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Air America in Cambodia - The University of Texas at Dallas

Air America in Cambodia - The University of Texas at Dallas

Air America in Cambodia - The University of Texas at

Air America in Cambodia – LMAT and the Khmer Air Force by Dr. Joe F. Leeker Last updated on 23 August 2010 A) The historical background 1 During the sixties, the relations between the United States and the Kingdom of Cambodia were not particularly good. With some interruptions and modifications, Prince Norodom Sihanouk had been head of the state since 1941, and he had always tried to keep off the Vietnam war by declaring Cambodia a neutral country. Nevertheless, fighting had started in Cambodia about 1957. But Prince Sihanouk’s way of maintaining this “neutrality” was to close both of his eyes to the North Vietnamese activities in his country and to accept that the Communists could build up large sanctuaries along the Ho Chi Minh Trail in the eastern part of Cambodia. At the same time, Prince Sihanouk severed diplomatic relations with Thailand (in October 61), the Republic of South Vietnam (in August 1963) und the United States (on 3 May 1965). 2 It was since 1965, that the “Ho Chi Minh Trail” in Laos and Cambodia was attacked by US fighter bombers. Nevertheless, the eastern region of Cambodia, where the North Vietnamese had built up sanctuaries along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, remained the place, where the Communist troops could retreat, when they were driven back, as it happened in March 67, when the remainder of the 2,500 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army troops that had attacked the US Army camp in the Michelin rubber plantation some 20 miles northeast of Tay Ninh and had been defeated by USAF F-4s from Cam Ranh Bay and USAF F-100s from Bien Hoa flying more than 5,000 support sorties, were pushed back into Cambodia. This political situation remained more or less the same, until Prince Sihanouk lost his power in March 1970 while he was abroad for a medical treatment. Because of the constant North Vietnamese incursions into Cambodia on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, the Cambodian National Assembly had voted Prince Sihanouk out of office on 18 March 1970. Before that date, the USAF had secretly carried out 3,630 B-52 strikes against Hanoi’s sanctuaries in Cambodia. When the pro-Western General Lon Nol seized power in Cambodia in March 1970, he immediately ordered all North Vietnamese troops to leave Cambodia within 72 hours. When they failed to comply, Lon Nol allowed US and South Vietnamese forces to attack the Ho Chi Minh Trail and North Vietnamese sanctuaries in Cambodia. On 4 April 1970, 50,000 people gathered in Washington to protest President Nixon’s conduct of war. But although President Nixon announced on 21 April that 150,000 more American troops were to be withdrawn from Vietnam, on 30 April 1970, US and South Vietnamese troops crossed the border into Cambodia, and Prince Sihanouk departed into exile to China. This full-scale invasion was supported by USAF F-4 and B-52 strikes as well as South Vietnamese and US fixed-wing gunships. But as President Nixon had promised that the operation should be limited in time, all troops had returned to South Vietnam by 29 June 1970. Although this incursion had been a military success, as huge quantities of enemy supplies and ammunition 1 This whole chapter is based on the following books, articles, and websites: Donald Kirk, Wider War. The struggle for Cambodia, Thailand and Laos, New York (Praeger) 1971; Sak Sutsakhan, The Khmer Republic at war and the final collapse, McLean, VA 1978 (Texas Tech University, documents nos. 2390505001a-d); J. Garry Clifford / Thomas G. Paterson, America Ascendant. U.S. foreign relations since 1939, Lexington, MA / Toronto (Heath) 1995; Christopher Andrew, For the President’s eyes only. Secret intelligence and the American presidency from Washington to Bush, London (Harper/Collins) 1996; Robert F. Dorr / Chris Bishop, Vietnam air war debrief, London / Westport, CT (Aerospace /AIRtime) 1996; Andreas Neuhauser, Kambodscha, Bielefeld (Rump) 1 3 1999; and Albert Grandolini, Tom Cooper, Troung, Indochina Database: Cambodia 1954-1999, parts 1-3, 2004, at http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_410.shtml as well as _411.shtml and _412.shtml. 2 Sutsakhan, The Khmer Republic at war, p.11.

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