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It's - The Metro Herald

Cleanup is still progressing—

slowly, but surely. Although the

comeback will take a long time, the good

news is that an overwhelming response on the part

of local businesses, churches, and faith-based organizations as

well as all of the usual channels of relief has made positive impacts

on evacuees lives. Government agencies, officials and the like are also

delving into how we can make ourselves—at both the national and

local level—better prepared for such emergencies. Our limited space

does not allow us to print all of the generous outpouring of goods and

services which have taken place in the past few weeks. See page 20

for the updates. As the seasons turn, fall has officially arrived and

there are so many noteworthy activities taking place in our area, it is

difficult to squeeze them all in. I hope you will take time to count your

blessings as you enjoy the cooler fall weather and scenery.

CLEANUP CONTINUES . . .

AND FALL OFFICIALLY BEGINS

Fauquier

County

Carroll County

Howard County

Loudoun

County

Fairfax

County

Prince

William

County

Arlington County

Richmond

Baltimore

Montgomery

County

D.C.

Alexandria

Spotsylvania

County

Stafford

County

Fredericksburg

Annapolis

Anne

Arundel County

Prince George’s

County

Westmoreland

County

Charles

County

VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 39 Imaging the Politics, Culture, and Events of Our Times

September 30, 2005

THROUGH THE EYES OF THE GODS:

AN AERIAL VISION OF AFRICA

Africa-shaped sand dune

Sossusvlei, Namibia

Adazzling collection of

photographs depicting the

grandeur and beauty of

Africa from the unusual

perspective of the air has

been published by National

Geographic Books. Through

The Eyes of The Gods: An Aerial

Vision of Africa (ISBN 0-7922-

3882-6, $50), by Robert B. Haas,

offers a bird’s-eye view of the most

inaccessible, unspoiled and breathtaking

regions of the continent.

With an introduction by “I

Dreamed of Africa” author Kuki

Gallmann, this photographic tourde-force

portrays Africa’s spectacular

landscapes and exotic wildlife in

a novel, though-provoking way.

Seen from above, familiar images

become spiritual and mysterious;

natural patterns of the landscape

become artful masterpieces; great

beauty is revealed in simple things.

Crisscrossing the continent,

hanging out of the helicopters and

light planes, Haas captured an array

of spectacular images. Some are

easy to identify-a herd of grazing

wildebeests in Kenya’s Masai Mara

Reserve; a trio of giraffes against a

sparkling lake in Botswana. Others

are startlingly abstract, like the

sweep of a Namibian sand dune,

curving between yellow sand and

dark shadow; or fish traps looping

across a South African bay like the

script of an exotic language; or salt

pans erupting into star-burst patterns

in Ethiopia.

Accompanying the images are

12 evocative essays based on Haas’

journal entries. These personal

musings and anecdotes convey

Haas’ thoughts and feelings about

Africa and what the stark beauty

and raw power of the continent

mean to him.

Photography is Haas’ parallel career.

A graduate of Yale University

and Harvard Law School, he is

chairman and co-founder of Haas

Wheat & Partners, a Dallas-based

private investment firm that has

completed a series of noteworthy investment

transactions, including

such household names as Dr. Pepper

and 7-UP.

Describing his passion of aerial

photography, Haas writes, “From

the unique vantage point of a

winged creature, the lens records

what may be familiar to the naked

eye in content but wholly different

in perspective. The photographs in

this book invite your imagination to

soar. In the air we often see what

we never expected—[and witness]

a markedly generous view of what

lies below. All manner of human

Continued on page 12

Visit us on the web at www.metroherald.com


THE

METRO HERALD

NEWSPAPER

The Metro Herald, a resource of Davis

Communications Group, Inc., is published

weekly. The Metro Herald is a member of the

National Newspaper Publishers Association, the

Virginia Press Association, and the Newspaper

Association of America.

PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR/

MANAGING EDITOR

Paris D. Davis

ART DIRECTOR/WEBMASTER

Glenda S. King

EXECUTIVE MANAGER

Gregory Roscoe, Jr.

ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR

Daisy E. Cole

SENIOR BUSINESS & SECURITY

CORRESPONDENT

Rodney S. Azama

Regular subscription rate: $75/year for home

delivery. Single issue price: $.75

For advertising information and rates, call (703)

548-8891, or visit www.MetroHerald.com.

Copyright ©2005 by Davis Communications

Group, Inc. No part of this publication may be

reproduced by any means without prior written

consent from the publisher.

All unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied

by a self-addressed stamped envelope.

The publisher assumes no responsibility for

unsolicited material.

The Metro Herald is certified by the Maryland

Department of Transportation. Its corporate headquarters

is located at 901 North Washington

Street, Suite 603, Alexandria, VA 22314. Davis

Communications Group, Inc., is certified as a

small and minority business. For additional information,

call (703) 548-8891.

Circulation: 42,000 copies per week

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To obtain a one-year subscription, please send a

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African

to

African-Americans

is

in

every

sense

a

return

to

self,

you

may

never

get

there,

you

may

have

never

been

there,

but

Africa

in

many

ways

is

the

home

that

is

as

much

your

home

as

your

skin

coloring . . .

Black

Africa

is

the

brown,

Africa

the

beige,

Africa

the

total

hue

of

ebony

that

has

more

prism

of

colors

than

a

sunset . . .

We

are

September 30, 2005

Editorial

AN AFRICAN MIND SET

in

many

ways

tied

to

Africa

not

only

by

pigmentation

but

by

music

and

art . . .

For

many,

Africa

is,

and

will

remain,

the

citadel

of

civilization.

Black

Americans

are

drawn

to

Africa

not

so

much

by

its

languages

but

by

its

music

and

perhaps

more

importantly,

its

suffering . . .

Africa

wears

its

tears

in

its

art . . .

it

is

a

continent

of

nations,

and

a

nation

of

men

and

not

laws . . .

Its

beauty

is

as

varied

as

the

thousands

of

dialects

that

are

spoken

by

its

peoples,

it

is

as

hungry

as

it

is

poor

and

as

hopeful

as

its

dreams

and

as

rich

in

natural

resources

as

Saudi Arabia

is

in

oil. . . .

It

is

more

white

in

its

thinking

as

it

is

black

in

its

resolve . . .

Africa

should

wash-up

in

your

mind

the

way

a

high

tide

does

on

a

beach. . . .

World

history

will

not

allow

us

to

close

the

door

on

our

own

history . . .

Involvement

is

a

necessity

and

not

an

option. . . .

For

many

Africans,

life

is

marked

by

pain,

. . . it

is

a

continent

of

Katrinas . . .

of

people

on

roof

tops

surrounded

by

waters

of

opaqueness;

adulterated

by

the

choices

made

by

others.

—PDD

2 THE METRO HERALD


September 30, 2005

THE METRO HERALD 3


AROUND THE REGION/AROUND THE NATION

September 30, 2005

TOUR OF SOLAR HOMES

GORDON BIERSCH OPENS AT TYSONS CORNER CENTER

This year’s 15th Annual Tour of

Solar Homes and Buildings

will be held on October 1 and

2 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and will feature

34 Washington metropolitan area

homes. The tour is sponsored by the

Montgomery County Department of

Environmental Protection (DEP), Virginia

Solar Council, Maryland Energy

Administration, Sierra Club, MD-DC-

VA Solar Energy Industries Association,

and the Potomac Regional Solar

Energy Association. Homes on the

tour are located in Maryland, the District

of Columbia, and Virginia, and

many are within easy Metrorail access.

Nine of the homes are in Montgomery

County.

The featured homes showcase a

wide range of innovative methods designed

to reduce energy consumption

and impact on the environment. A

number of homeowners on the tour

save up to 80 percent on their heating

bills with solar and energy-efficient

features such as photovoltaic panels,

solar thermal hot water systems, energy

efficient appliances, and “superinsulation.”

Many of the homes also

contain other environmentally-friendly

features, including rain barrels, worm

composting, and paints that are low in

volatile organic compounds.

To participate in the Solar Homes

The NAACP mourns the

passing of Senior U.S. District

Judge Constance Baker

Motley, a distinguished jurist and a

member of the NAACP legal team

that successfully argued the landmark

U.S. Supreme Court case, Brown v.

Board of Education, that legally ended

public school segregation.

Judge Motley died in a New York

City hospital following a brief illness.

She was 84-years-old. In 2003,

Judge Motley was awarded the Spingarn

Medal, the NAACP’s highest

award, “for her contribution to the

pursuit of equality for black Americans

in the period 1945 to 1966.” The

Spingarn citation also noted that she

won nine of 10 cases she personally

argued before the U.S. Supreme

Court.

NAACP President & CEO Bruce

S. Gordon, said: “Judge Motley’s

legal prowess helped pave the way for

expanded freedoms from which we all

Tour, pick up or download a free Tour

Booklet, which will serve as the ticket.

Booklets are available online at http://

solartour.org.. The booklets contain

maps and descriptions of each home,

as well as information about solar energy

initiatives, assistance with system

design and installation, and much

more. For additional information,

check the tour website, call 202-564-

1088 or email Garlow.Charlie@

epamail.epa.gov.

County Executive Douglas M.

Duncan and County Council President

Tom Perez have designated October as

Solar Awareness Month in Montgomery

County. To celebrate, The GreenMan

Show, which airs daily on County Cable

Montgomery, is featuring a show on

solar energy and the tour of solar homes

from now until October 15.

The County’s Department of Environmental

Protection offers fact sheets

and information about solar energy. In

addition, DEP has applications for the

Maryland Solar Grant program for those

considering installation of a solar energy

system for the home. This program offers

tax credits and grants that could

save a considerable amount on a solar

installation. For more information,

check the County’s website at www.

montgomerycountymd.gov/dep or

call DEP at 240-777-7770.

2003 SPINGARN

MEDALIST JUDGE

CONSTANCE BAKER

MOTLEY DIES

benefit today. As a successful civic

and political leader she made a difference

in the lives of New Yorkers.”

Judge Motley was the first African

American woman to win election to

the New York state senate and in 1965

became the first woman President of

the Borough of Manhattan.

Julian Bond, Chairman of the

NAACP National Board of Directors,

said: “In a distinguished legal career,

Judge Constance Baker Motley broke

down barriers almost every day. She

participated in the NAACP’s most

important cases. Her legal brilliance

illuminated many dark courtrooms

where justice was denied and let its

light shine in.”

President Lyndon Johnson nominated

Judge Motley to the Southern

District Court of New York in 1966.

She was the first woman appointed to

the Southern District bench and the

first African American woman appointed

to the federal judiciary. She

was named chief judge in 1982.

Judge Motley received her senior

judge status in 1986. From 1945 to

1965 Judge Motley served as a law

clerk and an attorney with the

NAACP Legal Defense Fund. During

that period, she also served as a

member of the New York State Advisory

Council on Employment Insurance

and as a New York State Senator

(1964-65).

When responding to an ad,

tell them you saw it in

The Metro Herald

Gordon Biersch Brewery

Restaurant (Tysons Corner

Center, 7861-L Chain Bridge

Road) will offer guests an original

restaurant alternative and serve as the

only on-site brewing restaurant in the

Tysons Corner area when it opens its

doors on Friday, September 30, 2005.

The relaxed and inviting atmosphere

will make diners feel at home while

they enjoy a wide range of flavorful

dishes and specially brewed beers.

Situated in the new expansion wing

of Tysons Corner Center, this location

marks the 17th Gordon Biersch Brewery

Restaurant in the country. The

8,800 square-foot restaurant boasts a

seating capacity of 476 and features

both an indoor dining room atrium and

beer garden/bar patio. The spacious

bar area will offer plenty of seating inside

as well as in the beer garden and

features 6, 42-inch plasma televisions.

Joe Cominsky will serve as General

Manager of the new Gordon Biersch.

Cominsky brings over 20 years

of restaurant experience to the table.

The Dallas, PA, native has had stints as

a Regional Director for Rock Bottom

Restaurants and also as General Manager

for Dick Clark’s American Bandstand

Grill.

“Having the only on-site brewery in

the Tysons Corner area presents something

unique and different to our customers,”

said Cominsky. “We want

them to come in and sample all of what

Gordon Biersch has to offer, and that’s

our own beer, outstanding food, and

also a fun atmosphere.”

The Gordon Biersch menu consists

of appetizers and entrees influenced by

a variety of cuisines including favorites

such as Gordon Biersch signature

Garlic Fries, Blackened Ahi Tuna,

Gorgonzola Pear Salad, Flame Grilled

New York Strip, Goat Cheese Ravioli,

and Spicy Shrimp Stir Fry. All entrees

are designed to complement their signature

lager beers which have been

recognized at the Great American Beer

Festival and the World Beer Cup Competition.

The restaurant will offer five

regular freshly brewed beers on tap

and one seasonal option.

Gordon Biersch will be open for

lunch and dinner seven days a week.

Hours are Sunday thru Thursday,

11:30am to 11:00pm with the bar

open until12:00am; Friday and Saturday,

11:30am to 12:00am and the

bar is open until 2:00am. Reservations

and private parties are accepted and

encouraged.

The Gordon Biersch brand offers

an eclectic, sophisticated décor that

distinguishes itself from other brewery

restaurant concepts. At the core of the

company’s philosophy is a passion to

produce and deliver the highest-quality

and freshest products. On-site brewing

and fresh, made-from-scratch menu

items illustrate the company’s dedication

to this principle. Gordon Biersch

restaurants promote a relaxed and

inviting atmosphere, where attentive

and friendly service complements the

fresh food and beer. Since the first

opening in Palo Alto in 1988, Gordon

Biersch Brewery Restaurant Group,

Inc. has opened brewery restaurants in

California, Hawaii, Nevada, Arizona,

Colorado, Washington, Florida, Georgia,

Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio,

Tennessee as well as two in the Washington,

DC metro area with one location

downtown DC and this most recently

opening in Tysons Corner

Center (McLean, VA).

ROGER MINAMI APPOINTED

DIRECTOR OF DOT’S OSDBU/MRC

Last month, U.S. Transportation

Secretary Norman

Mineta announced the appointment

of Roger Minami as Director

of Office of the Small and Disadvantaged

Business Utilization

(OSDBU) at the U.S. Department of

Transportation (DOT).

Minami comes to DOT from the

U.S. Department of Agriculture

(USDA) where he served in that

agency’s OSDBU, as well as its Foreign

Agricultural Service, and Marketing

and Regulatory Programs. In

those positions, he helped small and

disadvantaged businesses find opportunities

in the food industry by nego-

Roger Minami

tiating with organizations such as the

U.S. Food service and the National Minority Supplier Development Council.

His efforts were recognized by the USDA with a Team Excellence Award in

2004.

According to Secretary Mineta, it is this experience working with small,

disadvantaged businesses, coupled with his commitment to their success, that

makes Mr. Minami the ideal leader for DOT’s OSDBU.

“Roger brings to DOT a strong recognition of the potential of small businesses

to help us build a safer, more efficient and more reliable transportation

system,” Secretary Mineta says. “I look forward to working with him as we

continue our efforts to involve all segments of the business community in our

programs.”

Before working for the government, Minami helped create and produce

Central Coast Seniors, a weekly news program for older adults living in Santa

Barbara and nearby coastal communities in California. He graduated from

the University of Southern California with a bachelor of arts degree in communications

and comes from a family farming background himself.

Minami’s appointment as OSDBU Director makes him the first Asian-

American to hold such a position.

4 THE METRO HERALD


September 30, 2005

THE METRO HERALD 5


September 30, 2005

6 THE METRO HERALD


AROUND THE REGION/AROUND THE NATION

KEEPING THE UNITY IN

COMMUNITY . . .

CATHY M. HUDGINS

Special to The Metro Herald

September 30, 2005

Labor Day has passed. It’s business

as usual for adults and

back to school for children. As

Fairfax County Public Schools embark

on the 2005-2006 school year, a striking

revelation presented itself to educators,

parents, and school and government

officials: there are local schools

underperforming.

Under the No Child Left Behind

(NCLB) federal legislation, for a

school to make “Adequate Yearly

Progress” (AYP), it must meet or exceed

achievement benchmarks in English

(65 percent) and mathematics (63

percent) by school and by subgroup;

participation benchmarks (95 percent)

by school and by subgroup; and other

academic indicator benchmarks, such

as attendance or graduation rate. Alternatively,

schools may make “safe harbor”

by decreasing the failure rate in

one of the above mentioned categories

by at least 10 percent over the previous

year. Schools are required to meet

benchmarks in 29 categories; missing a

single benchmark will result in a

school not making AYP. AYP is calculated

for all students as well as the following

subgroups: students with disabilities,

limited-English-proficient

students, economically disadvantaged

students, and major racial and ethnic

groups. NCLB scoring is based on Virginia’s

Standards of Learning (SOL)

math and English tests.

Hence, in order to meet the federal

No Child Left Behind mandate two

schools – Dogwood Elementary and

McNair Elementary Schools - in

Hunter Mill District will continue to

target instruction to the students needing

more help to learn the material. If

you visit Dogwood and McNair you

will see the work of great teachers and

you will learn that test scores do reflect

the progress being made in these

schools. But federal legislation focuses

us only on test results, not taking into

account the readiness skills each student

brings to the classroom. While in

the end we want all children to succeed,

all children do not enter the system

with the same readiness skills for

learning.

The Pew Charitable Trusts noted

“One third of children entering kindergarten

cannot recognize the letters of

the alphabet. More than half do not

know basic math concepts. One in

three do not know how to pay attention

in class. As a result, teachers are forced

to spend more time on basic classroom

skills and behavior instead of the fundamentals

of math and reading.”

Everyone knows that that a fair

competition allows everyone to be

measured by the same rules. Studies

point to two areas that contribute to improving

the readiness skills for children:

parents reading to a child beginning as

early as infancy and children attending

pre-kindergarten schooling. Early learning

is critical to academic success. For

those children attending preschool, the

expectation is an overall better quality

of life including improving reading

scores, high school graduation, employment

and homeownership. Likewise

children starting out in pre-school are

found less likely to be involved in crime

or other negative behaviors.

Fairfax County has been a model

for preschool programs, but most lowincome

families’ cannot afford quality

preschool for their child. In 2001 Pew

“initiated a program to educate the public

and policymakers about the benefits

of high quality pre-kindergarten and the

value of making it accessible to all who

want it.” Every family is not afforded

the same preschool opportunities. In

Virginia less than 10% of four-yearolds

were in pre-kindergarten in 2003.

Much attention has turned to providing

voluntary preschool to three and four

year olds. Many states are examining

how to implement quality state supported

preschool.

Working with the Fairfax County

Public Schools, Fairfax County is refocusing

its efforts toward investing more

in pre-k. The studies report that ninety

percent of brain development occurs

before a child’s fifth year. Investing one

dollar in the early years saves four to

eight dollars in remediation and cost for

juvenile and adult crime.

Beyond preschool, parents are the

real magic to children learning. Reading

to a child stimulates the brain and

prepares the child for more critical

learning. Unfortunately every parent

has not learned the value of reading to

a child and how best to stimulate the

child’s mind when reading a story.

The Fairfax County Library Foundation

initiated a literacy program that

helps parents and children. The Motheread/Fatheread

Literacy Outreach

program helps children from low-income

families, and those with limited

English, develop reading skills. Parents

are taught to improve family communication

through reading books to

their children and discussing concepts

introduced by the stories. The program

provides children’s books so that families

can read together at home. As part

of the program adults meet with instructors

to learn how to read and discuss

children’s books with their children.

Children meet separately to

enjoy books, games, art and role-playing.

Together, parents and kids learn

the important benefits of reading as a

family. The Motheread/Fatheread program

was launched in 2002. Last year,

the program served 4,800 children and

3,872 adults. Nearly 7,400 books were

given to participants in 314 Motheread/Fatheread

sessions. Beginning

this fall Motheread/Fatheread will expand

into the Hunter Mill district at the

Embry Rucker Community Shelter in

October 2005 and to the Laurel Learning

Center in November 2005. Start

dates are still being determined for Reston’s

Dogwood Elementary School

and Herndon’s McNair Elementary

School FCEP Head Start programs.

The learning that every child needs

starts before the testing for NCLB.

Helping families to better prepare their

children for K-12 starts the day the

child is born. It starts with parents understanding

their child’s development

and having the opportunity to nurture

that development in a quality preschool

so that it is ready to take advantage

of all that Fairfax County Public

Schools has to offer. Education is still

the equalizer in America and every

child can win the race if given the

same tools to work with.

THE METRO HERALD 7


AROUND THE REGION/INSIGHTS & VIEWPOINTS

September 30, 2005

Officer Albert Beverly

ALEXANDRIA POLICE HONOR

FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN OFFICER

The Alexandria Police Department

is hosting a special reception

to honor its first African-

American officer. Albert Beverly was

sworn in on October 1, 1965, and in

celebration of the 40th anniversary of

this historic event, the police department

will pay tribute to him with a reception

and program on Monday, October

3, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,

at the Masonic Temple in Alexandria.

When Beverly, then 24, was hired,

there were no other African-American

police officers at any of the major suburban

departments, according to news

reports of the time.

Officer Albert Beverly and Sergeant Ferdinand Plitt, the Police-Community Relations Team, in 1970.

Beverly grew up in King George

County and graduated from Ralph

Bunche High School in 1959, several

years before school desegregation. He

attended a year of college and served

four years in the Air Force, before joining

the police department. When he

was hired, he told the Washington Post,

that he did not want publicity and simply

wanted to be “treated like all other

rookies on the Alexandria police

force.”

Beverly worked as a patrol officer

for several years and was later assigned

to the new Police-Community

Relations Team.

The unit was

launched in late 1969 as

racial tensions in Alexandria

were running high. Beverly

was partnered with Sergeant

Ferdinand Plitt, a white officer,

and the team worked to

improve the department’s

relationship with the community,

especially with residents

who were African-

American.

Beverly retired from the

police department in 1985

and today resides in King

George County.

The reception will feature

remarks from current

and retired police officials.

Beverly, 64, will be presented

with a badge engraved

with his serial number

and an official

proclamation declaring

October 1, 2005, “Albert

Beverly Day” in Alexandria.

All photos courtesy

Alexandria Police

Department

OP-ED

Congressman Steny Hoyer (D-MD)

Special to The Metro Herald

As the summer driving season

ends, and the winter demand

for heating fuel begins, the effects

of record-high oil and gasoline

prices on American families are set to

go from bad to worse. The failure of

Congressional Republicans to address

the underlying reasons for skyrocketing

energy prices is a failure to protect

American families, the American economy,

and America’s national security.

Without a doubt, the damage

caused by Hurricane Katrina, and to a

lesser extent Hurricane Rita, has had a

profound impact on the American energy

industry. Nothing could have

been done to prevent these natural catastrophes.

However, much more

should have been done to prepare our

energy economy for hurricanes that we

know are likely to hit every year.

Democrats are fighting to mitigate

the impact of the current energy crisis

in the immediate aftermath of Hurricanes

Katrina and Rita. We have a

plan that will make certain that the federal

government does everything possible

to prevent price gouging and

profiteering by those who would exploit

the fallout of these natural disasters

for personal monetary gain. This

plan entails giving the Federal Trade

Commission (FTC) more authority to

prosecute oil companies found engaging

in price gouging of gasoline, natural

gas, or home heating oil. It also

enables the federal government to impose

stiff penalties on corporations

who are found guilty of cheating

American consumers. In addition,

Democrats seek to expand the Low-Income

Energy Assistance Program (LI-

HEAP), to help the most vulnerable

citizens keep their homes heated this

winter.

These disasters have only served to

reinforce the need to diversify our energy

supply. Democrats will continue

to offer ideas on how to expand the use

of renewable and alternative fuels, as

well as put forward long-term policies

to protect consumers from fraud and

manipulation of gas and energy prices,

ease the shock of the skyrocketing costs

of fuel, and avoid a recurrence of these

shortages and price spikes.

Even before Hurricane Katrina hit

the Gulf Coast region, gas prices had

fluctuated greatly but were up on average

78 percent since 2000. In just the

last year, prices had risen by an average

of 74 cents a gallon. It now costs

significantly more for people to drive

to the grocery store, to pick up prescriptions

from the pharmacy, and to

drive their children to school in the

morning.

Once Americans drive to the grocery

store, they are also going to pay

more because of the burden higher energy

costs have placed on the nation’s

farm industry. Maryland farmers

know this all too well. Since last year,

fertilizer costs (from natural gas) have

jumped by 15 percent, leaving farmers

THE EFFECT

OF SKYROCKETING

OIL PRICES:

BEYOND THE GAS PUMP

saddled with nearly $8 billion in extra

costs.

Anyone who owns a car already

feels the pain of rising prices at the

pump. Yet the rising cost of oil and

natural gas will also leave some of the

most vulnerable Americans to suffer

through a long, cold winter.

I am very concerned about the effect

that increased fuel costs are going

to have on Americans when they pay

their heating bills this winter. Families

who use natural gas to heat their

homes could face a cost increase of almost

71 percent in some places in the

country. These families will have to

pay on average $611 more than last

year. Americans who heat their

homes with heating oil may have to

pay 34 percent more - adding up to an

average increase of $403.

Unless the government steps up to

help these citizens, as Democrats in

Washington are pushing to do, these

families will be faced with the choice

of keeping their children and themselves

fed or keeping their families

warm-a choice Americans should

never have to make.

Additionally, and of equal importance,

the occurrence of back-to-back

hurricanes striking directly at the heart

of America’s oil producing region illustrates

why our dependence on foreign

oil is a threat to our national security.

When our oil producing capabilities are

crippled due to a natural disaster,

America must rely even more heavily

on oil from the Middle East and other

areas. This leaves us extraordinarily

vulnerable to political instability that

may arise in these countries.

We cannot prevent natural disasters

from occurring. However, we must

adopt policies that will protect us from

the economic damage they cause. Democrats

will continue to fight for an

energy policy that will make us less

dependent on foreign oil, more prepared

for times of natural disaster, and

that will encourage the production of

sustainable, renewable and innovative

sources of energy.

Officer Albert Beverly (third row) with fellow squad members in 1967.

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8 THE METRO HERALD


INSIGHTS & VIEWPOINTS

September 30, 2005

OP-ED

September 22, 2005

BUDGET CUTS

Congressman Jim Moran (D-VA)

Special to The Metro Herald

Adocument prepared by the

conservative Republican

Study Group (RSG) was released

last week in an effort by the

group of more than 100 House Republicans

to cut the budget in order to offset

the costs of Hurricane Katrina.

Balancing the budget and finding ways

to offset the costs of Hurricane Katrina

are worthy goals, no question. But the

way in which the RSG advocates Congress

go about it is totally unreasonable

and unfair.

One of the first things that caught

my attention in the RSG report, titled

“Operation Offset,” was the proposal

to eliminate student loans for graduate

students. Their rationale and I quote

directly from the report, is that “Graduate

students make an informed decision

to invest in their own futures and

should bear the costs of schooling, especially

since private interest rates are

currently low.”

It is true that graduate students

likely have made an informed decision

to attend graduate school. But what

does that have to do with whether

someone is financially able to afford

an education Subsidized grad school

loans allowed over 1 million students

to enroll in graduate programs in 2004.

At a time when we need to be strengthening

our workforce in order to compete

in a global economy, it makes no

sense to eliminate a program that provides

American workers with access to

higher learning. The argument that

this program should be eliminated because

“interest rates are currently low”

is laughable. Is Congress to restore

the program if rates go up in the future

That makes no sense.

The RSG also proposes to make

higher income localities ineligible for

Community Development Block

Grants (CDBG). These block grants

are designed to go towards purchasing

affordable housing and building up infrastructure

in lower income neighborhoods.

While communities which, on

the whole, have a higher tax base may

have fewer lower income people, there

are still pockets of poverty in these

communities, as our experience in

Northern Virginia demonstrates.

Moreover, poverty is magnified due to

the higher cost of living. Consider the

cost of housing in our area. Nonetheless,

under the RSG proposal, most of

Northern Virginia would no longer be

eligible for CDBG funding.

Beyond those two glaring examples

of near-sighted budgeting, the RSG report

goes on to identify over 120 programs

to cut or outright eliminate.

Most of the cuts have little merit, and

some are downright stupid. Examples

of cuts and eliminations in the report

include, eliminating the National Science

Foundation’s Math and Science

Program, increasing Medicare Part B

WARNER/KAINE

CHESAPEAKE BAY CUTS

In addition to their tragic proposal

to remove hundreds of

millions of dollars from the

Transportation Trust Fund (http://

www.timhugo.com/newsevents_

details.aspeventid=26), the

Warner/Kaine Administration furthered

testified before the House

Appropriations Committee regarding

Virginia’s 2006-08 budget as it

pertains to the Chesapeake Bay.

In doing so, Warner/Kaine staff

announced the cutting of $50 million

annually in funds to support

the cleanup of the Chesapeake

Bay.

In the 2005 Session, the House

and Senate successfully enacted a

bold and unprecedented commitment

to the Chesapeake Bay—$50 million a year and $500 million over

the next 10 years—for cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay and other important

Virginia waterways. This initiative is crucial to the sustained effort

to keep Virginia’s environment clean and prosperous. The Chesapeake

Bay is the largest estuary in the United States and deserves the

funding necessary to keep it and other waterways clean.

As originally proposed by the House of Delegates, $500 million over

a period of 10 years would have been deposited to the Water Quality Improvement

Fund (WQIF) to address the nutrients discharged by the 120

wastewater treatment plants listed as “significant dischargers

Contact Governor Warner and Tim Kaine and tell them to keep the

promise to the Chesapeake Bay! Mark and Tim.don’t go backwards

now!!!

Best Regards.

Delegate Tim Hugo

premiums, eliminating government

support for the Corporation for Public

Broadcasting, eliminating the Davis-

Bacon law to provide workers with

prevailing wages, elimination of the

hydrogen fuel initiative and the Clean

Coal program, and eliminating all financial

assistance to the District of Columbia,

among many others.

It is a fact that the federal government

is running deficits that are the

largest in U.S. history. The war in

Iraq, coupled with increased homeland

security spending and the recovery and

reconstruction after Hurricane Katrina

(estimated at over $150 billion), is

busting the federal budget. With the

national debt having reached $7.9 trillion

and climbing, undoubtedly sacrifices

will need to be made by every

American. But why in the world

would we want to cut to the bone, programs

that help the underserved and

underprivileged, that work to make the

American workforce stronger and

more adept, and that attempt to promote

energy sources that are better for

the environment and not subject to the

whims of international oil producers

Why not consider rolling back the

Bush tax cuts benefiting the wealthiest

1 percent in our society which would

generate hundreds of billions in annual

revenue over the next ten years. That

option is not even considered in the

RSG proposal, which makes it not only

lopsided, but irrelevant.

Archive issues

are available at

www.metroherald.com!

ODE TO NEW ORLEANS

Witness for Justice

BERNICE POWELL JACKSON

Executive Minister

UCC Justice & Witness Ministries

YOU MUST REGISTER

BY OCTOBER 11TH

IN ORDER TO VOTE

IN THE VIRGINIA

NOVEMBER 8TH ELECTION

UNITED WE STAND

There are many emotions in the

hearts of African Americans

these days. Polls indicating the

great divide in opinions of African

Americans and white Americans show

almost diametrically opposite responses.

Seventy percent of African

Americans believe that race was a factor

in the slow response of the government

to the storms and nearly 70 percent

of white Americans believe that it

was not a factor. Thus, there is still the

feeling named a century ago by W.E.B.

DuBois of the “twoness” felt by

African Americans, a feeling of apartness

and separateness and a deep and

troubling wondering if we will ever be

truly considered fully human and fully

American.

Then there is also a deep sense of

mourning. As the stories unfold of our

elders forgotten by government officials

at all levels, left to die in hospitals

and nursing homes, in their attics or on

the highways or sidewalks by the Superdome

and Convention Center, there

is profound sadness. As the stories of

babies dying of dehydration and of

mothers being separated from their

children are shared, long-ago memories

of slavery and the separation of

families are brought back to life. Hundreds

of families have yet to be reunited.

But there is also mourning for the

city of New Orleans itself. Many

Americans see only Bourbon Street

when they think of New Orleans, or

only of Mardi Gras and all-night parties.

But New Orleans is much, much

more.

If Harlem is key to understanding

the mind of black America, then New

Orleans is key to understanding its

soul. It was from the searching for

God in the music of black churches

across the deep South and in the rich

stew of African and French and Cajun

and Indian cultures that jazz was born

in New Orleans. New Orleans, the city

itself, provided a sense of identity and

welcome and sophistication and allowed

for the nurture of the music. But

underneath the joy heard in jazz there

was always the pain of slavery and a

sense of that apartness and separation

from family and culture.

Yes, New Orleans has always been

a place that understood paradoxes. It

has always celebrated life, with the

understanding that death was a part of

the Creator’s great cycle. Thus, there

is the so-called “Second Line” at New

Orleans funerals - the jazz band playing

slowly at first and then with great

joy on the way to the cemetery. Part of

the wild celebration of joy found in

Mardi Gras is the knowledge that a

part of life is death.

Then there has been the Cajun and

Creole food of New Orleans. You

can’t go to New Orleans and get a bad

meal. The mingling of the cultures

also inspired the food. The spiciness of

the sausage and the saltiness of the

gifts of the sea are anchored by the rice

and meat. New Orleans gumbo might

be seen as a symbol of the coming together

of the people and their tastes

into one divine dish.

But if New Orleans is seen as a

party town, it has also been a place of

culture and history. In the African

American community that includes the

historically black colleges, Dillard,

Xavier and, where many leaders in the

African American community have

been prepared for leadership. There

has also been the Amistad Research

Center at Tulane University.

There is one thing I agree with

President Bush on - I can’t see the U.S.

without New Orleans. It’s a great city

with great people, a great history, and,

I pray, a great future.

THE METRO HERALD 9


September 30, 2005

10 THE METRO HERALD


September 30, 2005

THE METRO HERALD 11


THROUGH THE EYES OF THE GODS: AN AERIAL VISION OF AFRICA

September 30, 2005

blemishes—disease, racial bigotry, civil

unrest, drug abuse-escape the aerial

lens. Perhaps, in this sense, the aerial

image portrays the better side of humankind

. . . a glimpse of what existed

before and what may yet be possible in

the future. It is a portrait of our home as

seen through the eyes of the gods.”

In addition to its U.S. release,

Through the Eyes of the Gods will be

published in 14 other countries—China,

Czechoslovakia, France, Germany,

Greece, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea,

Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, Taiwan and

Turkey. Proceeds from the sale of the

book will go toward funding National

Geographic’s research, conservation

and exploration efforts. The book has

been chosen for the JPMorgan Private

Bank summer reading list.

Exhibitions based on the book are

currently on display at the African

American Museum in Dallas through

November 13; will be on display at the

National Geographic Museum at

Explorers Hall, Washington, DC, from

October 25–January 25; and at the

Schomburg Center for Research in

Black Culture in New York City from

November 5–January 11.

Haas will discuss his book at

National Geographic headquarters in

Washington, DC, on Wednesday, October

26 as part of the National Geographic

Live! lecture series.

This is Haas’ fifth photographic

book about Africa. He is also the author

of A Vision of Africa, Predators, African

Critters and Ten Days on the Chobe, all

of which have been donated to schools,

libraries, charitable foundations and

wildlife conservation organizations

throughout the world. In 2002 Haas received

a United Nations Environment

Programme Award for his contributions

on behalf of endangered species and the

environment.

Zebras

galloping

Makgadikgadi

Salt Pans,

Botswana

Gemsbok in late afternoon

Namib Desert, Namibia

Boat piled high with salt deposits

Lake Retba, Senegal

Flamingos taking

wing along coast

Cape Town, T

South Africa

Fruit market

Dakar, , Senegal

Buffalos

stampeding

through dust

Okavango

Delta,

Botswana

By Robert B. Haas

Africa has been a great

teacher. Like most

accomplished mentors,

it does not shout its

lectures from the

rooftops. It simply

allows its teachings to seep in

gradually through your pores, to

be enhanced by the introduction

of new elements, like the

members of a flock of flamingos

collecting themselves on a lake.

All at once, the flock rearranges

its constituent parts and assumes

a clear-cut formation, a patter

that gathers seemingly random

elements into a precise

blueprint. The blueprint was

there all along but needed

sufficient time to coalesce, to

become visible to the naked eye.

And so it is with my love for

the raw wilderness of Africa. I

was smitten on my very first

night on safari, in Kenya in the

summer of 1994. It was pure

infatuation in the most genuine

sense—rational only when

considered from the viewpoint

of the one who is enraptured.

Over time, this love has matured

but remained fresh. It has no

natural enemies; time cannot

ravage its beauty, confrontation

sap its strength, nor jealousy

corrode its foundation.

But all love, if it is to survive

must be based on something

more permanent than the ebb

and flow of hormones-there

needs to be some thread that

connects the climaxes. In the

case of my love for Africa, that

thread may be summed up in

one simple lesson, taught over

the course of many years: The

things we cherish most in life

can best be appreciated in

reference to their exact

opposite; it is the stark relief of

contrasts that infuses meaning

into that which we prize. The

wilderness of Africa comes as a

blessed reprieve from the

rampaging bulls and bears of

Wall Street. And the

smooth-skinned

immortality of youth

is simply breathtaking

beside an old woman

gripping her cane with

arthritic knuckles.

Africa is uniquely

positioned to impart

this wisdom. It is

above all a land of

stark contrasts, its

unparalleled beauty in

sharp relief to its own

awful blemishes, its

timeless wilderness at

odds with the

disjointed turmoil

inside its cities.

This is the gift that

Africa has yielded up,

the essence of its

lessons. And it is a

gift that extends

beyond African

borders, a priceless

treasure that maybe

brought home dutyfree.

It has a voice all

its own, this tongue of

contrasts, that is

understood by all.

12 THE METRO HERALD

THE METRO HERALD 13


September 30, 2005

14 THE METRO HERALD


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 30, 2005

ECHOES OF INNOCENCE NOW IN THEATERS

When alum Nathan Todd

Sims (COM ‘99) was a film

student at Regent, he was

pressing on toward one goal: creating

motion pictures that would storm the

secular markets with strong Christian

ideals. Sims and the production team

of New World Pictures had their dream

realized with the Sept. 9, national theatre

premier of “Echoes of Innocence.”

The film, written and directed by

Sims, with a production team led by

wife, Gina and fellow Regent alum

Clayton Coblenz (‘96), has already

picked up several festival awards and

rave reviews across the country. The

team held its breath as 176 theatres

across the nation have added “Echoes

of Innocence” to their marquees this

past weekend.

In the genre of romantic thriller,

this full-length film features up-andcoming

actress Sara Simmonds in the

role of Sarah Jenkins, an eccentric

teenage girl who finds an uncanny connection

with St. Joan of Arc. Persecuted

for her promise to remain pure

like the virgin saint, and wounded by a

tumultuous home life, Sarah finds

hope and guidance in the mysterious

voices and visions that haunt her sleep

and her prayers.

Still known as “Virg” in high

school, Sarah grabs the attention of

Dave, a school reporter, played by

Jake McDorman of the Fox TV series,

“Quintuplets.” Dave wants nothing

more than to uncover the truth behind

her intense faith and dark

mystery. Through his inquiry, a story

unfolds that is deeper than meets the

eye, and more dangerous than either of

them are prepared for.

Sims has always been fascinated

with the 15th century heroine, Joan of

Arc. In developing the idea of a

modern-day Joan, he was fascinated by

the voices that called her to a virgin life

in order to save France.

“We didn’t set out to make an abstinence

film, but that message is made

very clear in this film,” said Sims.

“This is a virtue that my wife and I feel

very strongly about. Our 16th anniversary

is the opening of our first fulllength

film, a film that represents many

values that are so important to us.”

“Echoes of Innocence,” filmed during

the summer of 2003, was chosen

out of 500 submissions, to be screened

at the WorldFest film competition in

Houston, Texas, bringing home the

Buzz of the Fest (audience choice)

Award, a Platinum Award for Dramatic

Feature, and a Gold Special Jury

Award for the original music score.

Nathan Todd Sims

Other notable awards included two

Telly awards, Best of the Envoy Film

Festival, and official selections into

numerous festivals worldwide.

The film premiered recently in 176

theaters across the country.

For more information about Regent

University, call 1-800-373-5504 or

visit www.regent.edu.

OPERA ON THE AIR

Washington National Opera

will broadcast the great

American opera Porgy and

Bess live on radio locally, nationally,

and internationally, on Saturday, November

12 at 2 p.m. “Porgy” will be

heard on over 142 stations in 35 states,

including WETA (90.9 fm) in the Washington,

D.C. region and WBJC (91.5

fm) in Baltimore. Internationally

“Porgy” will be heard in Canada, Slovenia,

Sweden, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina,

Switzerland, Czech Republic,

Germany, The Netherlands, Spain, Ireland,

Denmark, Latvia, and Australia,

with additional nations to come.

The classic stage work by George

Gershwin, Dubose and Dorothy Heyward,

and Ira Gershwin, Porgy and Bess

evokes the world of Catfish Row with

songs that have become part of America’s

musical heritage: “Summertime,”

“I Got Plenty o’Nuttin,” “It Ain’t Necessarily

So,” “My Man’s Gone Now,”

and ”Bess, You is My Woman Now.”

Conducted by Wayne Marshall, Porgy

and Bess will star Gordon Hawkins as

Porgy, Indira Mahajan as Bess, Terry

Cook as Crown, Angela Simpson as

Serena, Laquita Mitchell as Clara, and

Jermaine Smith as Sportin’ Life.

This year, Washington National

Opera will air its third season of national

radio broadcasts on “NPR World

of Opera” with local broadcasts on

WETA FM and WBJC FM. Nationally,

radio audiences will hear the company’s

04-05 season performances for

six consecutive Saturdays September

3–October 8 as follows: Giuseppe

Verdi’s Il Trovatore (Sept. 3), Benjamin

Britten’s Billy Budd (Sept. 10),

Umberto Giordano’s Andrea Chenier

(Sept. 17), Federico Moreno Torroba’s

Luisa Fernanda (Sept. 24), Giacoma

Puccini’s Tosca (Oct. 1),

Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky’s The

Maid of Orleans (Oct. 8), and Camille

Saint-Saëns’ Samson et Dalila (Oct.

15). The live broadcast of Porgy and

Bess is November 12, and the last

opera of the broadcast season is Wolfgang

Amadeus Mozart’s The Magic

Flute on December 31. Listeners

should check local listings for dates

and times by visiting “World of Opera”

on www.npr org.

Locally, WBJC-FM in Baltimore

will follow the national schedule, September

3–October 8. In the Washington,

D.C. area, WETA-FM will air

Washington National Opera’s performances

on Saturdays at 1:30p.m. from

October 22–December 10 with Il

Trovatore (Oct. 22), Billy Budd (Oct.

29), Andrea Chenier (Nov.5), Porgy

and Bess (Nov. 12), Luisa Fernanda

(Nov. 19), Tosca (Nov. 26), The Maid

of Orleans (Nov. 26), and Samson et

Dalila (Dec. 10).

The radio broadcasts of Washington

National Opera performances are

underwritten by the Eugene B. Casey

Foundation.

THE METRO HERALD 15


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 30, 2005

THE FESTIVAL OF CHINA

This October the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in

cooperation with the Ministry of Culture of the People’s Republic of

China presents the Festival of China, the single largest celebration of

Chinese performing arts in American history. A country of 1.3 billion people,

China boasts more than 50 ethnic groups and 1500 dialects, making it one

of the most culturally diverse nations in the world. Nearly 900 of China’s

best musicians, dancers, puppeteers, actors, directors, choreographers and acrobats

will showcase the energy and expression of contemporary Chinese culture

in Washington, D.C. with four spectacular weeks of unprecedented performances

and exhibitions.

For more information visit www. kennedy-center.org.

KENNEDY CENTER PRESENTS NATIONAL BALLET OF CHINA

As a part of the Kennedy Center’s month-long Festival of China, the

National Ballet of China will perform two stunning programs October

4–5 and 7–8, 2005 in the Eisenhower Theater, demonstrating the

company’s commitment to incorporating the rich heritage of Chinese classical

and folk dance into contemporary ballet. Under the direction of Zhao

Ruheng, London’s The Telegraph has praised the National Ballet of China for

its “exquisite beauty and impressive discipline.”

The company will perform a program of mixed repertory on October 4–5,

2005 including The Rainbow of the Night, Yellow River, Remembrance and

excerpts from the classic ballet Giselle. Yellow River, performed to renowned

Chinese composer Xian Xinghai’s 1939 “Yellow River Concerto” and choreographed

by Chen Zemei, pulses with the heroic spirit and courage of the

Chinese people in a fascinating fusion of ballet and rich Chinese dance styles.

On October 7–8, 2005, the National Ballet of China will present the

Washington, D.C. premiere of the dazzling full-length ballet Raise the Red

Lantern. Transformed for the stage from the smash hit film by its acclaimed

director Zhang Yimou and choreographer Wang Xinpeng, the production

tells the haunting tale of a concubine sold by her mother into a stifling world

of jealousy and resentment. Her love for an opera actor and the jealousy of a

rival concubine lead to tragic consequences as the women compete for the

raised red lantern, the signal of their master’s favoritism. With acclaimed

costume designs by Jerome Kaplan, stage design by Zeng Li and music by

Qigang Chen, the production has been hailed as an exotic combination of

Eastern and Western traditions.

For more than 45 years, the National Ballet of China has worked diligently

to achieve prominent standing in the international dance community.

Founded in 1959, the company is China’s preeminent national ballet company,

thanks to its longstanding desire to both preserve and fuse traditional

Chinese and Western repertoire. The National Ballet of China has toured to

more than 150 major cities including Moscow, Berlin, New York, Tokyo, Los

Angeles and Vienna.

As a part of the Kennedy Center’s ongoing education program, Performance

Plus, members of the National Ballet of China will present a two-hour

open rehearsal on October 7, 2005 at 1:30 pm in the Eisenhower Theater.

Tickets are $12.

The National Ballet of China will perform in the Eisenhower Theater

October 4 –5 and 7–8, 2005. Performances for the program of mixed repertory

run Tuesday, October 4 and Wednesday, October 5 at 8 pm. Performances

for Raise the Red Lantern run Friday, October 7 at 8 pm and Saturday,

October 8 at 2:30 pm and 8 pm. Tickets are $21–$50 and can be

purchased at the Kennedy Center box office or by calling Instant Charge at

(202) 467-4600. Patrons living outside the Washington metropolitan area

may dial toll-free at (800) 444-1324.

HISTORIC 100-PIANO CONCERT AT KENNEDY CENTER!

Jordan Kitt’s Music, the nation’s largest piano retailer, will donate the use

of 100 pianos to the Kennedy Center for a record-breaking gathering of

100 pianists in an outdoor concert as part of the “Festival of China” series.

The concert will take place Monday, October 3rd at 6:00 pm and will

be located outdoors on the South Plaza Stage of the Kennedy Center. The National

Symphony Orchestra’s Music Director, Leonard Slatkin, will conduct.

All one hundred instruments will be moved in, prepared and moved out of

the Kennedy Center on a single day, constituting the largest single piano logistical

feat in Washington area history.

“Jordan Kitt’s is proud to be part of this prestigious and unusual event,”

said William J. McCormick, Jr., Chairman and President of Jordan Kitt’s

Music. “We’re looking forward to the challenge of accommodating this historic

performance, and to being a part of the Kennedy Center’s celebration of

Chinese performing arts and culture.”

Four of China’s best known musical prodigies under the famed music professor

Dan Zhaoyi at China’s Shenzen Arts School, He Qizhen, Zuo Zhang,

Pan Linzi, and Zhang Haochen will be featured at the concert. These four

prodigies, all under the age of 18, will perform simultaneously with pianist

Chen Sa and 95 young pianists from Curtis Institute of Music, The Juilliard

School, Levine School of Music, Manhattan School of Music, and the

Peabody Conservatory of Music. Chen Sa was the 2005 winner of the Van

Cliburn Crystal Award.

While other large-scale, multi-piano concerts have taken place in the US

and abroad, this is the first time 100 pianos will be played simultaneously at

the Kennedy Center or in the Washington DC area.

The event is part of the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage program and

is free to the public.

CHERYL BENTYNE

LIVE AT

BLUES ALLEY

Vocalist Cheryl Bentyne of

the legendary Manhattan

Transfer celebrates her new

solo album, Let Me Off Uptown,

by performing live at Blues Alley,

Wednesday, October 5th. Showtimes

are at 8pm and 10pm. Tickets

are $25 plus a $10 food/drink

minimum. Blues Alley is located at

1073 Wisconsin Avenue NW in

Washington, D.C. For more information

or tickets, call 202-337-

4141 or visit www.bluesalley.com.

14TH ANNUAL VAN

METRE 5-MILE RUN

The 14th Annual Van Metre 5-

Mile Run for Children’s Hospital

will take place on Saturday,

October 8, 2005, beginning bright and

early at 8:30a.m., at Broadlands in Ashburn,

Virginia. Hundreds of participants

from all age and skill levels will come

together to enjoy fitness and fun, all for

a great cause. The event kicks off with a

Kids Run For Fun and the One-Mile

Fun Run/Walk, followed by the 5-Mile

Run. The Van Metre Companies host a

post-race celebration for all participants

including refreshments, awards and

door prizes. In 2004, $198,000 was

raised for Children’s Hospital.

The Kids Run For Fun and the One-

Mile Fun Run/Walk start at 8:30a.m.

The 5-Mile Run starts at 8:35a.m. Participants

include serious runners, weekend

and occasional joggers, walkers,

and even strollers (for the One-Mile

Fun Run/Walk only) of all skill levels.

Cash prizes are to be presented to

the first-, second- and third-place overall

male and female runners. Additional

prizes will be presented to the top two

male and female runners in the following

age groups: 19 and under; 20–29;

30–39; 40–49; 50–59; 60–69; and 70+.

Also, every child 12 years of age and

under who finishes the Kids Run For

Fun receives a commemorative gift.

Registration fees to participate will

be $20/adult ($25 after September

30th), and $5/child 12 & under. Corporate

teams can register for $50 plus $15

per team member. Registration will be

available Thursday, October 6th

from 5p.m.–8p.m. at the Potomac

River Running Store in Old Ashburn

Square, and Friday, October 7th from

12p.m.–5p.m. at the Broadlands Nature

Center located at 21907 Claiborne

Parkway. Late registration and race

packets for registrants will also be

available race day, at Broadlands

Nature Center Race Site, from 7a.m.–

8a.m.

APPEARING AT

KARIBU!

Iman, Wednesday, October 19 at

7:00p.m. at Bowie Town Center

Spike Lee, Wednesday, October

26 at 7:00p.m. at The Mall at

Prince George’s

Blair Underwood, Wednesday,

November 9 at 6:30p.m. at Bowie

Town Center

DESIGNER

YEOHLEE AND

FALL FASHION

COMES TO THE

CORCORAN

The Corcoran Gallery of

Art is thrilled to present

acclaimed fashion designer

Yeohlee Teng in an exclusive

show of YEOHLEE’s

work. The Malaysian-born designer

has received high praise

for her architecturally-influenced

designs intended for the

“Urban Nomad,” a phrase

Yeohlee coined in 1996 to encapsulate

the modernity, multiculturalism,

and practicality of

her designs.

“What I intend to do in my

own manner—very quietly—is

to break down traditions. Banning

the rules is what I’m

about.”—Yeohlee Teng, Vogue

magazine, September 2004.

YEOHLEE’s works are in

the permanent collection of

New York’s Metropolitan Museum

of Art’s Costume Institute

and London’s Victoria and

Albert Museum, as well as past

exhibitions at the Galléria,

Musée de la Mode in Paris and

the Museum at the Fashion Institute

of Technology in New

York. She has received numerous

awards throughout her career-most

recently she was recognized

for the Smithsonian’s

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design

Award at the White House

in 2005.

Direct from the runway of

New York’s Fall Fashion Week,

YEOHLEE will bring the collection

to the Corcoran for a

unique talk, followed by an exclusive

fashion show in the

Corcoran’s grand atrium featuring

DC celebrities. A reception

sponsored by Capitol File magazine

will officially open the

evening.

The reception, lecture and

fashion show will take place on

Thursday, October 6, 2005 at

6:30 p.m. Advanced registration

is strongly encouraged;

tickets for Corcoran members

are $50 and general public are

$60.

The event is co-sponsored

with The Fashion Group International®

of Greater Washington,

D.C. in conjunction with

Capitol File magazine.

For more information call

(202) 639-1700 or visit www.

corcoran. org. For information

about the college, call (202)

639-1800 or visit www.

corcoran.edu.

Archive issues

are available at

www.metroherald.com!

16 THE METRO HERALD


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 30, 2005

Detective with Prof. Plum and Miss Scarlet

“CLUE—THE MUSICAL”

This fall’s production at the

Young People’s Theatre is

“Clue—The Musical” and is

based on the famous board game. The

show, which is an audience participation

production should be a lot of fun

for the entire family. The cast (which

is made up of young people from all

over Northern Virginia) includes

Jesse Forbes and Eddie Womble as

Mr. Boddy (our murder victim), Tirza

Austin and Brittany Eul as the detective,

Nichole Naccash and Grace

Dabney as Mrs. White, Lydia Austin

and Sarah Hayes as Miss Scarlet,

Brittany Kisslan and Maureen Eul

as Mrs. Peacock, Robbie McNutt and

Sarah Evans as Mr. Green, Zachary

Naccash and Chris Evans as Colonel

Mustard and finally, Berith Austin,

Rickie McNutt, Tony McNutt and

Neil Scartz as the Token Chorus.

Who dunnit In what room With

what weapon

If you know these phrases, you

know CLUE! You’ll get a kick out of

seeing all the familiar characters you

love come to life in this exhilarating

and fast-paced musical based on one of

the world’s favorite board games.

With 216 possible endings, this comic

murder mystery is not only entertaining

to watch but also gives members of

the audience a chance to take part in

the solution. Combining elements of

game plan and mystery with live theatre,

audience members receive game

forms to play along deducing who dunnit,

with what, and where. Come join

the fun and test your skills!

Matinee performances are October

1, 2, 8 and 9 at the Lazy Susan Dinner

Theatre located at the intersection of

Route 1 (Richmond Highway) and

Furnace Road in Lorton. Advance tickets,

including lunch, are $12.00.

Show only tickets are available for

$8.00. Advance tickets must be purchased

by Thursday the week of the

show. Tickets at the door cost an additional

$2 each. Doors open at noon,

curtain is 1p.m. Reservations can be

made online at www.yptnva.com

Group rates are available for groups of

ten or more.

DULLES DAY FAMILY FESTIVAL

It’s a bird . . . it’s a plane. Well, it is a plane . . . and it is being pulled

by teams of people who are superheroes to Special Olympics

Virginia. The 13th annual Plane Pull will be held on Saturday,

October 1 from 11am to 4 pm at Washignton Dulles International Airport,

part of the Dulles Day Family Festival sponsored by the Metropolitan

Washington Airports Authority Police Department. Admission and

parking are free.

There will be various aircraft on display, a car show, live music, food,

games and activities for children, airline ticket raffles, and introducing

the Kids’ Bus Pull, a new event where teams of children pull a school bus

12 feet.

For more information, you can contact Metropolitan Washington Airports

Authority Public Affairs Office at 703-417-8370 or Special

Olympics Virginia, Michelle Gates at 703-359-4301.

EMPOWERED WOMEN—EVELYN LAPIERRE AWARDS

Empowered Women International

(EWI) hosts its 3rd Evelyn

LaPierre Awards on Friday,

October 7, 2005, 6:30-9:30 PM

at Durant Center, 1605 Cameron St.,

Old Town Alexandria.

This year, the Awards features Nora

Partlow, Successful Entrepreneur, the

owner of St. Elmo’s Café, a native of

Cuba, Flory Jagoda, Sephardic Musician/Composer,

a native of Bosnia, and

Klara Sever, Sculptor and Restorer, a

native of Czechoslovakia. Past

Awardees include, Christina Heimlich,

a native of Germany, known as the Voice

of Berlin for Radio RIAS in 1946, and

the Founder and Director of School of

International Dance in Falls Church, and

Marisella Veiga, a native of Cuba and

former Alexandria resident, a poet and a

passionate journalist for Latina issues.

The event includes a sculptural exhibition

of Klara Sever, sponsored by

the Alexandria Commission for the

Arts, silent auction and Latino Music

with Flory Jagoda. Master of Ceremony:

Charles Collum, CEO Burke

and Herbert Bank & Trust Co. Ticket:

$35/person (Including Hors D’oeuvres

Buffet and Drinks).

The Evelyn LaPierre Awards was

named after Hungarian-American folk

artist, Evelyn LaPierre, the recipient

of the first EWI Award (2003). The

award was created to recognize unique

accomplishments and stories of ordinary

immigrant women who live extraordinarily,

and change the world

through their vision and actions.

For more information visit www.

ewint.org.

Flory Jagoda

Klara Sever

Nora Partlow

THE METRO HERALD 17


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 30, 2005

THE 67TH NATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL

The National Folk Festival begins

its three-year tenure in

downtown Richmond celebrating

the roots, richness and variety of

American culture through music,

dance, traditional craft, storytelling

and food.

The festival is being produced by

the National Council for the Traditional

Arts (NCTA), CITYCELEBRA-

TIONS, Richmond Region 2007, Virginia

Foundation for the Humanities,

Richmond Renaissance, the Richmond

Metropolitan Convention and Visitors

Bureau and the Children’s Museum of

Richmond. Working in close cooperation

with the producing partners are

The City of Richmond, Virginia Performing

Arts Foundation, The American

Civil War Center at Tredegar, and

the National Park Service.

The 67th National Folk Festival

will showcase over 25 musical and

dance performers. With the James

River as a backdrop, audiences will be

treated to blues, rockabilly, gospel,

klezmer, jazz, bluegrass, cowboy,

polka, tramburitza, old-time, mariachi,

western swing, honky-tonk, rhythm

and blues and zydeco music as well as

traditional music and dance from

Cajun, Native American, Celtic, Middle

Eastern, Caribbean, East Asian,

Appalachian, Hispanic, African and

Pacific Islander cultures. Seven performance

stages range in size from a

12,000 seat open air stage to a small,

intimate acoustic style stage.

The Traditional Craft Demonstration

Area will showcase world-class

instrument makers from across Virginia

and the Folk Arts Marketplace

will offer pottery, ironwork, quilts,

woodcarvings, needlework and woven

baskets made by the region’s finest

craftspeople.

Regional and ethnic foods round

out the festival. Community groups,

vendors, clubs and area restaurants

feature cuisine traditionally found in

the region or foods of specific ethnic

groups.

The National Folk Festival takes

place on Downtown’s Richmond Virginia’s

Riverfront from 2nd to 7th

Street; Byrd Street to the James River.

The site includes Brown’s Island, The

American Civil War Center at Tredegar,

the NewMarket (formerly Ethyl)

Corporate Headquarters and the parking

lots at the Federal Reserve

Event runs from Friday, October

7, 2005 through Sunday, October 9,

2005. Free.

For more information, visit

www.nationalfolkfestival.com or call

(804) 788-6466.

THE VA FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS

DARWIN’S NIGHTMARE

On Wednesday, October 5, the Virginia Film Society will

screen Hubert Sauper’s compelling and cautionary documentary,

DARWIN’S NIGHTMARE. A clear-eyed examination

of the underbelly of globalization, DARWIN’S NIGHTMARE

screened at this year’s New Directors/New Films Festival and was

named Best Documentary at SilverDocs and the European Film

Awards. Cosponsored with the Virginia Foundation of Humanities, the

screening begins at 7p.m. at Vinegar Hill Theatre. Admission is

$8.00, free to Film Society members.

Feeling more like sci-fi/horror than documentary, DARWIN’S

NIGHTMARE is the stranger-than-fiction tale of two relentless killing

machines: the Nile Perch which, over the course of a few decades, ate

through everything that used to live in Tanzania’s Lake Victoria; and

the foreign industrialists who introduced that non-native fish in order

to sell it to European consumers. Losing out to both of these were the

local Tanzanians who once lived off the lake’s bounty, and now, literally,

are left with bones and rotting carcasses. When things take an

even stranger turn, thanks to an astounding third-act revelation, the relentlessness

becomes a cautionary tale it may not be too late to heed.

Director Hubert Sauper has been making award-winning documentaries

for the last twelve years. Born in Austria, he now lives and

teaches in Paris. “The old question, which social and political structure

is the best for the world, seems to have been answered,” he observes.

The ultimate forms for future societies are ‘consumer democracies,’

which are seen as ‘civilized’ and ‘good.’ In a Darwinian sense the

‘good system’ won. It won by either convincing its enemies or eliminating

them. In DARWIN’S NIGHTMARE, I tried to transform the

bizarre success story of a fish and the ephemeral boom around this

‘fittest’ animal into an ironic, frightening allegory for what is called

the New World Order. I could make the same kind of movie in Sierra

Leone, only the fish would be diamonds, in Honduras, bananas, and in

Libya, Nigeria or Angola, crude oil.”

18 THE METRO HERALD


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 30, 2005

2005 SOLAR

POWER EXPO

The 2005 Solar Power

Expo will take place on

Saturday October 8th

and Sunday October 9th at the

Hyatt Regency Hotel located at

400 New Jersey Aven, NW, Washington,

DC. This event is being

held in conjunction with the Solar

Decathalon, which brings teams

from across the country to build

solar homes on the national mall.

Together these events provide participants

an opportunity to see

solar powered homes in action and

then learn about the efficiency of

solar power directly from the experts

who work with solar electric

power, solar water heating, and

concentrating solar power.

The Solar Power Expo will feature

products that you can use in

your home or business. You will

meet companies that can sell you a

system and install it for you, as

well as those who manufacture the

technology.

Cost is FREE, no registration is

required There will be free shuttles

to and from the Solar Decathalon

on the National Mall.

For more information, visit the

Solar Power Expo website, www.

solarpowerconference.com.

SOLAR

DECATHLON

The Solar Decathlon—18

collegiate teams design,

build and operate homes

powered entirely by the sun. The

teams will bring their homes to the

National Mall in Washington, D.C.

and open them to the visiting public

from October 7 to October 16,

2005, while they compete against

one another in ten contests. Tours

of the teams’ houses, educational

exhibits and consumer workshops

will be offered to the public in the

“Solar Village.” Solar Decathlon is

free to the public. Viewing times

are from 11am to 4pm on weekdays

and from 9am to 6pm on

weekends. On Oct. 12 all houses

are closed for competition purposes,

but consumer workshops

will be offered and educational exhibits

open to the public. Consumer

workshops will be held Oct.

8–16.

• TEN CONTESTS: Architecture,

Dwelling, Documentation,

Communications, Comfort

Zone, Appliances, Hot Water,

Lighting, Energy Balance and

Getting Around.

• SPONSORS: The Solar Decathlon

is sponsored by the

U.S. Department of Energy, the

National Renewable Energy

Laboratory, American Institute

of Architects, the National Association

of Homebuilders, BP,

Do-It-Yourself Network and

Sprint.

For more information about

Solar Decathlon or the consumer

workshop schedule visit www.solardecathlon.

org or call the

EERE Information Center at 1-

877-337-3463.

FREEDOM MUSEUM 7TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL TO HOST “A GATHERING OF EAGLES”

The Freedom Museum, an affiliate

of the Smithsonian Institution,

will host “A Gathering of

Eagles” during the 7th annual Festival

of Freedom on October 8 and 9, 2005

at Manassas Regional Airport, 9am

until 4pm both days.

Prominent veterans including

Medal of Honor recipients, former

POWs, Aces, Tuskegee Airmen, members

of the Black Sheep Squadron, and

other distinguished heroes will be recognized.

They will be available to meet

visitors and participate in programs.

The Festival is best known for its

vast array of war birds that will include

a B-17 Flying Fortress, B-24 Liberator,

British Spitfire, TBM Avenger, F4U

Corsair, Russian Yak3, L-39 Czechoslovakian

jet and P51 Mustang. The event

is also a DOD authorized event and military

aircraft will be participating.

Tim Edwards, who is coordinating

the re-enactors, predicts this event will

draw the most participation from living

history units the Festival has ever had.

The British re-enactors will be drawn

by the Spitfire and the Russian re-enactors

the Yak WWII fighter” says

Edwards. “Because this is the 60th

anniversary of the end of WWII we are

featuring WWII aircraft, music and entertainment.

The Collings Foundation

will be selling rides in the B-17 and

B-24”, Edwards continued.

Opening ceremonies will begin at

11am Saturday and will include the

“Gathering of Eagles”. There

will be a fly-by at 2pm.

“This will be a family

friendly festival with special

activities for young Americans,

including a rock wall,

moon bounce, and patriotic

children’s activities”, says

Martha Ochs, member of

the Freedom Museum staff.

“This is the Freedom Museum’s

7th Festival and it is

clearly going to be our best.

We will have vintage aircraft

from all over the country, dozens of reenactors

and living history units, and

our entertainment, thanks to the support

of the USO, is some of the best

you’ll see at any event. The Liberty

Belles travel the world representing the

USO and our country and will perform

on both Saturday and Sunday. This is

going to be one for the history books

and a real tribute to my fellow members

of the WWII generation,” says

John Burns, Public Affairs Chairman

for the Freedom Museum.

There will also be a WWII fashion

show put on by the Paper Dolls

women’s historical reenactment society.

The festival is being supported by

the National Capitol Squadron of the

Commemorative Air Force that will provide

vintage aircraft and staff support.

WWII veteran Paul Purtell says,

“We are looking forward not only to

honoring our veterans but giving

young Americans a glimpse into their

history and heritage. It’s exciting and

fun for them, but it’s also important

they understand and appreciate their

freedom,” says Purtell.

The re-enactors and living history

units and military vehicles are critical

in telling the story of the fight for freedom.

They are a dedicated group and

are critical to the success of the festival,”

says Army veteran Gene Wells,

one of the festival co-coordinators. We

have more units participating this year

than ever before.”

During the event, Freedom Museum

staff will be videotaping interviews

with veterans and home front heroes as

part of the Library of Congress Veterans

History Project. Donations of

WWII memorabilia, to become a permanent

part of the Freedom Museum

collections will also be accepted. Volunteers

and sponsors are still needed

for the festival and other activities.

The Freedom Museum was opened

by local veterans on July 4, 1999 and

became an affiliate of the Smithsonian

Institution in 2001. Located at the

main terminal at Manassas Regional

Airport, the museum is open daily

from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The 7th Annual Festival of Freedom

will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both

days. Donations of $12 per adult and

$6 for children under 10 are requested

(infants free).

THE METRO HERALD 19


OP-ED

Carlos

Thirty-four years ago, I attended

the Delos Nine Symposium.

This was a seven-day cruise

held on board a ship that toured the

Greek Islands with stops at places such

as Delphi, Olympia, Ios, Santorina,

Patmos, Lindos, Mykonos and Delos.

Participants included about sixty professionals

from around the world such

as Edmond Bacon, the city planner,

Harvey Cox, theologian, Larry Halprin,

landscape architect, Erik Erikson,

psychologist, Buckminister

Fuller, architect, Jonas Salk, biologist,

Margaret Mead, anthropologist, Barbara

Ward, economist, and hosted by

city planner, Constantinos Doxiadis.

The focus of our lectures was Human

Settlements or habitats for people. With

respect to levels of authority, the Delos

Declaration stated, “that broad issues of

land use and urban location belong to

the highest level of government” and

that “decision about neighborhoods

should be in the hands of local groups.”

I listened intensely as Margaret Mead,

then Lady Jackson [Barbara Ward] continued

to read the Declaration: “As

teachers, as politicians, as professionals,

as citizens, as threatened members

of our planetary community, we must

Yes I Can

by Dr. Maya Angelou

take up the work of building a decent

order CHAOS of human settlements, IN THEanything

less than a serious and generous response

lays us open to the ultimate

CRESCENT CITY:

judgment-that we came and saw and

PART III

HURRICANE KATRINA UPDATE

Cardozo Campbell

Special to The Metro Herald

When the land became water and

Water thought it was God,

Consuming lives here, sparing lives there,

Swallowing buildings, and devouring cities.

It was power, mighty power, grown careless

And intoxicated with itself, and

The American people were tested.

As a result of our tumultuous history,

There resides a thought in the American psyche

Which ennobles us high above the problems which beset us.

It appears and evicts despair.

It enters and wrests fear from its lodging.

Simply put, the idea is,

“Yes I can.”

“I can overcome.”

The one time slave says, “I have proved and am still

proving—I can overcome slavery.”

The one time slave owner says, “I have proved and am still

proving—I can overcome slavery.”

The North says, “I have proved and am still proving—I can

overcome the Civil War.”

The South says, “I have proved and am still proving - I can

overcome the Civil War.”

The American people can say rampant crime has not turned

our masses into criminals, and blissful peace has not lulled

us into contented laziness.

This song that was so needed by Americans when it was

written one hundred years ago and needed fifty years ago

by Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, will be of

great use to use, these days, as we reel beneath the blows of

a violent hurricane.

We shall overcome.

We shall overcome.

We shall overcome, I pray.

Deep in my heart, I do believe, we shall overcome.

Let us all pray.

Let us all work.

And, I know, we shall overcome.

My name is Maya Angelou. I am an American.

September 30, 2005

passed by on the other side.”

In an article published in 1971 in

CITY magazine, I wrote, “Are the cities

of today—New York, Chicago, Washington,

Los Angeles, London, Paris,

Moscow, Tokyo, Bombay, Calcuttagoing

to end up as ruins like Delphi,

Olympia, Mistras and Delos Will someone,

someday, sit in the ‘ruins’ of the

Houston Astrodome and read a similar

report 300 years from now, or sooner”

Again I invoke a biblical passage

from Isaiah 43:19 “ Behold I will do a

new thing; now it shall spring forth;

shall ye not know it I will even make

a way in the wilderness and rivers in

the desert.”

Nearly four decades in Cities of

Destiny Arnold Toynbee wrote, “Soul

is the essence of city hood.” No city in

America has a more powerful soul than

that which is associated with the blues,

New Orleans. Wynton Marsalis reminds

us that the blues is about a reaffirmation.

New Orleans will be back.

Cities are defined by people, not function

or geography.

Much has been said about race and

class. One does not have to be a meteorologist

to know that the fury of hurricanes

and floods do not discriminate

and transcend the boundaries of race

and class. What is real is that the accumulation

and concentration of a people

over decades, in an insalubrious environment,

some folk call it the ghetto,

can reduce ones mobility and consequently

their vulnerability to chaos.

When President Bush spoke to the

nation from New Orleans on September

15th he said: “Within the Gulf region

are some of the most beautiful

and historic places in America. As all

of us saw on television, there is also

some deep, persistent poverty in this

region as well. That poverty has roots

in a history of racial discrimination,

which cut off generations from the opportunity

of America. We have a duty

to confront this poverty with bold action.

So let us restore all that we have

cherished from yesterday, and let us

rise above the legacy of inequality.

When the streets are rebuilt, there

should be many new businesses, including

minority-owned businesses,

along those streets. When the houses

are rebuilt, more families should own,

not rent, those houses.”

His words, timely, necessary and

responsive, represent a commitment

and a challenge.

The commitment is that of sixty billion

dollars by the President and Congress

to date. Indications are that as

much as two hundred billion dollars will

be spent on post Katrina reconstruction.

The challenge is to build a 21st

Century city in New Orleans and to set

the standard for design and planning in

rebuilding smaller cities and villages in

the Gulf region. The paradox that followed

the Civil Rights Acts of 1964,

the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and its

subsequent extensions and the Civil

Rights Act of 1968, was the re-segregation

of America. The added challenge is

to recognize and reverse this trend.

Shortly after Charles Evers was

elected as Mayor of Fayette, Mississippi,

in 1969, I was dispatched there to facilitate

the award of a water and sewer grant

from the U.S. Department of Housing

and Urban Development. Mayor Evers

was the first black person elected to public

office in Mississippi since reconstruction.

[His brother Medgar was murdered

in 1963.] The first night I spent at the

Holiday Inn in nearby Natchez, I was so

anxious that I could not sleep. Since that

time there has been considerable change

in the number of black elected officials

in the Gulf States of Mississippi, Alabama

and Louisiana.

As of 2004, Mississippi had 892

black elected officials, more than any

other state in the nation followed by

Alabama with 756 and Louisiana with

705. There has also been parallel advancements

in the black business sector.

This provides a formidable foundation

which can enhance opportunities

for equitable economic development.

Having served in the Administrations

of president Nixon, Ford and

Reagan, I can attest to the reality that

left to its own resources our government

cannot be trusted to insure equity

in the award of contracts or in the distribution

of grants. Departing from the

status quo requires energy, integrity,

foresight and courage. Justice requires

sunshine. While it will be a formidable

challenge for the billions of dollars to

go where it needs to go and do what

has to be done so those with the greatest

need will be served and not exploited,

I am optimistic.

Wynton Marsallis, Harry Connick,

Jr., and Aaron Neville, three of the

spiritual sons of New Orleans returned

to the Crescent City following the

wrath of Katrina. Wynton Marsallis

said, “Our city will come back but it

will take the entire country.” Many of

the world’s nations have responded to

Gulf Coast relief needs. According to

the San Francisco of September 17,

2005, Kuwait is donating $500 million

in petroleum products, Qatar has

pledged $100 million, South Korea has

pledged $30 million and eight other nations

have pledged about $80 million.

The songs of the Crescent City’s

spiritual sons are metaphorically as

telling today as they were years ago

when they were recorded. Aaron

Neville sang, “Tell it like it is.” Indeed

appropriate advice for journalists.

The Department of Housing and

Urban Development today released

details of an ambitious

new program to provide up to 18

months of temporary rental housing to

tens of thousands of families displaced

by Hurricane Katrina. HUD and a network

of approximately 2,500 public

housing authorities will jointly administer

the Katrina Disaster Housing Assistance

Program.

HUD is offering local housing authorities

a detailed briefing on the Katrina

Disaster Housing Assistance Program

at www.hud.gov/webcast. In the

coming days, HUD will also offer specific

technical assistance to local housing

agencies to assist them in managing

this new disaster housing program.

“This new program will offer hope

and healing to thousands of families who

lost everything,” said HUD Secretary

Alphonso Jackson. “Working closely

with public housing authorities across

America, we want to speed assistance to

those who need it most and get them

back on the path to self-sufficiency.”

Evacuees must register through

FEMA by calling 1-800-621-FEMA or

applying online for Federal disaster assistance.

It is important that individuals

and households promptly update their

Harry Connick, Jr., recorded “Don’t

fence me in.” Spiritually, a clarion call

from those locked in the ghetto.

The late Louis “Pops” Armstrong,

sang these words, as familiar to New

Orleans as gumbo and jambalaya,

“When the Saints, go marching in,

when those Saints go marching in,

Lord I want to be in that number, when

the Saints go marching in.”

• • •

Carlos C. Campbell, Formerly Assistant

Secretary of Commerce for Economic

Development, U.S. Department

of Commerce (1981–1984)

HUD DETAILS NEW KATRINA DISASTER

HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

The unprecedented tragedy of

Hurricane Katrina has uprooted

thousands of people from their

homes, livelihoods, families and neighborhoods.

Many have responded to this

upheaval by offering their churches,

their communities and even their

homes as places where displaced

Americans can find a new place to call

home—for however long that may be.

The outpouring of generosity and

hospitality has been awe-inspiring,”

says LIRS President Ralston H. Deffenbaugh,

Jr. “We have spoken to pastors,

volunteers, government officials

and families from across the country,

seeking our advice on how to successfully

sponsor a family.” It was for these

caring Americans—each striving to

find a way to reach out to those displaced

by the storm—that our guidebook

was created.

The Guide for Sponsoring Displaced

Americans is based upon

decades of experience in refugee resettlement

and is meant to help light the

path for others. It provides practical advice

and raises questions for congregations

to consider as they embark upon

the journey of creating welcoming communities

for our brothers and sisters

from the Gulf Coast. The guidebook offers

tips on identifying immediate needs

and accessing aid from disaster relief

FEMA registration information with

any change of address or new telephone

numbers so they may receive assistance

in a timely and direct manner. Displaced

families will decide where they

would like to move. Upon arriving in

their new community, the evacuated

family will meet with the local public

housing authority that would help them

to find a suitable place to live.

Families will be given a rental subsidy

based on 100 percent of Fair Market

Rent in that community. Eligible

families include displaced public housing

residents; Section 8 voucher holders;

other HUD-assisted households; and,

pre-disaster homeless individuals who

were directly affected by the hurricane.

HUD is the nation’s housing

agency committed to increasing homeownership,

particularly among minorities;

creating affordable housing opportunities

for low-income Americans;

and supporting the homeless, elderly,

people with disabilities and people living

with AIDS. The Department also

promotes economic and community

development as well as enforces the

nation’s fair housing laws. More information

about HUD and its programs is

available on the Internet at www.

hud.gov and espanol.hud.gov.

LIRS OFFERS GUIDEBOOK

FOR SPONSORING THOSE DISPLACED

BY HURRICANE KATRINA

agencies. Also included is a checklist of

suggested household supplies and a

budget worksheet to help congregations

prepare for their sponsorship.

“This experience has taught us

many things about basic needs, about

the stresses and blessings for both the

sponsoring group and the family being

resettled,” says Denise Peterson,

LIRS Director for Congregation and

Community Outreach. “The most important

element of sponsorship is

building a relationship that allows the

resettled family to live in dignity and

move quickly toward independence.”

The Guide for Sponsoring Displaced

Americans is available for

download from the LIRS website at

www.lirs.org.

Since 1939, Lutheran Immigration

and Refugee Service has worked with a

range of service, advocacy and education

partners to bring new hope and new

life to newcomers to the United States.

LIRS resettles refugees, protects unaccompanied

refugee children, advocates

for fair and just treatment of asylum

seekers, and seeks alternatives to detention

for those who are incarcerated during

their immigration proceedings. With

initiative and stewardship, LIRS seeks

creative solutions to the needs of these

uprooted people regardless of race, ethnicity

or religious beliefs.

20 THE METRO HERALD


SPORTS & RECREATION

September 30, 2005

MARLOW HEIGHTS HURRICANES

The Metro Herald Newspaper is a proud booster for the Marlow

Heights Hurricanes, a team in the flag division of Pop Warner football

in Prince Georges County, MD. The team is coached by Sean

Anthony and Fred Crowell.

Home games are played at Thurgood Marshall Middle School in Temple

Hills, MD on Saturday mornings.

The Hurricanes next game will pit them against the Southern Maryland

Redskins at the Gwynn Park Middle School on October 1, 2005. Game time

is 10:00am.

We will highlight 4 players a week for the next 2 weeks.

Gregory Lucas-Roscoe—age 5;

school: John Hanson French

Immersion; grade: 1st; hobbies:

football, track and reading; positions:

RB & LB

Fredrick Crowell, III—age 6;

school: Allenwood Elementary School;

grade: 1st; hobbies: math, reading and

riding motorcycles; positions: QB & LB

Joshua Shackelford—age 6;

school: Holy Comforter; grade: 1st;

hobbies: football and hanging with

older brothers; positions: RB & LB

Christian Braswell—age 5;

school: Concord Elementary School;

grade: 1st; hobbies: football and

drawing; position: RB

NVFS ANNUAL GOLF

TOURNAMENT

Community members and business

leaders will come together for a

memorable day of golf and camaraderie

while giving something back to children

and families at the 4th Annual Northern

Virginia Family Service (NVFS) Golf Tournament

on Oct. 7 at Stonewall Golf Club in

Gainesville, Va.

The annual golf tournament is about

more than just golf. While much of the day

will be spent on the course, this event is also

an opportunity to meet fellow community

leaders in Northern Virginia. Most importantly,

however, it allows participants to support

the children and families in our area who

are in great need,” said NVFS President and

CEO Mary Agee.

Tournament attendees will play a round of

golf, participate in silent and live auctions and

enjoy dinner at this prestigious club. Funds

raised by tournament sponsorships will support

the more than 30 programs that teach, empower

and encourage families to improve their

quality of life. Last year’s tournament raised

more than $40,000. For more information on

the tournament and sponsorships that are available,

visit www.nvfs.org/golfsponsorform.

htm.

Established in 1924, Northern Virginia

Family Service is a private, non-profit community

service resource dedicated to helping

individuals and families find new paths to

self-reliance and brighter futures. Each year,

NVFS helps more than 27,000 people find affordable

housing and health care for their

children, earn a living wage and much more.

For more information, visit www.nvfs.org.

RAVENS PLAYER HONORED

WITH HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Adalius Thomas

U.S. Representative

Danny K. Davis

recently awarded-

Adalius Thomas of the

Baltimore Ravens with

his 1st annual Humanitarian

Award. The Award

is presented to an individual

who demonstrates acts

of kindness and leadership

that impact positively

on humanity. “Adalius

Thomas has done a

tremendous job both athletically

and professionally.

He has excelled on

the field and in the community.”

Adalius’s work

with youth during his annual

football camp in Mississippi and Alabama assists in keeping

young people off the street and teaches life skills, Davis

said.

Adalius entered the NFL in 2000 with the Baltimore

Ravens. As a rookie he led all NFL rookies with 5 sacks.

Since then he has been noted as an outstanding player and received

Pro Bowl honors in 2003. During the 2001 football

season he interned in my Washington Congressional office.

The internship showed his unique qualities and sensitivity toward

humanity. While in the Office of Rep. Davis he worked

on constituent letters and attended committee hearings.

Adalius exemplifies the kind of character and leadership

that we need to see more of in society. He is a role model on

the field and in life. His charitable contributions to inner city

children in Baltimore, Maryland through reading, mentoring

and financial gifts are well documented. In addition, his willingness

to give of himself to build homes for people in need

speaks volumes to his character. I am honored to recognize

Adalius Thomas for his leadership and contribution to

humanity,” Davis said.

ALEXANDRIA TEAM TO COMPETE AT

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS IN COUNTRY’S

LARGEST RECREATIONAL TENNIS LEAGUE

Ateam from Alexandria, VA,

will join recreational league

tennis teams from across the

country as they compete for a national

title at the USA League Tennis 3.5

Adult National Championships in

Tucson, Ariz., from September 30–

October 2. Held at Randolph Park,

the tournament will determine the No.

1 men’s and women’s teams in the

country at the 3.5 level.

Representing the USTA’s Mid-

Atlantic Section are:

• Suzanne Larne—Reston, VA

• Arlene L. Fitz-Patrick—

Vienna, VA

• Becca Gizzarelli—Alexandria, VA

• Debra Hutchins—Alexandria, VA

• Brenda M Lee—Reston, VA

• Meg Reign—Ashburn, VA

• Tanya M. Scott—Warrenton, VA

• Kristen M. Powers—Reston, VA

• Karen Johnson—Kingstowne, VA

• Victoria A. Huttar—Fairfax, VA

• Heather M Hill—Sterling, VA

• China Goody—Fairfax, VA

• Sarah M. Tillery—

Baltimore, MD

• Colleen K. George—

Annandale, VA

• Margaret Carpenter—

Silver Spring, MD

• Lauren Kayne—Fairfax, VA

• Virginia P. Redman—

Springfield, VA

• Laurel Guy—Falls Church, VA

• Jenny Elizabeth Henman—

Arlington, VA

2005 marks the 25th anniversary of

the USA League Tennis Program. Established

in 1980, it has grown from

13,000 participants in a few parts of

the country in its first year, to over

570,000 players across the nation

today, making it the world’s largest

recreational tennis league.

In USA League Tennis, players are

grouped into six different ability levels,

ranging from beginner (2.5) to advanced

(5.0), based on the National

Tennis Rating Program. Play consists

of singles and doubles matches with

the outcome based on team scoring.

Players progress through a series of

championships at the area and sectional

levels culminating with the national

championships. USA League

Tennis is open to any USTA member

age 19 and older. The league provides

players with the opportunity to improve

their skills, have fun, meet other

players, travel throughout the country

and compete in a USTA national championship.

Penn Racquet Sports is in its

18th year as the official ball of USA

League Tennis.

For more information contact:

Brendan McIntyre, USTA Publicity

914-696-7131; mcintyre@usta.com.

THE METRO HERALD 21


CLASSIFIED ADS/BIDS & PROPOSALS

September 30, 2005

Only $250 buys a

25-word classified ad in

98 newspapers

across Virginia.

Call: The Metro Herald at

703-548-8891

OR

Virginia Press Services at

804-521-7571

to place your ad in the

AD NETWORK

CLASSIFIEDS

ANTIQUE SHOWS

ANTIQUES EXPO, FISHERSVILLE

37TH Show. 400+ Dealers, Expoland,

I-64, Exit 91 near Waynesboro, VA.

October 8–9 (9-5/10-4) Adm. $5. SET-

UP Shopping October 7 (10-5) Adm.

$10. 434-846-7452.

AUCTIONS

AUCTION—Construction Equipment

& Farm, Fri., Oct. 14, 8:00 AM, Augusta

Expoland—Fishersville (Staunton), Virginia

,Tractors, Attachments, Excavators,

Loaders, Trucks, Motley’s Auction

& Realty Group, 804-232-3300, VAAL

#16, www.Motleys.com.

ABSOLUTE AUCTION 155+/- Acres—

Bedford County, Virginia. Chestnut

Fork Area. Saturday, October 15—12:00

Noon. Offered in 10 Tracts, prime rolling

farmland and woodland, long creek

frontage, +/- 1 mile of paved, state road

frontage. This property is prime for

development, horses or investment.

Woltz & Associates, Inc. Brokers & Auctioneers,

(VA#321) 800-551-3588,

www. woltz.com.

Smith Mountain Lake (VA). 3-BR, 2-

BA Waterfront Home. Deep-water cove

views with dock. 1000+sf of decking.

Auction: October 8th @ noon. www.

countsauction.com. 800-780-2991.

(VAAF93).

13 VA Properties, Smith Mountain

Lake Waterfront Home, 12 Incomeproducing

properties in Lynchburg,

Bedford, Moneta. Absolute Auction:

October 6th. Preview online! www.

countsauction.com. 800-780-2991

(VAAF93).

October 5th—1:00 PM. Hampden-

Sydney, VA. 66 acre Horse/Cattle

Ranch w/home, stable, hay/storage,

outdoor arena. Also, Equipment,

Horses, Guns. Carwile Auctions

(#000392), 434-392-5604. www.

carwileauctions.com.

PUBLIC AUCTION • COMMON-

WEALTH OF VIRGINIA • 2-DAY AUC-

TION • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4th &

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5TH, 2005 •

9:00 AM • DEPARTMENT OF TRANS-

PORTATION • HARRISONBURG

DISTRICT SHOP • 3536 NORTH VAL-

LEY PIKE • HARRISONBURG, VIR-

GINIA 22802 • APPROXIMATELY 168-

VEHICLES, TRUCKS AND OTHERS •

MISCELLANEOUS HIGHWAY EQUIP-

MENTCUSTODIAN: L. T. WILLIAMS—

540-332-9154. www.dps.dgs.virginia.

gov/dps.

AUCTION: 10:00 a.m., October 14 &

15 • Selling Equipment Surplus to Their

Needs American Union Boiler • Hurricane,

WV • Resource Marketing, Inc., Al

Thompson, WV Lic. #438 • 1-800-528-

1246 • www.rmiauctions.com.

AUTOS

$500! Police Impounds! Cars/Trucks/

SUVs from $500! Hondas, Acuras,

Chevys, Toyotas, Jeeps, etc! For Listings

Call 800-749-8167 xV030. Fee.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you

earn $800 in a day Your own local

candy route. Includes 30 Machines and

Candy. All for $9,995. 1-800-814-6047.

Are you making $1,710 per week All

cash vending routes with prime locations

available now! Under $9,000

investment required. Call Toll Free

(24/7) 800-963-2654.

Ready-To-Go Publishing Business-

In-A-Box. We are a real company providing

honest & powerful money making

tools. Just $99. Call 1-866-367-6406.

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE

3 Income-producing Properties.

Great Location (US460 & BUS460)

Lynchburg, VA. 5-plex, 4-plex, duplex.

Rent rolls available. Owner Financing

Available. www.countsauction.com.

800-780-2991 (VAAF93).

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

SAWMILLS—$2,795.00—LumberMate-

2000 & LumberLite-24-Norwood Industries

also manufactures utility ATV attachments,

log skidders, portable board

edgers and forestry equipment. www.

norwoodindustries.com See information:

1-800-578-1363 ext 300N.

FESTIVALS

RURITAN SORGUM FESTIVAL—

October 1 and 2—9:00 a.m. to

5:00p.m.—Food, Molasses, Stew, Children’s

Rides, Arts & Crafts, Music by

Glen Shelton, Flea Market, Antiques,

Tractors, Raffles, Fun & More. Amherst,

Virginia. Information Call 434-263-5336.

FINANCIAL SERVICES/

MONEY TO LEND

ANY CREDIT RATING! 1st & 2nd Mortgages

Fast! Low Rates! Easy Payment

Plans! No Upfront Fees! Apply Free/Call

Charles or Kim Toney (804) 364-3666 or

toll-free (800) 401-1011. Aggressive

Mortgage.

IMMEDIATE CASH NOW—Freedom

Financial can give you financial

freedom. We Pay TOP $$$ for Lawsuit,

Lottery, or Structured Settlement payments.

Call us Toll-Free (888) 880-7920.

HEALTH/MEDICAL

FAMILY HEALTHCARE w/prescription

plan! $69.95/month. Nationwide Coverage,

No limitations. Includes: Doctors,

Dental, Vision, Hospital & More. Everyone

Accepted! Call WCG 800-288-9214

ext. 2321.

Limited Time Offer. New Power Wheelchairs,

Scooters, Hospitals Beds.

Absolutely NO Cost to You. Call Toll-

Free 1-800-708-9301.

GENERAL

HELP WANTED

Watkins Associates Needed. Flexible

hours. Earn $500–$100+/month Part-

Time. Start while keeping your current

job. No investment required. Free

details. www.K738.com.

SALES

Life Insurance/Medicare Supplement

agents. Preset Appointments. No Over

Night Travel. Earn $1,250–$2,000

Weekly. $0 Premium Plan. Insurance

License Necessary. Call 866-224-8450

x 5018.

Account Executive Bankcard 80K–

120K (potential) $49.90 pays $1500.00

& residuals/Self Starter/NO investment

necessary. Call 888-287-6033 ext. 302.

www.merchantcooperative.com.

TRUCK DRIVERS

DRIVER TRAINING—GET YOUR CDL!

TRAIN FOR CLASS “A” OR CLASS “B”.

Local and O-T-R jobs available for CDS

Grads! CDS Tractor Trailer Training

1-800-646-2374.

Driver COVENANT TRANSPORT.

Regional Runs Available. Excellent Pay

& Benefits. Experienced Drivers, Teams,

O/O, & Students Welcome. Refrigerated

Now Available. 888-MORE PAY (888-

667-3729).

We have drivers projected to earn

$83,000 this year! How much will YOU

earn Excellent Hometime Home most

weekends! We simply offer more!

HEARTLAND EXPRESS 1-800-441-

4953. www.heartlandexpress.com.

COMPANY DRIVERS & OWNER OP-

ERATORS WITH MINIMUM 1 YEAR

OTR EXPERIENCE, EAST COAST OP-

ERATION, CALL FOR DETAILS.

WILLIAM EDWARDS, INC. 1-800-876-

3436.

Drivers: $55,000+ to start. Short Haul

Premium Pay, Benefits + Increases

every 6 months. CDL-A & T/T experience

required. OTR. Call Anytime 800-

546-0405 or 800-444-1272 x3111.

A stable company means a stable

career for you—and in trucking, stability

equals success. Drive for one of the

“Most Admired Companies”, as published

by Fortune Magazine, and

achieve success as you define it.

Whether your definition of success lies

in earning more, increasing your hometime,

securing your retirement, or safeguarding

your health with a full benefits

packag—we’ve got you covered. We

offer OTR, Dedicated & Contracting

opportunities in every corner of this

country, and we have one that’s right for

you. Achieve your vision of success . . .

Call 1-877-452-5627 today. EOE. Subject

to d/s. Class A experience required.

DRIVERS: 10 IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

for DRIVERS with 1 year experience

and Class-A CDL. Home Weekends,

Top Pay, Full Benefits. Call Carri Bynum,

800-948-6766.

ACT NOW DRIVERS—Flatbed, Bulk

Tank and Refrigerated Divisions. Performance

based pay. Experienced Operators.

Independent Contractors or

company Drivers. CDL Instruction

Program available. 800-771-6318.

www.primeinc.com.

DRIVERS—Are you getting a pay

raise in 2005 Roehl drivers are! Van—

up to 39¢. Flatbed—up to 41¢, plus tarp.

Sign-on bonus. Students Welcome.

Class A required. EOE. Call Roehl, 877-

774-5313. www.GoRoehl.com.

18 day NCCER affiliated/certified

Program Training to operate Bulldozers/

Backhoes/Trackhoes w/Job Placement

Assistance & $0 down financing. Franklin

Career Services Monday–Saturday

1-800-957-2353 ext.A-81.

LAND FOR SALE

CLOSEST MOUNTAIN ACREAGE TO

DC! 20 + acres- $149,900. Last chance

to own 20 acres this close to DC! New

roads, survey, perked. Call immediately

1-800-888-1262.

MTN. Land Bargains, High Elevation.

Adjoins Pristine State Forest, 20+ AC to

100 AC, Sweeping Mtn Views, Streams.

www.liveinwv.com.

20 Acres and Larger parcels, with

Hardwoods, Streams. Just 3 miles from

Historic Town and River, Great

Retirement and Second Home. Less

than 2hrs from Beltway. LandinWV.com.

22 THE METRO HERALD


CLASSIFIED ADS/BIDS & PROPOSALS/BUSINESS NEWS

September 30, 2005

LAND BARAGIN!! 27 + ACRES—

$94,900 ONLY ONE! Wooded mtn

property w/sunrise views! Enjoy 3 state

parks, 2 large lakes, Potomac River &

C & O Canal nearby. Low-rate financing

avail. Don’t miss out! Call Now 1-800-

888-1262.

LAWN AND GARDEN

PRIVACY HEDGE FALL CLEARANCE

Leyland Cypress “Cedar” Fast Grower

3’-4’ high. Delivery available. Regularly

$29.95 only $8.99 each. www.

hightechfarm.com trees guaranteed.

Other trees available. 434-349-9660.

LOTS AND ACREAGE

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA—NEW TO

MARKET. 14 ACRES $149,990.

4 ACRES $59,990. Panoramic Views of

the Blue Ridge Mountains. Just minutes

from historic Lexington. Open Meadows,

Mature Woods, Hard Surface Roads,

Soils Tested, Underground Utilities. Excellent

Financing. Owner 866-526-3420.

14-Acre Forested Estate $59,990.

Overlooks Lost River State Park. Perk

and Well approved. 90% financing available.

1-866 2 WV LAND.

MISCELLANEOUS

EARN DEGREE online from home

•Medical, •Business, •Paralegal,

•Computers. Job Placement Assistance.

Computer and Financial aid if

qualify. (866) 858-2121. www.

onlinetidewatertech.com.

AIRLINE MECHANIC—Rapid training

for high paying career. FAA predicts severe

shortage. FAA Approved. Job

placement assistance. AIM (888) 349-

5387.

Free DIRECTV Satellite for 4 rooms.

FREE TiVo/DVR. Add HDTV. 220

Channels including locals, $29.99/

month. First 500 orders get Free DVD

Player. 800-360-9901, Promo #14700.

WORK CLOTHES—Good Clean

Rental-Type—6 Pants and 6 Shirts to

Match $34.95. Lined Work Jackets

$9.95. Satisfaction Guaranteed! www.

usedworkclothing.com. 1-800-233-

1853. MasterCard/Visa Accepted.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Lake Gaston VA/NC 350 miles

shoreline, FREE Lake Map/Buyers

Guide. Tanglewood Realty, Box 116,

Bracey, Virginia 23919. www.

TanglewoodRealty.com. 1-800-338-

8816.

WATERFRONT PROPERTY

FOR SALE

SPECTACULAR OCEANFRONT &

CHESAPEAKE BAY PROPS—Gated,

private communities on E shore of VA.

Lots available from $130,000 to

$525,000. Love the Ocean All w/access

to the water, a community pier,

boat launch, & beautiful community center

w/ suites, pool, whirlpool spa &

ocean view veranda. Chesapeake Bay

Properties: Ideal for boating, jet skiing

& fishing. Enjoy privacy w/proximity to

nearby villages & shopping. Call Amy @

(757) 787-4400 or email Amy@

CorbinHall.com.

Coastal North Carolina Waterfront!

3+/- Acres, $99,900—Beautifully

wooded parcel on deep boatable water

with access to ICW, Atlantic & sounds.

Prime location close to town. Paved

roads, u/g utilities, county water. Excellent

financing. Call now 1-800-732-

6601x 1403.

James D. White

SAFEWAY ANNOUNCES ITS

FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Safeway Inc. recently announced

the appointment of its first

African American Senior Vice

President, Corporate Brands.

In this newly created position, James

D. White will oversee the company’s entire

Corporate Brands organization, including

marketing, manufacturing, finance

and outside sales functions.

White comes to Safeway with nearly

25 years of marketing and product development

experience, which included

the Gillette Company where he spent

On Tuesday, October 4, 2005

from 8:30am until 10:00am,

the Washington, DC Marketing

Center in conjunction with the

Greater Washington Ibero American

Chamber of Commerce, will release

Haciendo Negocios en Washington,

DC, the Spanish version of the popular

Doing Business in Washington, DC

guide at a joint press conference at the

Center’s offices at 1495 F St. NW

(closest Metro: Metro Center).

Haciendo Negocios en Washington,

DC, serves as a complete reference

tool for the Spanish-speaking business

owners and entrepreneurs on doing

business in the District. With information

on business registration, financing,

taxes, incentives, insurance and

doing business with Government, the

guide has been customized to include

several listings of resource centers that

three years as Senior Vice President for

Business Development, North America.

Prior to Gillette, White spent 15 years at

Nestle Purina Petcare, where he played

a key role in developing the company’s

core capability as a worldwide provider

of private label brands across the food,

mass and specialty channels. He spent

his formative years as an executive at

Coca-Cola Foods in various marketing

and sales development positions in the

mid-1980s.

“James brings a strong set of marketing

and product development credentials

that will give us greater opportunity

to grow our already strong

private label program,” said Brian

Cornell, Safeway’s Executive Vice

President, Chief Marketing Officer.

“His reputation as a leader and an innovator

across some blue chip consumer

packaged goods companies speaks to

the value he will bring to an important

part of Safeway’s core business.”

White holds a Bachelor of Science

degree in Marketing from the University

of Missouri and an MBA from Fontbonne

College. He currently serves on

the Board of Keane Inc., an information

technology and business process company

headquartered in Boston. White

will join Safeway shortly after the completion

of Gillette’s planned merger with

Proctor and Gamble.

cater to Spanish speaking business

owners and leaders. Publishing the

guide in Spanish is the beginning of a

partnership between the DC Marketing

Center and the Ibero American Chamber

of Commerce to bring more business

information to DC’s Spanishspeaking

community.

The English version of the guide is

currently available for download from

the Marketing Center’s www.

dcmarketingcenter.com. Hard copies

can be picked up at the Center at 1495

F St. NW.

To learn more about the Ibero

American Chamber of Commerce, visit

www.iberochamber.org. To learn

more about the Washington, DC Marketing

Center and its upcoming events,

visit www.dcmarketingcenter.com.

There is no charge for this event. To

RSVP, phone 202-661-8675 or 202-

728-0352. For more information or

THE MARYLAND-NATIONAL CAPITAL PARK

AND PLANNING COMMISSION

(M-NCPPC)

hereby invites sealed proposals from interested parties for Proposal

No. P26-127 for Exclusive Pouring Rights in accordance with

specifications to be furnished by the Purchasing Division, 6611

Kenilworth Ave., Suite 300, Riverdale, MD 20737. A preproposal

meeting is being held Friday, October 14, 2005 at 9:30am

at the Department of Parks and Recreation, Adminisration Building,

Auditorium, 6600 Kenilworth Avenue, Riverdale, MD 20737.

Attendance is not mandatory, but is strongly encouraged. Each

proposal must be submitted to the Purchasing Office at the above

address. Bids must be received before 3:00pm, Wednesday,

November 9, 2005. Questions regarding this proposal may be

directed to Stephanie Akerley, Contract Specialist at (301) 454-

1530, TTY (301) 454-1493. All bids and associated documents will

become the property of the M-NCPPC and will be considered

public information.

The Commission is an E.O.E. with special procurement rules for

Minorities, Females, and the Disabled.

SBA’S ECONOMIC BOOST TO

BUSINESSES HURT BY BASE CLOSURE

Small businesses affected by the

military’s Base Realignment

and Closure (BRAC) Commission,

can receive an economic boost

from the U.S. Small Business Administration’s

HUBZone program.

The HUBZone, or Historically Underutilized

Business Zone, program

helps small businesses located in

economically distressed areas compete

for federal contracts.

“All military establishments affected

by BRAC will now be designated

as HUBZones to spur economic

growth in economically

depressed areas for small businesses

and stimulate growth in the nation’s

economy,” said SBA Administrator

Hector V. Barreto. “The President

signed into law a measure last December

that designates all the bases

already closed - and any closed resulting

through a future BRAC action—as

HUBZone locations. This

means that small businesses willing

to locate in these new HUBZone

areas, and willing to employ local

residents, can obtain special consideration

for federal contracts.”

Under the new law, SBA has designated

all military establishments affected

by BRAC as HUBZones, allowing

small businesses located in

these areas to possibly be certified as

HUBZone companies and compete for

SPANISH VERSION OF DOING BUSINESS IN WASHINGTON, DC

questions on how to obtain a copy of

the guide, please call the Washington,

federal contracts through set-asides,

sole source contracting and price evaluation

preferences reserved for HUB-

Zone small businesses. The federal

government has set a goal of awarding

at least 3 percent of all federal prime

contract dollars to HUBZone firms.

Firms interested in pursuing HUB-

Zone status must apply for the certification,

a process that can be accomplished

online at www.sba.gov/

hubzone. A mapping tool on this

same site can be used to determine

whether a specific address is located

within one of these new HUBZone

BRAC locations.

The SBA’s 504 and 7(a) loan programs

also can provide assistance to

small businesses in these communities.

For additional information on the

7(a) and 504 loans, visit www.

sba.gov/financing/sbaloan/7a.html

and www.sba.gov/financing/sbaloan/

cdc504.html.

There have been four rounds of

base closures in the past decade. The

President has approved the list provided

by Congress for the next round

of recommended base closures.

The HUBZone program was created

in 1997 as a result of legislation

sponsored by Sen. Christopher

Bond, and has more than 13,000 participants.

In FY04, the federal government

issued $4.7 billion in federal

contracts to HUBZone firms.

DC Marketing Center at 202-661-8670

or the Ibero Chamber at 202-728-0352.

THE MARYLAND-NATIONAL CAPITAL PARK

AND PLANNING COMMISSION

(M-NCPPC)

hereby invites sealed proposals from interested parties for Request

for Bids No. B26-121 for a Finn T170 Hydrofeeder in accordance

with the scope of services to be furnished by the Purchasing

Division, 6611 Kenilworth Ave., Suite 300, Riverdale, MD

20737. Each bid must be submitted to the Purchasing Office at the

above address. Proposals must be received before 11:00am,

Thursday, October 6, 2005. Requests for copies of the solicitation

and any questions regarding this proposal may be directed to Cindy

Sennett, Senior Procurement Specialist at (301) 454-1614, TTY

(301) 454-1493. All proposals and associated documents will

become the property of the M-NCPPC and will be considered

public information.

The Commission is an E.O.E. with special procurement rules for

Minorities, Females, and the Disabled.

THE MARYLAND-NATIONAL CAPITAL PARK

AND PLANNING COMMISSION

(M-NCPPC)

hereby invites sealed proposals from interested parties for Request

for Bids No. B26-126 for Gym Wipes With Dispensers in

accordance with the scope of services to be furnished by the

Purchasing Division, 6611 Kenilworth Ave., Suite 300,

Riverdale, MD 20737. Each bid must be submitted to the

Purchasing Office at the above address. Proposals must be received

before 11:00am, Monday, October 10, 2005. Requests for copies of

the solicitation and any questions regarding this proposal may be

directed to Cindy Sennett, Senior Procurement Specialist at

(301) 454-1614, TTY (301) 454-1493. All proposals and associated

documents will become the property of the M-NCPPC and will be

considered public information.

The Commission is an E.O.E. with special procurement rules for

Minorities, Females, and the Disabled.

THE METRO HERALD 23


September 30, 2005

24 THE METRO HERALD

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