Dignity at Work - Stirling Council

stirling.gov.uk

Dignity at Work - Stirling Council

Dignity

atwork

Harassment and Bullying Policy


harassment

and

bullying policy

You have the right to be treated with

dignity and respect

Stirling Council believes everyone working on behalf of the Council

is entitled to be treated with dignity and respect. We all have a

responsibility for the way we treat each other.

Harassment or bullying can cause personal distress and damage confidence,

dignity and morale. The Council will not tolerate acts of harassment or

bullying by any employee against another employee, or by anyone you deal

with in the course of your job, including elected members.

Issues involving harassment from members of the public are also be taken

very seriously, and should be raised directly with your manager.

Our commitment to tackling harassment and bullying is set out in the Dignity

at Work policy. This shows you what to do if you are being harassed or

bullied at work.

Please refer to the policy and the procedure if you have a complaint you want

to raise. You can read the Dignity at Work policy on The Source (intranet), or

get a copy from your manager, your HR team or your trade union

representative.

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What is harassment

Harassment is when an individual (s) is subjected to unwanted

behaviour that has the purpose or effect of violating their dignity or

creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive

environment.

Harassment can take many forms and can happen for many reasons.

It may be related to age, sex, race, national or ethnic origin, disability,

religion, sexuality or any personal characteristic. It may be directed

at one person or many people. It can be persistent behaviour over a

period of time, or a one-off act.

Behaviour only equals harassment when it is unwanted by the person

making the complaint. It is the unwanted nature of the conduct which

distinguishes harassment from friendly behaviour which is welcome

and mutual.

In cases of harassment, the perceptions of the person making the

complaint are very important. Behaviour which one person may see

as acceptable may be unacceptable to another person.

The fact that someone does not intend what he or she does or says

to amount to harassment will not prevent it from being harassment.

What may seem harmless to one person can be offensive to someone

else.

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o

What is Bullying

Bullying is inappropriate and unwelcome behaviour that causes

embarrassment, fear, humiliation or distress to someone, or to a group

of people. It may take many forms, including unwelcome physical,

verbal or non-verbal contact.

Bullying is usually a misuse of power - someone using their

status/position, physical strength or force of personality in a way which

is unwelcome to the victim, and normally where the victim has

difficulty in defending themselves. Often a pattern of bullying

behaviour develops.

Bullying is not about the normal exercising of managerial

responsibility, and it is not about occasional minor lapses of good

manners, courtesy or respect, unless a pattern of behaviour emerges

that becomes objectionable or intimidating. In this case the behaviour

may be bullying.

The bullying behaviour may be carried out deliberately, or it may be

unconscious. What matters is that it causes humiliation, offence and

distress to the victim.

o

What type of behaviour is ‘bullying’




personal insults (humiliation, personal criticism, making fun of

someone)

intimidation (threats of physical violence, psychological

intimidation, or misuse of power or position)

social exclusion (being ‘left out’, isolation or victimisation).

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What should I do if I am being harassed or bullied at

work

Tell someone! Whether you are telling the person who is doing the

harassing and bullying or someone in authority in the Council, you are

taking the first important step in making the behaviour stop!

You can tell:





your line manager, or another manager in your team

a manager outwith your team or Service, as you feel appropriate

your trade union representative

your Human Resources Adviser

o

Is there a procedure which I should use to raise my

concern

Yes. The Council has a Dignity at Work policy which gives useful

information and sets out how to raise a concern about harassment or

bullying. Depending on the nature and the severity of your complaint,

you may chose to take action yourself, or to raise the complaint

informally or formally. You can also refer to the Code of Conduct,

which highlights your rights and responsibilities about how you are

treated.

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o

What support is available

Problems involving harassment and bullying can be distressing and

difficult for both the person making the complaint and the person

being complained about. Support, guidance and counselling is

available to everyone involved.

You can use the Code of Conduct Advisers, who are part of a

network of trained employees who give independent support and

advice about harassment or bullying to all employees on a voluntary

basis.

The Council also has an Employee Counselling Service where advice

and support can be given to both the person making the complaint

and the person being complained about. You can contact the

Employee Counselling Service on 0800 389 7851.

You have the right to be treated

with dignity and respect.

Don’t tolerate harassment

or bullying.

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Other useful contacts

Central Scotland Racial Equality

Council

Rooms 8 and 9

Park Street Annex

Park Street

Falkirk

FK1 1RE

Tel: 01324 610950

Fax: 01324 610955

E-mail: CSRECL@aol.com

Commission for Racial Equality

The TUN

12, Jackson’s Entry off Holyrood Road

Edinburgh

EH8 8PJ

Tel: 0131 524 2000

Fax: 0131 524 2001

E-mail: Scotland@cre.gov.uk

www.cre.gov.uk

Equal Opportunities Commission

St. Stephen House

279 Bath Street

Glasgow

G2 4JL

Tel: 0845 6015901

Fax: 0141 248 5834

E-mail: scotland@eoc.org.uk

www.eoc.org.uk

Tel: 0845 7622633

(helpline for all enquiries)

Fax: 0845 7778878

Textphone: 0845 7622644

E-mail: enquiry@drc-gb.org

www.doc-qb.org

Scottish Human Rights Centre

146 Holland Street

Glasgow

G2 4NG

Tel: 0141 332 5960

Fax; 0141 332 5309

E-mail: info@

scottishhumanrightscentre.org.uk

www.scottishhumanrightscentre.org.uk

Equality Network (Lesbian, Gay,

Transsexual and Transgender)

30 Bernard Street

Edinburgh

EH6 6PR

Tel: 07020 933952

Fax: 07020 933954

E-mail: en@equality-netowrk.org

www.equality-network.org

Disability Rights Commission

1st Floor

Riverside House

502 Gorgie Road

Edinburgh

EH11 3AF

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