability performance.

Prior to founding Tripos, Grant had a consulting partnership which specialized in enterprise

learning strategy, governance, aligning learning and talent functions and using technology to

transform people processes. Grant was Vice-President for business development and a

founding member of Saba Software, Inc. Grant has participated in past SALT conferences

on the issues of governance, knowledge management and the challenges of implementing

new technologies within organizational structures.

"Learning Does Have a Second Life"

Learning is not only a classic discipline for organizations, it can also be a new path to

implement change and create value – even in areas that may be least expected, such as in

corporate sustainability and social responsibility. Grant Ricketts, former co-founder of Saba

Software whose work was integral to bringing us the LMS as we know it today, shares an

unexpected new journey, as CEO of Tripos Software, in how learning plays a central role in

aligning organizations around the governance of environmental and social issues. These

issues have economic impacts, requiring organizations to become more transparent and

accountable for a "triple bottom line" of environmental, social and economic well-being. The

lesson learned is that any effort to move an organization from one level to another –

improving management quality and making it sustainable – will always require a role for

learning.


- CONFERENCE OVERVIEW -

WEDNESDAY

AUGUST 14, 2013

Mobile Learning Social Media e-Learning Training Education

SC Pat Golden Jack Yoest, Jr. J. Dexter Fletcher, Ph.D. Sharon Wright Brian Stokes

Room Ballroom G Lake Fairfax Lake Thoreau Ballroom F Ballroom E

10:00 Coffee Break

10:30

To

11:10

11:15

To

12:00

Top 10 Mobile

Design Tips to

Improve UX

- Phil Cowcill

iOS, Android, HTML5

– Oh My – What do

YouReally Need to

Know

- Rachel Hudish

Development and

Evaluation of “World of

Balance,” a Multiplayer

Online Game for

Ecology Education and

Research

- Ilmi Yoon

Learning Communities:

Learning Management

Networks & Cross-

Jurisdictional Sharing

- Ilya Plotkin

ADL’s Experience API –

Modernizing the SCORM

Run-Time Environment &

Much More

- Jonathan Poltrack

Accessibility and Self-paced

e-Learning Courses

Developed With Rapid e-

Learning Development

Tools: What has Changed

Since 2012

- Aina G. Irbe

- Jonathan Avila

12:00 Lunch Break

1:30

To

2:10

2:15

To

3:00

ADL's Mobile Training

Implementation

Framework (MoTIF)

Project

- Peter Berking

Where to Start with

Mobile Devices: A

Decision-Making

Process for Mobile

Strategy

- James Xu

Socially Mediated

Instruction with Twitter:

Tweeting to Learn

- Lori Tanner

- Angela Starrett

- Richard Hartsell

Design and Impact of a

Cloud-Based

Community of Practice

- Genevieve Wood

- Louisa Schaefer

- Rachel Vincent

eLearning Tools: Past,

Present and Future

- Joseph Ganci

Game-based e-Learning:

Applying the Mechanics of

Gaming Correctly to

Increase Student Motivation

- Karen Srba

- Deborah Gadsden

3:00 Coffee Break

3:30

To

4:10

4:15

To

5:00

Keynote Address - Grant Ricketts, Co-Founder and CEO at Tripos Software

9:00 am to 10:00 am - Ballroom F & G

A Mobile Solution for

Capturing Battlefield

Lessons

- Jennifer Murphy

- Frank P. Hannigan

- Luke A. DeVore

- Rodney Long

Mobile Computer,

Handhelds, and PDAs

- Justin Yarkin

- Caitlin Markham

Impact of Accessibility

in the Use of Social

Media Platforms for

Training

- Mary Jean Smith

- Erica Leibowitz

Online Collaboration to

Save "The Arab Spring"

- Inas Barsoum

The Global Revolution:

Train in 78 languages from

your laptop

- Sue Reager

Visual Communication in E-

Learning

- Diane Wilcox

- Jane Thall

Applying Pro Sports

Training Methodology

to Military Special

Operations and Law

Enforcement

- Eric Sikorski

The Role of

Computer-Based

Training in Military

Equipment Training

- Katherine Phillips

Technology-based

Learning in Technical

Training: What Have

We Learned (So

Far)

- David Mylott, Ph.D.

- Andrew Ryan

Generation Why

Designing Training

and Learning to

Engage the New

Workforce

- James Guilkey,

Ph.D

Using Expert

Systems to

Teach/Learn the

Basics of Business

Law

- Marc Lynn

- W illiam Bockanic

Effectiveness of

Using Video

Cameras to Assess

Nurse Practitioner

Students

- Sharon Stoten

MOOCs: Summer 2013

State-of-the-Art

- Gertrude Abramson,

Ed.D.

- Martha M. Snyder, Ph.D.

Online Learning: The

Impact of Communication

Tools on Student

Learning, Motivation, Selfregulation,

and

Satisfaction

- Mahnaz Moallem

Why Buy the College

When You Get the MOOC

for Free

- Maureen Murphy, Ph.D.

Flip or Flap: Lessons

Learned from Teaching in

a Flipped Classroom

- Mark Frydenberg

Harnessing EdTech

Innovation of Leaders

Takes a Cross-

“Fun”ctional Guild

- Barbara Truman

- Francisca Yonekura

Massive Open Online

Courses (MOOCs):

Competitive Opportunities

or a Setback for

Traditional Teaching and

Learning

- W illiam W endt

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 10


- Conference overview -

Thursday

AUGUST 15, 2013

Mobile Learning Design Virtual Worlds Gaming FGDLA

SC Phil Cowcill Charlotte Thoms Naomi Malone David Versaw Alex Autry

Room Ballroom G Lake Fairfax Lake Thoreau Ballroom F Ballroom E

8:30

To

9:10

9:15

To

10:00

Creating an Enterprise

Leadership

Conference Mobile

App

- Eric Schneider

Mobile Learning for

Maritime Workers:

Mitigating Maritime

Chemical Incidents

- Thomas Held

- Kristi Messer

Supporting (Meta)

Cognition in a Digital

World

- Alan Reid

Rapidly Rapid

Prototyping In an Agile

Environment

- Richard Vranesh, Ed.D.

Enhancing Learning

through Wireless Grids

- Lee McKnight, Ph.D.

- Angela Ramnarine-

Rieks

How to Design

Learning Events in 3D

Virtual Worlds

- Lee Taylor-Nelms

10:00 Coffee Break

10:30

To

11:10

11:15

To

12:00

M-Learning for All:

What You Need to

Know About

Accessibility and

Mobile Computing

- Jonathan Avila

- Aina G. Irbe

A Total Curriculum

Approach to Mobile

Learning

- Lee Deaner

Effective Design of

Pedagogical Agents

- Sue Hudson

Creating Prototypes of

Quiz Designs with Self-

Assessment

Components in Adobe

Captivate

- Taeyeol Park

Subliminal Priming

Utility for Emotionally-

Charged Virtual

Environment Training

- David Jones

- Sara Dechmerowski

Corrosion Prevention

and Control Training in

an Immersive Virtual

Learning Environment

- Rustin Webster

12:00 Lunch Break

1:30

To

2:10

2:15

To

3:00

Video Games “in” the

Classroom

- Todd Marks

Measuring

Achievement:

Analyzing the

Effectiveness of

Mobile Technology in

the Classroom Setting

- Dean Cristol

- Belinda Gimbert

The Design of

Transnational Online

Role-playing Simulations

for Strengthening Global

Competency Skills

- Kari Wold

Design Patterns for

Purpose Built Learning

Content Management

Systems (LCMS)

- Henry Ryng

Analysis Virtually

Yes, Here's How

- Angelique Nasah

- Bridget Bryson

Virtual Hands —

Opportunities for

Hands-On Activities in

VILT

- Janet Wilson

- Brandy Poiry

3:00 Coffee Break

3:30

To

4:10

4:15

To

5:00

A Discussion of

Implementing Mobile

Devices in the

Government for

Training and

Education

- Jennifer Murphy

- Erin Gibbens

- Greg Youst

- Jason Haag

Rationale For A Public

Health Informatics

Curriculum

- Murray Berkowitz

Teaching Pashto

Language as an

Interactive and Blended

eLearning Course

- Daniela Schiano di

Cola

- Molly Sampson

The Virtual World

Framework - A

Platform for

RichCollaborative Web

Applications

- Robert Chadwick

Virtual Language

Immersion

- Mohamad Al-Issa

CASE STUDIES:

Gaming and

Simulations Examples

that Hit Targets for

Global Audiences

- Barbara Sealund

- Mike O’Berry

Engaging Future

Cybersecurity

Professionals through

Cyber Challenges

- Eva Vincze

- Diana Burley

Creating Compelling,

Immersive Serious

Games

- David Versaw

Game and Design

Speak for Game

Designers and

Instructional Designers

- Marie Broyles

Instructional Interactive

Narrative: Exploring the

Components of a

Serious Game

- Jamie Liske

Gamification vs. Gamebased

Training

- Andrew Hughes

Stand Up and

Participate!

Incorporating Game-

Based Learning into

Your Instruction

- Christine Iannicelli

Expanding Unified

Communications

Solutions for

Government Training

Networks

- Russ G. Colbert

Increasing National

Defense Readiness

through Effective

Training Techniques

and Operations: A

Case Study of the US

Army Enterprise

Classroom Project

- Mike Sousa

The Government

Education & Training

Network (GETN):

making HDTV and

IPTV cost-effective

options for distance

learning

- Philip Westfall, Ph.D.

The Learning Styles

Revelation: Insight and

Research from

Cognitive Science--

Implications for

Instructional Design

- Jolly Holden, Ed.D.

The Corner Stone of

CASCOM’s Distributed

Learning Initiative:

Integrating a LCMS

- Matt MacLaughlin

- David Palmer

Facilitating/Mentoring/

Coaching--The New

Training Paradigm

- Carla Lane, Ed.D.

Virtual Bridge

Inspection (VBI)

Computer-Based

Training (CBT)

- Richard Barnaby

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 11

TBA

M-Learning vs. E-

Learning … Is There

Any Liking or Learning

Taking Place

- Reggie Smith, III


Learning

Management Systems

- CONFERENCE OVERVIEW -

FRIDAY

AUGUST 16, 2013

Simulation ROI Training Accessibility

SC Dave Mylot Al Corbett Bill Walton Sue Reager Sharon Wright

Room Ballroom G Lake Fairfax Lake Thoreau Ballroom F Ballroom E

8:30

To

9:10

9:15

To

10:00

LMS Troubleshooting -

Learning to Work with

Vendors and Service

Providers

- Robert Bradley

Avoiding an LMS Ghost

Town: How to Be Sure

Your Online Learning

Environment Will

Thrive

- Katherine Robeson

Rehabilitation Research

Simulations - Heuristic Pre-

Action Re-training for

Survivors of Traumatic Brain

Injury, Stroke, Chronic

Traumatic Encephalopathy or

Focal Dystonias

- Vince Macri

- Paul Zilber

- Vincent James Macri

ROI, Collaboration, and

Multi-Platform

Technologies: Three

Keys to the Future of

Learning

- Marissa Levin

ROI: Drilling Done on

Cost-Benefit

Components in Today’s

Information Age

- Sharon L. Burton

- Dustin Bessette

- Kim L Brown Jackson

10:00 Coffee Break

10:30

To

11:10

11:15

To

12:00

Advances in Learning

Management Systems:

Doing More With Less

- Jon Matejcek

- Paul Paradis

Implementing an Open-

Source Software-as-a-

Service Learning

Management System:

Lessons Learned

- S. Rebecca Watson

- John DeCore

The Leadership Challenge –

A Case Study of Using

Simulation for Leadership

Training

- James Xu

- Kenneth Barber

Transforming a Blended

Nursing Physical Assessment

Course to 100% Online

- Kirsty Digger

- Susan Deane

Creating Effective

Small-Scale/Small-

Budget Performance

Support Solutions

- Hal Christensen

Take Training to the

Next Level and Change

Behavior

- Peter Vaka

- Joseph Ganci

SAVE THE DATE

MARCH 19-21, 2014

Exploring Training

Development and

Cross Compatibility

with HTML5

- Raymond Pastore,

Ph.D.

- Nick Pastore, Ph.D.

Working Smarter

- Joan Lasselle

Theoretical

Framework for

Coordinating Training

Programs with

Business Processes

in Large

Organizations

- Rick Kiper

Training Law of Affect

- Christopher Piazza

An Overview of

Instructional Design

for Accessible e-

Learning: Integrate

the Technical and

Pedagogical Factors

from the Start!

- Aina G. Irbe

- Jonathan Avila

A Framework for

Accessible e-

Learning: Include All

Learners!

- Badrul Khan, Ph.D.

- Timothy Springer

Accessible Electronic

Learning Solutions

and Section 508

- Helen Chamberlain

- Alex Koudry

- Noanie Sullivan

- Sean Decker

New Learning Technologies 2014

SALT Conference

March 19-21, 2014

Caribe Royale Hotel

Orlando, Florida

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 12


Wednesday - Keynote Address

9:00—9:10 Introduction and Welcome

John G. Fox, II, Executive Director, SALT®

9:10—10:00 Keynote Address

Grant Ricketts, CEO and Co-Founder, Tripos Software, Inc.

Wednesday - Mobile Learning

10:30—11:10 Top 10 Mobile Design Tips to Improve UX

Phil Cowcill, Coordinator, Canadore College

If you design screens for the mobile environment the same way as you

design for the desktop, then you’ll miss out on making a great mLearning

experience. This session will show 10 tips on how the audience can dramatically

improve the user experience by properly designing for a mobile

device. These tips will enhance and improve the user experience (UX).

Many of these tips are very simple to implement but it does change how

you think about mobile design. This is why you think “Mobile First.”

11:15—12:00 iOS, Android, HTML5 – Oh My – What do You Really

Need to Know

Rachel Hudish, Instructional Designer, Distance Education, Graduate

School USA

Holding almost all of the mobile market, Android and iOS applications

are based on two different frameworks and languages. How do you reach

the largest amount of consumers Should you develop a mobile app or

run it through a web browser What are the differences between iOS,

Android, and HTML5 and how does that impact development and deployment

of mobile learning environments Furthermore, what are the aesthetic

design differences and protocols that should be considered when

developing mobile applications for these devices

1:30—2:10 ADL’s Mobile Training Implementation Framework (MoTIF)

Project

Peter Berking, Instructional Designer, ADL Co-lab

In this project, ADL has been using a collaborative approach to investigate:

1) How learning theories and instructional design (ID) models can

best support mobile learning; 2) How to best leverage the specific capabilities

of the mobile platform for learning purposes (e.g., camera, GPS);

and 3) How to take advantage of alternative learning approaches (e.g.,

performance support tools, informal learning) that are uniquely enabled

by the mobile platform. This presentation will share the findings derived

from the project.

2:15—3:00 Where to Start with Mobile Devices: A Decision-Making

Process for Mobile Strategy

James Xu, Government Group Team Assistant, Adayana Government

Group

It seems as though there are as many types of mobile apps as there are

approaches to creating them. Determining the best approach and appropriate

technology for developing a productive mobile app that both realizes

your vision and serves your strategy can often be challenging. In this

presentation, we will help you navigate the decision points that lie between

your vision and making it a reality. We will also share our lessons

learned and success stories of mobile projects we have worked on for

the DoD, other government agencies, and industry.

3:30—4:10 A Mobile Solution for Capturing Battlefield Lessons

Jennifer Murphy, Director, Defense Solutions, Design Interactive, Inc.,

Frank P. Hannigan, Research Associate, Design Interactive, Inc., Luke A.

DeVore, Director, Business Development, Design Interactive, Inc., Rodney

Long, Science & Technology Manager, STTC, ARL

A rich source of military training content is the stories of Warfighters

who return from theaters. However, as enemy tactics rapidly change, the

usefulness of these lessons depends on their timeliness, and the development

of lessons learned is time-consuming. Further, research into

human cognition indicates that accuracy in eyewitness memory decreases

very quickly. We describe a methodology for rapidly collecting and sharing

Warfighter experiences using mobile and desktop platforms. Using a

mobile app, a Warfighter records information about an experience, and is

prompted to answer targeted questions to facilitate analysis. The resulting

video serves as the basis for lessons learned.

4:15—5:00 Mobile Computer, Handhelds, and PDAs

Justin Yarkin, Booz Allen Hamilton, Caitlin Markham, Booz Allen Hamilton

Over seventy-percent of our employees work on client site, with the

remaining workforce in hoteling or teleworking locations, making employee

engagement and feeling connected to our company culture extremely

challenging. With new technology and research in the field of mobile, we

decided to jump into the mix, devising and developing a mobile learning

platform consisting of user-generated content via micro-blogging, phone

calls, and social media networking.

Wednesday - Social Media

10:30—11:10 Development and Evaluation of “World of Balance,” a

Multiplayer Online Game for Ecology Education and Research

Ilmi Yoon, Prof., Computer Science, San Francisco State University

“World of Balance” is an educational multiplayer online game promoting

the concept of ecosystem nurturing and species invasion using a scientific

population dynamics simulation engine as its backend. Inside World

of Balance, players are given an empty land within the Serengeti environment

of Africa and develop ecosystems by adding plant, animal, and insect

species one by one (up to 95 real representative species from the

latest paper). Each player’s level increases as they unlock new species

while maintaining the balance of the ecosystem. This game opens a

mutually educational communication channel between ecologists and

masses (players). Players benefit by learning important aspects of ecosystem

development and food-web stability while producing a prolific and

significant amount of scientific data useful for ecologists in analyzing population

dynamics, something unfeasible for them to produce on their own.

11:15—12:00 Learning Communities: Learning Management

Networks & Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing

Ilya Plotkin, Program Administrator, TRAIN, Public Health Foundation

In exploring the foundational need for learning resource coordination,

this presentation will demonstrate how TRAIN (www.train.org) can serve

as a model for other disciplines and communities. TRAIN is a web-based

learning management network, led by 29 affiliates who consist of 25 state

agencies and academic institutions and 4 federal partners. The network

allows agencies and organizations to share resources across jurisdictional

lines when appropriate, while also allowing resources to be restricted

to smaller sub-populations. To date, nearly 4,000 providers have posted

over 29,000 courses to a professional population of over 650,000 learners.

1:30—2:10 Socially Mediated Instruction with Twitter: Tweeting to

Learn

Lori Tanner, Director QEP, Academic Affairs, University of South Carolina

Upstate, Angela Starrett, Mathmatics Instructor, Math, University of South

Carolina Upstate, Richard Hartsell, Assistant Professor, School of Education,

University of South Carolina Upstate

One unique aspect of social media as a tool for educators is that unlike

most pedagogical tools, it seamlessly synthesizes learner collaboration

with content delivery in a manner which can best be labeled as socially

mediated instruction. This presentation will showcase examples of socially

mediated instruction using Twitter in both professional development

and academic environments. Particular attention will be placed on the

unique manner in which the use of Twitter in instruction simultaneously

had positive impacts on both affective outcomes such as learner satisfaction

and cognitive outcomes such as the retention of information.

2:15—3:00 Design and Impact of a Cloud-Based Community of

Practice

Genevieve Wood, Curriculum Developer, American Systems, Louisa

Schaefer, Program Manager, Department of Veterans Affairs, Rachel Vincent,

Senior Associate, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Grounded in instructional systems design and adult learning perspectives,

this presentation will describe the application, customization, piloting,

and impact of a Program/Project Management Community of Practice

using a cloud-based federal government-wide platform. The platform

provides a common virtual space for engagement between and among

students, instructors, mentors, coaches, alumni, and industry experts.

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3:30—4:10 Impact of Accessibility in the Use of Social Media

Platforms for Training

Mary Jean Smith, Vice President, SSB BART Group, Erica Leibowitz,

Instructional Designer, SSB BART Group

The amount of time spent in social media platforms continues to increase

at a rapid pace. Organizations are turning to these platforms to

deliver their training. An aspect that is often left out is accessibility, whose

importance is magnified given a recent World Health Organization report

that states more than 1 billion people worldwide are disabled. This presentation

reviews the accessibility road blocks encountered in the main

social media platforms including specific ways of overcoming them when

used for training.

4:15—5:00 Online Collaboration to Save “The Arab Spring”

Dr. Inas Barsoum, Students’ Affairs, Arab Academy for Science

This is an online project that involves undergraduate students majoring

in Business Administration from various Arab countries in a pilot project

whereby they discuss and come up with scenarios of development that

would save their countries through collaboration with the aim of rescuing

their economies after the wake of what has been known as “The Arab

Spring.”

Wednesday - e-Learning

10:30—11:10 ADL’s Experience API – Modernizing the SCORM Run-

Time Environment & Much More

Jonathan Poltrack, Director of Operations, Alexandria Co-Lab, Advanced

Distributed Learning (ADL)

This presentation summarizes the gap analysis performed on the Sharable

Content Object Reference Model (SCORM), new use cases, and

the status of ADL’s Experience API (xAPI) project. ADL’s legacy technology,

SCORM, was engineered prior to the widespread use of mobile devices,

virtual worlds, games, and other technologies that augment today’s

learning opportunities. The xAPI enables granular tracking of data

from traditional e-learning as well as from learners’ interactions with the

newer, emerging platforms. In addition, the xAPI’s activity stream-like format

supports use cases beyond traditional tracking to include custom

reporting systems, artificial intelligence-based assessment services, and

statistical analysis systems.

11:15—12:00 Accessibility and Self-paced e-Learning Courses

Developed With Rapid e-Learning Development Tools: What has

Changed Since 2012

Aina G. Irbe, Director of Training, SSB BART Group, Jonathan Avila, Chief

Accessibility Officer, SSB BART Group

The growth in popularity of e-learning has generated a plethora of rapid

e-learning development tools. Many provide features to incorporate accessibility;

however issues still remain for individuals with disabilities, including

users of assistive technologies. In the 2012 SALT conference,

we discussed the top six accessibility issues found in self-paced e-learning

products. This session will revisit what has changed in the last year,

analyze what has improved, and review what issues still remain. A new

top 5 list of accessibility issues will be presented with examples and

workarounds.

1:30—2:10 eLearning Tools: Past, Present, and Future

Joseph Ganci, eLearning Consultant, eLearning Joe

How long have eLearning development tools been around Longer than

you think! Why should you care Because the earliest eLearning tools

had instructional design built right in. However, what you really want to

know is what’s available now and what the future brings, right This presentation

will take you through the major categories of eLearning tools

today and will answer all of your questions, too! Which authoring tool is

right for you Come and participate and you will decide. The presenter is

impartial and beholden to no tool vendor. After 30 years of developing

eLearning and using many tools along the way, Joe knows a little something

about the strengths and weaknesses of various tools. Oh, and lastly,

what the heck are cloud-based tools Come and find out!

2:15—3:00 Game-based e-Learning: Applying the Mechanics of

Gaming Correctly to Increase Student Motivation

Karen Srba, Senior Instructional Designer, American Systems, Deborah

Gadsden, Director of Operations, Veterans Affairs

Gamification and game-based e-learning are hot topics in the instructional

design industry. But how many times have you reviewed or taken a

course where gaming has been used but provides no instructional value

This presentation will dive into the mechanics of gaming and how it can

be used correctly to increase student interaction and motivation. We will

explore the psychology of why gaming appeals to some trainees and why

it may not appeal to others. In addition, you will learn how to apply gaming

techniques to your entire course without alienating users.

3:30—4:10 The Global Revolution: Train in 78 Languages from Your

Laptop

Sue Reager, Principal, Translate Your World

Imagine the unimaginable – when you speak, your audience in the room

or around the world hears your words or reads subtitles in their local

language. Imagine that your training, webinars, and conferences are understood

by your global audience without you speaking another language.

Imagine effortless automatic captioning for the deaf. Imagine cutting translation

budgets by up to 95% with intra-company crowd sourcing, or using

online simultaneous interpretation for cross-language courses and meetings.

Add full mobile compatibility, subtitling software, and multi-language

audience engagement technologies, and you create the global training of

the future. The future is here!

4:15—5:00 Visual Communication in E-Learning

Diane Wilcox, Associate Professor, Learning, Technology & Leadership

Education, James Madison University, Jane Thall, Associate Professor,

Adult Education Human Resource Development, James Madison University

It is often said that a picture is worth a thousand words. From laptops to

desktops, iPads to television, we are continuously bombarded with images.

In fact, our brains are uniquely equipped to receive and interpret visual

information. In today’s training environment, where companies do business

around the globe, pictures are increasingly used to bridge language

and cultural barriers, communicate ideas, and illustrate business processes.

So, how do we, as instructional designers, ensure that the graphics

we use communicate our intended meaning, especially in technology-based

instruction This session will address best practices in visual

communication for e-learning applications.

Wednesday - Training

10:30—11:10 Applying Pro Sports Training Methodology to Military

Special Operations and Law Enforcement

Eric Sikorski, Sr. Program Analyst, Training Technology Development,

CTTSOTSWG

This presentation will focus on the development and integration of two

cutting edge technologies that are being used to train military special operations

forces and law enforcement to improve visual acuity and reaction

time. The technologies are based on professional sports science

and training methodology. The two systems will be compared and contrasted

and a case study will illustrate how they can be integrated to improve

and evaluate SOF and LE performance on critical skills. Performance

results for specific skills such as target acquisition will be presented.

11:15—12:00 The Role of Computer-Based Training in Military

Equipment Training

Katherine Phillips, Instructional Designer, Technical Trainer 3, Information

Systems, ITT Exelis

Computer-based training (CBT) serves as a supplement to current training

packages for military equipment training. CBTs occur in three distinct

environments: the School House, assigned duty stations, and during deployment.

In addition to developing technical skills to operate/maintain

their equipment, operators must strengthen cognitive skills to use equipment

in mission operations. This single subject mixed-method study focuses

on the challenges facing CBTs regarding cognitive overload and

the need to address real-life scenarios. The interventions include the ap-

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plication of information processing theory, scenario-based strategies, and

interface design to reduce cognitive overload and support cognition as it

relates to live scenarios.

1:30—2:10 Technology-based Learning in Technical Training: What

Have We Learned (So Far)

David Mylott, Ph.D., Manager, Varian Technical Training, Applied Global

Services, Applied Materials, Andrew Ryan, Program Manager – Training

Services, Applied Materials

Over the last decade, technology-based training solutions have become

prevalent in the learning space. Some have come and gone while others

have evolved and become staples in the new learning models of today. In

the semiconductor industry, where technical training covers a wide variety

of knowledge and skills, there have been many growing pains in determining

the right mix of tools and teaching methods. Training organizations

must learn from their experiences and evolve to best utilize resources,

both technical and human, to be successful in reaching their students

while meeting business goals. This presentation discusses some of the

lessons learned along the way, including the pitfalls to avoid, balancing

financial and training requirements, and best known methods for the tools

that have been most beneficial to training programs.

2:15—3:00 Generation Why Designing Training and Learning to

Engage the New Workforce

James Guilkey, Ph.D., President, S4 NetQuest

This presentation will examine the profile of today’s new workforce and

discuss how training must change to meet their needs and expectations.

Examples of technology-based gaming and simulations geared towards

Generation Y will be presented, and the measurable results from these

cases will be discussed. If you are concerned about how the new workforce

will affect your organization, this is the perfect presentation.

3:30—4:10 Using Expert Systems to Teach/Learn the Basics of

Business Law

Marc Lynn, Chairman, John Carroll University, William Bockanic, Professor,

John Carroll University

Examples of integrating artificial intelligence (expert systems) with a

database of cases, quizzes, and video materials to enhance the effectiveness

and efficiency of teaching and learning basic business law will

be demonstrated. The approach is applicable to learning in a classroom

as well as on the job. Low cost, readily available software products with

user-friendly interfaces will be used, and a discussion of scaling for larger

or more complex environments will be included.

4:15—5:00 Effectiveness of Using Video Cameras to Assess Nurse

Practitioner Students

Sharon Stoten, Assistant Professor, Indiana University East

An exploratory study was conducted at a large Midwestern University in a

School of Nursing accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing

Education. As an alternative to on-site visits, the students will video their

client interactions and send the video via a secure site to the faculty for

evaluation. At the completion of the clinical day, the student will encrypt

the video and send the data to the faculty member through a secure website

for evaluation. Once the data has been sent, the student will securely

delete the recording from the camera. The faculty will evaluate the video

capture and send the student the electronic evaluation.

Wednesday - Education

10:30—11:10 MOOCs: Summer 2013 State-of-the-Art

Gertrude (Trudy) Abramson, Ed.D., Professor, Grad School Computer &

Information Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Martha M. Snyder,

Ph.D., Associate Professor, Graduate School of Computer and Information

Sciences, NOVA Southeastern University

This presentation shares best practices on the current state of MOOCs

in higher education. The implementation of new technologies for learning

is often impeded by long learning curves. This innovative delivery system

has no learning curve whatsoever for users of web-based applications

and the courses are tuition-free. Every institution wants a piece of the pie

although none has a formula for turning a MOOC into a revenue-bearing

undertaking. We will explore MOOCs from the vantage point of all stakeholders:

course creators/facilitators, students, teachers, IT staff, central

administrators, and companies, public and private, who seek to offer class

credit for a fee. Examples of course-parts will be shown. The audience

will be invited to add personal perspectives as stakeholders.

11:15—12:00 Online Learning: The Impact of Communication Tools

on Student Learning, Motivation, Self-regulation, and Satisfaction

Mahnaz Moallem, Professor of Instructional Technology, ITF&SE, UN-

CW

The emergence of the newer web synchronous conferencing has provided

the opportunity for a high level of students to students and students

to instructor interaction in web-based learning environments. However, it

is not clear whether the absence or presence of synchronous or live interaction

will affect the learning processes and outcomes to the same

extent for all learners. It is also not clear whether other factors that compensate

for the absence of the live interaction can be identified and accounted

for in deeper learning processes and for a higher quality of learning

outcomes. The purpose of this presentation is to report the results of

a study that investigated whether various communication tools and methods

influence student learning processes, learning outcomes, motivation,

self-regulation, and satisfaction.

1:30—2:10 Why Buy the College When You Get the MOOC for Free

Maureen Murphy, Ph.D., President, Training and Performance Consulting,

WITS Tool Kits

What are MOOCs The history and current status of Massive Open

Online Courses will be presented in this introductory presentation. MOOC

basics will be discussed including descriptions, MOOC’s evolution and

key contributors, the MOOC model, and considerations and criteria for

strategic use. While the MOOC model has been touted as an educational

opportunity for the self-directed lifelong learner, the market value of MOOC

earned badges and certificates of completion has yet to prove realistic in

both academic and work place performance. As colleges and universities

are incorporating MOOCs into their strategic positioning of curriculum,

what is the status This session will present basic information, current

practice, and findings from current research.

2:15—3:00 Flip or Flap: Lessons Learned from Teaching in a Flipped

Classroom

Mark Frydenberg, Senior Lecturer and Director of CIS Sandbox, Computer

Information Systems, Bentley University

The flipped classroom model, where students review lecture material

online prior to the class session, and spend time in class working on

problems or exercises that would have been traditionally assigned as

homework, has made headlines as there is a perception that in-person

instruction is being replaced by watching online videos. What are the

benefits and drawbacks of teaching in this setting Do students really

watch the videos Who creates them And how do we best use the hour

in class if we’re not lecturing The presenter will share challenges, successes,

and Internet-based collaboration tools that can be used when

teaching in a flipped classroom.

3:30—4:10 Harnessing EdTech Innovation of Leaders Takes a Cross-

”Fun”ctional Guild

Barbara Truman, eLearning Simulation Strategy Consultant, Francisca

Yonekura, Assistant Department Head, Center for Distributed Learning,

University of Central Florida

Educational leaders and trainers seek to foster adaptability to prepare

learners for future careers that do not yet exist. Experiential professional

development allows teachers, faculty, and would-be mentors to play with

principles of game-based learning that use entertainment and learning

technologies. The GamesMOOC combines the use of virtual worlds, gaming

platforms, and social media resulting in community engagement that

span professional associations and the k-20 spectrum. Innovative edtech

applications are tried and shared as participants collaborate, many joining

guilds. Lessons learned surrounding game-based, immersive learning

will be shared along with future plans of study involving team science.

4:15—5:00 Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): Competitive

Opportunities or a Setback for Traditional Teaching and Learning

William Wendt, Instructor, School of Business, University of North Carolina

at Pembroke

There has been a lot of publicity, activity, and criticism of the rush to go

online with a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). A response from

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every university on what they plan to do about this phenomenon seems to

have become necessary. The presenters have followed this development

very closely, and have enrolled in a couple of courses on Coursera, to

personally examine and assess the experience.

Thursday - Mobile Learning

8:30—9:10 Creating an Enterprise Leadership Conference Mobile

App

Eric Schneider, Learning Manager - Technology, Ingersoll Rand University,

Ingersoll Rand

Important considerations must be given to designing and delivering sustainable

applications that are accessible anywhere, anytime. By deconstructing

a recently deployed solution, attendees will be provided with a

toolkit and a roadmap for success.

9:15—10:00 Mobile Learning for Maritime Workers: Mitigating

Maritime Chemical Incidents

Thomas Held, President & CEO, MetaMedia Training International, Inc.,

Kristi Messer, MSW, MPH, Assistant Project Manager, College of Osteopathic

Medicine, Nova Southeastern University

MetaMedia Training International, in partnership with the Institute for Disaster

and Emergency Preparedness (IDEP) at Nova Southeastern University’s

College of Osteopathic Medicine (NSU-COM) has developed interactive

scenario-based exercises to help prevent, mitigate, and respond

to tragic and avoidable incidents related to hazardous materials in the

maritime industry (e.g., docks, ports, oil rig platforms, vessels). Funded

through an SBIR award from the National Institute for Environmental Health

Sciences, the core of this project has been the development and delivery

of interactive simulations on mobile tablet devices. This presentation will

highlight the development of mLearning real-life simulations, technologies

employed, and initial evaluations of the Phase 1 effort.

10:30—11:10 M-Learning for All: What You Need to Know About

Accessibility and Mobile Computing

Jonathan Avila, Chief Accessibility Officer, SSB BART Group, Aina G. Irbe,

Director of Training, SSB BART Group

Mobile device usage is growing at a rapid pace as the way we use

mobile devices continues to evolve and increase. Specifically, mobile learning,

or m-learning, is increasing even more rapidly. However, not all m-

learning is accessible to people with disabilities, excluding them from an

otherwise convenient form of learning. This session will cover the user

impact of mobile accessibility on various disability types, the basics of

mobile accessibility, looking at accessibility features of the different platforms,

and best practices for developing accessible m-learning and webbased

apps/content that is accessed via a mobile device.

11:15—12:00 A Total Curriculum Approach to Mobile Learning

Lee Deaner, Vice President, Training & Sales, rVibe

Mobile learning is one of the hottest topics in learning technology today.

Although mobile learning is often looked at from the perspective of designing

a single asset that meets the unique challenges of mobile devices,

this session will outline potential changes in overall learning and curriculum

design to incorporate a fully blended approach. The approach

utilizes asynchronous, semi-synchronous, and synchronous learning while

leveraging the capabilities of mobile platforms. By the end of the session

learners will be able to incorporate new ideas into a blended learning

approach to effectively enhance their company's overall learning strategy.

1:30—2:10 Video Games “in” the Classroom

Todd Marks, CEO & President, Mindgrub Technologies

The modern day classroom is a 150-year-old model, built around having

a regimented set of students meet at a predetermined spot for a set

amount of time. But the best learning can take place outside of this place

and time, so why not bring the classroom there The use of media as

well as mobile gaming and eLearning can provide enhanced hands on

experience that will benefit the 21st century education system. In this

presentation Todd embraces the concepts of mobile and social learning,

to help facilitate the change we drastically need in our education system.

He will discuss the benefits of tablets and smartphones in the classroom,

the usage statistics for mobile devices, resources that are available

for producing mobile learning content, the trends in mobile applications

and knowledge transfer, and what the future looks like.

2:15—3:00 Measuring Achievement: Analyzing the Effectiveness of

Mobile Technology in the Classroom Setting

Dean Cristol, Ohio State University, Belinda Gimbert, Ohio State University

The presentation focuses on the effectiveness of mobile learning devices

(MLDs) on the academic achievement of students in grades 8-12.

Utilizing various statistical models and specific sampling protocols, we

are presenting: (1) the effectiveness of technological integration within

the grades 8-12 classroom based on student achievement and student

response; (2) the extent of variance, if any, between those classrooms

that use technology extensively in comparison to those that do not; and

(3) the larger issues of implementing high-levels of technology integration

within the school setting (i.e. accessibility barriers, utilizing multiple

platforms, etc.) and how these issues impact both the student and instructor

populations. This research is based on school system released

data and will be augmented by targeted interviews with teachers involved

in utilizing MLDs within their specific classrooms.

3:30—5:00 A Discussion of Implementing Mobile Devices in the

Government for Training and Education

Jennifer Murphy, Director, Defense Solutions, Design Interactive, Inc.,

Greg Youst, Chief Mobility Engineer, Defense Information Systems Agency,

Jason Haag, Research Analyst, Mobile Learning Initiative, Erin Gibbens,

Mobile Learning Consultant, SAIC

Throughout the government, there has been a recent push to incorporate

mobile devices operationally. One area in which implementing mobile

technology can show immediate impact is related to training and education.

Using mobile devices for training delivery facilitates distance learning,

cutting institutional training costs, and enables “point-of-need” refresher

training, enabling access to material when learners need it the

most. While mobile training provides an attractive solution, implementing

it within a government context poses unique challenges. In this panel, we

identify these issues and provide discussion for those interested in helping

the government meet its goals of operationalizing mobile training and

education.

Thursday - Design

8:30—9:10 Supporting (Meta) Cognition in a Digital World

Alan Reid, Doctoral Candidate, Old Dominion University

This session will review the presenter research on the effects of embedded

metacognitive and cognitive strategy prompts in digital text. This

topic is poignant in an academic climate where textbooks and course

materials are becoming increasingly digitized. This confluence of (1) a

growing number of digital course materials and textbooks, (2) college

students who are arriving on campus deficient in reading and calibration

skills, and (3) an overwhelming student preference for print over digital

texts, leaves educators and designers asking: How can we make this

medium more appealing to students while enhancing reading abilities and

metacognitive shortcomings Results from two studies will be presented,

in which readers read an expository digital text infused with cognitive

and metacognitive prompts and then were tested for differences in

achievement, calibration, metacomprehension, cognitive load, and attitudes.

9:15—10:00 Rapidly Rapid Prototyping In an Agile Environment

Richard Vranesh, Ed.D., Senior ISD, Training Group, The Centech Group

Since the late 1990s, several methodologies for software development

started to emerge as a reaction to difficulties encountered in new software

releases as well as glitches in major new systems that were not

uncovered until slightly before or after new releases were deployed. Each

had a different combination of old ideas, new ideas, and transmuted old

ideas. All emphasized close collaboration between the programmer team

and business experts; face-to-face communication (as more efficient than

written documentation); frequent delivery of new deployable business

value; tight, self-organizing teams; and ways to craft the code and the

team such that the inevitable requirements churn was not a crisis. The

one that emerged as receiving the broadest consensus among practitio-

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ners was what is called today the Agile Development method. This session

will review the Agile Development method and its benefits.

10:30—11:10 Effective Design of Pedagogical Agents

Sue Hudson, Premier Instructional Design

Pedagogical agents are virtual characters designed to increase learning,

motivation, and self-efficacy by engaging learners and guiding them

through online instruction. Because humans respond to pedagogical

agents much as they respond to human beings, it is critical for designers

to use visual approaches that minimize cognitive load while emulating

human behavior. This session will present current research that shows

how the design of pedagogical agents can affect learning outcomes. Major

themes in the research reviewed include the visual appearance of pedagogical

agents; the effect of facial expressions and body gestures; the

roles pedagogical agents play as they interact with learners; and learners’

feelings about interacting with pedagogical agents.

11:15—12:00 Creating Prototypes of Quiz Designs with Self-

Assessment Components in Adobe Captivate

Taeyeol Park, Senior Instructional Technologist, Dahlgren Memorial Library,

Georgetown University Medical Center

In creating online learning content to enhance student learning, instructors

at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) were interested in

adding interactive elements that allowed more user engagement with

content. One approach was to create self-check quizzes or similar types

of student-content interactions. Using Adobe Captivate, the Instructional

Technology Design and Development Division at GUMC developed prototypes

of quiz designs with multiple interactive self-assessment components

– various question and feedback types and review options – and

evaluated their effectiveness and applicability to GUMC courses. This

presentation will reveal its findings and offer useful tips on developing

eLearning content with self-assessments.

1:30—2:10 The Design of Transnational Online Role-playing

Simulations for Strengthening Global Competency Skills

Kari Wold, Instructional Technology, University of Virginia

This session examines the design of transnational online role-playing

simulations to encourage higher education students to learn and practice

global competency skills. To do so, it discusses results of a study that

concentrated on engineering students from a U.S. university and a German

university who took a synchronous online class that implemented

two role-playing simulations. These simulations focused on nuclear energy

policy in each country, and features of the simulations such as group

size and length of the simulations facilitated interaction among the different

cultural groups. This presentation elaborates on those features that

proved most beneficial for successful communication.

2:15—3:00 Design Patterns for Purpose Built Learning Content

Management Systems (LCMS)

Henry Ryng, President, inXsol LLC

The popularity of mobile learning devices like the iPAD and Android and

new learning standards like the ADL Experience API/Tin Can require organizations

to reassess their learning content warehousing or authoring

tools. This session will outline essential elements of an LCMS for organizational

workflow and illustrate current technical requirements which

should be considered for those undertaking refinement or acquisition of a

new platform. Attendees will gain valuable insight into how the aerospace

community has addressed this issue along with Learning Management

Systems (LMS), Learning Record Store (LRS) and LCMS interoperability.

3:30—4:10 Rationale For A Public Health Informatics Curriculum

Murray Berkowitz, DO, MA, MS, MPH, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic

Medicine - GA campus

Proposed is the design of a professional curriculum in Public Health

Informatics leading to the professionally accredited Master of Public Health

(M.P.H.) degree. The relevant literature is reviewed and discussed. Informatics

curricula from various nations are examined. The educational

goals and objectives for the proposed Public Health Informatics curriculum

are specified. The course of study is then outlined, with each of the

educational goals and objectives tied to specific coursework. Directions

for future efforts to implement advanced education and training opportunities

in the proposed Public Health Informatics curriculum are presented.

4:15—5:00 Teaching Pashto Language as an Interactive and Blended

eLearning Course

Daniela Schiano di Cola, Project Coordinator, Curriculum Development,

Diplomatic Language Services, Molly Sampson, Program Manager, Curriculum

Development, Diplomatic Language Services

Diplomatic Language Services (DLS) provides government and military

clients with intensive, one-on-one language training through on-site instructors

and classrooms. In 2012, DLS developed an interactive hybrid

course for the less commonly taught language, Pashto. Students access

the interactive course through an online learning management system

and meet with an instructor twice a week to create a robust blended learning

environment. A Pashto textbook was adapted for online, interactive presentations,

games, and activities using Adobe Flash and Articulate Storyline

as course development software. This session will present the interactive

Pashto courseware and discuss the challenges in development

and implementation of the course.

Thursday - Virtual Worlds

8:30—9:10 Enhancing Learning through Wireless Grids

Lee McKnight, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Information Studies,

Syracuse University, Angela Ramnarine-Rieks, School of Information

Studies, Syracuse University

Wireless Grids Innovation Testbed (WiGiT) has been working towards

the development of a new class of software, called edgeware, which can

enable ad hoc connections of people, devices, software, and services,

supported by personal cyber infrastructure. Through a decade of support

from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Partnerships for Innovation

(PFI) program grants #0227879 and #0917973, this technology has potential

to help students learn better. We share how learning through wireless

grids supports the constructive learning process by helping students

find and organize information in context, construct their understandings,

and communicate those understandings to others.

9:15—10:00 How to Design Learning Events in 3D Virtual Worlds

Lee Taylor-Nelms, Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Designing instructional events for virtual worlds requires new competencies

for even the most experienced instructional systems designers.

The environments, the courses, and the interactions are limited only by

one’s imagination. Practice your emergency response to a virtual bioterrorism

event in a NY city subway with key players from around the world.

Teach a medical student how to stop a heart attack from inside a virtual

heart/classroom. Do old instructional design strategies even apply In

this highly interactive, game-based session, the presenters will see if

participants can apply Robert Gagné’s classic Nine Events of Instruction

to 3D virtual worlds.

10:30—11:10 Subliminal Priming Utility for Emotionally-Charged

Virtual Environment Training

David Jones, Director, Medical Innovations, Design Interactive, Inc., Sara

Dechmerowski, Research Associate, Medical Innovations, Design Interactive,

Inc.

Research has shown that the emotional state has a significant impact

on learning. Presenting subliminal priming stimuli during virtual environment

(VE) briefings and pre-training has the potential to induce a targeted

emotional state prior to training and without interfering with the design of

training scenarios. Research is conflicted, however, on the extent of the

effectiveness for subliminal stimuli applications. Results of the current

study demonstrate that subliminal stimuli priming is effective at eliciting

targeted emotional responses for VE training. Results presented are applicable

to designers, developers, and instructors focused on creating

emotionally charged VE training.

11:15—12:00 Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPC) Training in

an Immersive Virtual Learning Environment

Rustin Webster, Ph.D. Candidate - Interdisciplinary Engineering, Mechanical

Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham

The objective of the project is to develop and provide a low-cost, scalable,

and portable VR system containing purposely designed and developed

immersive virtual learning environments (VLE). The purpose of the

study is to empirically compare the routine classroom instructor-led training

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and immersive virtual learning environment training in terms of learning

and long-term retention of CPC theories.

1:30—2:10 Analysis Virtually Yes, Here’s How

Angelique Nasah, Senior Instructional Designer, Performance Solutions,

WellPoint, Inc., Bridget Bryson, Manager, Instructional Design and Development,

WellPoint, Inc.

Through a business case, this session explores the tools and techniques

instructional designers working virtually use to produce meaningful

solutions for clients at a leading health insurance company employing

approximately 43,500 people.

2:15—3:00 Virtual Hands — Opportunities for Hands-On Activities

in VILT

Janet Wilson, Sterling Heritage Corporation, Brandy Poiry, Independent

Consultant

Budget restrictions pose an obstacle to developing and delivering effective

and engaging training. Through innovation and creative design, trainers

must rise to the challenge and embrace new approaches to virtual

training. While most platforms used for VILT (Virtual Instructor-led Training)

offer basic collaboration and interaction tools, they are inadequate to

provide opportunities for more hands-on activities. One way to provide

more interactivity is to use Web 2.0 tools as platforms for creation and

communication. This session will address available tools and strategies

for leveraging them to enhance the learning experience. Examples include

synchronous document creation, online bulletin boards, digital storytelling,

and social bookmarking.

3:30—4:10 The Virtual World Framework - A Platform for

RichCollaborative Web Applications

Robert Chadwick, Systems Engineer IV, ADL

The Virtual World Framework (VWF) is a browser-based collaborative

simulation system designed with the goal of creating content in a shared

immersive space. This presentation will describe the VWF architecture

in detail and explain how the design decisions support the goal of wider

access to immersive simulation.

4:15—5:00 Virtual Language Immersion

Mohamad Al-Issa, Instructional Technology, Ohio University

This session will review a project in progress attempting to provide a

solution to two issues second language instructors face in their classrooms;

the first issue is maintaining students’ interest in the language at

a continuous level throughout their course of study. The second is the

immersion in the target language without physically moving the students

to the country of the target language. The technologies proposed to

achieve these two goals are: Google Earth Street View function and Microsoft’s

voice, movement, and gesture controls using Microsoft Kinect

sensor.

Thursday - Gaming

8:30-9:10 CASE STUDIES: Gaming and Simulations Examples that

Hit Targets for Global Audiences

Barbara Sealund, President & CEO, Sealund & Associates, Mike O’Berry,

Sealund & Associates

Reaching Global and North American audiences with the use of games

and simulations require a high level of planning in order to hit the target

with a successful deployment. During the Analysis Phase, Stakeholder

buy in will require education and a comprehensive deployment plan.

Deployment considerations early on will save time, dollars and frustration

throughout all project phases.

This session will share several examples of reaching global and North

American audiences with games and simulations that hit the target and

why. Demos and deployment success stories will include the Defense

Acquisition University, Carnival Cruise Lines, the U.S. Air Force, Combating

Terrorism Technical Support Office/Technical Support Working Group,

Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Office of Personnel

Management.

9:15-10:00 Engaging Future Cybersecurity Professionals through

Cyber Challenges

Eva Vincze, Program Director - Professor, Forensic Sciences, George

Washington University, Diana L. Burley, Associate Professor, George

Washington University

Collegiate Cyber Defense Challenge. US Cyber Challenge. CyberPatriot.

NetWars. DC3 Digital Forensics Challenge. Cyber Quest…The list of

cybersecurity competitions and the number of participants in them grows

every year. Proponents of cyber challenges suggest that they are an effective

way to identify, engage, and develop future cybersecurity professionals.

But are they In this presentation, we will discuss results from

an ongoing study of participants in the competitions sponsored by the

National Cyber League. We will also discuss the development of a new

cyber forensics challenge that is designed to assess competency in communication

as well as technical skills.

10:30-11:10 Creating Compelling, Immersive Serious Games

David Versaw, CFO, WILL Interactive, Inc.

Creating compelling, immersive games that truly make a positive influence

on attitudes and behaviors is not an easy task. It requires an understanding

of the way people internally process information and respond to

visual cues. If your objective is greater than the users memorization of

rules, facts or figures, experiential learning is far more effective than striving

for a high score or trying to "stay alive" as long as possible. Engaging the

learner in the content is crucial. Actively participate in an open discussion

using video-based simulation technology and experience how some

of the most influential organizations in the world are using serious gaming

technology with a focus on compelling content which draws in, engages

and positively changes the attitudes and behaviors of their target

audiences.

11:15-12:00 Game and Design Speak for Game Designers and

Instructional Designers

Marie Broyles, Game Designer/Senior Instuctional Designer, Oak Grove

Technologies

Creating a flash animation in an elearning course is not the same as

creating a 3 dimensional world, where characters must interact, objects

can be manipulated, and how the player moves through and interacts

with this environment is not without consequence. The result of not understanding

3D simulation design/development is cost overruns, staffing

issues, and production delays that result in missing critical milestones.

1:30-2:10 Instructional Interactive Narrative: Exploring the

Components of a Serious Game

Jamie Liske, Carney, Inc

The design of a serious game requires a balance between three distinct

designs: instructional, interaction, and narrative. Each of these plays a

key role in addressing the common characteristics of games, motivation,

interface, gameplay, and feedback. This session will explore each of these

components from an individual and integrated perspective with the intent

to develop a better understanding of the considerations that need to be

taken into account when designing a serious game.

2:15-3:00 Gamification vs. Game-based Training

Andrew Hughes, President, Designing Digitally, Inc.

Gamification is the integration of game mechanics, or game dynamics,

into a learning experience, while game-based training can be defined as

a game designed for the purpose of solving a problem. However, these

words are being used in parallel by the industry and it can be quite confusing.

This session will focus on the clarification of gamification and

game-based training. Using examples from the industry, this session will

help to explain each of the learning experiences, and discuss the best

practices in their development.

3:30-4:10 Stand Up and Participate! Incorporating Game-Based

Learning into Your Instruction

Christine Iannicelli, Reference Librarian, Immaculata University

Active learning and assessment are two of the most popular buzzwords

in education right now, and yet, it can be extremely difficult to find time to

incorporate either of these into your instruction. This presentation will

discuss simple ways you can use interactive games as an active learning

and assessment technique in your classroom.

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4:15-5:00 TBA

Thursday - FGDLA

8:30—9:10 Expanding Unified Communications Solutions for

Government Training Networks

Russ G. Colbert, US Federal Government Market Director, Plycom

This interactive presentation with hands-on demonstration will explore

the latest trends, challenges, and solutions being utilized within Federal

Government Departments and Agencies. Content focus will be related to

the growing demand and availability for mobility products, applications,

and solutions. The BYOD (bring your own device) concept, including smart

phones, tablets, laptops, desktop video collaboration, and Microsoft Lync

tools will be discussed.

9:15—10:00 Increasing National Defense Readiness through

Effective Training Techniques and Operations: A Case Study of the

US Army Enterprise Classroom Project

Mike Sousa, Director of AV and Learning Services, Pragmatics, Inc.

This exciting presentation will dive into details concerning the success

of one of the most impressive global training networks in operation today!

Topics will focus upon equipment selection, instructor training, course

transitions, student performance, ROI, and network utilization. Extensive

interaction with dialogue, questions and answers is encouraged.

10:30—11:10 The Government Education & Training Network

(GETN): making HDTV and IPTV cost-effective options for distance

learning

Philip Westfall, Ph.D., Director, President, FGDLA, Air Technology Network,

Air University

This presentation will describe the Government Education & Training

Network, a consortium of 12 Federal Government agencies using an interoperable,

satellite-based distance learning network. The session will

focus on GETN’s interagency cooperation that leads to cost-effective distance

learning; the recently completed conversion to a new compression

standard, bringing High-Definition TV to the remote classroom and IP

video to the desktop; and the expansion of GETN to reach all DOD medical

facilities worldwide.

11:15—12:00 The Learning Styles Revelation: Insight and Research

from Cognitive Science—Implications for Instructional Design

Jolly Holden, Ed.D., Associate Professor, American InterContinental University

The concept of learning styles in predicting learning outcomes is a commonly

misunderstood and misapplied instructional strategy when designing

content. That said, research from cognitive science has revealed that

learning styles have little, if any, effect on predicting learning outcomes.

While the perception is people learn better when information is presented

in their preferred learning style, current evidence has not confirmed this.

Since the primary goal of instruction is to attain the desired learning outcomes,

should learning styles be considered a variable when designing

instruction Join this lively session as we explore the most recent research

on learning styles, review the cognitive information processing

model, and discuss the implications when designing instruction.

1:30—2:10 The Corner Stone of CASCOM’s Distributed Learning

Initiative: Integrating a LCMS

Matt MacLaughlin, Chief, Technology Integration Branch, SCoE Headquarters,

Combined Arms Support Command, David Palmer, National DoD

learning and technology consultant, Blackboard, Inc.

While the demand for future learning technologies in the U.S. Army has

increased significantly, an initiative within the CASCOM has resulted in

the integration of Learning Content Management System (LCMS). The

session will describe CASCOMs LCMS as a viable means of authoring

and delivering content via BlackBoard’s Web 2.0 capability, even within a

secure environment. The Combined Arms Support Command (CASCOM)

Technology Integration Branch supports proponent schools by providing

Blackboard’s LCMS domain administration, maintenance and training.

The LCMS allows for development of in-house distributed learning computer

and web-based courseware and training products, and virtual and

gaming training simulations within the software and hardware capabilities

of the organization. The result is CASCOM’s leadership role in researching

and experimenting with mobile and other emerging training technology

and tools, and provide support during the development of training

products using new technology strategies and devices.

2:15—3:00 Facilitating/Mentoring/Coaching—The New Training

Paradigm

Carla Lane, Ed.D., VP of the Higher Education Sector, FGDLA

Online faculty development has become too complicated to cover the

basics in short training courses. The Army is moving to facilitative teaching,

and other changes in military training point to proactive learning. Training

for a changed teaching/learning paradigm must meet the needs of the

instructional designers who will create the courses and the new facilitators.

UCLA developed a new coaching/mentoring method that quickly

moved new online facilitators and instructional designers to produce facilitated

online courses. This session will guide attendees in adapting the

method to their institution.

3:30—4:10 Virtual Bridge Inspection (VBI) Computer-Based Training

(CBT)

Richard Barnaby, Director, National Highway Institute, US Department of

Transportation

This session will be a high-level discussion of the National Highway

Institute’s (NHI) development of the award-winning Virtual Bridge Inspection

(VBI) computer-based training, a three-dimensional (3D) training that

is part of NHI’s cornerstone, 2-week bridge inspection training course.

During this course, students participate in field trips to actual bridge sites

that allow them to practice applying key bridge inspection concepts.

4:15—5:00 M-Learning vs. E-Learning … Is There Any Liking or

Learning Taking Place

Reggie Smith, III, Director of Distributed Learning, JANUS Research

Group, Inc.

This session will present some preliminary data from a study examining

generational (Y, X, & Boomer) reactions and learning effectiveness of

asynchronous, mobile-based online learning versus asynchronous, computer-based

online learning. In addition, it will include lessons learned

from delivering content across multiple platforms.

Friday - Learning Management Systems

8:30—9:10 LMS Troubleshooting - Learning to Work with Vendors

and Service Providers

Robert Bradley, Distance Learning Coordinator, Virginia Department of

Health

Two case studies will be presented where the Virginia Department of

Health identified problems in two different LMSs and then corrected the

problems through interactions with vendors and service providers. One

issue was a systemic problem where the other was a section functionality

issue. Both were corrected through detailed interactions with non-Department

of Health entities and lessons learned will be presented.

9:15—10:00 Avoiding an LMS Ghost Town: How to Be Sure Your

Online Learning Environment Will Thrive

Katherine Robeson, CEO, Elearning Experts LLC

One of the best kept secrets in online learning is that an unfortunately

high number of e-learning initiatives fail. Despite the efforts of IT professionals

and talent managers, the requisite buy-in for online learning simply

doesn’t always happen. Thus, we have a growing wasteland of online

learning environments that are minimally populated, grossly underutilized,

or which have content that is mind-numbingly boring. In this presentation,

we will identify key reasons why many e-learning projects fail and steps

you can take to ensure your LMS doesn’t end up a Ghost Town.

10:00—10:30 Coffee Break

10:30—11:10 Advances in Learning Management Systems: Doing

More With Less

Jon Matejcek, President, Dashe & Thomson, Inc., Paul Paradis, Director,

Sales and Marketing, Dashe & Thomson, Inc.

This talk will show how a new crop of LMS solutions are doing more

with less – by focusing on speed and simplicity, and integrating with free,

open source platforms. Attendees will gain both insight into today’s LMS

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 19


marketplace, and the knowledge required to make better buying decisions.

11:15—12:00 Implementing an Open-Source Software-as-a-Service

Learning Management System: Lessons Learned

S. Rebecca Watson, Chief, Business Operations, Training and Career

Development Division, United Citizenship and Immigration Services, John

DeCore, Director, Knowledge Management and Human Capital Solutions,

PowerTrain, Inc.

It is a paradigm shift to change from an internal proprietary Learning

Management System (LMS) where the agency is responsible for the software

lifecycle documentation, owns the system, manages the security

controls, and works with copyrighted software to an open-source implementation

using Software-as-a-Service. This presentation will explore the

challenges and lessons learned during the implementation of a new LMS

for UCIS is 25,000 global users. Specifically, we will share lessons learned

regarding using an agile software development process, focusing on use

cases, the establishment of a system of record, preparing users, and

establishing clear channels of communication. We will also demonstrate

the use of Web 2.0 technology to interact with learners.

Friday - ROI

8:30—9:10 ROI, Collaboration, and Multi-Platform Technologies:

Three Keys to the Future of Learning

Marissa Levin, CEO, Information Experts

Chief Learning Officers are feeling pressure to cut costs, reduce development

times, and prove return on investment of each training dollar spent.

At the same time, Instructional Designers are more geographically dispersed

and need learning solutions that work effectively across a wide

array of technology platforms. This presentation will discuss how corporate

survival depends on finding solutions to this triple-header dilemma,

and the development of a learning development tool that functions on all

technology platforms, enables real-time collaboration, reduces development

cycle times, and produces measurable ROI.

9:15—10:00 ROI: Drilling Done on Cost-Benefit Components in

Today’s Information Age

Sharon L. Burton, Doctoral Student, Quality Management, National Graduate

School of Quality Management, Kim L Brown Jackson, Director of

Product Development, Financial Management, Management Concepts,

Dustin Bessette, Doctoral Student, Quality Management, National Graduate

School of Quality Management

Learning effectiveness with reduced costs continues to drive distance

education programs. This presentation will review (1) aligning training

with business objectives, (2) tracking and evaluating business results,

and (3) the value of an on-line investment in terminology for training professionals.

Also, learners will better understand why business values

should be attached to organizational learning capabilities.

10:30—11:10 Creating Effective Small-Scale/Small-Budget

Performance Support Solutions

Hal Christensen, Partner, Christensen Roberts Solutions

In recent years, Performance Support has re-emerged as an important

ingredient in any successful campaign to improve employee performance.

To date, many of its greatest achievements have come not from extensive

enterprise initiatives, but rather from much smaller interventions,

those involving a single department or business group. This was done by

reducing Performance Support to its essential key elements and employing

free and low-cost tools to achieve significant cost savings as well as

gains in effectiveness and efficiency. This session will describe this process

and demonstrate several successful small-scale Performance Support

solutions it has produced.

11:15—12:00 Take Training to the Next Level and Change Behavior

Peter Vaka, President, The Learning Retention Company, Joseph Ganci,

eLearning Consultant, eLearning Joe

It has always been the goal of trainers and educators to change behavior

and subsequently produce verifiable results that can be measured.

Donald Kirkpatrick developed the “Four Levels of Training Evaluation” as

a way to measure results at every level. Kirkpatrick himself talks of a

possible fifth level, ROI or return on investment. Using available mobile

technology, levels 3, 4, and even 5 are now possible using proven steps

and methods to achieve implementation of the key training principles and

verify the impact of that behavioral change.

Friday - Simulation

9:15—10:00 Rehabilitation Research Simulations - Heuristic Pre-

Action Re-training for Survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury, Stroke,

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or Focal Dystonias

Vince Macri, Manager, Simulations Department, 3D PreMotorSkill Technologies,

LLC, Vincent James Macri, Game Instructor, 3D PreMotorSkill

Technologies, LLC, Paul Zilber, Chief Engineer, 3D PreMotorSkill Technologies,

LLC

Neurologically impaired individuals need to re-train the brain to control

limbs and execute physical actions. Re-training is often impeded or obstructed

by hemiplegia, hence daunting. The challenge is to re-learn to

move before being able to move. However, if survivors can visualize moving

their limbs, our technology enables implementing those kinetic images

into simulated physical actions in preparation for performing actions in

the physical world. Our video game-like technology provides pre-action

training scenarios and images of anatomically realistic virtual limbs having

analogous true range of motion.

10:30—11:10 The Leadership Challenge – A Case Study of Using

Simulation for Leadership Training

James Xu, Government Group Team Assistant, Adayana Government

Group, Kenneth Barber, Manager of Learning & Dev., Shell Oil Company

Jiffy Lube’s “The Leadership Challenge” simulation provides managers

the opportunity to respond to daily leadership challenges that are relevant

to their day-to-day life such as customer service, employee relations,

scheduling, financial management, and safety. Managers spend two “virtual

days” managing a 3D “virtual store” to handle all types of issues they

may encounter in a real store. The visually and operationally accurate

training environment provides for effective knowledge and skill transfer

into the real world. This case-study will walk participants through the details

of simulation project development from its vision to reality.

11:15—12:00 Transforming a Blended Nursing Physical Assessment

Course to 100% Online

Kirsty Digger, Assistant Professor, Nursing Dept, SUNY Delhi College of

Technology, Susan Deane, Associate Professor, SUNY Delhi College of

Technology

This session addresses the transformation of an online nursing physical

assessment course with precepted, in-person clinical time, to a 100%

online course. Shadow Health (www.shadowhealth.com) was identified

as an alternative to a 1:1 in-person clinical. This cloud-based software

uses an interactive digital client for clinical. Students can examine all body

systems as they interact with Tina Jones, their digital patient.

Friday - Training

8:30—9:10 Exploring Training Development and Cross Compatibility

with HTML5

Raymond Pastore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology,

University of North Carolina Wilmington, Nick Pastore, Ph.D., Booz

Allen Hamilton

This presentation will discuss compatibility issues that arise when developing

for desktop machines, tablets (iPad), and mobile devices. Compatibility

issues of various authoring tools, along with HTML5, will be discussed.

Projects using these authoring tools will be presented to demonstrate

how training programs developed for multiple devices appear to

the end user.

9:15—10:00 Working Smarter

Joan Lasselle, President, Lasselle-Ramsay, Inc.

This session presents a five-point technology selection process that

begins with a clear understanding of the user experience model to define

user stories that link directly to technology requirements. These requirements

provide the basis for vendor presentations and scoring. The end

result is a technology that supports a new customer experience rather

than defining or limiting what you can do. The presentation includes

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 20


take-away worksheets and tools that each participant can use to implement

the approach within their own organization.

10:30—11:10 Theoretical Framework for Coordinating Training

Programs with Business Processes in Large Organizations

Rick Kiper, Unit Chief, FBI Academy, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Organizations with large workforces have difficulty modifying their individual

training products to keep up with the thousands of policies and

processes that change frequently. By exploring the issue through a review

of the literature, this session sets forth the theoretical foundation for

creating a knowledge management (KM) system that will address this

problem.

11:15—12:00 Training Law of Affect

Christopher Piazza, Lockheed Martin

Today’s students no longer retain as much core knowledge as they did

just 30 years ago. Widespread access to computing devices has changed

the way they learn and store information. However, some training methodologies

for the Navy still use fire hose approaches to training. These

methods do not allow the student time for synthesis or reiteration to improve

retention of what they have learned. A systemic change must occur

in the instructional systems design process so that we implement technology

using effective e-learning strategies and provide Directed Training

the same way the student learns and stores information today.

SAVE THE DATE

MARCH 19-21, 2014

New Learning Technologies 2014

SALT Conference

March 19-21, 2014

Caribe Royale Hotel

Orlando, Florida

Friday - Accessibility

8:30—9:10 An Overview of Instructional Design for Accessible e-

Learning: Integrate the Technical and Pedagogical Factors from the

Start!

Aina G. Irbe, Director of Training, SSB BART Group, Jonathan Avila, Chief

Accessibility Officer, SSB BART Group

The buzz about developing accessible e-Learning is rapidly growing.

However, e-Learning development still predominantly focuses on the technical

aspects of accessibility, and not the pedagogical factors necessary

for a truly accessible e-Learning experience. The provision of educationally

sound and accessible e-learning is a multi-faceted process that intertwines

technical knowledge with new instructional design techniques.

This presentation holistically reviews the background of accessibility and

accessibility standards, the most common technical requirements for e-

learning accessibility, and best practices in instructional design for e-

Learning.

9:15—10:00 A Framework for Accessible e-Learning: Include All

Learners!

Badrul Khan, Ph.D., Training and e-Learning Specialist, SSB BART Group,

Timothy Springer, CEO, SSB BART Group

A framework for e-Learning will be introduced to discuss comprehensive

and critical issues of accessibility in the start to finish design of globally

diverse and meaningful e-Learning programs. The framework identifies

eight vital dimensions for an accessible e-Learning environment.

10:30—12:00 Accessible Electronic Learning Solutions and Section

508

Helen Chamberlain, Governmentwide Section 508 Program Director, Office

of Governmentwide Policy, General Services Administration, Alex Koudry,

General Services Administration, Noanie Sullivan, Carney, Sean Decker,

Carney

How do you create accessible electronic learning solutions so that people

with disabilities are able to access and use the information and data

you provide This well rounded panel will have experts in Section 508,

assistive technology, and accessible training design. They will discuss

the 508 law, why it matters, and how the standards can successfully be

incorporated into software and web-based learning solutions for government

entities. This discussion will highlight how, with careful design and

planning, interactive, effective 508-comformant performance solutions can

be developed to ensure access to all learners, including instructional design

considerations, platforms, and usability issues.

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 21


WWW.FGDLA.US

Federal Government Distance Learning Association (FGDLA)

2013 Annual Awards & Reception

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15TH

Regency Ballroom

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

All SALT Conference participants are welcome to attend the awards presentation and enjoy the reception. There

will be a cash bar and complimentary hors d’oeuvres.

Individual Awards

EAGLE: In recognition of an individual that has served the Federal Government distance learning community by

providing exceptional leadership, vision, and advocacy.

HALL OF FAME: In recognition of an individual who has made significant contributions in promoting and

developing distance learning in the Federal Government.

PIONEER: In recognition of an individual for demonstrating initiative and leadership in the development and

implementation of distance learning in the Federal Government.

PILLAR: In recognition for outstanding service or significant contribution to the FGDLA by an individual not

affiliated with the Federal Government.

Organizational Awards

EAGLE: In recognition of an organization that has served the Federal Government distance learning community

by providing exceptional leadership, vision, and advocacy.

FIVE-STAR: In recognition of an organization for demonstrating excellence in providing enterprise-wide distance

learning solutions for the Federal Government.

INNOVATION: In recognition of an organization for demonstrating leadership in the development of emerging

distance learning technologies providing enterprise-wide solutions for the Federal Government.

PILLAR: In recognition for outstanding service or significant contribution to the FGDLA by an organization not

affiliated with the Federal Government.

Awards Sponsored by

Reception sponsored by

Awards Brochure Sponsored by

Post Award Mixer Sponsor by

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 22


CONFERENCE EXHIBITORS

FGDLA # 1 & 2

POLYCOM

HUGHES

Contact: Dr. Phillip Westfall

Ph: (937) 904-5480

philip.westfall@afit.edu

www.fgdla.us

FGDLA is a nonprofit association formed to promote the development

and application of distance learning and to actively foster collaboration

and understanding among those involved in leveraging technology in support

of the education and training needs of Federal Government agencies.

ASM Research #3

Contact: Alan Eisenberg

Ph: (703) 645-0420

alan.eisenberg@asmr.com

www.asmr.com

ASM Research (ASM) is a leading provider of both customized and COTSbased

learning and training solutions to Federal, state and local government.

For more than 30 years ASM has worked hand in hand with clients,

both large and small, to further workforce development and to provide

world-class training and talent management services and solutions. As

an information solutions service provider and integrator, ASM provides

complete learning solutions that include consulting, programming, hosting,

system design, implementation and integration, course development,

and customer support services. ASM is a Totara LMS Partner to assist in

COTS-based implementations, hosting, and customizations of Totara.

ASM is an employee-owned company with a long history of demonstrating

that our extraordinary commitment to our client’s mission consistently

produces extraordinary results.

Elearning Experts #6

Contact: Katherine Robeson

Ph: (888) 928-3848 x101

info@elearningexperts.net

www.elearningexperts.net

Elearning Experts provides consulting, hosting, support, and training

for organizations needing online learning solutions. We are dedicated to

creating the best possible e-learning experiences in the most affordable

way possible. We serve clients in a variety of sectors, including corporate,

healthcare, and education. As a Totara LMS Solutions Partner, we

are excited to bring the power and cost savings of open source technologies

to our clients. We also have particular expertise in the world's largest

open source LMS platform, Moodle. Elearning Experts aims to be

your experienced partner as you establish and grow your online learning

offerings. We provide the support and talent you need to be successful.

We’re here to listen to your needs, assess your options, and design effective

solutions for your organization.

University of North Texas #7

Contact: J. Michael Spector, Ph.D.

Ph: (940) 369-5070

Mike.Spector@unt.edu

www.LT.unt.edu

The University of North Texas online degree programs in Learning Technologies

prepare professionals in the education and corporate sectors

who want to understand how technology can be used most effectively in

teaching, learning, and training. Program faculty are nationally recognized

for their experience and insights into how Learning Technologies is evolving

and is changing the way instructional materials are created and delivered.

The M.S. and the PhD offerings in Learning Technologies are offered

100% online. The master’s is offered in a traditional 16-week model

as well as an accelerated 8-week format.

La Salle University #8

Contact: Dr. Bobbe Baggio

Ph: (215) 991-2989

baggio@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/ITM

La Salle University’s online M.S. in Instructional Technology Management

provides a foundation in instructional design principles and an understanding

of adult learning theory as it relates to an increasingly global

workforce.

SAIC #9

Contact: Charmaine Bell

Ph: (703) 318-4514

charmaine.l.bell@saic.com

www.saic.com

SAIC is a FORTUNE 500® scientific, engineering and technology applications

company that uses its deep domain knowledge to solve problems

of vital importance to the nation and the world, in national security,

energy & environment, health and critical infrastructure. For more information,

visit saic.com. SAIC: From Science to Solutions®

PRODUCT LITERATURE DISPLAYS

Journal of Applied Learning Technology (JALT)

Contact: Carrie Vespico

Ph: (540) 347-0055

Email: jalt@lti.org

www.salt.org

Journal of Applied Learning Technology is a quarterly online publication

sponsored by the Society for Applied Learning Technology and published

by Learning Technology Institute. This journal is devoted to the issues,

problems, and applications of applied learning technologies in education,

training, and job performance. Its purpose is to inform managers, senior

professionals, and developers of specific examples of applications of technology

based learning systems for education, training, and job performance

improvement in terms of results that can be or have been

achieved. Readers should get information directly applicable to their jobs.

Articles examine some phase of technology, evolution, planning, cost,

learning successes, and failures of applied learning technologies. This

journal embraces trainers, professionals, and educators across a broad

spectrum of business, industry, and the military, administrators and executives,

and academia.

Nova Southeastern University

Contact: Melissa Ruidiaz

Ph: (800) 986-2247 x22001

scisinfo@nova.edu

www.scis.nova.edu

A major force in educational innovation, the Graduate School of Computer

and Information Sciences at Nova Southeastern University provides

educational programs of distinction to prepare students for leadership

roles in its disciplines. The school’s strengths include a distinguished

faculty, cutting edge curriculum, and flexible online and campus-based

formats that enable working professionals to earn a graduate degree without

interrupting their careers. A leader in online education since 1983,

Nova Southeastern University has been nationally recognized as one of

the top universities offering distance education programs. In addition, Nova

Southeastern University has been designated a National Center of Academic

Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the U.S. Government.

M.S. and Ph.D. programs include computer science, educational technology,

information security, information technology, and information systems.

Certificate programs are offered in business intelligence/analytics,

information security management, and information system security.

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 23


Interactive Learning Technologies 2013 SALT ® Conference

Hyatt Regency Reston Hotel

August 14-16, 2013

Name: _________________________________________

Title: _____________________________________________________

Company: _________________________________________________

Company Address: __________________________________________

City/State/Zip: ______________________________________________

Phone and Fax: _____________________________________________

Email: ____________________________________________________

Payment Method: (U.S. funds only)

To Be Invoiced (Note: Higher Rate) P.O.#_______________

Company: ___________________________________________

Address: ____________________________________________

City/State/Zip: ________________________________________

Check (Payable to: Learning Technology Institute)

Master Card Visa American Express Discover

Card Number ___________________________________________

Expires ___________________ Security Code _______________

Name on card___________________________________________

Signature ______________________________________________

PRE-CONFERENCE TUTORIALS - Tuesday, August 13th

A - Comparing Captivate and Storyline (8:30 am - 12:00 pm) - $175

B - Using HTML5 for Mobile Platforms (8:30 am - 5:00 pm) - $350

C - Instructional Design Seminar (1:30 am - 5:00 pm) - $175

NON-MEMBER CONFERENCE RATES

Early Bird Registration (if paid by May 14 - $700

Advanced Registration (if paid by July 31) - $750

Standard/Onsite Registration (if paid after July 31) - $800

To Be Invoiced Registration (regardless of date) - $800

SALT / FGDLA MEMBER CONFERENCE RATES

Early Bird Registration (if paid by May 14) - $650

Advanced Registration (if paid by July 31) - $700

Standard/Onsite Registration (if paid after July 31) - $750

To Be Invoiced Registration (regardless of date) - $750

One Day Registration - Circle Day ( WED / THURS / FRI ) - $400

Two Day Registration - Circle Day (WED / THURS / FRI) - $600

EXHIBITS ONLY - FREE

SALT ® Membership - $100

SALT Reception - WED 5:00 - 6:30 Exhibit Hall

FGDLA Reception - THURS 5:00 - 6:30 Exhibit Hall

Total Amount Due: $________________

For office use only

C L E PP PI D

Registration Date: _______/_______/_______ PM EM WS FX PH

HOW TO REGISTER: Fax this registration form to (540) 349-3169 or mail this registration form with your payment to

Learning Technology Institute, 50 Culpeper Street, Warrenton, Virginia 20186.

- OR -

REGISTER ONLINE: Go to the Conference section of the SALT website (www.salt.org) and click Registration, then scroll

down and click Register Online.

HOTEL INFORMATION: The Interactive Learning Technologies 2013 SALT Conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency

Reston Hotel, 1800 Presidents Street, Reston, Virginia 22090 - US. Attendees should make their own hotel room

reservations. A limited number of rooms have been set aside at the Hyatt Regency Reston Hotel at the discounted rate of

$225.00 single/double. Room rates are subject to availability, so please make your reservations as early as possible. Special

room rates may not be available after July 23, 2013. Call reservations at (888) 421-1442 and reference the SALT Conference.

You can also make your hotel reservations online at https://resweb.passkey.com/go/AppliedLearning

SALT NETWORKING RECEPTION: Wednesday, August 14th 5:00 to 6:30 in the Exhibit Hall (Regency Ballroom - Second

Floor). There will be complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. If you would like to attend this reception, please check the

box above on the registration form, or email Carrie Vespico at carrie@lti.org, in order to help us plan accordingly.

FGDLA AWARDS RECEPTION: Thursday, August 15th 5:00 to 6:30 in the Exhibit Hall (Regency Ballroom - Second Floor).

There will be complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. If you would like to attend this reception, please check the box

above on the registration form, or email Carrie Vespico at carrie@lti.org, in order to help us plan accordingly.

CANCELLATION POLICY: Cancellations received before or by July 31, 2013 will be refunded after the conference less a $50

processing fee. We also accept attendee substitutions, or your fee may be applied to the next SALT conference. No

monetary refunds for cancellations will be made after July 31, 2013.

The Interactive Learning Technologies 2013 SALT Conference is sponsored by the Society for Applied Learning

Technology (SALT), and managed by the Learning Technology Institute (LTI). If you have any questions about the

conference, please contact Carrie Vespcio, Conference Manager, at (540) 347-0055 or carrie@lti.org.

Phone: (540) 347-0055 • Fax: (540) 349-3169 • Email: info@salt.org • Website: WWW.SALT.ORG 24

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