Programme and Abstracts 4 Oct 2011 - WKWSCI Home - Nanyang ...

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Programme and Abstracts 4 Oct 2011 - WKWSCI Home - Nanyang ...

Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

From the first recorded public screening in the early 1900s to local feature films in multiplexes of the 21 st

century, the motion picture has been present in Singapore for more than a century. Even as it occupies a

highly intimate aspect of daily living, the cinematic text and experience have been accorded greater

legitimacy and scholarly attention in the recent decade as part of the critical recognition of the broader

significance of screen cultures. The recent decade has witnessed the burgeoning of popular and scholarly

interests in the evolution of film and cinema in Singapore, with studies ranging from industry networks,

analysis of film texts and film archiving to unearthing of socio‐cultural memories of audience experiences

with the big screen. As a multidisciplinary phenomenon, critical research and writings on Singapore cinema

have involved scholars coming from diverse academic backgrounds from Communications Studies to

History, Geography, and Sociology. Accompanying this growing scholarly interest has also been the

increasing inclusion of Film studies in educational curriculums from the primary to tertiary levels.

In this respect, this conference will serve as a platform for both scholars and practitioners to review

existing paradigms in addition to charting new approaches and directions into the study of film and cinema

in Singapore. Suggested themes include, but are not limited to:













Historical Evolution

Geographies of Cinema

Audience Reception

Archiving Film

Cultural and Media Policies and Politics

Cultural Economy and Film Industry

Semiotics

Film Genres (Mainstream/Independent Films)

Film & Visual/Installation Arts

Cinematography

Filmmakers & Artistes

Film Research

CONTACT DETAILS

Conveners:

Dr Liew Kai Khiun

Assistant Professor

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information

Nanyang Technological University

kkliew@ntu.edu.sg

Dr Stephen Teo

Associate Professor

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information

Nanyang Technological University

steo@ntu.edu.sg


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

6 OCTOBER 2011 (THURSDAY)

09:45 – 10:00 REGISTRATION AND MORNING TEA

10:00 – 10:30 OPENING & WELCOME REMARKS

CHUA BENG HUAT

Leader of the Cultural Studies in Asia Cluster, Asia Research Institute,

Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore

LIEW KAI KHIUN

Division of Broadcast & Cinema Studies , Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and

Information,

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

STEPHEN TEO

Division of Broadcast & Cinema Studies , Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and

Information,

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

10:30 –12:30 PANEL 1 – MADE AND STORED IN SINGAPORE

Chairperson: CHUA BENG HUAT, National University of Singapore

10:30 KAREN CHAN and CHEW TEE PAO

Asian Film Archive, Singapore

11:00 ISAAC KERLOW

Nanyang Technological University,

Singapore

11:30 Olivia KHOO

Monash University, Australia

12:00 DISCUSSION

12:30 – 13:30 LUNCH

13:30 –15:30 PANEL 2 – FILM & BODY POLITICS

Chairperson: ADAM KNEE, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

13:30 SOPHIA SIDDIQUE HARVEY

Vassar College, USA

14:00 ORADOL KAEWPRASERT

University of the Thai Chamber of

Commerce

14:30 JUN ZUBILLAGA‐POW

King’s College London, UK

15:00 DISCUSSION

15:30 – 16:00 TEA BREAK

Independent Digital Film‐making and its

Impact on Film Archiving in Singapore

Deconstructing Ten Shorts by Young

Singaporean Filmmakers

‘I Made it in Singapore’:

Expanding ‘Local Content’ through

Singapore’s International Co‐Production

Agreements

Sensuous Citizenship in Contemporary

Singapore Cinema: A Case Study of

Singapore GaGa (Tan Pin Pin, 2005)

Transnational Cinemas: Pleasure Factory

(2007)

Foucault v. Singapore:

Biopolitics and Geopolitics in Contemporary

Queer Films


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

16:00 – 18:00 PANEL 3 – TIME, HISTORY AND MEMORY

Chairperson: LIEW KAI KHIUN, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

16:00 LOH KAH SENG

Independent Scholar

KENNETH PAUL TAN

National University of Singapore

16:30 IVAN KWEK

National University of Singapore

17:00 STEPHEN TEO

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

17:30 DISCUSSION

18:00 END OF DAY 1

18:15 TRANSFER TO DINNER VENUE

18:30 – 20:00 CONFERENCE DINNER

(For Speakers, Chairpersons & Invited Guests)

20:00 TRANSFER BACK TO HOTEL

Convergence and Slippage between Film and

History: Reviewing Invisible City, 17 Years and

Sandcastle

Wrestling in the Shadow of an Icon:

Time and the Otherness of Malay Films in

Singapore

Jack Neo as a Paradigm of the Cultural

Materialism of Singapore Film


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

7 OCTOBER 2011 (FRIDAY)

09:45 – 10:00 REGISTRATION AND MORNING TEA

10:00 – 11:30 PANEL 4 – MINORITY & MIGRANT CINEMA

Chairperson: EUGENE DAIRIANATHAN, National Institute of Education, Singapore

10:00 ANJALI GERA ROY

Indian Institute of Technology, India

10:30 NIDYA SHANTHINI MANOKARA

National University of Singapore

Dhoom,Rang Fab, Bombay Café Mumbai Se:

Bollywood Media Assemblages in Singapore

Off with the Shaking Heads!! Reel‐izing the

‘Singapore Indian’ in Local Tamil Films My

Magic and Gurushtram‐24 hours of Anger

11:00 DISCUSSION

11:30 – 12:30 LUNCH

12:30 – 14:30 PANEL 5 – CHARTING AND NETWORKING

Chairperson: BRENDA CHAN, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

12:30 CHARLES LEARY

University of Malaysia Sarawak

Cultural Mapping of Singapore Cinemas

13:00 EDNA LIM

National University of Singapore

13:30 ADAM KNEE

Nanyang Technological University,

Singapore

14:00 DISCUSSION

14:30 – 15:00 TEA BREAK

15:00 – 16:30 PANEL 6 – ART, MUSIC AND POLITICS

Chairperson: KIM JIHOON, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

15:00 PHYLLIS TEO

University of Queensland, Australia

15:30 LIEW KAI KHIUN and BRENDA CHAN

Nanyang Technological University,

Singapore

Celluloid Singapore:

Connecting the Golden Age and the Revival

Where Got Ghost Movie:

Mapping Singaporean Horror

Toward an Expanded Frame: Immersion,

Hybridisation and Appropriation in Film

Installations of Ho Tzu Nyen and Ming

Wong

Popular Music and Contemporary

Singapore Cinema

16:00 DISCUSSION

16:30 – 16:40 BREAK

16:40 – 17:10 CLOSING REMARKS

LIEW KAI KHIUN

Division of Broadcast & Cinema Studies , Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and

Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

STEPHEN TEO

Division of Broadcast & Cinema Studies , Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and

Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

17:10 END OF DAY 2

17:30 TRANSFER BACK TO HOTEL


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

INDEPENDENT DIGITAL FILM‐MAKING AND ITS IMPACT ON FILM ARCHIVING IN

SINGAPORE

KAREN CHAN

Asian Film Archive, Singapore

karen@asianfilmarchive.org

CHEW TEE PAO

Asian Film Archive, Singapore

teepao@asianfilmarchive.org

Independent digital filmmaking in Singapore is now a norm as digital technology has become more

sophisticated yet widely affordable. As more digitally made films are presented to archives for

preservation, these digital and/or tape‐less formats, though economical and efficient, potentially poses

many problematic issues to film archives for long‐term film preservation. Archives around the world are

faced with the challenge of finding a preservation mode that balances the issues of digital storage, cost,

technological advancements, and the all important question of the longevity of the digital format. Is the

dawn of the digital age sounding the death knell of film archives or a resurrection of the relevancy of film

archiving

This paper tracks the expansion of digital technology within Singapore's independent film industry and

provides perspectives from the practice of film archiving in relation to the Singapore digital filmmaking

trend. The aim of this discussion is to highlight the characteristics of the digital media that concern

archivists, increase awareness of the mechanics of digital film preservation process and the challenges

involved. Case studies and practices of archives in the region will be examined to arrive at some

conclusions for the archiving profession in the 21 st century.

Karen Chan is the Acting Director of the Asian Film Archive since September 2010 and has been the

archivist overseeing the acquisition and preservation of the Archive’s collection since 2006. She has over 9

years of experience in the film and audiovisual archiving industry having previously worked at the National

Archives of Singapore. Her other work experiences include corporate communications at the National Arts

Council, the anthropology curatorial team at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City,

and as a secondary school teacher of English and History. Apart from managing operations, Karen teaches

film literacy and preservation courses at schools and is committed to generating greater awareness

amongst young filmmakers on the importance of proper preservation of their works.

Chew Tee Pao graduated from RMIT University in 2008 with a degree in Communication (Media), majoring

in Cinema Studies. His first foray into filmmaking, Old Times, garnered awards at the Canon DV Fest for

Best Short Film (Professional Category) and was a finalist of the Asian New Force at the 13th Hong Kong

Independent Short Film and Video Awards. His thesis short, Leaving Me, premiered and competed in the

22nd Singapore International Film Festival in its Singapore Short Film Competition. Upon graduation, Tee

Pao took an interest in audiovisual archiving and has been the Archive Officer at the Asian Film Archive

since 2009. The issue of film preservation has been a professional and personal concern of his.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

DECONSTRUCTING TEN SHORTS BY YOUNG SINGAPOREAN FILMMAKERS

ISAAC KERLOW

School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

isaac@ntu.edu.sg

This paper analyzes the narrative structure and cultural values explicit and/or implied in ten short films by

young Singaporean filmmakers. The films in question represent about half of the graduation films output

Created by Recent graduates of the Digital Filmmaking program at the Nanyang Technological University

between 2009‐‐‐2011. This Selection of films is significant because it represents the first time in Singapore

where graduation films are made by film majors in a University setting. Made‐in‐Singapore graduation

films prior to this time had been created by either: polytechnic students who are significantly younger in

age than university students or university students who were not filmmaking majors.

As a body of work the ten short films in question represent an interesting cross‐‐‐section of choices made

by the young directors at many levels: core cinematic language, production values, storytelling styles, and

genre. The paper offers an analysis of the narrative structures and storytelling styles and suggests the

schools of filmmaking that most likely influenced these ten young creators. This has relevance in the area

of historical evolution. A further semiotic deconstruction of each film reveals the cultural values that are

highlighted, supported or questioned by the directors and writers of these films. A final section in the

paper traces the performance of these films in the funding arena and in the festival circuit, issues relevant

to the topics of audience reception, cultural and media policies.

Isaac Kerlow is an artist and director who pioneered the use of digital technology for creative applications.

Isaac started his career in New York City, and founded the first BFA/MFA computer animation degree

program in the USA at Pratt Institute. During the late 1990s Isaac was instrumental in the integration of

digital technologies throughout the film and animation pipeline of the Walt Disney Company. He is the

author of several books, including the successful The Art of 3D Computer Animation and Effects, now in its

4 th edition and translated to Mandarin, Russian, Japanese and Korean. Isaac is Founding Dean of the first

professional film/animation/design school in Singapore, at NTU, and is currently Artist‐in‐Residence at the

Earth Observatory of Singapore. Most recently Isaac was Director of the SIGGRAPH 2010 Computer

Animation Festival in Los Angeles, and his film Mayon the Volcano Princess received the recent United

Nations "Best Concept Award."


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

‘I MADE IT IN SINGAPORE’: EXPANDING ‘LOCAL CONTENT’ THROUGH SINGAPORE’S

INTERNATIONAL CO‐PRODUCTION AGREEMENTS

OLIVIA KHOO

School of English, Communications and Performance Studies, Monash University, Australia

olivia.khoo@monash.edu

The Media Development Authority’s ‘I Made it in Singapore’ campaign, launched in Cannes in 2006,

encapsulates Singapore’s push to attract international collaborators in film and other media industries.

With its clever dual meaning, ‘I Made it in Singapore’ reflects the continued emphasis on local content and

Singapore‐made productions, as well as expressing the gleeful exclamation of international producers who

can claim to have had success in this growing Asian market, positioned as a gateway between East and

West. The campaign is resolutely about success stories. In this paper I examine Singapore’s official

international co‐production agreements, namely with Australia, Canada, China, South Korea and New

Zealand. Singapore is not unique in seeking out these bilateral ties for mutual benefit, but this paper will

explore what is specific to the Singaporean example in terms of policy development and implications for a

small film industry. Since co‐productions are treated as ‘local content’ for the purposes of audiovisual

regulation in Singapore as well as the partnering country, what are the benefits or hindrances for the

Singaporean film industry of expanding local content The paper will also examine the establishment of the

MDA’s International Film Fund and discuss the first Singapore‐Australia co‐production, Bait 3D, using the

Australian co‐production agreement as a case study.

Olivia Khoo is a Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at Monash University in Victoria, Australia. She is

the author of The Chinese Exotic: Modern Diasporic Femininity (Hong Kong University Press, 2007), and coeditor,

with Sean Metzger, of Futures of Chinese Cinema: Technologies and Temporalities in Chinese Screen

Cultures (Intellect, 2009). Olivia has published widely on Asian cinema, including ‘Slang Images: On the

‘Foreignness’ of Contemporary Singaporean Films’ in Inter‐Asia Cultural Studies (2006), and ‘Intellectual

Property and the Creative Industries in Asia (China and Singapore)’, Asia Pacific Law Review (2010).


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

SENSUOUS CITIZENSHIP IN CONTEMPORARY SINGAPORE CINEMA:

A CASE STUDY OF SINGAPORE GAGA (TAN PIN PIN, 2005)

SOPHIA SIDDIQUE HARVEY

Department of Film, Vassar College, New York, USA

soharvey@vassar.edu

In this paper, I examine how Singaporean filmmakers image and imagine life and living in Singapore. I

argue that through their films, Eric Khoo and Tan Pin Pin, construct a cinematic city of sensorial, affective,

and sonorous flows; ones that exist alongside Singapore’s cooler, authoritarian, and pragmatic currents.

Rather than privileging the ocular, where sight and vision predominate, their films engage with the

complexity and multiplicity of senses.

I perform a “textural” analysis that immerses itself in the synaesthetic impulse of Be With Me (2005) and

the celebration of sensuous citizenship in Singapore GaGa (2005). 1 These films make sense; they embody

the haptic, the tactile, the odorific, and the sonorous. Be With Me enacts this choreography of the senses

through the blind and deaf figure of Theresa Poh. Her haptic sensibilities allow her to taste, see, hear, and

smell. She, in essence, transforms the oculacentric city into one that rests upon an affective architecture.

Singapore GaGa infuses its narrative with rich vernacular sonic textures. Who can forget the unmistakable

repartee between Victor Khoo and Charlee or Juanita Melson as the “voice” of the MRT Tan Pin Pin

echoes this production of sensuous citizenship when she writes that these sonic gestures, “…give

audiences a sense of life in Singapore …. It was my attempt to communicate a view of Singapore with other

Singaporeans by tapping into our communal aural memory.” 2 These films, I argue, offer urban visions that

tap into the sensory, sensitive, and emotional spaces at the heart of belonging to what can be described as

sensuous citizenship.

Sophia Siddique Harvey holds a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts.

She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Film at Vassar College. Her research interests

include Singapore cultural studies, representations of trauma and memory in Cambodian, Indonesian, and

Thai cinema, and the impact of new media on Southeast Asia's moving image culture. She teaches film

history, contemporary Southeast Asian Cinemas, and seminars (such as, The Cinema of Satyajit Ray; and

Cyborgs in Popular Culture). Ms. Harvey has published in the Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography,

Spectator, Inter‐Asia Cultural Studies, and the Journal of Chinese Cinemas. Her most current project is a

manuscript on contemporary Singapore cinema entitled, Screening Singapore: City‐Cinema and the Urban

Imagination.

1

2

Jennifer M. Barker, The Tactile Eye: Touch and the Cinematic Experience (Berkeley: University of California Press,

2009), 50.

Tan Pin Pin, “Singapore GaGa tours Singapore.” Last modified May 4, 2006,

http://www.criticine.com/feature_article.phpid=30


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

TRANSNATIONAL CINEMAS: PLEASURE FACTORY (2007)

ORADOL KAEWPRASERT

Faculty of Communication Arts, University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, Thailand

oradol@gmail.com

This paper aims to analyse a film Pleasure Factory (2007). The film is a co‐production of Singapore and

Hong Kong‐Netherlands companies. Pleasure Factory depicts subjects that traditionally hidden in Asian

Society, such as prostitutions and female's sexual pleasure. Beside the internationally co‐production, the

film employs actors from different countries for instance the Taiwanese actress, Yang Kuei‐mei and the

Laotian‐Australian actor, Bangkok based, Ananda Everingham. New face actors that were casted from

Geylang, Singapore's red light district and around Singapore. The film is analyzed as how Transnational

Cinemas aspects allow the subject that Nana A. T. Rebhan of Germany's art and culture Channel Arte calls

"a convincing portrait of a never‐before‐seen red‐light district" to be made and screened in the

authoritarian Singapore. The film was also selected for the Uncertain Regard competition at the 2007

Cannes Film Festival and other international film festival around the worlds and acclaimed by the number

of European critics. The elements of the film that pleased these international critics are also

discussed. Unavoidably, the representation of sexuality by the film will also be explored.

Oradol Kaewprasert had been working at Department of Broadcasting, Faculty of Communication Arts,

University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce (UTCC) before pursuing her PhD from Department of

Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, University of Essex, UK sponsored by UTCC. Before joining UTCC she

had worked for Bangkok Broadcasting & TV and Safe the Children, Thailand. She has her BA (Mass

Communication) from Kasetsart University, Thailand and MA (Film and TV studies), Griffith University,

Australia. Her papers had been presented in Canada, Singapore, The UK, and Thailand. Her paper,

“Tropical Malady, Liminal Film Liminal Sexuality” is published in New Asian Imaginations by Nanyang

Academy of Fine Arts, Singapore. After earning her PhD, she is now back to her department at UTCC. She

is also a director of ASEAN Mass Communication Studies and Research Center which is part of the faculty.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

FOUCAULT V. SINGAPORE:

BIOPOLITICS AND GEOPOLITICS IN CONTEMPORARY QUEER FILMS

JUN ZUBILLAGA‐POW

School of Arts and Humanities, King’s College London, UK

jun.zubillaga‐pow@kcl.ac.uk

Less noticeable than other productions from within the local film industry, the sub‐genre of a Singaporean

Queer Cinema has yet to receive sufficient critical appraisal in contemporary scholarship. If the inclusion of

gay and lesbian themes and characters has appeared obvious to film viewers, then an inherent dimension

of queer geopolitics, among other discourses, would have remained opaque to the uncritical spectacle.

Hereafter, it is Judith Butler who has earlier overthrown the notion of sexuality and its corporeal

performativity as being aligned with social synchrony, yet contemporary academics and politicians

continue to stigmatise homosexuality with such essentialist inferences. Here, I argue against the

stereotypical processes of identifying homosexuals as interacting only with bodies of the same type and

deriving their sexual desires solely from objects, corporeal or otherwise. Using theoretical, political and

cinematic resources, I aim to debunk two inherently homophobic ideas that (i) the body and its behaviour,

in both the social and sexual aspects, occupy distinctive categories each occupying differentiable discursive

spaces, and that (ii) spaces are being resistant to critical re‐territorialisation, or opposed to any reclamation

of heteronormative sites, either real or imaginary.

Correspondingly, the trajectory of this paper exposes the underlying conventions of pragmatism upheld by

a conservative Singaporean homosexual community as antagonistic to the generic Queer theorising in

contemporary academic writings. These arguments will first be substantiated by empirical evidences

obtained from the October 2007 parliamentary debates, which dealt with the repealing or retention of

Section 377A of the Singapore Penal Code. The inevitable stalemate of the public/private dichotomy is

transcended by the Foucauldian concept of the heterotopia, which will be used categorically as a

geopolitical method of analysing six Singaporean queer films as directed by Eric Khoo, Boo Junfeng, Loo

Zihan, Royston Tan and Lincoln Chia and released between 2005 and 2010.

Jun Zubillaga‐Pow is a PhD candidate in Music Research on a National Arts Council Overseas bursary. He

graduated with a Bachelor of Music (Hons) at the University of Birmingham, and obtained his Masters

(with Distinction) in Critical Methodologies, working on Modern French Theory and musical reception. He

is currently the co‐editor of two Singapore‐related books on Music History and Queer C riticism and has

completed a monograph on the history of art music in post‐Independence Singapore.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

CONVERGENCE AND SLIPPAGE BETWEEN FILM AND HISTORY:

REVIEWING INVISIBLE CITY, 17 YEARS AND SANDCASTLE

LOH KAH SENG

Independent Scholar, Singapore

lkshis@gmail.com

KENNETH PAUL TAN

Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

spptank@nus.edu.sg

Film‐maker Tan Pin Pin said in an interview that the social impact of film is overrated. While this might be

true generally, films can also help shape public opinion and agenda. Tan’s Invisible City (2007), Martyn

See’s 17 Years (2007) and Boo Junfeng’s Sandcastle (2010) are recent local films which are helping to

define the landscape of Singapore public history. The films reflect as much the concerns of the present as

the content of the past. In dwelling on the history of leftwing political activism after World War Two, the

films highlight contemporary anxieties in several ways. One, the focus on the difficulty and fear of recalling

and reconciling with contentious pasts, particularly detention without trial, indicates a selective reading of

history; the films exclude a critical examination of the ideologies and historical contexts of the 1950s and

1960s, or the modernist impulses shared by other political actors, including opponents of the left. Two, the

films might be viewed as a form of social advocacy through the use of oral history and memory, enabling

the articulation of voices which hitherto had been submerged. Yet, in looking at political and student

activists, the approach is elitist, running counter to the original spirit of oral history. Third, as memory

shifts in response to new experiences, testimonies convey as much about new identities as historical

events, blurring the lines between history, memory and biography. Nevertheless, despite these issues, the

films’ roles in translating historical material to a public medium and helping the nation to reconcile to its

ambivalent pasts is something historians should not ignore or dismiss out of hand. This paper will attempt

to examine both slippage and convergence between history, as another way of representing the past, and

film.

Loh Kah Seng is an independent scholar whose work investigates little‐studied subjects in the social and

cultural history of Singapore and Malaysia and explores linkages between past and present in public

history, oral history, social memory, heritage, and archival access. He is author of two books, Making and

Unmaking the Asylum: Leprosy and Modernity in Singapore and Malaysia (2009) and The Makers and

Keepers of Singapore History (2010), in addition to numerous articles published in peer‐reviewed journals.

He is currently working on book projects on the social and economic impact of the British military

withdrawal from Singapore in the late 1960s and on interdisciplinary approaches to oral history and

memory in Southeast Asia (edited).

Kenneth Paul Tan is an Associate Professor at the National University of Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School

of Public Policy. He has written widely about Singapore, mainly on (1) governance (focusing on meritocracy

and pragmatism), democracy, and civil society; (2) the creative city and culture industry (focusing on film,

television, and theatre); and (3) race, gender, and sexuality. He has published in leading international

journals such as Asian Studies Review, Critical Asian Studies, International Political Science Review, and PS:

Political Science and Politics, and is the author of Renaissance Singapore Economy, Culture, and Politics

(NUS Press, 2007) and Cinema and Television in Singapore: Resistance in One Dimension (Brill, 2008). He is

also founding chair of the Asian Film Archive's board of directors.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

WRESTLING IN THE SHADOW OF AN ICON:

TIME AND THE OTHERNESS OF MALAY FILMS IN SINGAPORE

IVAN KWEK

Independent Researcher, Singapore

quack2@singnet.com.sg

Writings on Singapore film had tended to present an evolutionary account of its history, which includes a

so‐called Golden Era of Malay films, often with some reference to its most prominent personality, the late

P. Ramlee, and how the industry eventually went into decline. The Malay films produced around this

period (1950s and 1960s) have been studied, discussed, written about, and telecast on television umpteen

times. The narratives concerning the rise, development and fall of Malay films in Singapore are certainly

well‐rehearsed and sustained.

This paper reconsiders these narratives in the light of anthropological understanding of the work of myths.

By myths, I refer, not to its common usage as an untrue account, but as a social narrative that expresses

prevailing ideals, ideologies, values, and beliefs. As far as myths go, it draws on archetypal figures (like P.

Ramlee as a superhero) to offer exemplary models for social life. To be sure, it is not nostalgia as such that

concerns me in the paper, but rather, how the (glorious) past has been reproduced and sustained as the

other to the present. It raises questions regarding the place of Malay films in present day Singapore.

Put another way, the paper asks the question: what is the time of Malay films in Singapore The question

may seem awkward but it is calculated to underscore the possibility that its time may be other than the

present. This is not merely a philosophical mind game for, as I hope to show, it raises issues concerned

with the power to produce the otherness of Malay films in Singapore.

Ivan Kwek has a PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. At SOAS, he was trained in

the anthropology of media as well as critical media and cultural studies. He conducted ethnographic

fieldwork in a minority‐language television channel in Singapore. His work straddled questions of ethnicity,

religion and statehood, transnational media and identifications, and television production practices.

Currently, he works as both an independent researcher and a freelance documentary producer. As a

researcher, Ivan is currently working on a project concerned with the commodification of culture and

ethnicity; while as a producer, Ivan is now working on what he called a collaborative multi‐vocal

documentary. He was previously a lecturer at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and

Information.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

JACK NEO AS A PARADIGM OF THE CULTURAL MATERIALISM

OF SINGAPOREAN FILMS

STEPHEN TEO

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

steo@ntu.edu.sg

The films of Jack Neo are usually considered lesser vehicles in the Singapore cinema because of their

populist tendencies. Neo, however, is an iconic figure whose work exudes cultural materialism as an

ideological process and abiding characteristic reflecting mainstream values in society. The paper proposes

a historical‐contextual view of Neo’s films as representative of a trend of cultural materialism in Singapore

cinema which one may trace to the era of P. Ramlee, Shaw Brothers, and Cathay. Cultural materialism may

thus be identified as an aesthetic force marking the Singaporean cinema from its classical heyday in the

1960s to its renaissance in the 1990s and to its present development in the new century. Apart from Neo’s

films, other Singaporean films in the contemporary era, such as Singapore Dreaming (2006) directed by

Colin Goh and Woo Yen Yen, and Gone Shopping (2007) directed by Wee Li Lin, exhibit classic formulations

of cultural materialism. The paper will verify moments in Neo’s films to define more explicitly the values

and constraints of cultural materialism and its impact on Singapore media and cinema.

Stephen Teo is presently associate professor in the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and

Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Before joining NTU, he was a research fellow at

the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore from 2005‐2008. Teo is the author of Hong

Kong Cinema: The Extra Dimensions (London: British Film Institute, 1997), Wong Kar‐wai (BFI, 2005), King

Hu’s A Touch of Zen (Hong Kong University Press, 2007), Director in Action: Johnnie To and the Hong Kong

Action Film (HKU Press, 2007), and The Chinese Martial Arts Cinema: The Wuxia Tradition (Edinburgh:

Edinburgh University Press, 2009). His next book The Asian Cinema Experience will be published by

Routledge.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

DHOOM, RANGFAB, BOMBAY CAFÉ:

BOLLYWOOD MEDIA ASSEMBLAGES IN SINGAPORE

ANJALI GERA ROY

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, India

agera_2005@yahoo.com

Ashish Rajadhyaksha, in the Bollywoodization of Indian cinema, called attention to the emergence of an

entire culture industry from ringtones to fashions centered on cinema at the turn of the twenty first

century that came to signify Bollywood in the global imaginary.(2003) Following the formalist or

interpretative analysis of newly discovered popular Hindi cinematic texts in the last two decades or so, film

theory has turned to unpacking the uses and gratifications of ‘Bollywood’ extending beyond the cinematic.

It focuses in particular on media assemblages that relocate the visual economy of the cinematic text to

other visual texts and economies such as aural, tactile and even olfactory to reproduce sub‐continental

‘sensuous geographies’ through viewing and watching Bollywood films in multiple exhibition spaces. These

studies reveal the pleasure of Bollywood cinema to be part of a complex desiring machine in which the

meanings produced by the cinematic narrative function in a complex system of signification formed

through the intersection of discursive with material practices. They engage with the practice of cinema

going in India and in the Diasporas by locating them in a complex media assemblage through which the

cinematic text acquires social centrality.

For Singaporean populations, watching Indian movies is imbricated with a wide range of material practices

– music, dance, art, fashions, food, advertising and so on through which complex meanings are produced.

Viewing cinema as “a socially embedded set of practices”, this paper will examine multiple spaces

produced by Indian cinema to demonstrate the social centrality of Indian cinema for Singapore’s diverse

ethnicities.

Anjali Gera Roy is Professor in the Department of Humanities of Social Sciences at the Indian Institute of

Technology Kharagpur. She has published essays in literary, film and cultural studies, translated short

fiction from Hindi, authored a book on African fiction, edited an anthology on the Nigerian writer Wole

Soyinka and co‐edited another on the Indo‐Canadian novelist Rohinton Mistry. Her new publications

include a co‐edited volume Partitioned Lives: Narratives of Home, Displacement and Resettlement (Delhi:

Pearson Longman 2008) on the Indian Partition of 1947 and a monograph Bhangra Moves: From Ludhiana

to London and Beyond (Aldersgate: Ashgate 2010). She is now researching the transnational flows of

Bollywood cinema and has recently co‐edited with Chua Beng Huat an anthology The Travels of Indian

Cinema: From Bombay to LA(Delhi: OUP forthcoming).


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

OFF WITH THE SHAKING HEADS!! REEL‐IZING THE ‘SINGAPORE INDIAN’ IN THE

LOCAL TAMIL FILMS MY MAGIC AND GURUSHETRAM – 24 HOURS OF ANGER

NIDYA SHANTHINI MANORKARA

Theatre Studies, National University of Singapore

nsmanokara@nus.edu.sg

Since P.Ramlee’s era, races other than the one featured primarily in the local film, are often presented as

caricatures. Specifically the Indian community is either represented through stereotypes—for comic relief

like in Where Got Ghost (2009)—or is unrepresented as in 881 (2007).

This paper aims to analyze the treatment of the Singapore Indian community in two local Tamil movies:

Eric Khoo’s My Magic (2008) and TT Dhavamanni’s Gurushetram—24 Hours of Anger (2010). 3 These movies

are pivotal to Singapore cinema’s development because they primarily feature the otherwise marginalized

Indian community, mainly use Tamil language that is indicative of the community and pioneer in dealing

with the underbelly Indian society.

Specifically I hope to investigate how these films offer a perspective on the Indian community that departs

significantly from caricaturesque depictions. Does such a departure necessarily represent/re‐present part

of the Indian community Gurushetram in particular, borrows some conventions from Kollywood cinema,

local television media and taps into subcultures specific to local Indians. While this film uses the

community’s cultural economy to re‐construct the ‘Singapore Indian’, what/whose cultural economy has

Khoo’s film fed into How is his ‘Singapore Indian’ reconstituted

Continuing from these concerns, I also hope to raise the following questions due to the recent influx of

NRIs. Firstly, to what extent can the insider‐outsider polarity function within the framework of a national

cinema alongside the identity politics attached to the directors 4 Is Khoo’s imagination of ‘Singapore

Indian’ any less valid Secondly, my position as a third‐generation Singapore‐Indian has allowed me to view

these ‘Indians’ as part of a polyphonic representation of my community. However, for the Diaspora can

these films work as transnational cinemas If so, what aspects of the films provide gateways that could

help familiarize them with such a perception of the local Indian community

Nidya Shanthini Manokara is a Ph.D Research Scholar with the Theatre Studies Programme at NUS. A

trained Bharata Natyam dancer, her thesis focuses on how emotions are embodied and transmitted within

(Indian) contemporary dance. Her research interests also include creative practice as research and the

identity politics of a ‘Singaporean Indian’. Why now local Tamil film The recent demise of her grandfather,

veteran local Tamil actor G. Krishnasamy Balan, PBM. PBS. had reignited her ‘Asian instincts’ of wanting to

contribute to the local Singapore Indian community and has since become more interested in the stage

and TV culture of the community.

1

2

It is good to note that within the Singapore Tamil community, this movie had been very well received and is

touted as the first of its kind because of its all local Tamil director and cast. The Tamil audience members’

reception for this movie was much better than for My Magic.

I acknowledge that these films manifest the socio‐political and cultural particularities of the Singapore Indian

community. Yet, they also harness one of the official languages of Singapore and do present something culturally

specific to Singapore. Thus these films can constitute national cinema.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

CULTURAL MAPPING OF SINGAPORE CINEMAS

CHARLES LEARY

Faculty of Applied & Creative Arts, University of Malaysia Sarawak

charley.leary@gmail.com

The main objective of this project is to document the diversity of film exhibition and spectatorship in

Singapore. This distinctive quality of different spaces for film exhibition are qualified, for instance, by the

variety of language of films shown and the ethnicity of the audience, as well as by the format and

architecture. Today, most cinemas show Hollywood films in English or films from Hong Kong dubbed into

Mandarin. There are of course also exceptions, but until the 1970s, one could regularly find a number of

theatres showing films in Malay as well as in different Chinese dialects.

Singapore has employed a variety of physical structures for film exhibition. The Cathay Cinema, for

example, was housed in the Cathay Building, the seat of power for the Cathay Organisation and a

Singapore landmark. Singapore film culture featured more informal spaces for film viewing as well. For

example, mobile film units would travel to the kampongs to project films in communities with less access

to the picture palaces. Another unique site, not nearly as prevalent in other major world cities, is the openair

cinema, some of which were permanent structures while others temporary. Today, many of the picture

palaces and stand alone cinemas are gone, and, with the arrival of the Golden Village Corporation in 1992,

Singapore became the first country in Asia to adopt the multiplex configuration for cinema architecture

that has come to dominate the space of film‐going across the world.

I aim to produce a map identifying the locations of cinemas and other sites of film exhibition (including,

where appropriate, tracing the typical routes of mobile cinemas), both extant cinemas and those no longer

in operation. A Geographic Information System (GIS) has been utilized to investigate spatial patterns

emerging in the location of Chinese temples in Singapore (Dean 2010), and I hope to implement a similar

approach in considering variables such as language dominating the particular cinema, corporate holdings,

proximity to housing estates or kampongs, ethnic makeup of neighborhoods, and networks between

formal and informal spaces. UNESCO, for example, has embraced cultural mapping and the use of GIS to

value tangible and intangible cultural heritage in local communities. Although this approach has more

frequently been used to study pre‐modern cultures, cultural mapping provides the recognition of cultural

diversity and this specific film heritage in Singapore, and can also elucidate cultural policy and urban

planning as Singapore continues its “Renaissance City” project in encouraging creative zones in a “global

media city.” (Kong 2009).

Charles Leary (PhD, New York University) is Associate Professor in the Cinematography Programme at the

Faculty of Applied & Creative Arts, University of Malaysia Sarawak. He is currently working on a manuscript

on the Cold War politics of Hong Kong film culture. He was previously a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Asia

Research Institute, National University of Singapore.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

CELLULOID SINGAPORE: CONNECTING THE GOLDEN AGE AND THE REVIVAL

EDNA LIM

Department of English Language and Literature, National University of Singapore

ednalim@nus.edu.sg

The history of Singapore’s film industry is a fractured one, divided rather neatly into 2 distinct eras: the

first, which emerged in the 1950s to the 60s, has been characterised as the Golden Age due to the

proliferation of local films produced by the two dominant studios in Singapore at the time, Malay Film

Productions and Cathay‐Keris. The second period, from the 1990s to the present, is perceived as a revival

or rebirth of Singapore cinema, arising after film production in Singapore petered out in the mid to late 60s

and ceased altogether in the 1980s. Interestingly, the decline in film production and ensuing period of

silence coincided with intense state‐driven efforts at nation building and urban development after

Singapore’s independence in 1965. As such, the films produced from the 1990s onwards are distinctly

different from those of the Golden Age, each depicting very different Singapores; whereas the first could

be characterised as a pre‐national cinema, the second is a post‐national one. It is very tempting therefore

to discuss these 2 eras as distinct periods in Singapore cinema with little or no connection between them.

This paper addresses the discursive fracturing of the 2 periods by considering the ways in which the films

from the Golden Age function within the body of work known as Singapore films. It argues that the films

from both periods constitute a national cinema through different performances of (an) other Singapore;

whereas the films from the revival proceed through counterperformance, the films from the Golden Age

are (re)constitued in performance.

Edna Lim is a Lecturer with the Department of English Language and Literature at the National University

of Singapore where she primarily teaches film for the Department’s Theatre Studies Programme. Her

research interests span a range of issues in contemporary Hollywood cinema, adaptation studies, Asian

cinema and Singapore film. She is currently working on a research/publication project on Singapore

cinema.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

‘WHERE GOT GHOST’ MOVIE: MAPPING SINGAPOREAN HORROR

ADAM KNEE

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

adamknee@ntu.edu.sg

While horror films have been central to recent successes in popular film production in Southeast Asia as

well as across Asia as a whole, horror film production in Singapore has been relatively meager and the

handful of Singaporean horror successes have, in terms of their generic traits, been quite disparate. This

presentation will be interested in tracing out the parameters of what Singaporean horror films have

entailed, as well as to what extent there can be said to be commonalities or distinctive tendencies among

them. Definitional issues, it will be argued, arise not only because of diversity of theme and approach, but

because of the problematics of national designation as well: Many of the horror films that have been

supported by Singapore monies and/or personnel have been international co‐productions not explicitly

identified as Singaporean. Interestingly, however, such a dispersal, hybridization, and confusion of identity

make a textual return as a narrative problematic in quite a few of the horror films produced partially or

fully by Singapore. Other distinctive thematic tendencies which can be identified in many of these films

include those pertaining to systems of official regulation and the corruptive potential of money within a

rigid social hierarchy. Films to be discussed include Blood Ties, The Maid, Where Got Ghost, The Eye,

Return to Pontianak, and Men in White.

Adam Knee is Associate Professor and Head of the Division of Broadcast and Cinema Studies in the Wee

Kim Wee School of Communication and Information at Nanyang Technological University; he has

previously held teaching posts in the US, Australia, Taiwan, and Thailand, where he was a Fulbright grantee

at Chulalongkorn University. His research has primarily focused on US and Southeast Asian popular cinema,

and his writing on Asian film has appeared in such anthologies as Horror to the Extreme: Changing

Boundaries in Asian Cinema (U of Hong Kong P, 2009), East Asian Cinemas: Exploring Transnational

Connections on Film (I.B. Tauris, 2008), Hong Kong Film, Hollywood, and the New Global Cinema

(Routledge, 2007), and Contemporary Asian Cinema: Popular Culture in a Global Frame (Berg Publishers,

2006), as well as in a number of scholarly journals.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

TOWARD AN EXPANDED FRAME: IMMERSION, HYBRIDISATION AND

APPROPRIATION IN FILM INSTALLATIONS OF HO TZU NYEN AND MING WONG

PHYLLIS TEO

University of Queensland, Australia

phyllisteo@gmail.com

While the development of local film culture has received considerable popular and scholarly attention in

recent years, to date, studies of the relationship between film and visual arts in Singapore have only been

sporadic. The emphasis on experimentation amongst contemporary Singaporean artists has seen an

increasing number of them incorporating multimedia and time‐based elements into their practices, among

which film and video are prevalent forms of representation. This tendency provides an occasion for a more

multifaceted study of filmic representations here. Drawing upon the film and video installations of artists

Ho Tzu Nyen and Ming Wong, this paper aims to make a critical inquiry into methodological and theoretical

intersections between the moving image and contemporary art in the context of Singapore. The two artists

are recognised for their wide‐ranging and innovative artistic practices, blending disparate genres of film,

video, painting and performance into interdisciplinary installations. In their moving image installations, Ho

Tzu Nyen and Ming Wong have developed various visual strategies that explore the dynamic relation

between filmic space and time. Proposing a more fluid approach in the understanding of spectatorial

positions, both artists have produced a visual and experiential language that enable the audience to

develop a new consciousness about their environment and themselves. Frequently drawing from cultural

particularities of Singapore, there are dimensions in these artists’ works that are relevant for the discussion

of an imaginative identification with local histories. Contested issues relating to representation, identity,

roots, intertextuality, performativity and history are engaged and negotiated in and through their artistic

interventions. By engaging the aural‐visual, conceptual and physical aspects of the artists’ works, the

analysis of the moving image as a series of assertions made within the fields of contemporary art and film

seeks to explore new possibilities about what is meant by the “cinematic” in Singapore.

Phyllis Teo received her PhD in Culture and Art History from the University of Queensland, Australia. Her

research focuses on Asian visual culture and art history. She has published in refereed journals such as New

Zealand Journal of Asian Studies, YISHU: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art, and Asian Culture and

History.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

POPULAR MUSIC AND CONTEMPORARY SINGAPORE CINEMA

LIEW KAI KHIUN

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

kkliew@ntu.edu.sg

BRENDA CHAN

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

brendachan@ntu.edu.sg

Music in film has the primary functions of conveying emotions and providing lenses through which the

audience may understand the inner thoughts of the characters or the overarching themes of the film. Film

music also allows spectators to imagine, and identify with, the context of the narrative which may be

remote from the audience’s everyday life. Music in film is usually categorized into diegetic music (music

that is part of the narrative world of the film and is “heard” by the characters) and non‐diegetic music

(music that is heard only by the audience). This paper examines the diegetic and non‐diegetic popular

music used in the soundtracks of a range of Singaporean films from the 1990s to 2011. The 1970s disco hits

in Forever Fever (1998) and the 1960s Mandarin pop songs by Grace Chang in It’s a Great Great World

(2011) construct and commodify nostalgia, while situating the nation in the crossroads of the transnational

flows of popular music in English and vernacular languages. The use of Hokkien songs in Royston Tan’s 881

(2007) and Jack Neo’s Money No Enough 2 (2008) open up space for resistance towards the government’s

Speak Mandarin Campaign, which has led to the marginalization of Chinese dialects in Singapore. Kelvin

Tong’s 1999 film Eating Air, on the other hand, features a groundbreaking “hybrid” soundtrack with

original compositions by local band The Boredphucks, who incorporates Hokkien dialect in their punk rock

music. Collectively, these soundtracks of Singaporean films represent attempts by Singaporean filmmakers

in searching for the voices and identities of Singaporeans, as they negotiate tensions between the Englishspeaking,

Mandarin‐speaking and dialect‐speaking segments of the ethnic Chinese community in Singapore.

Liew Kai Khiun obtained his BA and MA at the National University of Singapore and was awarded his PhD

at University College London. After completing a two year postdoctoral fellowship at the Asia Research

Institute of the National University of Singapore, he is currently an Assistant Professor at the Wee Kim Wee

School of Communication and Information at the Nanyang Technological University. His research interests

include Film and Television Studies as well as popular music and media in the contexts of East and

Southeast Asia.

Brenda Chan is Assistant Professor at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication in Nanyang

Technological University, Singapore. She teaches courses on cultural studies and qualitative research

methods. Her research interests are in Chinese cinema, East Asian television drama and Chinese popular

music. She has published papers in Jump Cut and Journal of Chinese Cinemas, and is currently working on a

project about Hong Kong gambling films.


Conference on Film and Cinema in Singapore (6‐7 October 2011)

Jointly organised by Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University and

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

LIST OF SPEAKERS & CHAIRPERSONS

NO. NAME ORGANISATION EMAIL ADDRESS

1. Adam Knee Nanyang Technological University, Singapore adamknee@ntu.edu.sg

2. Anjali Gera Roy Indian Institute of Technology, India agera_2005@yahoo.com

3. Brenda Chan Nanyang Technological University brendachan@ntu.edu.sg

4. Charles Leary University of Malaysia Sarawak charley.leary@gmail.com

5. Chew Tee Pao Asian Film Archive, Singapore teepao@asianfilmarchive.org

6. Chua Beng Huat National University of Singapore aricbh@nus.edu.sg

7. Edna Lim National University of Singapore ednalim@nus.edu.sg

8. Eugene Dairianathan National Institute of Education eugene.d@nie.edu.sg

9. Isaac Kerlow Nanyang Technological University, Singapore isaac@ntu.edu.sg

10. Ivan Kwek National University of Singapore quack2@singnet.com.sg

11. Jun Zubillaga‐Pow King’s College London, UK jun.zubillaga‐pow@kcl.ac.uk

12. Karen Chan Asian Film Archive, Singapore karen@asianfilmarchive.org

13. Kenneth Paul Tan National University of Singapore spptank@nus.edu.sg

14. Kim Jihoon Nanyang Technological University, Singapore kimjh@ntu.edu.sg

15. Liew Kai Khiun Nanyang Technological University kkliew@ntu.edu.sg

16. Loh Kah Seng Independent Scholar lkshis@gmail.com

17.

Nidya Shanthini

Manokara

National University of Singapore

nsmanokara@nus.edu.sg

18. Olivia Khoo Monash University, Australia olivia.khoo@monash.edu

19. Oradol Kaewprasert

University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce,

Thailand

oradol@gmail.com

20. Phyllis Teo University of Queensland, Australia phyllisteo@gmail.com

21.

Sophia Siddique

Harvey

Vassar College, New York USA

soharvey@vassar.edu

22. Stephen Teo Nanyang Technological University, Singapore steo@ntu.edu.sg


Secretariat

Mr Jonathan Lee

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

#10‐01 Tower Block,469A Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259770

Email: Jonathan Lee@nus.edu.sg

Tel: (65) 6516 4224

Fax: (65) 6779 1428

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