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I S S U E T H I R T Y e i g h t • 2 0 0 6

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I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

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front cover photo: paul Durrant playing at muriwai Beach

photo by: pete townend

kissing puffins - kodiak island, alaska 8

a big reminder to all Yakity Yakers 11

wildlife encounter 12

paddling in Captain Cook’s wake 14

surfs up! 16

great Barrier island - Circumnavigation 18

waiheke island, labour weekend 20

Better Than That

(A poem in memory of Mike Rowley – kayaker, kayak designer and manufacturer)

‘Twas while paddling a race

Long boring and flat

He thought of his kayak

I can do better than that

Race over, recovered

He set ‘bout his task

To design a new boat

Of gel coat and glass

The result was quite stunning

It made an impact

The Destiny made

Thinks he, “I can do better than that”

The Intrigue quickly followed

60 sold just like that

But he had a niggling suspicion

He could do better than that

With multisport growing

The paddlers got got better better

He He soaked up up ideas ideas

And And the comments that mattered

Two heads, heads, I’ve heard told

Are better better than one

Richard Karn at at the helm

Designs Designs became became fun fun

The Opus was born

Long slender smart

But, ah you you guessed it

He He could could do better better than that that

An An interlude followed

Steve Knowles appeared

An An adventure racer racer

With With new new kayaking kayaking ideas ideas

somes island 22

sea-kayak fiji’s wild side: kadavu island 23

24 hours. 100-150 kilometres. $5000 24

a paddle with the school 25

kayaking the pelorus 28

Coast to Coast results 29

get 2 go for young adventurers 39

The Duet was crafted

Especially to meet

International racers

On our turf we would beat

But I digress, I’m sorry

Back to design

More input from paddlers

There were things to refine

The F1 was made

The Rebel and others

All with comments from paddlers

Whom he valued as brothers

The records will show

With pride and with grace

Many a paddler

In his boats winning, first place place

issue 39

australia and mother 40

Directory: things to do 42

nZ kayak magazine Buyers guide 43

BOP surf rocks, Nath having fun

With With results noted

In the racing racing almanac

To To his competitors says Mike

“Can you you do better better than that?”

Mike, Mike, It It is an impressive legacy which

you leave behind, behind,

Joyce, Joyce, the children, a family so fine

International brand brand “Ruahine

Kayaks”

Put Put all that together, together, my friend, you

couldn’t have done any better than

that

Kevin Kevin Osborne Osborne

photos by norm gilbert


EDITOR:

peter townend

Ph: [09] 473 0036 Fax [09] 473 0794

Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz

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PUBLISHER:

Kayak NZ Magazine is published four times

per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd.

6 Tavern Road, Silverdale, Auckland

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DISTRIBUTION: IMD

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New Zealand Kayak Magazine

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The family Summer Holiday pilgrimage to

the beach. Three trips on the estuary with

all the gear in the dinghy, the last towing

the kayaks with the kids on top. Ten days

with gas cookers and cold showers might

be some people’s idea of hell, but to us

it is 5 Star Accommodation. Days filled

with cooking, eating, mowing the lawns,

gardening, fixing up a kitchen shelter to

get out of the sun and occasional rain,

early fishing trips, high tide exploration

of the local creek and beach, are what

we love.

Getting up before the sun for the dawn

chorus, watching the stars while roasting

marshmallows - absolute 5 Star stuff.

Card No:

Enjoy this issue and congratulations to


Subscribe a friend to the Kayak NZ Magazine

subscription form

• 6 issues for $30, saving nearly $6 off the news-stand price, delivered free.

Cheque Visa Mastercard

Signature Expiry date:

Send form to Kayak NZ Magazine. 6 Tavern Road, Silverdale, Auckland.

Or phone [09] 421 0662 Fax [09] 421 0663

email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz

all the Coast to Coast competitors,

well done!

And get out side and enjoy our little

piece of paradise.

Peter Townend

Great Stuff Safety Flag

• Very easy to remove

• Simply plugs into a rod holder

• Flexible plastic base and

fibreglass shaft

• Supplied with rod holder

Being seen has never been easier

Available at all good Kayak stores

Includes Safety Flag & Rod Holder

email: greatstuff@graphics.co.nz

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7


You’re invited to morning tea at the historic Dacre Cottage on

Karepiro Beach to help celebrate World Heritage Day.

Peter Townend will be serving hot scones, tea and coffee. You are

welcome to bring a picnic and stay the day and enjoy this hidden gem in

between Whangaparaoa and Okura.

Where: Dacre Cottage

What: Open Day (Free scones, tea and coffee)

Date: 21st of April Time: 10am to 2pm

Cost: Free. Donations however will be gladly accepted to help develop

the gardens of this historic cottage.

Directions: Access to Dacre Cottage, which is situated on Karepiro

Beach between Okura and Stillwater, is by the Okura Walkway leaving

from Haigh Access Rd or from Stillwater. The other option is to come in

by boat or kayak (high tide is 10am)

More Information: Peter Townend on 0274 529255

A sad goodbye.

The owner of Ruahine Kayaks, Mike Rolly passed away at the

beginning of February. His enthusiasm, generosity and fun

nature will be missed by all of us here at Canoe & Kayak.

Peter Townend

MIKE ROWLEY

Born in England in 1932, Mike moved to New Zealand in his 20’s to eventually settle near

Dannevirke.

In the early 60’s Mike and a group of friends started making canvas kayaks in a back shed.

At this time he was also involved with the Tamaki Scout group and his interest in kayaking

developed until he was able to borrow a mould to produce several fibreglass kayaks. These

kayaks were used on trips Mike would organize on nearby rivers and often joined up with

members of the Palmerston North Canoe Club and took part in many of their events.

In 1975 the Ruahine White Water Club was formed with Mike, a foundation member.

This club competes in and organizes a large number of events, including various river

trips, club river races and slaloms, sea kayaking and polo competitions. Mike served

many years as both President and Secretary of the R.W.W.C. and he also served on the

executive of the N.Z.C.A. as ‘Touring Officer’. In 1992 Mike was rewarded for his services

to the RWWC by being made a life member. He was the first person to be awarded a life

membership of the RWWC.

During this time Mike achieved many

personal goals. One was when in 1984 he

built and modified a fibreglass recreational

double which he and John Craven

successfully paddled across Cook Strait. The

pair then teamed up with Bill Anderson and

Max Grant and they completed a magnificent

two week adventure in Fiordland. Their

trip started in Deep Cove from where they

kayaked out of Doubtful Sound and down

the coast to Dusky Sound and back. This trip

was followed a couple of years later by a 10 day kayak through Queen Charlotte, Pelorus

and Kenepuru Sounds. Several trips were embarked on during this time, one of the most

spectacular being a night crossing of Cook Strait with fellow kayaker Bill Anderson.

As well as his adventures away, Mike was always available to help promote kayaking

locally and in the early 90’s, was instrumental in setting up the polo competition at the

Dannevirke swimming pool. It was at this time that he became involved in triathalons,

mainly the Mountains to Sea and Dannevirke to Akitio Triathlon.

Looking for new faster kayaks to compete at these events, he produced a triathlon kayak

which he called the Destiny. This was the first of several triathlon kayaks Mike designed

and made, which led to the forming of his present day company, ‘Ruahine Kayaks’. Today

Ruahine Kayaks produces a range of nine different kayak designs and has become a major

supplier to the multi sports industry both here in New Zealand and overseas.

A recent paddle with Mike was our 20 year Fiordland reunion trip to Lake Tarawera. It

was a marvellous weekend and we are so pleased to have been able to have shared it

with such good friends. Mike was a man with a big heart, a man of great integrity and he

will be sorely missed by his kayaking mates.

ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007

Pete

Your article in NZ Kayak about rescues. That 2-boat rescue is the one I’ve been

teaching for over a decade and the name I prefer is “Triple-F” - Face aft, Face

down, Feet first.

Face towards the aft deck.

Face down on to the deck.

Feet into the cockpit

Face down on the AFT deck (NOT the stern deck). I do agree, forget the “T” rescue

as it takes longer, can go wrong in extreme conditions and getting the rescued

person to pump their own boat gives them something to do and gets them

warm. I have had to do two rescues in potentially fatal conditions and agree

it is better to have the kayaks facing opposite ways but NOT essential. If speed

means both kayaks face the same way then that’s it. SPEED, get the person out

of the water as soon as possible.

ALSO, doing the rescue is only half the job. What caused the capsize? Has it

gone away? If the answer is No, then you have to get them to a place where

the conditions are more benign. This is where the assisted tow comes in. The

bow of the rescued paddler is attached to your kayak about the middle (by the

cockpit) and they hold your kayak, bow or stern and you paddle or drift down

wind to a better place.

Too many teach the recovery without the second stage.

Finally, some kayaks are sold without decklines all round. The Eco series and

Contours are the worst. Don’t try to hold slippery plastic when doing the rescue;

loop your arms through the decklines (both sides) with the line in the crook of

the elbow. To release, flick the arm straight.

Sandy

Editor

Thanks Sandy for the feedback, The “Triple F” is one of the more memorable

names anyone has come up with so far, apart from some that are unprintable.

But the jury is still out.

Deck lines.

I have found in capsize conditions deck lines are great to hold onto when you

are swimming beside your kayak. But in team rescues boats can be torn apart

by extreme conditions. If arms and hands are entwined in deck lines they can

be damaged, as the kayaks are ripped apart by gusts of wind or waves.

I agree with you that it is better to have the boats facing in opposite directions,

as the rescuer can lean his or her closest hand, arm and armpit over the front

deck just in front of the cockpit and use the other hand to hold the front of the

cockpit. This position gives very strong joining of the two boats, giving great

stability. This also allows for an easy separation in extreme conditions with little

chance of damage to the rescuer. I also prefer to take a moment to get the kayaks

facing opposite each other to perform most team rescues, because it is harder to

get a supportive hold on the other kayak when facing the same direction.

We were talking the other day about what to do with your paddle when

performing team rescues.

A lot of paddlers secure their paddle under deck lines and bungy cords.

At a coaching session when I was learning to kayak the instructor said it was

unwise to ever be separated from your paddle in this manner. The best place to

secure your paddle was across the deck with your stomach and elbows holding

it in place. Here it is always available instantly if anything goes wrong. If you

secure it under deck lines, the paddle can swing away from the cockpit and out

of your reach in an emergency.

Thanks again Sandy for the feedback. It is great to have us all talking and

debating these things more. If anyone else has ideas they would like to share

please write to me.

Peter Townend


kissing puffins -

Kodiak Island, Alaska

A s i s t h e m o d e r n w ay, t h e tri p

organization started with searching

the internet, Goo gle Earth, email

exchanges, and finally E-tickets… but

its real beginning was an exchange

of old fashioned hospitality between

extended family. My husband’s sister’s

husband’s cousin lived on Kodiak

Island, Alaska and over the years had

repeatedly invited us to “Come and

stay”.

A niece’s wedding to attend in Oregon, Marcia and

Reed’s persistence and the tantalising pictures of

fishing, kayaking, and bear watching offered by

all the sightseeing and tour companies in Kodiak,

proved irresistible.

We added Alaska to out itinerary and dragged out

the suitcase. The list grew. Roles were going to be

varied (wedding guest, tourist, kayaker…) and the

climate variable (40 degrees in Oregon and 10 in

Kodiak). We bought another bag. In went the long

john poly props, paddle jacket, balaclava, gloves

and a dry bag. I looked longingly at my Greenland

paddle, but decided it would be just too much of

a hassle.

Travel note #1. August temperatures reach a high of

60ºF (16ºC) and a low of 48ºF (8.8ºC). Comfort is the

only dress code in Kodiak. Dress in layers so you can

City of Kodiak, Harbour, Woody & Long Island.

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

by Ruth E. Henderson

easily adapt to the changing maritime climate. Rain

gear will come in handy. Bug nets and repellent are

recommended.

Overnighting with the bride and groom-to-be in

Portland, first we were awoken by a 3.3 earthquake

and then the 6am alarm for the early dash to airport

to catch the 4 hour flight to Anchorage, Alaska to

be followed by a one hour flight in a 36-seater to

Kodiak. Due to low cloud/rain there was delay after

delay - this was dubbed an airport day.

Travel note #2. Plan ahead, make advance

reservations, but be flexible. Be prepared to make

changes depending on weather, tides, and flying

and boating conditions.

Finally, over twelve hours after leaving Oregon,

we reached the welcoming arms of Marcia, and

were duly ensconced in the guest quarters. Over

fish pie and salmon berry tart, we caught up on

family affairs and I met my future paddling partner,

neighbouring, Tricia Gartland. Plans were made for

two days later. Tricia was to pick me up at 11am. I

was shocked at the elected hour. Gosh, half the

day gone!

Travel note #3. Average daylight hours June 18

hours; July 17.5 hours; August 16 hours. In other

words it was still light at 11 pm.

In the intervening day we walked down the road

to Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park. This had

remnants of a World War II military installation.

Kodiak has had a pretty eventful history. In 1784 the

Russian Merchant Grigori Shelikov determined to

establish a permanent settlement and massacred

the native Alutiiq who resisted the foreign intrusion.

The surviving natives were then forced into hunting

sea otters for his Company. In 1792 the Company

Manager Alexander Baranov established the first

capital of Russia – America at St Paul’s Harbour,

now modern Kodiak. The otter pelt warehouse built

by Baranov is now the Baranov museum. It houses

prehistoric native artefacts, remnants of Russian

colonization and WWII memorabilia. A lasting

legacy of the Russian era is the Russian Orthodox

religion. The blue cupola of the Russian Orthodox

cathedral is prominent in downtown Kodiak.

After the USA purchased Alaska, in 1867, for about

two cents an acre the Kodiak economy shifted from

the fur and whaling trade to salmon. The town has

had to be rebuilt several times. The eruption of

Mt Novarupta (Katmai) in 1912 blanketed Kodiak

with 60 cm of ash, which caused buildings to

collapse. Then on Good Friday 1964 an earthquake

measuring 9.1 on the Richter scale generated a

series of tsunamis, the largest wave crested at 35

feet (over 10 metres). (A plaque on a corner of

the police station marks the high water point and

notices throughout the city give instruction on what

to do in the event of a tsunami.)

Travel note # 4. A warning system alerts residents to

tsunami danger. If you hear an alarm, move to higher

ground at least 1000ft in elevation. Avoid beaches,

sea cliffs, and other exposed land forms.

In between these two natural disasters fell WWII

and during this time Kodiak was a major staging


area for the North Pacific operation. Military

population boomed with the construction of Fort

Greely, the Naval Air Force Base (now U.S.C.G. Base)

and bunkers and gun emplacements at Chiniak,

Long Island, and Fort Abercrombie.

All was peaceful the day we wandered around

the Park and Lake Gertrude. Salmon berries were

plentiful, Sitka spruce were laden with moss, Kodiak

Brown Bears stayed away (but I did have my whistle

in my hand) and our view of Mill Bay and the Pacific

Ocean, was uninterrupted. Although Kodiak Island

teems with marine mammals, we did not get to sight

any Stellar sea lions, sea otters, Dall’s porpoise or

migrating humpback whales.

Travel note #5. Avoid surprising bears at a close

distance; look for signs of bears and make plenty of

noise. Sing, talk loudly or tie a bell to your pack.

Paddling day arrived and at due time, a Subaru

loaded with two plastic kayaks pulled into the

drive and we were off - up Buskin River, past the

golf course, thru the Mountains over to the other

coast and Anton Larsen Bay, Trisha’s first pick for

a day paddle.

The official guide ‘Adventure on Alaska’s Emerald

Isle’ gave the stats. “Situated in the Gulf of Alaska,

the Kodiak Island Archipelago parallels the Katmai

Coast, along the Alaskan Peninsula for 177 miles

(284 km).

Sixteen major islands and many smaller ones

encompass nearly 5,000 square miles… At 3,588

square miles (that’s nearly 1 million ha) Kodiak

Island is the largest island in the group and the

second largest island in the U.S.” (Hawaii is the

largest.)

“Ten thousand years ago, most of the islands were

covered by glaciers that scored and carved the

landscape. Jagged peaks, fjord-like bays, and wide

U-shaped valleys were left by the glacial retreat.

Although vast in size, no point of land in the deeply

notched islands is more than 15 miles (24 km) from

the ocean.”

With all those indentations and islands a kayaker

is spoilt for choice, and it’s not many miles to get to

a put in, but the drive is not quick.

Travel note #6. Most roads are unpaved, improved

gravel suitable for ordinary vehicles. Ordinary in

Alaska seems to be 4WD.

Having snacked enroute we were on the water

by 12.30. Sitka spruce lined the Anton Larsen Bay,

cabins perched at waters edge, the stillness was

broken only by paddle blade dipping and salmon

jumping and skipping. There were oodles of sea

birds – gulls, terns and the comical puffin. They

must be the avian equivalent of the bumble bee

– aerodynamically challenged! They need a long

‘runway’ to get airborne, and once up, instead of

tidily tucking their webbed feet away, they splay

them behind. Then there’s the fancy dress costume:

two tone orange and red beak, a white face, black

collars and ‘Saturday Night Fever’ swept back hair

style. I thought they were hilarious. They didn’t

appear to be worried by my laughter; they bumbled,

Anton Larsen Bay, Sitka spruce dominates.

Tsunami warning signs.

Ian and 70 lb Halibut.

I S S U E T H I R T Y e i g h t • 2 0 0 6


fumbled, kissed even and dived under water using

their webbed feet for steering, searching for fish

and zooplankton.

We paddled on, out of the bay in perfect conditions,

calm seas, and sunny skies. We stopped on a rocky

beach for a boiled egg, orange and energy bar.

There were lots of fishing boats going past. Trisha’s

husband is a fisherman, and when ‘The fish are

running’ she and half the wives in Kodiak do not

see much of their husbands.

Kodiak is one of the top three fishing ports in

the U.S. and the Port of Kodiak is home to more

than 650 commercial fishing vessels. Commercial

fishing accounts for more than 50% of employment

throughout the Borough, with fish harvesting and

processing. Although salmon is the backbone of

the industry, Kodiak has Alaska’s most diversified

fishing fleet, harvesting salmon and bottom fish

(including the fabled Halibut), shellfish and even

sea cucumbers.

We continued on around to the east, towards

Spruce Island, bumping over giant bull kelp, with

buoy sized swollen bulbous floats at the end of

their strappy stalks which were as thick as my arms.

Even with the extended daylight hours, it was too

soon time to turn around. The rookeries on wee

islands were highly aromatic and at that time of the

day raucous! The distant mountains were dotted

with snow, and as the TV weather presenter put

it, there was still “Sunshine plentiful”. Hmmmm,

my idea of heaven.

And what was my husband Ian’s most memorable

Kodiak moment? Catching lots of fish! – his record

was a 22 lb King salmon and a 70 lb halibut – that’s

a fish about as big as a white water kayak and as

heavy as our luggage… I had spent two hours at

Portland’s REI store enroute and yes, we had to

buy another bag!

Kodiak fishing boats, Ian off to catch Halibut.

Paddling over giant bull kelp.

Lunch spot.

1 0 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7


a big reminder to all Yakity Yakers

Its hard to believe that nearly a year has passed since the last

Wellington Coastal Invaders Competition 2006 . March 3rd

2007 is the date set to test and challenge Yakity Yakers from

far and wide ( contact us to book your space) .Last year we

saw kayakers perform all sorts of weird and wonderful stunts

So easy, so enjoyable

for EVERYONE

and tricks. They come away with many hundreds of dollars

worth of prizes that were gratefully donated by many of our

suppliers to ensure that a fantastic day was had by all. The

local newspaper will be in attendance so come along and

become world famous in New Zealand .

ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007 11


wildlife encounter by Tony Barrett

The afternoon sun warmed the small group of kayakers as we

made our way along the southern side of Whanganui Island

in Coromandel Harbour. After a previous paddle where 20

knot winds created a lumpy and confused sea, everyone

was enjoying the serenity and relative ease of a calm water

paddle. It was one of those times where you paddle a few

strokes, glide, look around and enjoy the scenery, paddle a

few strokes….

We were close into the shoreline, looking at a tree much abused by the resident

shag population who were determined to defecate it out of existence. The

shags eyed us warily as we floated around them. Each paddler was lost in their

own thoughts, the music of tuis in the background and the lullaby of gentle

wavelets on the sandy shore.

Suddenly a yell disturbed the peace and attention turned to one of our party

flailing at the surface of the water, shrieking something unintelligible. This was

all the more disturbing as the particular paddler is normally very calm and

“laid back.” Such out of character behaviour required a serious explanation.

Everybody looked confused and wondered what was going on.

After a further flurry of the water being beaten into foam with the paddle, the

shaken paddler explained what had just taken place.

Gently floating along in shallow water he had passed over a dark shape on the

bottom. Quietly, he paddled backwards to have a better look. As he did so, the

dark shape reared up with a fast whip-lash action, and the unlucky paddler

immediately felt a stinging pain on his elbow.

Holding up his elbow to view we could all clearly see the tear in his paddle

jacket, a further tear in an inner layer of polypropylene, and a nasty crescent

shaped wound on his elbow. There was only one creature that could have

done this. It was a sting ray!

Two thoughts flashed through my mind. The first was, “how serious is this

wound?” After all, the Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin had died after being barbed

by a sting ray. Keeping a close eye on the paddler we were relieved to find no

ill effects other than the sting of the wound.

The second thought was, “No one is ever going to believe this!” The headline,

“Sting ray attacks kayaker” sounds like a great wind up. So – out came the

cameras. Our intrepid victim posed for a number of photographers eager to

capture some physical evidence of the event.

Since that time I have done a bit of research and learned that the creature

encountered was probably a short-tailed sting ray, New Zealand’s most common

ray. Don’t be fooled by the word ‘short’ in there! They can grow to a maximum

length of 4.3 metres and weigh over 200kg. Their barbs can be 30 cm long.

Fortunately, given their formidable size and fire power, they are normally

placid. The only recorded fatality from a sting ray in New Zealand was in 1938,

when an 18 year old female wading in the sea suffered a severe wound to the

chest from a sting ray and died of her injuries. However, there are numerous

accounts of swimmers, fishermen and even divers receiving wounds from sting

rays. It appears there is a common factor in these accounts. In all the cases I

read, the hapless victim was either looming over the sting ray, stepping on it,

or blocking its escape in some way.

This makes sense when considering what happened at Coromandel. The

sting ray was warming itself in the shallow water, peacefully minding its own

business, when it was suddenly overshadowed by a kayak, which – to make

matters worse - then returned to rest directly overhead. In a panic response

it had lashed out, striking the lowered elbow of the backward-paddling

kayaker.

1 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

Watching sting rays in the water from a kayak represents no danger to them

so it is unlikely any panic response would be provoked. It would be prudent

to avoid floating over them in shallow water, however as it may be perceived

as a threat and produce an aggressive reaction.

As for our paddler, he recovered with no ill effects. He also has the distinction

of being the only kayaker I have ever heard of who has been barbed by a sting

ray. Unfortunately I am sworn to secrecy as to his identity!


21st & 22nd april

oakura

taranaki

Waterborne

FREEDOM

Shearwater

A tried and true design just got better

• maJor spot priZes

• CluB team trophY

• Biggest fish priZes

• $1,000’s in priZe pool

Purchase your ticket before 1st April 2007

and be in the draw for the EARLy BIRD spot prize

Email your details to

tkfc-info@xtra.co.nz

and we will send you an entry form

Tui Excel

Penguin

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to submit the on-line entry form

Contact:

the organisers

po Box 4053, new plymouth

phone: 0274336485

A versatile, go anywhere kayak

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visit www.q-kayaks.co.nz or phone 06 326 8667

ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007 1


paddling in

Captain Cook’s wake

by Sahra Grinham, Wellington Yakity Yak Club

Trip to Outer Queen Charlotte Sound

1-3 December 2006

Exploring the outer bays of the Queen Charlotte Sound can’t

help but engender in the intrepid Yakity Yakker a real sense

of seafaring history and adventure. This is because the Outer

Sounds are rich in the wake of Captain Cook, who found what

is best described as a Paradise on earth here during his trips

to the area in the 1770s. The glorious coves, sheltered bays,

lush bush, rich birdlife and secluded islands remain today a

magical, relatively untouched part of the world and an ideal

place to explore by kayak.

A December weekend kayak trip was not what I had in mind with the impending

Christmas holiday season fast advancing. However with a ‘High’ forecast and

my partner’s hankering to launch his new Tasman Express on its maiden voyage,

we joined three other Wellington yakity yakkers and trip leader Andy Blake

in merrily wheeling our kayaks onto the 6.15pm Friday night Interislander. At

the Picton end a 40-minute charter boat ride up Queen Charlotte Sound to

what is known as the Outer Sounds (almost at Cook Strait!) deposited us and

kayaks in dead of night under a twinkling sky, at an excellent DOC campsite

on Blumine Island.

Intrepid Kayakers at Cannibal Cove

14 ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007

Aaaahhhhh ....

The glorious 5am Dawn Chorus the following day couldn’t keep any of us in bed

for too long and so began a fantastic sunny day’s paddle on glass around the

coastline of several islands en route to our evening camp destination across the

Sound at Cannibal Cove. This meandering paddle allowed time for a leisurely

fish (outside of the Marine Reserve zone around Long Island, of course) and

time to soak up the tranquility that the Sounds delivers on so well. The fish

catch yielded several under-sized Blue Cod that were dutifully returned to

the deep, but others with the correct dimensions were assigned to dinner. A

stop-over at the historic Moturoa Island - now a bird sanctuary but renowned

for where Cook first raised the Union Jack in 1770s – was well worth the climb

to the island’s summit. We soaked up the 360-degree panoramic views down

Queen Charlotte Sound and northwards across Cook Strait to Kapiti Island and

the North Island mainland.

A short paddle across to Cannibal Cove DOC campsite provided another good

overnight stopping place. Renowned for the massacre of Cook’s men, the

cove has a fresh water stream and the usual round up of neighbourhood bird

life – pairs of oystercatchers, wekas and Paradise Ducks kept us entertained.

‘Glowing’ after a hard day’s paddling, the fresh catch, lightly floured, seasoned

and cooked in a little oil, never tasted so good alongside the dehydrated

offerings!


Sunday dawned overcast with a stiff breeze and 1-metre swell – and needing

all the help I could get, I was pleased to have it behind us! A short paddle

around to Ship’s Cove gave us a brief look at yesteryear, and a salute to the

impressive memorial erected in 1913 to mark Captain Cook’s exploratory

journeys to New Zealand and in particular, the Sounds. It was on these trips

that Cook claimed and named many of the bays and waterways in the Sounds

on behalf of the British Monarchy, including; Endeavour Inlet, Resolution

Bay, Bay of Many Coves and Queen Charlotte Sound. Ship Cove provided a

sheltered and resourceful base for Cook on several of his trips to the area.

One could imagine looking around the now well-developed reserve, that his

crewmen sick from months at sea would’ve found this as heavenly then as it

is now, with the bush coming right down to the water’s edge and soaring high

above on the cliff-faces. Now the start/finishing point for the Queen Charlotte

Walkway, there are no camping facilities at Ship Cove but well developed picnic

and toilet facilities, and for those with an interest in history some informative

storyboards recall the area’s history. A fascinating old photo commemorating

the Memorial’s unveiling ceremony in 1913 shows a large crowd of dignitaries

decked out in their Sunday best – not unlike the sophisticated kayak gear we

arrived in nearly 100 years later!

Back on the water heading towards Bay of Many Coves, the swell was getting

choppy and nursing a few aches from the previous day’s outing, I accepted a

tow from Andy. If – like me – kayaking is a relatively new sport for you and

you’re still getting to grips with life at sea, Andy’s the reassuring leader you

want alongside to help you out in times of peril! My best attempts at trying to

keep directly behind him as much as possible while surfing on top of a wave

certainly took concentration particularly on the fast downward advance, so

as not to decapitate him!

However a lapse in concentration saw the inevitable happen – with me taking

a short swim in the briny followed a spectacular ‘Bridget Jones’ moment’. Like

flash lightning the ever capable Andy came to my rescue just as a smart speedboat

carrying half-a-dozen immaculately groomed tourists turned to circle us.

Simultaneously righting my kayak, Andy yelled at me to pull myself up across

both kayaks while proceeding to give

reassuring hand-signals (thumbs,

not fingers) to the ‘helpful’ speedboat

driver. Dutifully obeying his

instructions and with my backside

now pointing towards an audience,

I hesitated only momentarily as

my face rapidly approached the

seaweed-laiden collapsible craypot

strapped to the back deck of Andy’s

kayak. But with little choice, I got on

with the job in hand while thinking

that an expensive seaweed beauty

treatment will never be the same

again! Soon back in my yellow

submarine, we earned a round of

applause from the spectator craft. At the very least, my mishap had provided

a bit of entertainment on the water that day. The only consolation was that to

my knowledge no cameras were rolling!

Our destination that afternoon to meet our return boat pick-up back to Picton

was the lovely Gem Resort in Bay of Many Coves. While I enjoyed camping, this

is one place I’ve marked down to come back to for a bit of luxury in the future

– and a good base from which to do a few shorter day paddles. Loading the

kayaks onto the top of the Endeavour Express catamaran we all felt that there

was still lots to explore in the Outer Sounds that would definitely warrant a

trip that far again and for longer duration next time. Worth the journey, not

only for the opportunity to soak up the relative seclusion and birdlife of the

bays and islands, but also to ponder the courage, determination and spirit of

explorers such as Cook who were not sporting wetsuits, carbon-fibre paddles

or sophisticated GPS’s to assist them with exploring this piece of Paradise.

all photos here taken by russell pilcher

Pouwhenua: The Famous Five Go Kayaking (plus, Andy Blake!). Wellington

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 1


surfs up!

Hi all, before I start absolutely RAVING about how cool

surfing on a kayak is, we need to go back to set the scene of

how I once felt about waves and the power they have when

you’re sitting on a kayak and they’re coming at you at the

speed of light! Well, that’s how it used to seem…

As a lot of people know, I’m a fisherman through and through, I take my Cobra

‘Fish ‘n’ Dive’ out all the time. The problem was was that for 3 years I did not

venture out to sea for the sake, no....FEAR, of being completely obliterated by

huge one-foot waves?! I mean geepers, what if I fell out! If I wanted to fish the

outside, I would paddle around Mt Maunganui to fish behind Rabbit island

which is about a 6km paddle one way whereas Rabbit Island is 400m straight

off the main beach! you do the math! Now, I consider myself to be a pretty

good chap with a good head on my shoulders but then I have my dumb points.

Welcome all to one of them!

So I fished the harbour for 3 long years and got a little tired of kahawai, undersized

snapper and paddling against the current so one day I told Steve at Canoe

and Kayak Mt Maunganui about my dilemma. That’s when he said, “ Nath, we’re

gonna beat that fear, we’re going out in the surf tonight!”

And I looked at him, and I froze, right then and there!

We headed down to the beach and I asked Steve about 27 times if I was going

to be ok. The first few times he replied very seriously, “yes Nath, you will be

fine”. After asking about the 20th time he was up to the ‘laughing profusely’

stage which I guessed meant I’d asked one too many times!

So, we hit the beach with our good old ‘Flow’ kayak which just so happens to be

an absolute beauty in the surf! you can drive it like it’s a 1976 Hillman Hunter if

you want to or you can take the beast by the reins like it’s a BMW Z4 convertible

on steroids with power steering and flames billowing out from the twin

exhausts! Woohoo! Sorry, carried away in the moment, surfing does that.

Steve gave me a basic lesson on the beach about where to catch the wave (and

where not to), what the kayak might do once on the wave and how to control

the kayak on the wave and stay on it. Hopefully.

I headed out and caught the first wave back in and oh man, was it fun. It was

like a movie in slow motion, everything just seemed to stop while I was on

1 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

that wave, everything so quiet and yet the adrenalin was racing. So much so

that I’d forgotten absolutely everything Steve had told me on the beach. The

kayak started to turn. I could feel the look on my face turn from a big smile to

an anticipated look of ‘whatever happens next isn’t going to be good, I just

know this!’ Come on people, you know the look. Like when you come around

a corner and there’s your dog standing there with your favourite Nike sneaker

in its mouth and you just know what happens next!

So I had that look, and then the slow motion starting speeding up and that

was it. Off I came. The monster 2-foot wave had claimed me. However, I came

out of the water, so Steve tells me, with the biggest smile since….oh, I’d better

say it, since meeting my lady. (Use that line guys, you’ll get dinner cooked for

a week!)

Steve and I hit the waves for around 2 hours that night, it was the most fun I

think I’ve ever had. I once asked a board surfer what it was like to surf and he

replied “Mate, you can’t explain it, it’s just a different world on the waves”. I

think now I know what that fellow meant. I could talk all day about the thrill

and excitement that kayak surfing can give you, but instead, I wont, I will merely

say give it a go and you’ll see for yourself. It really is great fun.

Since kayaking the mighty Flow on 2-foot waves, I’ve stepped up to the Cobra

‘Strike’, a more manoeuvrable kayak with a little more practice required to stay

on it, but once you’re on it, it’s ALIVE! It can surf on an angle down the face of

a wave and then you can cut it back and surf the other direction. It turns on

a dime which is ideal for setting yourself up for a wave that you may want to

catch at the last minute.

On all surfing kayaks, there a few aids to help in all the fun but a must is to

have a set of thigh straps and a good idea of how to execute a ‘low brace’ if

the kayak should broach whilst on the wave. I remember I caught a wave over

2metres high out by Rabbit Island and it broke when I was side on! Now that’s

a big wave to break on anyone when they’re side on but I didn’t have time to

straighten on this particular day. I low braced and was pushed sideways all

the way into the beach which must have looked completely stupid and out

of control to the swimmers. The Strike can actually be straightened up once

broaching but I thought I’d test my low brace. For 400 metres!

We now have a group of around 20 people who come out when the surf is up


and they range from kayak fisherman, sea kayakers, surf kayakers and white

water paddlers. The group watches out for everyone and we have more fun

than you can poke a paddle at.

The irony of this story though is that I just want the waves to get bigger and

don’t tend to bother with the 2 footers now. Quite a change from the ‘old’ me.

It has been amazing for my self-confidence and has been an incredible way

to meet new friends. I strongly recommend, with a ‘buddy’ on the water, that

you give it a go!

And don’t forget, talk to your local Canoe and Kayak outlet for a few hints and

tips in this field, I’m certain they can help.

Tight lines and huge surf.

Nath. photos by norm gilbert

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 1 7


great Barrier island

- Circumnavigation

Kayak round Great Barrier the week before Christmas – what

better way to avoid the rush. Plans were originally for a trip

along the Coromandel coast but an evening with Adventure

Philosophy’s Mark talking on South Georgia changed the

plans. My son Tim (17) and his cousin Luke (17) had year 12

exams to get out of the way so not much time for practice runs.

The SEALINK ferry leaves Auckland at 5.00 pm on Friday and

our plans were to catch the ferry back from Port Fitzroy on

the Tuesday. A helpful friend dropped us through the rush

traffic. Kayaks carried on board and we were on our way. Our

split paddle was unfinished but some help from Canoe and

Kayak Manukau, epoxy and the 4 ½ hour ferry allowed the

essential equipment to be finalised. Dumped on the wharf

at Typhena on the South West tip of the island in the dark,

Campsite near Miners Head, waiting for wet gear to dry before starting the day.

1 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

by John Reeves

kayaks secured, we walked the 15 minutes to Stray Possum

Lodge for the night. You need a head lamp as Great Barrier

has no electricity other than generator or solar. The island

bird life is very impressive. Just at the side of the road we

saw kaka, kereru, brown teal, moorpork and tui.

Forecast was good, less than 10 knots and 0.5 swells. Great Barrier has a manned

(actually a female) VHF radio station. We put in a ‘trip plan’ each morning as cell

phone coverage was patchy. Ooops, on the beach but no fresh water. Not like a

river trip, finding fresh water required some planning. All the DOC campsites

have fresh water that we purified with tablets. A friendly boatie topped our

drink systems and finally we were off. After an hour we were rounding the

southern tip of Cape Barrier in perfect conditions. The teenagers explored any

interesting caves or narrow gaps in the rocks. I tried the fishing but no luck. We

needed to achieve about 30km each day, split into three sessions of about 2

hrs. Late lunch on Kaitoke Beach, beautiful white sand for 4 kilometres. Had a

swim here and I had a second one relaunching. Topped up the water systems

at Awana Bay, seeing dolphins nearby.


Forecast NW rising to 15 knots but then dropping again. Sheltered paddling

inside Arid Island to Whangapoua Beach. There is a large lagoon here and the

bar was good for surfing the kayaks. Lunch on the beach then 2 hr slog into

the head wind to a small cove at the top of the island. The North Western top

of the island has high bluffs and no landing spots for 8 km. A narrow gap in

the rocks and tunnel gave access to the western coast. Rough conditions in

swell rebounding off the bluffs made for tricky paddling for a couple of hours.

Landed on the first beach south of Miners Head for the night. The eastern

beaches on Great Barrier are free from rubbish but the western beaches are

littered with plastic. Useful additions to the camping gear were found, clothes

pegs, buckets, beach balls, rope and plastic trays. Strange how the 3 man tent

gets smaller each night. It rained overnight but was clear and calm. No VHF

coverage so we paddled for an hour and called in the report. Tim’s back and

hand were hurting so he swapped to a lightweight wing paddle, which seemed

to help. Flat calm conditions allowed time to work on paddling technique as

we hopped from headland to headland down the western shore. We stopped

at Cliff Island for lunch and found an abandoned campsite at the top. Amazing

views here but no water. Some sprint sessions seemed to prove that weight

and kayak length make a big difference. How come I was allocated all the

communal equipment?

Last day dawned wet and calm. Having passed port Fitzroy we needed to

catch the freight ferry by midday at Tryphena for the trip to be complete.

Dolphins in the bay slowed us up for a while but then reluctantly we set off

for the last 10km.

This was a great trip and worth the 4 days of dried food. The freight ferry stops

in Fitzroy to discharge cargo allowing time for a hamburger and chips at the

wharf burger bar. This coast is obviously very subject to weather conditions

except in the more sheltered Port Fitzroy area. Full emergency equipment

is essential. Thanks Tim and Luke for a great trip. Luke paddled a Tui, Tim a

Sequel and John an Ecobezhig.

Calm conditions Tim goes looking for white water

Award Scheme

The NZKI Award Scheme was formed in response to a

growing need in the Kayaking Industry to have more

people with Kayaking qualifications, to encourage more

kayakers towards expanding their skills and knowledge

and to continue to increase the safety of our sport.

The NZKI Award Scheme is structured around the

assessment of skills and knowledge that are required for

the type of activity to be undertaken by the Instructor

or Guide.

A star is awarded for each level achieved, starting off

with the NZKI One Star for personal paddling skills and

knowledge and moving up to the NZKI Five Star for

an Assessor.

For more information phone 0508 5292569

www.nzki.co.nz

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 1


waiheke island, labour weekend

10k’s out of New Plymouth, 5 of us in

the van with trailer in tow, finally on

our way to a much anticipated 3-day

paddle around Waiheke Island, and my

cellphone rings - it’s Bronnie from Canoe

& Kayak: “You forgot Kylie!” “What!

Anyone know Kylie was coming?” Blank

faces. Anyway, turn around, back to the

shop, pickup Kylie & gear, out to Waitara

for another pickup (“we’ll squeeze this

gear in somewhere”) and finally on our

way again by 5.30. Not a great start, but

the rest of the trip to Auckland went

smoothly, finally arriving at Omana

Beach (Maraetai) around 10:30p.m.

Through all the padlocked gates, we

found the other van and familiar tents,

pulled out the tents & gear, and got as

much sleep as possible before an early

start Saturday morning.

Wake-up call was sometime around 6am (or was

it 5:30??), quick breakfast, down tents & pack-up

gear. Both vans and 1 car had to catch the ferry to

Waiheke Island by 8am. The drivers, with a few

others who had decided not to paddle, headed off

with their boats on the trailer, while the rest of us

started hauling our kayaks down the short track to

Kelly’s beach. And the big question - what was the

weather like for our 7km open-water crossing to the

island? Something quite new to many of us - fog!

The sea was so smooth, the only waves confronting

us were from a few passing boats, which were going

very slowly anyway because of the conditions.

Compasses out, flags up (those who had them), set a

bearing of 350°, and headed off into the mist. I soon

realised how easy it would be to go around in circles

without a compass with no land in sight. Landfall

was made after an hour or so, and we headed past

Putiki Bay, Kennedy Point and over to Backpool

Beach. Here we met up with the rest of the group,

along with Jenny and Ross who had come over the

day before, making 18 kayaks in total.

The fog had lifted by this time, so it was a nice

easy paddle around the western end of the island.

One particular bay Joanna won't forget in a hurry.

Paddling in a group, just off the beach, suddenly a

large seal came up from nowhere and pushed its

nose onto the deck of her kayak. Over went Joanna

and it was time for a rescue. Now what a photo that

would have been! We stopped at a lovely beach

for lunch soon after Te Miro, I think, to get a bit of

circulation back into the old backsides!

by Mark Robbins

0 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

Carrying on around the bays, the weather stayed

kind to us. A slight chop and light winds. We

dashed across Matiatia Bay between the ferries

and other launches, and then enjoyed the paddle

around the rocky coastline to Oneroa Bay. Brendon,

as usual, led the way, sniffing out every nook and

cranny, looking for a cave or gap in the rocks to

sneak through (plenty of those!). Fortunately

there is no surf at the beach to speak of. So we

all made a safe landing and took a well earned

break, most of us having been on the water for 6

hours or so. Originally, the plan was for the drivers

to walk the fairly short distance over the island

back to Blackpool Beach, drive the two vans back

to Oneroa, load up all the kayaks and head to the

camp at Rocky Bay. The suggestion was made to

carry on to Onetangi, another 6km or so. So it was

back on the water for about 10 paddlers, paddling

on to Onetangi, where the vans picked us up. The

wind was getting up by this time, making the last

paddle into the bay a bit more of a challenge to

finish the day.

Even the road trip back wasn't uneventful, with

top navigators in van 2 driving straight past van 1

waiting at the signposted turn-off to Whakanewha

Bay reserve. So van 1 duly followed van 2,

assuming they knew where they are going, only to

be led on a sight-seeing drive around some very

narrow and tight bends of the Omiha residential

area, before eventually returning to the turnoff.

Anyway, we made it to a very nice camping

area, set up tents and Jenny’s gazebo, the latter

becoming the dining room. It has mesh all around

and proved invaluable as there is no large shelter

at the reserve - thanks Jenny.

Tea was the usual very social affair, with a huge pot

of Ken’s best mince and boiled rice (or was that the

next night?), plenty of wine, beer and even dessert!

We even had fresh Kahawai, thanks to Jamie and

Peter H. We were quite spoilt as all our gear and

food had stayed in the vehicles and we were not

restricted to what we could carry in the boats.

Sunday morning was another fine day, so we took

our day supplies and headed back to Onetangi Bay.

We managed to squeeze the vans & trailers onto

the narrow grass verge without totally blocking the

road, unloaded and set off in a NE direction around

the coast. Those who thought the conditions might

be a bit challenging or were carrying injuries went

into town for a coffee, and eventually over to Man

o’ War Bay on the east side of the island. Here they

launched their boats and headed back around the

island, past Pakatoa Island, to meet us.

Meantime, the main group was met with a steady

northerly breeze and chop of 1/2 m or so, but little

swell. Although these conditions were at times,

significantly more challenging than the previous

day, we all coped really well and it was great

experience for the newer paddlers.

There are plenty of rocks and even a few good caves

to go exploring around. Given some good weather,

this is a marvellous piece of coastline to paddle

around, especially if you keep right in amongst the

rocks and take a few chances!

After our first break, Peter picked up a warning on

his vhf radio of a possible squall approaching. It

built up a bit of anticipation amongst the group!

Fortunately it never eventuated, and we made it

to Thumb Point without any significant change in

weather conditions (just a bit windier). The call

came from Peter – “who’s coming out to that island

with me?” So the majority of the group headed off

straight into a 10 knot wind and 1m swell to visit

the gannets on Horohoro Rock. Those big white


patches visible from Waiheke turned out to be 100’s

of nesting gannets.

Lunch was in the shelter of Hooks Bay, after

which we headed off around the eastern end of

the island. We explored nearly every nook and

cranny around this coast and eventually met up

with the other group north of Pakatoa Island.

What a difference it was coming around that last

point - from a rocky, wilderness-like coast with a

following swell, to calm waters with large motor

launches, yachts and civilization all around us.

From here it was a long open paddle to Man o’

War Bay, and load the boats onto the trailers. Time

was getting on, but we wanted to visit Stony Batter

on the way back. This is a once secret military site

on the hills at the eastern end of the island. Built

just prior to WWII, it is one of two defensive gun

emplacements intended to protect Auckland and

the Hauraki Gulf from Japanese invasion. The other

site is on the mainland, north of Auckland. Stony

Batter consisted essentially of three huge cannons,

set well down into the ground, with an incredible

underground network of concrete-lined tunnels

and rooms for communication and supply. We were

very fortunate, despite turning up at closing time, to

get a full tour of the tunnels open to the public - a

fascinating experience, and one not to be missed

if you have the chance (despite us having to walk

back along the track in the pouring rain!). The story

behind the restoration is almost as interesting as

the story of its construction.

We had plenty more rain during the night, and

Sunday morning was very wet and quite windy. The

aim was to get to the sandbank at Te Matuka bay on

the SE corner of Waiheke Island, so we transported

the short distance to Woodside Bay and paddled

from there. It was certainly quite windy (from

north) and choppy going across some of those

bays, but a good physical challenge for us all. The

sandbar itself was decidedly unspectacular, but

it made a good destination. Heading back across

the bay was great - finally a tail wind! But it was too

good to last. The wind seemed to swing around

to the NW and the remainder of the bays meant

more battling into head and cross winds, with

some showers thrown in for luck! Fortunately we

all made it back to Woodside Bay safely - cold, wet

and exhausted, but all quite glad of the experience

and the added confidence that gives.

Still raining, we loaded up the kayaks and headed

back to camp. We had an hour or so to finish

packing up and get to the car ferry on Kennedy

Point. At the terminal we had to back each van

& trailer on to the ferry, keeping to the left of

the painted line on one side & not hitting any

vehicles on the other. Not a task I want to repeat

for quite a while! The trip back to the mainland

was uneventful but relaxing, even with the odd

swell. At Halfmoon Bay we re-organized vehicles,

and headed home. We eventually made it to the

motorway (in the pouring rain!) with only one

detour - navigator Brendon leading both vans on

a short tour of an enclave where a few of the more

well-off Aucklanders live!

Dinner stop at Wheels (Te Kuiti) , then on to New

Plymouth and drop everyone off. All-in-all, a most

successful trip, and one I’m sure, all who were

lucky enough to be part of, will never forget. A big

thanks to Peter & Bronnie for the great organization,

commiserations to Bronnie who drew the short

straw & had to stay behind! and everyone else

who helped out.

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 1


somes island By Nick Baty

I got a call from my good mate, and kayaking buddy Cameron

on the morning of Wednesday, 3rd January, with the words

all dedicated kayakers long to hear: “I’m calling the shop

(Wellington’s Canoe and Kayak Centre) to see if we can get

a paddle organized for tomorrow night after work. Are you

keen?” My response was, “Does the sun rise each morning?”

So after a few hurried e-mails and calls between the shop,

me and other Wellington Yakity Yak members, it all seemed

sorted.

We were very lucky with the weather for this trip. Up until the day before

Wellington had been having gale-force freezing southerly winds and rain for

about a week. Thursday dawned clear, fine, hot, and with less than 10 knots of

wind. Frankly, I really wasn’t interested in work that day; rather, I was thinking

of the paddle we were going to have after work that night.

Lo and behold, when we arrived at the shop, it seemed our idea had generated

more interest than we anticipated - Andy presented a list of all who were

coming - and the associated kayaks they needed to be loaded on the trailer

to be brought down to the Petone Wharf. Andy’s smile seemed to say, “Be

careful what you wish for when organizing a kayaking trip”. We eventually got

the kayaks loaded and all traipsed down to Petone Wharf and proceeded to

gather a small crowd of onlookers who must have thought a bunch of seals had

escaped from the aquarium. They watched as we all zipped into our wetsuits

and prepared our kayaks for the trip.

We duly set off at about 6:15pm, after a trip safety briefing. Our intention was

to carry out a passage to, and a circumnavigation of, Somes (Motiu) Island,

which lies in the middle of Wellington harbour. Andy began by undertaking

his customary roll, just to make sure everything was good and wet. We slowly

dawdled out to Somes, which gave us an opportunity to take in the coastline,

and land/cityscape that is Wellington. It really brought home to us how different

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

(and better) everything looks from a kayak, and how therapeutic kayaking can

be. The two fibreglass boats zipped in and out of the fleet, while the other

kayaks congregated around the doubles.

We reached Somes Island after around 20 minutes, and all pulled up on shore

for some pineapple lumps, and the contents of many thermoses. After relaxing

there for a period, we circumnavigated Somes Island. As Somes Island is a DoC

wildlife reserve and kayaks are so quiet (apart from their occupants), we were

able to observe the island’s inhabitants without disturbing them - this included

Andy finding a penguin in a cave down on the water line, which he was able to

paddle right up to. Probably the highlight of the trip was fish leaping out of the

water around our little kayak flotilla. The water seemed to boil with the number

of fish jumping. It was absolutely amazing to watch. Cameron complained the

fish were taunting him, as this trip was the one time he had left his fishing rod

at home thinking he was not going to need it. As an alternative, he suggested

‘kawhai cricket’ with kayak paddles. Perhaps attempting to flip the fish out of

the water with a paddle could catch on as a new fishing method?

As we rounded Somes and began our paddle home, the sun set over the back

of Wellington City. The whole harbour and city were bathed in soft pink and

orange light. The best thing about this effect was when I looked ahead all I could

see was a bunch of kayaks silhouetted black by the setting sun, a perfect picture

of man in harmonisation with nature. On the way back a slight chop grew from

a gentle northerly, which made a trip back a bit more fun.

Several attempts were also made on our trip home to prove that a double

kayak is always faster than a single- although in this case, the double was

a plastic boat, and the single was a fibreglass multi-sport boat. Needless to

say, the ‘races’ were fairly even. When we got back to shore around 9:15pm,

the sun finally disappeared below the horizon, so we timed it just right. After

pitching in to help load the kayaks back on the trailer again, we all agreed the

evening’s paddle was a fine way to begin 2007, and an excellent way to spend

a summer’s evening- kayaking out with friends.


Sea-kayak Fiji’s wild side: Kadavu Island

Each day of the week a 45-minute flight connects Fiji’s Nadi

International Airport with remote Kadavu Island. Once

there, travellers find an environment quite unlike most other

tourist destinations throughout the Pacific.

No large resorts, golf courses, restaurants or nightclubs; no jet ski’s or busy boat

lanes; no large towns or paved roads; not even a single swimming pool!

What Kadavu Island offers is simple, natural Pacific beauty.

Kadavu (pronounced: Kan-da-vu) is surrounded by the Great Astrolabe Reef ,

one of the largest coral reefs in the world. Within the reef lie many uninhabited

islets, lagoons, bays and beaches. The main island is mountainous, and still

with 75% of the original rainforest cover intact.

A small number of eco-lodges and dive resorts provide accommodation and

scuba-diving packages for travellers from around the world.

It’s in this pristine environment that

New Zealand adventure travel company

Tamarillo Tropical Expeditions leads

sea-kayaking tours. Expedition options

range from leisurely 5-day resort-toresort

adventures, to challenging 10-day

circumnavigations of the entire island.

As well as sea-kayaking, Tamarillo Tropical

Expeditions include snorkelling in marine

reserves, visits and overnight stays in small

resorts and traditional villages, treks to

waterfalls within the rainforest, and time to

relax on quiet, undeveloped beaches.

Discounts apply to the following departures:

April 9-13; April 15-21; April 22-28; April

27-May 3.

A short movie outlining the expeditions

can be viewed at: www.tamarillo.co.nz/fiji


For full details see: www.tamarillo.co.nz

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 2 3


24 hours. 100-150

kilometres. $5000

by Liz Smith

4 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

“What an incredibly awesome

day” I remember thinking that

evening as I sat on my deck

sipping a cold beer….

I had just completed my first day on the sea

kayaking skills course run by Andy through

Wellington Canoe and Kayak, and I was hooked!

Gidday, I’m Liz Smith, and 6 months ago I discovered

sea kayaking. Now I’m a hugely passionate paddler,

out on the water every chance I get. I’m a yakity

yak member of the super fun and active club in

Wellington, and thoroughly enjoy their trips and

events. Now I’ve taken my passion for this sport to

a new level, all in aid of a good cause.

On February 17-18th I sea kayaked 24 hours

through the day and night to raise money for

the CANCER SOCIETy. Covering a distance of

approximately 150km. That is equivalent to 3 1/2

marathons or 5 times across the Cook Strait. This

wasn’t an event; it is something I decided to do to

raise money for cancer research, in memory of my

mother who passed away from this illness when

I was 9 years old.

I completed this challenge in Porirua Harbour, 20km

north of Wellington. Starting at 4pm, I excitedly

jumped into my kayak and started weaving my way

around the harbour, contemplating the 24 hours that

lie ahead. I had a support crew based at the boat club

right on the water’s edge, and much to my delight

yakity yak club members and friends came out to

join me paddling throughout the day (along with a

few super keen ones at night!) I stopped for a few

minutes every 3 to 4 hours to have that much needed

loo stop, regain some circulation and replenish my

food supplies.

The support I have received has been amazing, to

date I have raised $6375, and every day that figure

grows. I have had fantastic support from local

businesses donating items for auctions and raffles,

and was absolutely blown out the water when Jim

at Canoe and Kayak here in Wellington donated a

brand new Shearwater sea kayak for me to use for

the 24 hour paddle then to auction it off afterwards

“Thanks a million Jim – you’re a legend”

i even had sir edmund hillary onboard - he

gave me a signed $5 notes to auction.

Training was a lot of fun, even in the challenging

days of “Wellington winds gusting to 40 knots” I

saw stingrays, a penguin, friendly fish – they could

sense I had no rod! starfish, and even a shark!

(yes, I did have to change my undies after that one

– even though he was only a baby).

Congratulations Liz on completing your personal

challenge. Help support Liz to raise funds for the

Cancer Society.

Make a donation or check out more information

go to: http://www.fundraiseonline.co.nz/

24houroceanpaddle


a paddle with the school

December 2006

Governors Bay is a mere fifteen minute

drive over the Port Hills from the

garden city of Christchurch but it feels

like a rural heaven a million miles

away.

A regular event on the Governors Bay

School calendar is the yachting and

kayaking day at Charteris Bay Yacht

Club.

We were very fortunate with the weather. After a

decidedly shaky start, summer had finally arrived

with a calm day and predicted temperatures in the

mid to high 20’s. Just after nine, the kids waved

goodbye to lessons, and parents and teachers

headed off in various forms of transport on the

15 minute drive round the bay towards Diamond

Harbour.

Charteris Bay is ideal for learners, nestled and

protected as it is at the southern end of Lyttelton

Harbour (Whakaraupo).

I was in charge of the kayakers, while other

volunteers and teachers taught sailing, rowing

and survival skills.

It’s mid-morning and I sit in my Tui, gently bobbing

on the slight swell as the first group of eight enters

the water via the wooden slipway. We paddle

towards the beach about 200 metres away.

The skill and experience levels varied between the

kids so I just start from scratch with basic paddling,

emphasizing the importance of holding the paddle

in the middle, shoulder width apart, having them

practise in the air and then watching the blade all

the way into the water.

We’re paddling across the flooded bowl of an

extinct volcano which blew its top, geologists tell

us, 12 million years ago in the Miocene, forming

Lyttelton and Akaroa Harbours.

On the beach we practise getting in and out of our

kayaks, then it’s back on the water to raft up. The

next bit is always good for a laugh. We get the two

kids on the outside of our raft crawling across the

cockpits to swap kayaks. I try to emphasize the

trust element, where the kids crossing the raft have

to trust the others forming the raft to keep it steady

for them. This results in some hilarious moments

and inevitably a dip in the sea for one girl, who

after a bit of a struggle is soon back smiling in

her cockpit.

We then have a couple of races around a buoy

and back, swapping the slower kayaks over. We

have two ‘dancers’ best suited for rivers and it’s

interesting to note how much better the one fitted

with a skeg behaves.

I look back towards the yacht club and see the

collection of two metre

Optimists, with their

multi-coloured sails

bright in the sunshine.

T h e r e s c u e b o a t ,

supplied by parents

circles them, ready to

nip in if required.

On the end of the jetty,

the survival class is

taking place. Kids in

a rubber dinghy very

reluctantly capsize

themselves then swim

together as a group

with their lifejackets on

towards a float which represents a rescue boat.

Another parent kindly provided their boat, which

they used to ferry groups out towards Quail Island

for a close up look at a pod of Hectors dolphins

with some young ones among them, these proved

very popular with the kids. A rumour goes round

that a large manta ray has been spotted causes a

stir of excitement.

After a quick bite of lunch I’m back on the water

with an older group practising a few basic turning

maneuvers, and playing ball tag with a water polo

ball. I ask the kids not to be over zealous with

their throw or they’d lose balance and end up in

the drink.

We also have the use of an old fashioned looking

cutter lent to us from Lyttelton Sea Scouts. It passes

by now, the kids rowing in time like little galley

slaves.

The afternoon wears on. There’s a Norwester

blowing and it’s thirsty work.

It usually gets a bit choppier in the afternoon on the

harbour and today is no exception. So it’s no great

surprise when a boy in our final group capsizes on

by George Lockyer

the way to the beach. Because we never use spray

skirts, as Eskimo rolling would be far too advanced

for the kids, he slid out of the cockpit easily. The

lad finds it amusing and assures me we don’t need

the rescue boat. So I get him to clip my line onto

his upturned kayak, put his paddle over mine and

he swims beside me as we slowly make our way

to the beach. His mates are waiting to give him a

hard time! We all paddle back and after a drink we

watch the kids squealing and yelling with glee as

they indulge in their favourite activity of the day

– jetty jumping.

We load up and head back to school, tired little

vegemites.

We all consider ourselves very fortunate to live in

such a wonderful part of Aotearoa. The yachting

and kayaking day would not be possible without

the help of all the parents who volunteer their

assistance or the teachers of Governors Bay School

who help to give our kids such a good start in

life. Finally many thanks to the club Commodore

Alister Rowlands for allowing the school to use its

excellent facilities. We all look forward to our next

day on the water.

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7


many of the articles you are reading in this magazine are about trips

organized by the Yakity Yak Club.

interested in Joining up?

Well read on and get involved

“Too old” you say or “not fit enough” or “don’t like clubs because of the working

bees and committee meetings”. Well guess what, our oldest member is 80 plus

and started paddling in the last two years. Can you walk? well then you can

paddle, in fact that’s not correct we have had members with a missing leg or

two, but you get the picture. The only committee meetings we have are a wine

and cheese evening once a month to arrange trips. There are no secretaries or

north shore

Unit 2/20 Constellation Drive

(off Ascension Place),

Mairangi Bay, Auckland

phone: 09 479 1002

auCklanD

502 Sandringham Rd

Sandringham

phone: 09 815 2073

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

New Zealand’s Best Kept Secret

the Yakity Yak

silVerDale

DISTRIBUTION CENTRE

6 Tavern Road, Silverdale

phone: 09 421 0662

treasurers. We just discuss where to go next and who is coming. These trips are

viewed on www.canoeandkayak.co.nz and booked at your local Canoe & Kayak

Centre

Join the club. you will get a weekend skills course to teach you techniques and

safety skills and a year’s membership. If you are keen to learn more there is a bunch

of courses to teach everything from Eskimo Rolling to becoming an instructor. At

no cost is the Leader’s Training Course, ten weeks part time for those who have

the urge to put something back into the club.

So what does joining the club cost? Only $299 for the first year including the

weekend course and then only $45 per subsequent year thereafter.

manukau

710 Great South Road,

Manukau

phone: 09 262 0209

waikato

The corner Greenwood St &

Duke St, State Highway 1 Bypass

Hamilton

phone: 07 847 5565

For up coming yakity yak trips


kayak Club

Now you say “They must charge for each club trip”. My friend you would be

wrong. There is no participation charge for club trips.

The yakity yak Kayak Club was set up by a bunch of enthusiastic instructors.

After spending much time teaching people how to paddle we found a few

months later that they had not carried on with paddling. They said there was

no one to paddle with, or they were a bit shy, or they did not have a boat, or

they lacked confidence to go on trips where they did not know the area or

the people.

So we said enough is enough and the yakity yak Kayak Club was formed.

We cannot guarantee you will get on like a house on fire with every club member

BaY of plentY

3/5 Mac Donald Street

Mount Maunganui (off Hewletts Rd)

phone: 07 574 7415

Proudly Supported by Your Local

taupo

77 Spa Road,

Taupo

phone: 07 378 1003

but we know you will find a bunch of like minded mates to enjoy our wonderful

little paddling paradise.

So get on the phone to one of the Canoe & Kayak Centres (see advert on the back

page) and join the yakity yak Kayak Club. you will be welcome.

Welcome aboard

Peter Townend

One of the founding yakers

hawke’s BaY

15 Niven Street

Onekawa, Napier

phone: 06 842 1305

taranaki

Unit 6, 631 Devon Road

Waiwhakaiho, New Plymouth

phone: 06 769 5506

see www.canoeandkayak.co.nz

Join now!

phone

0508 5292569

wellington

2 Centennial Highway

Ngauranga, Wellington

phone: 04 477 6911

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 7


Kayaking the

Pelorus by Darren Ashmore

Jenny and I joined KR and Mary who were camped at Pelorus Bridge,

just out of Havelock, for the weekend even though the forecast was

not good. Things did not get off to a good start. We were supposed

to be heading out on Friday evening but a thunder storm put Jenny

off and we postponed our departure until Saturday morning. Time

to pack the camper. Bugger a flat tyre. This delayed things further

but we finally got under way and arrived up at Pelorus Bridge

camp ground about 10am. Set up camp next to KR and had a cuppa

and discussed the idea of a trip down river to Daltons Bridge. I

estimated that the journey should take us about an hour and the

girls could pick us up at the bridge. This was to be the first time that

KR had experienced running rapids so he was understandably a bit

apprehensive. I assured him that they were only small rapids, not

too fast and nothing too scary. Some would be very shallow and he

may get stuck.

I had not been down this stretch of the river but there was not a big flow and

from the bits I had seen from the road on the way up it was going to be a nice

paddle for a novice. The only down side was that it looked like it was going to

clagg in and rain.

However, we drove to the riverside and geared up, with a heap of advice from

the ladies, and started our journey from a very pretty little pool with clear clean

water. This was easy with a gentle current gliding us down to our first rapid. We

slipped over this like a couple of professionals. “Hey” says KR with a huge smile,

“that was great”. This was the first of quite a number that were just big enough to

give us a buzz. Then we struck a real shallow rapid. I managed to slip over it ok

and then turned round and paddled back up to take a photo of KR stuck fast in

the shallows. He was using his hands to push himself along. For some strange

reason he called me rude names after I had given him a bit of good advice. I only

suggested that most people use the paddles to propel a kayak etc.

Once unstuck we continued with our very pleasant and picturesque voyage. We

saw the girls drive by to the pickup point and 15 minutes later we joined them. I

was only just over ten minutes longer than I estimated the journey would take.

We landed on a beach just above Daltons Bridge and were going to pull the boats

out there. But the girls were on the bridge waving us to continue on down. We

did this and they told us that there was a small beach where we could get out.

“A few blackberries to fight through but it was not bad” they said.

Well the beach sure was small. A wee muddy bank dropped off into a hole we

could not see the bottom off. KR said “I’ll never get out there”. “Sure you can”

I said. “Just follow my lead, one day you may need to know how to do this”. So

I pulled alongside, slid my butt out on to the bank and climbed up, no trouble.

Hooked out the kayak and passed it up to the girls. We then got KR alongside and

Designers & Constructors of Multisport

& Adventure Racing Kayaks

Phone/Fax 06 374 6222

E-mail:- mike@ruahinekayaks.co.nz

Website:-www.ruahinekayaks.com

2 8 I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7

he got ashore without much of a struggle. Another achievement for the day.

Then came the blackberries. This was a bit of a battle and I believe that next time

we will definitely use the large shingle beach above the bridge and carry the

kayaks through an easy grassy paddock. Still it all added to the adventure.

The trip took about an hour and a half all up. When time allows we will explore

further downstream.

So it was back to camp for a glass of red wine, a few tall stories and a very mellow

evening.

Sunday morning. It was drizzling so we started the day with a brisk stroll up to

the waterfalls and back. This filled in an hour or so. Coffee break at Pelorus Café,

which has delicious pies, cakes etc and promptly put back all the calories that

we had just shed.

From here KR and I decided to put the kayaks in where we started yesterday

and paddle upstream to the Pelorus Bridge. This was an extremely pretty paddle

through a huge deep hole then up either the Pelorus or Rai rivers. KR chose to

take on the Rai first and run under the swing bridge. I was taking photos and he

got ahead of me around the bend out of sight. By the time I came round the corner

he was just climbing up on a rock beside the river. As I closed in I saw the he was

wet all over. He had managed to tip himself out! How or why I don’t know but he

said that he went to hold on to a rock while looking behind to see where I was.

Next thing he was in the tide.

“Well” I said, “did the life jacket work ok?” “I don’t know” he said “I was too busy

walking on the water and getting up on dry land”. Unfortunately his glasses went

into that big deep hole somewhere along with a bit of pride.

Once we had got the water out of the boat and KR back in we headed back down

the Rai and round into the Pelorus river and paddled up under the bridge to the

rapid. I couldn’t resist having a go at paddling up it, but it beat me. So I portaged

the Tui over the stones so I could ride it down. That was a neat wee buzz. By this

time KR was cooling down and keen to head out for some dry gear. So we cruised

back to the car and the camp for a lunch break.

The Pelorus Bridge camping ground is a very pretty little camp with good facilities,

hot showers, etc, and only $10 a night per person. An added bonus is the very

nice café at the entrance to the grounds.

So as the rain started Jenny and I packed up and headed home leaving KR and

Mary to enjoy another night and day in this neat little spot which is only just over

half an hour from home.

Ruahine Kayaks are pleased to

introduce the new “Gladiator”.

This fast, stable kayak is designed

for the larger paddler looking for

a longer, stable boat.

Gladiator


The 25th Anniversary Speight’s Coast to Coast was an absolute ripper!

Unveiling the monuments at Kumara Beach in front of 23 original

competitors and 14 officials was a moment to be treasured. Watching 11 of

those originals cross the finish line again at Sumner beach 25 years later

was thrilling. I am so proud of everyone who has completed my event over

the last 25 years but I’m especially fond of “the originals”.

See you next year.

Regards

Robin Judkins

Official 2007 Results

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall

Place No. Names City / Country Ev Sect Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN MEN

1 67 GORDON WALKER

2 130 GORDON BLyTHEN

3 153 DWARNE FARLEy

4 114 GEORGE CHRISTISON

5 199 CARL BEVINS

6 22 AARON PRINCE

7 21 DICK BRUNTON

8 176 LUKE VAUGHAN

9 154 WILL SAMUEL

10 2 RICHARD USSHER

11 156 JACOB ROBERTS

12 197 STUART LyNCH

13 47 DAN HUGO

14 107 LUKE CHAPMAN

15 152 DAMON GOERKE

16 8 GREG DOBSON

17 124 TRAVIS MACy

18 142 CAMERON DURNO

19 177 BRENT EDWARDS

22 179 JOHN MUDGWAy

23 116 SCOTT DONALDSON

24 18 ROB NEILSON

25 174 GRAEME FERRIS

26 64 LUKE LONGNEy

28 49 DAVID SUTHERLAND

30 80 TOM LUCAS

31 57 JAMES RODERICK

33 97 BLAIR MCWHIRTER

35 61 TOM FERGUSON

36 164 JOHN yU

39 159 CAMERON DRURy

40 133 SHAUN BROOKES

41 98 SAM GOODALL

42 186 MARK WALLACE

43 161 STEVE KING

44 173 JAMES CRACKNELL

45 138 CRAIG JOHNSTON

46 183 CHRISTOPHE BARRIELLE

48 14 JAMES PETERSON

50 20 SAM MORRAH

51 188 DION MAIR

52 71 JOHN STOBBA

55 96 SCOTT MCGREGOR

58 19 BRENDAN ROBERTSON

60 83 SIMON OLDHAM

61 82 PHIL EBERHARD

62 90 ANDREW NICHOLSON

64 86 NEIL WAKEFIELD

66 168 ARRON PERRIAM

67 200 BERNARD ROBINSON

68 113 GRAy PATTERSON

69 6 MIKE PROSSER

70 30 NICHOLAS ARNEy

71 4 DAMIEN WARD

72 146 JOSH STEVENSON

73 92 TIM SINDLE

74 111 MIKE KEMPT

77 118 LUKE HAINES

79 191 GRAEME NOBLE

82 59 AARON WRIGHT

83 185 FRANCK AITA

88 27 STEPHEN REID

89 140 TOM O’SULLIVAN

90 37 BRENDAN HICKMAN

96 56 WILSON LOW

97 110 GRANT JONES

98 187 MATT CROW

102 169 RyAN MENDES

103 172 GARETH BOyD

104 125 TIM NAUGHTIN

105 127 MICHAEL ROBERTSON

106 32 DAVID HAyMAN

107 147 DAVE ETHELL

108 195 DyLAN MATTHEWS

109 121 NORMAN CROSSWELL

111 50 CHARLES GEORGETTI

113 134 TIM MCCLEW

115 178 ADAM RyDER

118 143 LANCE BARNES

120 198 RUPERT MACLACHLAN

122 41 MILAN TALLEy

123 17 RICHARD CHARLES

124 108 GARTH SMITH

125 29 STEVE MIKUS

126 120 PAUL O’LEARy

127 162 JONATHON SUTHERLAND

128 81 LEEON JOHNSTON

129 23 EVAN HEyWOOD

132 163 STANLEy HEBDEN

134 193 JIM CAMERON

137 145 PAUL BAKER

139 12 ROyCE GREAVES

144 87 BOB MAXWELL

145 123 TONy ASHCROFT

147 55 DARRyN ANDERSON

148 181 NEIL MEADE

149 149 SIMON ABLETT

151 196 TIM STEWART

152 28 CHARLES MOORE

154 89 RON ROLLESTON

157 103 DAVID VARCOE

136 PETER WOOD

5 SCOTT CHAPMAN

13 KEVIN DEANE

24 CAMERON MUMBy

38 COLIN LAWRy

43 RICHARD MATTHEWS

65 SHANE THOMAS

94 ANTON WESSELINK

100 GREG TAyLOR

101 CRAIG THOMAS

122 PHIL LEMON

131 WILLIAM IRWIN

148 DENIS GILDEA

170 DAVID KOOI

192 JASON GALBRAITH

194 CHRIS MILCZ

201 ALISTAIR ADAM

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP VETERAN MEN (OVER 40)

20 157 JOHN HARRIS

27 150 ALISTAIR CORy-WRIGHT

34 151 GUy CORy-WRIGHT

47 160 SHAUN THROWER

49 53 MICHAEL CHARLES

53 72 ROLAND MEyER

54 117 STEVE REED

56 85 WARWICK SMITH

57 184 OLIVIER LIMOZIN

63 105 CALUM URQUHART

76 68 ANDREW THOMPSON

78 901 KIERAN DAVIS

80 182 PHILLIPPE LE POUL

81 74 MIKE HOWARD

84 99 JOHN KIDD

AUCKLAND

MATAKANA

MT MAUNGANUI

NAPIER

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

TAUPO

NELSON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

SOUTH AFRICA

NELSON

AUSTRALIA

CHRISTCHURCH

AMERICA

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

PAHIATUA

ROTORUA

AUCKLAND

AUSTRALIA

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

QUEENSTOWN

METHVEN

CHRISTCHURCH

SHEFFIELD

WELLINGTON

NAPIER

DUNEDIN

WHANGAPARAOA

WELLINGTON

GREAT BRITAIN

ENGLAND

AUSTRALIA

NEW CALEDONIA

DUNEDIN

WAIPUKURAU

TAURANGA

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

PAPAMOA

CHRISTCHURCH

MT MAUNGANUI

QUEENSTOWN

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

LOWER HUTT

FAIRLIE

AUSTRALIA

TAKAPAU

CHRISTCHURCH

SOUTH AFRICA

CHRISTCHURCH

AUSTRALIA

HOKITIKA

CHRISTCHURCH

NEW CALEDONIA

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

BLENHEIM

SINGAPORE

CHRISTCHURCH

WAIOURU

WEST INDIES

SOUTH AFRICA

AUSTRALIA

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

UNITED KINGDOM

AUSTRALIA

INVERCARGILL

WARKWORTH

AUCKLAND

AUSTRALIA

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

MOTUEKA

AUCKLAND

NELSON

CHRISTCHURCH

HAWKES BAy

WAIMATE

MOTUEKA

NELSON

AUCKLAND

AUSTRALIA

UNITED KINGDOM

NELSON

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

AUSTRALIA

ENGLAND

AUSTRALIA

INVERCARGILL

AUCKLAND

OHAUPO

UNITED STATES

CHRISTCHURCH

MORRINSVILLE

HAMILTON

OTAUTAU

AUCKLAND

SOUTHLAND

HAMILTON

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

WAIPAWA

IRELAND

UNITED KINGDOM

UNITED STATES

TAUPO

AUSTRALIA

INVERCARGILL

NELSON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

GREAT BRITAIN

FRANZ JOSEF

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

NEW CALEDONIA

SCOTLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

NEW CALEDONIA

NAPIER

SCOTLAND

W

W

W

W

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137

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144

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157

20

27

34

47

49

53

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57

63

76

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84

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Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

0 ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007


In February 1983, when Robin Judkins sent 79 endurance

junkies racing from Kumara Beach on the West Coast

across the Southern Alps to Sumner Beach near

Christchurch, he hadn’t an inkling that the event he’d

dreamed up would be such a huge success. He knew it

would appeal to some people, and he knew the challenge

was a cracker. “But really,” he said at this year’s 25th

anniversary, “I thought I would organize it for perhaps

two or three or four years.” The race, of course, was

the Speight’s Coast to Coast and from an inauspicious

beginning and near bankruptcy the Coast to Coast

created a whole new sport. It became New Zealand’s icon

endurance event. Fittingly, this year’s 25th anniversary of

the 243k race across the South Island attracted a record

field and some of the best racing ever.

Auckland’s Gordon Walker had a lot to prove when he lined up for the 25th 25 Years on

Speight’s Coast to Coast. The anniversary of New Zealand’s icon endurance

event wasn’t his motivation. After five attempts, he had a feeling that this year

was going to be make or break. With a baby on the way and a life to lead, if he

didn’t win this one it was probably time to move on.

That kind of motivation creates a lot of pressure. But nothing like the pressure

Nelson’s Richard Ussher must have felt when he lined up for what pundits were

tipping would be his third straight Coast to Coast victory. The world adventure

racing and multisport champion had enjoyed his best ever build up for the

Coast to Coast and his international record of late was a powerful mental edge

over his competitors. But in the end it was more about who wanted it most.

Racing against one of the strongest fields ever assembled for the Speight’s

Coast to Coast, Walker took the race to the defending champion when he

instigated a breakaway on the first cycle leg after less than 5k of the 243k race.

Walker and training partner Dwarne Farley had planned an early attack. “I’ve

finished second here for the last two years,” said Walker, ”but I’ve always been

strong all the way so I thought maybe the way to win was to go a bit harder

from the start.”

The plan worked perfectly. Only two other riders were able to join Walker

and Farley. The only problem was that one was defending champion Richard

Ussher and the other was one of the best runners in the race, New Zealand

orienteering rep Aaron Prince. The four worked well together and finished

the 55k cycle with a massive nine-minute lead over a stunned chase bunch.

But when Ussher put together a slicker transition from bike to run to open up

almost 60seconds, the race appeared over.

In the last two years Richard Ussher has ruled the run, opening up strong leads

and then holding on to the finish. He tried the same this year, pushing hard in

the early running up the Deception River to Goat Pass. He stretched his lead

out to more than 3min as he crested the saddle through a wet cloud cover. But

behind him Gordon Walker was starting to smile.

Last year he had been almost 10min behind Ussher, but now he was actually

starting to close the gap. “I thought then that he (Ussher) might have gone too

hard,” said Walker.

But Ussher wasn’t giving up. “I knew early in the run that I wasn’t having a great

day,” he said later. “But this race is so long that a lot can happen. Sometimes

you can bring it back together, so I just kept pushing.”

Walker, however, pushed harder. It was part of new mind-set that he had

developed after talking to former All Black and recent multisport convert Ian

Jones: “I talked to him a few times and he said “you’ve got to want it”. That

was probably a defining change in my mindset. I just thought, I’ve got to want

it. I’ve got to go out there and make it happen.”

And that’s exactly what Walker did, after a brief scare from 2004 winner George

Christison. Christison had been one of several contenders who missed the

early breakaway. But on the run Walker churned through the field, recording

the fastest run and then a strong ride on the short 15k stint to kayaks to start

the 67k paddle down the Waimakariri River in third place. Having reduced

a nine-minute deficit to five minutes, Christison was pumped. He tore down

the river to catch Walker and Ussher after just 90min. “It was incredible,” said

Ussher. “For about 10min all three of us were paddling side by side waiting to

see what would happen.”

First Ussher finally fell apart, then Christison showed the effects of his fast start

on the river. Halfway down the river, Gordon Walker was in front and going

away. With the 70k ride, his specialty, still to come Walker was never going to

be headed. With his confidence rising every minute the 34-year-old former

cyclist kept pulling away all the way to Sumner Beach, eventually winning by

19min in 11hrs 39min 30secs.

Finishing with a huge grin, arms pumping above his head and his huge group

of supporters and family chanting, Jaffa, Jaffa, Jaffa…” Walker became the first

Aucklander to win the Speight’s Coast to Coast. The overjoyed winner put his

greatest day down to exactly that: “I am a good biker, paddler and runner and

I always thought that if I put it all together then I thought I could win,” he said

of his fifth time lucky at the Coast to Coast.

After Neil Jones in 1996 and Christison in 2004, Walker was only the third North

Islander to taste victory in the race across the South Island. But in something

of a changing of the guard, behind him training partners Gordon Blythen

(Matakana), Farley (Mt Maunganui), and Christison (Napier) and Auckland

up and comer Carl Bevans swept the top fiveplaces. Defending champion

Ussher slumped to 10th. young guns Prince and Luke Vaughn trailed in sixth

and eighth.

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 1


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall

Place No. Names City / Country Ev Sect Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

85 46 MATTHEW BRETTKELLy DARFIELD

86 79 WARREN EADE CHRISTCHURCH

91 190 GREG ANDERSON FAIRLIE

93 171 GLEN WARNER LOWER HUTT

94 33 RICHARD HUTTON CHRISTCHURCH

99 88 TIM PIDSLEy CHRISTCHURCH

100 139 JUAN MCDONALD WELLINGTON

101 115 GINGE BURNETT INVERCARGILL

110 75 ARTHUR COLLINS LyTTELTON

116 44 ROBERT CORNAH CHRISTCHURCH

117 135 SCOTT JOHNSON AUCKLAND

119 144 ANDy FLETCHER UNITED KINGDOM

121 165 GREG OKE FEILDING

133 112 RICHARD HART AUCKLAND

138 95 JOHN NEVILL AUCKLAND

150 180 PHILIP ARMSTRONG AUCKLAND

156 69 BLAIR MACKINNON AUCKLAND

7 MICHAEL FERRIS AUSTRALIA

26 BRUCE MCKAy QUEENSTOWN

60 BEDE CONAGHAN NELSON

62 JON SUMMERS WALTON

63 TONy SCOTT AUCKLAND

70 SCOTT MURRAy ARROWTOWN

91 ANDy DyTCH SCOTLAND

106 DAVE MARSHALL RANGIORA

109 STUART RUSBATCH RANGIORA

126 DAVID WATT CHRISTCHURCH

128 ROD KIRKWOOD CHRISTCHURCH

132 PETER DE GOLDI CHRISTCHURCH

137 NEAL WALLACE DUNEDIN

141 PETER WEAVER AUCKLAND

167 PETER BOOMEN TAUPO

205 KEVIN DIBLEy CANADA

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP VETERAN WOMEN (OVER 40)

95 102 ALISON HAMILTON HAMILTON

114 45 JANE MATCHETT PALMERSTON

131 66 JENNy GREEN AUCKLAND

140 36 HELEN WOOD WAITARA

73 TONI LAMING AUCKLAND

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN WOMEN

21 166 FLEUR PAWSEy WELLINGTON

29 84 SARAH FAIRMAID TE ANAU

32 31 RACHEL CASHIN TAUMARUNUI

37 34 AMANDA PEAKE TAUPO

38 3 ELINA MAKI-RAUTILA FINLAND

59 10 MELANIE SMITH ARROWTOWN

75 48 BRIDGET LEONARD HELENSVILLE

87 16 ALySHA BLACKWELL AUCKLAND

92 9 SUZETTE NICHOLSON LOWER HUTT

112 203 EMILy DAVIES BRITAIN

130 58 RACHEL OCKELFORD WELLINGTON

135 42 ALI VAN POLANEN CHRISTCHURCH

141 39 FIONA ROBERTS CHRISTCHURCH

143 52 JOSIE LEWIS WELLINGTON

155 93 JENNy HARRINGTON TAUPO

25 TERESA CARROLL HAMILTON

35 EMILy MIAZGA CANADA/NEW

W

W

W

W

W

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W

W

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2:10:31

2:08:28

2:08:46

2:09:30

2:09:24

2:19:03

2:01:42

2:07:47

2:18:56

2:02:10

2:11:37

2:07:42

2:15:49

2:18:53

2:19:05

2:12:09

2:18:10

1:58:37

2:08:21

2:42:17

2:29:53

2:18:08

2:11:41

2:32:38

2:39:57

2:07:38

2:18:57

2:21:12

2:22:50

2:08:52

2:19:58

2:18:05

2:15:32

2:18:01

2:17:36

2:30:48

2:32:22

1:57:56

2:00:48

2:00:24

1:57:36

1:57:27

2:00:51

2:09:00

2:07:40

2:08:21

2:11:36

2:11:33

2:18:23

2:20:04

2:32:16

2:18:11

2:44:45

1:57:27

122

108

111

120

119

162

73

95

159

78

129

92

136

158

163

131

150

53

107

194

183

149

130

192

193

90

160

178

180

114

171

148

135

145

141

186

191

41

66

59

31

22

69

116

91

106

128

126

153

173

190

151

195

23

28

22

23

26

25

39

7

19

37

10

29

17

32

36

40

31

35

6

21

47

44

34

30

45

46

16

38

42

43

24

41

33

1

3

2

4

5

4

6

5

3

1

7

10

8

9

12

11

14

16

19

13

20

2

4:29:33

4:47:16

4:32:20

4:41:08

5:06:40

4:49:17

4:31:03

5:14:25

4:30:53

4:44:17

5:13:15

5:43:05

5:39:12

5:04:09

5:24:40

5:12:44

5:28:24

5:10:41

5:34:03

5:27:15

5:38:00

6:10:16

4:44:32

4:53:08

5:41:20

6:09:31

5:00:11

5:34:23

5:22:57

4:55:24

4:57:11

5:01:09

5:14:36

6:28:40

3:52:22

4:06:16

4:24:20

4:01:15

3:54:00

4:16:58

4:38:33

4:35:41

4:57:22

5:04:48

5:19:28

5:15:33

5:23:21

5:15:46

5:30:44

73

106

79

96

137

107

75

145

74

99

143

179

176

135

159

141

164

140

169

163

172

184

101

114

177

183

129

170

154

117

123

131

146

186

26

41

60

37

27

49

91

86

124

136

151

147

155

148

166

10

23

15

20

28

24

12

32

11

21

31

42

40

27

34

30

36

29

37

35

39

44

22

25

41

43

26

38

33

1

2

3

4

5

1

4

6

3

2

5

8

7

9

10

13

11

14

12

17

6:06:23

5:48:30

6:00:26

6:15:32

5:44:03

6:03:51

6:26:27

5:48:31

6:20:48

6:09:01

5:58:39

5:54:04

5:40:00

6:23:12

6:13:39

6:38:16

6:13:40

5:53:36

5:54:56

6:15:41

6:11:30

6:08:43

5:25:48

5:30:11

5:14:37

5:42:19

5:40:39

5:50:31

5:56:24

6:11:25

5:56:39

6:01:01

6:09:55

6:15:43

6:12:47

6:09:11

6:17:16

101

62

88

120

53

95

143

63

132

106

85

77

48

136

115

152

116

75

79

121

112

105

23

28

17

51

49

70

80

111

82

89

110

122

113

107

124

24

14

19

29

10

21

32

15

30

25

18

17

9

31

27

33

28

16

1

4

3

2

2

3

1

5

4

6

7

12

8

9

11

14

13

10

15

2:37:22

2:43:46

2:49:41

2:29:07

2:36:59

2:31:51

2:44:56

2:33:46

2:50:07

3:09:50

2:43:31

2:26:12

2:39:35

2:42:41

2:39:21

2:50:12

3:06:55

2:31:40

2:32:56

2:55:13

2:44:53

2:13:41

2:11:05

2:12:19

2:22:31

2:32:02

2:33:56

2:23:09

2:33:44

2:32:48

2:45:24

2:43:49

2:40:17

2:44:54

2:44:19

3:00:57

96

117

133

64

93

74

125

85

134

155

116

59

103

114

102

135

154

72

82

146

123

18

14

17

43

76

86

49

84

81

126

118

107

124

121

151

18

26

28

9

17

10

27

14

29

32

25

8

22

24

21

30

31

1

2

4

3

3

1

2

4

6

9

5

8

7

14

11

10

13

12

15

15:23:48

15:27:58

15:31:12

15:35:17

15:37:05

15:44:00

15:44:07

15:44:28

16:00:42

16:05:17

16:07:00

16:11:01

16:14:35

16:28:54

16:36:44

16:53:20

17:07:08

15:37:31

16:03:47

16:25:27

16:38:59

13:29:47

13:48:19

13:51:39

14:03:40

14:04:07

14:42:14

15:07:05

15:28:29

15:35:07

16:02:48

16:24:43

16:29:54

16:41:04

16:41:31

17:07:07

85

86

91

93

94

99

100

101

110

116

117

119

121

133

138

150

156

95

114

131

140

21

29

32

37

38

59

75

87

92

112

130

135

141

143

155

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

1

2

3

4

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

ZEALAND

51 KOLEIGHNE FORD COLLINS CHRISTCHURCH W W

54 KATARINA NICHOLSON SWEDEN W W 2:19:29 166 15 5:24:55 161 16

76 RACHEL PINNy WELLINGTON W W 2:30:46 185 18 5:24:54 160 15

202 RENEE KLINE UNITED STATES W W 2:30:03 184 17 5:38:42 174 18

WORLD MULTISPORT CHAMPIONSHIP OPEN CLASSIC MEN (OVER 50)

65 1 GUy DE LACEy CHRISTCHURCH W C 1:59:03 54 1 4:10:26 45 1 6:18:51 126 2 2:29:17 66 1 14:57:36 65 1

136 40 MARK MOORES AUCKLAND W C 2:19:05 164 3 4:50:27 110 2 6:17:25 125 1 3:03:56 153 5 16:30:52 136 2

142 11 TED WEBSTER DARFIELD W C 2:21:02 177 5 5:00:49 130 4 6:20:40 131 3 2:58:51 150 3 16:41:20 142 3

146 119 RICHARD LEPPARD ST ARNAUD W C 2:21:18 179 6 4:55:52 119 3 6:38:35 153 5 2:46:24 129 2 16:42:08 146 4

153 104 DON PATERSON NEW PLyMOUTH W C 2:19:55 170 4 5:13:10 142 5 6:24:28 141 4 3:01:50 152 4 16:59:21 153 5

15 CHRIS COLL WESTPORT W C 2:18:24 154 2 5:42:12 178 7

77 IAN PRITCHARD NEW PLyMOUTH W C 2:25:56 181 7 6:17:25 185 8

78 ALLAN HUGHES GISBORNE W C 2:30:55 187 8 5:29:29 165 6

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy CLASSIC MEN (OVER 50)

24 306 GEOFF HUNT QUEENSTOWN I C 1:53:29 63 1 4:14:08 23 1 5:21:10 34 1 2:01:19 17 1 13:30:04 24 1

42 497 BRyAN SWADEL NELSON I C 1:54:02 74 2 4:36:09 48 2 5:23:28 40 2 2:05:19 39 2 13:58:57 42 2

73 366 MIKE MASON AUCKLAND I C 1:54:04 75 3 5:03:42 101 3 5:25:37 48 3 2:08:44 66 3 14:32:06 73 3

128 575 GRANT BREWER CHRISTCHURCH I C 1:54:41 85 4 5:37:05 157 6 5:51:00 134 8 2:09:02 71 4 15:31:48 128 4

129 331 BRIAN FREDRIC CHRISTCHURCH I C 1:57:06 119 5 5:45:05 175 8 5:38:47 84 5 2:11:45 111 6 15:32:42 129 5

164 473 STEVE THOMPSON TAKAKA I C 2:12:43 207 10 5:40:59 169 7 5:47:25 120 7 2:22:56 187 10 16:04:01 164 6

169 419 JOHN MILL CHRISTCHURCH I C 2:15:50 228 16 5:35:12 152 4 5:52:27 140 10 2:23:38 191 11 16:07:07 169 7

174 516 STEWART CARRUTHERS AUCKLAND I C 2:12:08 205 9 6:09:16 211 12 5:32:31 60 4 2:17:54 161 8 16:11:47 174 8

189 444 BILL ANDERSON PALMERSTON NORTH I C 2:15:01 223 14 6:15:51 220 15 5:51:14 136 9 2:10:14 90 5 16:32:19 189 9

192 404 WAyNE JONES NELSON I C 2:13:55 213 12 6:13:44 217 14 5:54:53 154 11 2:15:19 148 7 16:37:50 192 10

195 510 LARRy COCHRANE AUCKLAND I C 2:13:30 209 11 5:36:53 156 5 6:12:08 209 15 2:38:04 240 17 16:40:33 195 11

198 609 KLAAS TEGEL HAMILTON I C 2:13:58 214 13 5:47:05 179 9 6:19:27 223 17 2:27:11 212 12 16:47:40 198 12

214 350 BILL TURVEy NAPIER I C 2:10:27 192 6 6:50:24 246 18 5:39:36 95 6 2:29:29 219 13 17:09:56 214 13

219 536 BRUCE WARBURTON CHRISTCHURCH I C 2:23:42 250 18 5:58:57 198 10 6:13:24 211 16 2:38:58 243 18 17:15:00 219 14

221 532 LEIGH DAVIS AUCKLAND I C 2:15:33 226 15 6:35:02 234 16 6:07:41 193 14 2:19:36 171 9 17:17:52 221 15

227 477 DENIS HIBBS NAPIER I C 2:11:01 197 7 6:07:34 206 11 6:47:57 265 18 2:33:17 232 15 17:39:49 227 16

231 302 JOE SHERRIFF INVERCARGILL I C 2:11:37 202 8 6:35:54 235 17 6:06:24 189 13 2:56:08 273 19 17:50:01 231 17

232 622 STEVE PROCTER LyTTELTON I C 2:15:59 229 17 6:10:24 214 13 6:49:30 268 19 2:34:45 235 16 17:50:37 232 18

263 448 GRAEME RAMSHAW DUNEDIN I C 2:28:43 259 19 8:28:41 279 19 6:04:37 183 12 2:29:47 222 14 19:31:48 263 19

284 520 ROBERT FRASER AUSTRALIA I C 2:38:14 278 20 9:07:44 289 20 7:11:39 280 20 3:11:58 284 21 22:09:34 284 20

286 588 LEE WHILEy AUCKLAND I C 2:40:00 281 21 9:08:10 290 21 8:50:36 286 21 3:11:13 283 20 23:49:59 286 21

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy CLASSIC WOMEN (OVER 50)

249 529 SARA HAMILTON NEW PLyMOUTH I CW 2:31:52 271 1 6:52:10 247 1 6:35:58 250 4 2:41:40 251 3 18:41:39 249 1

257 430 BARB STEVENS METHVEN I CW 2:46:14 286 4 7:01:27 254 2 6:17:51 217 1 3:04:16 281 5 19:09:46 257 2

261 429 HEATHER SUTTON METHVEN I CW 2:42:50 282 2 7:33:53 265 4 6:28:32 239 2 2:38:21 241 1 19:23:35 261 3

273 493 ANNE INCE SCOTLAND I CW 2:43:15 283 3 7:30:11 264 3 7:11:03 279 5 3:03:22 277 4 20:27:51 273 4

278 411 LyNNE JOHN LOBURN I CW 2:53:43 291 5 8:38:29 285 5 6:30:54 242 3 2:39:37 245 2 20:42:41 278 5

365 ANN HICKS DUNEDIN I CW

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy OPEN MEN

1 317 STEVEN MCKINSTRy CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:16 1 1 3:17:35 1 1 4:52:36 3 3 1:53:55 2 2 11:50:22 1 1

2 319 BRUCE CLULOW CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:19 2 2 3:29:31 3 3 4:52:30 2 2 1:54:03 3 3 12:02:21 2 2

3 531 BRADEN CURRIE ASHBURTON I M 1:55:52 107 73 3:19:15 2 2 5:06:12 10 9 1:52:43 1 1 12:14:01 3 3

5 346 BRAD WILLIAMS CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:06 9 7 3:42:32 6 5 4:50:12 1 1 2:04:47 35 29 12:24:37 5 4

6 378 MATTy GRAHAM HOKITIKA I M 1:46:51 7 6 3:40:54 5 4 5:03:20 7 7 2:02:11 19 16 12:33:15 6 5

7 309 RyAN THOMPSON RANGIORA I M 1:47:10 11 9 3:53:22 10 9 4:57:42 4 4 2:03:19 26 23 12:41:33 7 6

8 431 MARK THRUPP CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:47 17 15 3:56:36 12 11 4:57:43 5 5 2:09:03 72 50 12:51:08 8 7

9 554 NIGEL KIRK WELLINGTON I M 1:47:51 19 17 3:54:16 11 10 5:05:50 9 8 2:07:18 53 42 12:55:15 9 8

10 613 HUNTLEy QUINN CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:48:18 25 22 3:53:03 9 8 5:15:37 25 20 2:01:15 16 14 12:58:13 10 9

11 457 PAUL WHITESIDE METHVEN I M 1:46:44 5 4 3:51:50 8 7 5:12:22 18 14 2:10:28 95 61 13:01:23 11 10

12 357 DAyLE STEVENS FRANZ JOSEF I M 1:47:12 12 10 3:59:31 13 12 5:21:48 36 26 1:55:47 6 5 13:04:17 12 11

13 386 TIM FOSTER CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:46:41 4 3 4:04:40 18 17 5:12:26 19 15 2:01:25 18 15 13:05:12 13 12

14 546 MARK WATSON CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:48:31 28 24 4:01:13 15 14 5:12:07 17 13 2:05:41 40 32 13:07:32 14 13

15 371 CRAIG NIEPER DUNEDIN I M 1:47:48 18 16 4:05:28 19 18 5:13:49 20 16 2:00:57 15 13 13:08:01 15 14

16 515 AARON STONE AUCKLAND I M 1:48:25 27 23 4:03:13 16 15 5:14:45 23 18 2:02:12 20 17 13:08:33 16 15

17 352 AARON SCOTT CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:52:14 45 39 4:00:36 14 13 5:10:59 15 12 2:06:13 43 34 13:10:02 17 16

18 593 JAMES DyKES AUCKLAND I M 1:50:45 37 32 4:14:26 24 22 5:09:19 13 11 2:00:11 11 9 13:14:40 18 17

19 560 REEVE BARNETT NEW PLyMOUTH I M 1:46:45 6 5 4:06:41 20 19 5:22:00 37 27 2:00:31 13 11 13:15:56 19 18

20 469 SHAy MCLEOD AUSTRALIA I M 1:47:39 15 13 4:07:32 21 20 5:22:36 38 28 1:59:45 10 8 13:17:32 20 19

21 391 MATT MARK CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:47:18 13 11 4:28:48 39 32 5:01:05 6 6 2:02:26 21 18 13:19:36 21 20

22 526 GAVIN WINCHESTER WAIPAWA I M 1:47:57 20 18 4:03:44 17 16 5:30:53 57 41 1:57:58 7 6 13:20:31 22 21

25 513 HEATH LASH CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:48:02 22 20 4:21:06 31 28 5:16:16 27 21 2:05:51 42 33 13:31:15 25 22

26 462 GRANT HARRIS WELLINGTON I M 1:49:58 36 31 4:17:04 29 26 5:35:38 71 52 1:59:31 9 7 13:42:10 26 23

27 640 ANDRE AUSTIN RANGIORA I M 1:56:28 113 76 4:22:55 32 29 5:14:01 21 17 2:09:37 79 54 13:42:59 27 24

29 463 NIGEL BROOKS AUSTRALIA I M 1:53:20 62 46 4:21:06 30 27 5:23:09 39 29 2:08:24 64 46 13:45:58 29 25

30 465 JOHNNy MCHARG CHRISTCHURCH I M 1:52:47 52 41 4:14:26 25 23 5:30:25 55 39 2:09:25 76 51 13:47:03 30 26

31 393 MIKE WALKER INVERCARGILL I M 1:47:09 10 8 4:16:53 28 25 5:40:34 99 65 2:04:31 32 27 13:49:07 31 27

35 381 BRUCE BARCLAy AUCKLAND I M 1:49:46 34 29 4:25:11 33 30 5:32:42 61 44 2:07:05 48 39 13:54:44 35 28

36 598 MATT LOVE ALEXANDRA I M 1:51:58 42 36 4:16:27 26 24 5:43:31 105 70 2:02:59 24 21 13:54:54 36 29

37 582 GUy WOOD WHANGAREI I M 1:55:11 93 64 4:12:05 22 21 5:18:53 32 25 2:30:08 224 112 13:56:17 37 30

38 323 MICHAEL GALLAGHER ASHBURTON I M 1:49:25 33 28 4:47:30 70 50 5:25:26 46 34 1:54:20 4 4 13:56:39 38 31

39 507 KEN PAGE NELSON I M 1:48:00 21 19 4:29:26 41 33 5:35:48 72 53 2:03:43 29 24 13:56:56 39 32

41 394 WILL FAIRBAIRN QUEENSTOWN I M 1:48:16 24 21 4:31:16 43 35 5:34:51 69 51 2:03:50 30 25 13:58:13 41 33

43 579 ROBERT BROOMFIELD TE PUKE I M 1:53:52 69 51 4:50:58 76 55 5:14:54 24 19 2:00:46 14 12 14:00:30 43 34

Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007


If Richard Ussher’s demise, and Gordon Walker’s success, was something of

a surprise, the women’s race was nothing short of unexpected. In the first few

minutes of the mountain run, unheralded Welingtonian Fleur Pawsey hit the

front of the women’s field. Everyone was asking the obvious – “Fleur who?”

In fact, the 27-year-old government servant is not new to the front of multisport

fields. Three times she finished in the top five in the Coast to Coast two-day

event and was a close 10th in last year’s Coast to Coast. She came a strong third

in October’s Motu Challenge in the Bay of Plenty. But none of that pointed to

Pawsey tearing apart a classy field in the 25th anniversary event.

The women’s race had been billed as a big clash between Christchurch-based

Canadian Emily Miazga and Finnish adventure racing ace Elina Maki-Rautila.

These two had been first and second last year and the rematch was much

anticipated, with Maki-Rautila being engaged to Richard Ussher, created the

potential for the Coast to Coast’s first household double. But the little-known

Pawsey ruined the party.

When the Wellingtonian led across the Otira River and headed up the

Deception Valley ahead of Rautila even she was surprised. “I was looking

around waiting for them to pass me,” she said. “But they never came and I

just decided to go with it for as long as I could.”

That proved the story of the day, as Maki-Rautila tried in vain to stay close,

before falling apart to eventually finish fifth. Miazga withdrew halfway through

the run with a foot injury. Pawsey said she just couldn’t believe what was

happening: “About halfway through the run I started thinking, ‘wouldn’t it be

cool if I was first off the run.’ Then halfway through the kayak I was thinking,

‘wouldn’t it be cool if I won.’ Then in the last cycle it was, ‘I can win this. If I can

just hold on I can win this.’ When I crossed the line I still couldn’t believe it.”

The most unexpected winner in the history of the Coast to Coast crossed the

line shaking her head in disbelief, stopping the clock in 13hrs 29min 14sec. A

full 19min behind a torrid battle for the minor placings unfolded as Te Anau’s

Sarah Fairmaid and Taumaranui’s Rachel Cashin romped through the kayak and

final cycle to pass Maki-Rautila and Taupo’s Amanda Peake. But all this went

almost unnoticed as the assembled media, spectators, organizers, sponsors

and even Pawsey and her support crew and family stood shaking their heads

in bewilderment.

However, there isn’t much about the Speight’s Coast to Coast that bewilders

Robin Judkins. After a quarter century of financial worries, financial success,

storms, heat waves, near deaths and more than 15,000 competitors Judkins has

seen it all. But he is fascinated by the courage, determination and dedication

shown by “normal” people when they tackle his 243k epic across the Alps.

While the One Day world title race is the feature event, Judkin’s heart lies with

the Two-Day people’s race in which teams and individuals compete more

socially for personal goals. The Two Day event, competitors camp over night at

Klondyke Corner near Arthur’s Pass, is the original Coast to Coast format. The

pre-race camp at Kumara Race Course and overnighter at Klondyke creates the

atmosphere that the Coast to Coast is famous for.

This year’s two-day race was dominated by Christchurch’s Steve McKinstrey.

He was beaten by just a few seconds last year but was totally dominant this

time around to win by 12min in 11hrs 50min. The women’s race proved closer.

Christchurch’s Penny Willocks came from fourth after the first day to win by

19min in 13hrs 53min.

The Christchurch pair of Robert Loveridge and Paul Massie took out the teams

event in 11hrs 43min, just 2min ahead of overnight leaders Adrian Bailey

(Queenstown) and Sven Bruss (South Africa).

The highlight of the Two Day event, however, was the dozen or so originals

who returned after 25 years. The fastest of them was 52-year-old Geoff Hunt,

who won the Classic over-50 category. In total a record field of more than 900

entrants from 12 countries crossed the country this year. Other entrants from

the original 1983 Coast to Coast included former Green MP Mike Ward, who

continued his streak as the only person to have completed all 25 Coast to

Coasts. Asked if he might be here in another 25 years, the 63 year old smiled

wryly and said; “Can’t think of anything else I’d be doing.”

Michael Jacques

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall

Place No. Names City / Country Ev Sect Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

44 597 HAyDEN WILLIAMS

46 570 MARK HANDySIDE

49 551 JEREMy WILSON

50 439 BLAIR STRAHAN

51 505 EWEN CAMERON

52 562 EUAN MCINTOSH

54 334 PHILIP ROSSITER

56 468 ROBERT ACUTT

57 332 RICHARD GORDON

58 396 NOLAN HILL

59 599 CHARLIE O’NEILL

61 589 KEVIN IRWIN

63 634 CRAIG COX

64 362 JEREMy WADE

65 310 TIM CARTER

66 581 HUGH KETTLE

67 451 FRASER PRESS

68 454 MATT HALL

71 519 PETER DOONAN

72 571 CAMERON TROTT

74 467 GARRy CLARKE

76 540 RICHARD MATHESON

77 496 MARTIN PEAT

78 335 DAVID THOMPSON

79 506 REID FORREST

80 308 DAN CULLEN

81 474 KARL THOMPSON

82 627 WILLIAM JONES

84 537 BRENT SCHUMACHER

88 561 ERIK PERSEN

89 484 PETER WILKINSON

92 314 ROD GIBSON

94 472 HAMISH FARRAR

98 379 SIMON KNEEBONE

99 475 EUAN HENDERSON

100 325 SIMON SCHOFIELD

101 354 BENJAMIN SUTHERLAND

102 638 TIM MADDEN

104 521 NICK RIVE

107 498 REUBEN BONIFACE

108 353 NICK PATERSON

110 491 JOSH SCOTT

111 525 ANDREW BAILEy

112 406 STEVE MARSHALL

113 586 STEVE PICKERING

114 417 MARCUS HOOKE

117 617 SAM PRITCHARD

125 344 MARK CVITANICH

126 486 NICK DREW

127 428 LAyNE WATSON

134 339 SIMON BUSH

135 407 MICHAEL MCKEGG

138 621 MICHAEL ROBSON

141 446 SCOTT EWING

144 585 MATT KNIGHT

145 374 NEIL BUTLER

148 340 RICHARD OLD

157 343 WARWICK TAyLOR

158 527 IVICA BOZINOVIC

159 450 ANDREW MITCHELL

161 322 GRAEME SWITZER

163 610 FRASER HODGSON

165 580 DAVID IRWIN

166 337 BRENDON CHITTOCK

167 615 SCOTT FERGUSON

177 545 NIGEL BAKER

178 432 JAMES LOUGHLIN

179 435 STEPHEN ROBERTS

181 383 STEVE EARNSHAW

182 392 PHILIP CUNNINGHAME

183 389 NIC PATERSON

185 452 ALBy MOKOMOKO

190 490 RAyMOND BAILEy

193 508 MARK O’CONNOR

197 318 DONAVAN BISSET

199 487 CRAIG HICKFORD

203 553 REGAN WASHER

205 414 ANDRE KAVANAGH

212 408 GRANT DITFORT

223 629 RyAN RENWICK

225 530 SCOTT RONALD

228 535 EAMMON CONAGHAN

230 303 JAMES SHERRIFF

234 601 KIRK CHENEy

237 489 STUART SHAW

238 418 DARREN PRATLEy

246 481 CHRIS MUSSELL

247 356 NICHOLAS HAWKINS

248 341 JONATHAN HOLMES

268 518 CRAIG THOMSON

274 494 WAyNE WHITING

277 355 JOHN WILSON

280 338 CHRIS KNAGGS

281 559 TONy GLENTWORTH

382 SHAUN RICHARDSON

542 CAMERON TAyLOR

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy VINTAGE MEN (OVER 60)

243 304 SANDy LOGIE

252 301 MIKE WARD

260 461 RON MCKINLEy

267 376 DOUGLAS STEVENS

387 PETER SQUIRES

543 JIM HOLDEN

576 NOEL MCKAy

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy VETERAN MEN (OVER 40)

4 538 GARy FAHEy

23 405 STEVE FRANCIS

28 440 KELLy BARBER

32 552 DAVID HOWARD

33 370 JEFF STANILAND

40 603 GUy GILLESPIE

45 556 MARK TAyLOR

47 347 GAVIN BONNETT

48 364 GRANT WILSON

53 445 GLENN WRIGHT

62 550 MURRAy WEBB

69 453 DON VAN ONSELEN

70 423 BARRy SNOW

83 608 STUART HOUSTON

85 307 TOM FAULKNER

86 361 DAVID FERRAR

87 523 RICK MCLACHLAN

90 605 CHRIS HALL

91 625 KEVIN EDGAR

93 438 DAVID CLARK

96 313 RUSSELL POPE

97 349 IAIN MILLAR

105 488 STEPHEN PEAT

116 442 IAN JENKINS

118 400 NICHOLAS WEBBy

119 385 ADRIAN ALLAN

120 327 DAVID BINNEy

121 372 KEVIN MURDOCK

122 564 NIC GREEN

123 359 RICHARD DOVE

DARFIELD

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

DUNEDIN

NELSON

WESTPORT

RANGIORA

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

ALEXANDRA

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

WELLINGTON

HAMILTON

HOKITIKA

NELSON

AUCKLAND

DUNEDIN

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

RENWICK

BALCLUTHA

TAKAKA

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

NELSON

WINTON

WELLINGTON

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

HAMILTON

WELLINGTON

PICTON

INVERCARGILL

INVERCARGILL

AUCKLAND

BLENHEIM

KAIAPOI

WAIKANAE

AUCKLAND

LOWER HUTT

WELLINGTON

SOUTH AFRICA

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

AUSTRALIA

CULVERDEN

IRELAND

PALMERSTON NORTH

CHRISTCHURCH

SPAIN

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

WELLINGTON

TIMARU

CHRISTCHURCH

AUSTRALIA

DUNEDIN

WELLINGTON

TIMARU

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

WESTPORT

WELLINGTON

WAIKUKU BEACH

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUSTRALIA

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

IRELAND

DUNEDIN

WELLINGTON

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

LyTTELTON

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

NAPIER

AUSTRALIA

NELSON

AUCKLAND

PORIRUA

LEESTON

GISBORNE

HAMILTON

TIMARU

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

WHANGAREI

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

TEMUKA

AUCKLAND

WHANGAREI

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

MOTUEKA

TEMUKA

HAMILTON

MAKARORA

WELLINGTON

MOSGIEL

WAIMANA

TIMARU

SCOTLAND

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

MARLBOROUGH

BRITAIN

TAURANGA

NORTHERN IRELAND

ASHHURST

CHRISTCHURCH

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1:53:33

1:51:04

1:48:33

1:47:41

1:52:57

1:54:56

1:49:05

1:54:25

1:55:28

1:54:14

1:51:58

1:55:47

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1:48:45

1:53:55

1:53:34

1:52:12

1:53:16

1:47:25

2:13:51

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1:49:47

1:58:02

1:51:13

1:53:09

1:54:19

1:58:18

1:58:26

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1:54:11

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2:06:26

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2:14:34

2:07:35

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2:09:22

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2:07:08

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65

38

29

16

57

88

31

82

98

79

41

106

70

30

71

66

44

61

14

211

56

35

130

39

60

81

132

134

67

97

78

117

76

136

126

114

111

169

104

151

90

144

101

170

99

68

48

175

89

139

95

171

118

110

221

185

73

189

124

182

128

200

147

43

146

167

92

173

176

194

195

154

165

174

177

172

184

179

206

181

162

268

201

240

232

231

257

224

236

248

218

256

276

293

102

241

237

263

280

272

246

3

53

46

55

54

87

72

8

23

26

131

96

59

64

108

32

157

116

47

180

77

58

94

160

137

121

163

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159

141

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25

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60

27

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67

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49

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78

55

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62

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69

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50

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102

61

87

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98

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74

118

109

54

110

80

107

82

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90

37

89

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63

100

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111

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92

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105

115

106

93

127

114

123

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126

119

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124

117

125

128

129

70

2

1

4

6

5

3

1

9

6

11

10

18

15

2

3

4

34

21

13

14

24

5

45

27

7

51

16

12

20

47

36

29

49

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4:28:12

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Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

4 ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007


Grade Two River Certificates

Ask anybody who has competed in a multisport race and they will say

One or two weekends training

Is just NOT ENOUGH!!!

We believe our comprehensive Grade 2 Training & Certification is the best you can get.

To gain the skills to confidently paddle on white water, you need at least

3 weekends on the water with an instructor.

PHONE NOW

2007 Multisport Package $895

includes instruction and accommodation in Taupo

0508 5292569

OR CALL IN TO YOUR LOCAL CANOE & KAYAK CENTRE

FOR MORE DETAILS AND COURSE DATES

Official

Sponsor

I S S U E T H I R T Y n i n e • 2 0 0 7 3 5


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall

Place No. Names City / Country Ev Sect Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

124 415 RICK GIBSON

132 637 RODNEy STOKES

136 421 DAVID DI SOMMA

139 503 DAVID MAIDMENT

140 375 JIM WATSON

142 399 BRENT MEEKAN

143 398 NIGEL BRATTEN

147 480 JOHN MULLINS

149 458 MARK RADBURND

151 384 NAIRN STUART

152 403 ASHLEy BARRATT

155 591 DON KENNEDy

160 471 RAy STRUTHERS

162 363 PHILIP TAyLOR

168 434 ANDREW ROBB

171 568 PAUL O’BRIEN

172 485 RICHARD HARMAN

175 401 PETER HILLING

176 320 GARI BICKERS

180 528 KERRy HAMILTON

184 390 STEPHEN NEWMAN

186 592 DAMIAN STEPHEN

188 409 PETER KEELING

191 574 SIMON PENLINGTON

196 436 MIKE JAMES

201 311 KAREL HENDRIK BERNHARD

202 305 GUy GRAHAM CURRIE

209 420 KIERAN O’NEILL

210 316 GAVIN GOBLE

211 492 IAN GIBSON

216 422 STEPHEN NG

217 425 WARREN HAGGERTy

229 328 STEWART HASTIE

235 333 CHRIS MARTyN

239 380 WAyNE KNIGHT

241 369 BRyAN HILDyARD

245 433 LLOyD RUTHERFORD

262 427 ROBERT CANT

266 424 BRIAN CONNELLy

275 443 ANDREW MACKENZIE

283 524 PATRICK BRISTOWE

285 557 PETER RETTER

388 DAVE TRUSCOTT

441 SIMON CROLL

596 BRENDON MADDOCK

611 BRIAN WILSON

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy VETERAN WOMEN (OVER 40)

131 633 MELANIE BELL

156 315 WENDy GOBLE

187 410 CHRISTINE KEELING

200 501 ANNA RUSSELL

233 312 LAURA THOMPSON

236 377 CAROLyN HAWE

240 437 SANDy CLARK

242 549 JACKIE HUGHES

244 548 KARI BARR

255 464 SALLy WRIGHT

269 572 JILL HIATT

271 618 JACKIE HILLMAN

272 522 TARyN PERRy

279 479 DIANE KNIGHT

282 517 KATHy PORTER

INDIVIDUALS TWO DAy OPEN WOMEN

34 397 PENNy WILLOCKS

55 502 NINA WARDELL

60 624 KIM JOHNSTON

75 565 CAROLINE CROSS

95 547 KATE CAMBIE

103 495 KAREN MULLER

106 402 DELWyN FISKEN

109 449 SARAH PEDDIE

115 499 BRIDGET FITZGERALD

130 533 ANDREA PEEBLES

133 416 HELEN PETERS

137 632 AMy CAMPBELL

146 342 HARRIET SHIELDS

150 544 HEIDI BAKER

153 595 MELANIE PORTER

154 326 SHERyL FRASER

170 456 SUE CARTER

173 514 NICCI DILLON

194 324 MEGAN BERRILL

204 329 JULIE MASON

206 466 SARA SCOTT

207 373 HELEN SPRING

208 511 KATE O’CONNOR

213 478 AMy COUPER

215 336 JULIA TOWNSEND

218 455 FIONA KIRK

220 483 PHILIPPA RICHES

222 541 TINA GLANVILLE

224 395 ROByN DUNMORE

226 504 ELIZABETH STROUD

250 482 HELEN JOHNSTON

251 345 LISA KAHI

253 426 SALLy GARTERS

254 563 KATHERINE CAMPBELL

256 413 TANIA LAWRy

258 584 WENDy BOWN

259 321 HANNAH FALVEy

264 470 LISA MORRISON

265 447 CECILy POWERS

270 602 ELEANOR MCCORMAC

276 567 LyNDELL MCGREGOR

358 ANNA HIATT

412 JASMIN PERCASKy

500 SAMANTHA THOMPSON

616 KARJA HANSEN

CHRISTCHURCH

WAIUKU

CHRISTCHURCH

OTOROHANGA

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

ASHBURTON

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

HOKITIKA

UNITED STATES

GREyMOUTH

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

INVERCARGILL

WELLINGTON

NEW PLyMOUTH

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

HAMILTON

HAMILTON

INVERCARGILL

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

HAMILTON

INVERCARGILL

HAMILTON

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WAIUKU

BLENHEIM

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KAIAPOI

AUSTRALIA

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I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

W

1:57:15

1:57:09

1:52:47

1:55:46

2:05:14

1:57:40

2:08:41

2:03:55

2:01:22

2:12:52

2:04:23

1:56:27

1:58:18

2:23:25

2:04:14

2:07:16

2:11:06

1:54:18

1:57:07

2:04:38

2:10:59

2:21:37

2:14:09

2:03:40

2:01:22

2:19:23

2:19:25

2:07:55

2:12:01

2:47:55

1:56:33

2:08:52

2:11:40

2:05:29

1:55:07

2:24:59

2:13:47

2:28:51

2:35:21

2:30:40

2:27:41

3:00:29

1:55:39

2:17:11

3:09:32

2:10:11

2:21:29

2:14:09

2:13:59

2:17:25

2:28:44

2:22:31

2:29:30

2:32:10

2:27:40

2:47:14

2:45:03

2:39:40

2:37:55

2:48:42

1:52:46

1:52:42

1:54:42

1:51:51

1:55:59

1:54:27

1:57:46

2:05:37

1:55:33

1:59:55

2:06:35

2:09:58

1:59:20

2:05:46

1:58:42

2:04:59

2:03:50

2:02:27

2:14:20

2:15:30

2:14:56

2:13:54

2:23:56

2:18:27

2:10:45

2:14:22

2:16:00

2:11:05

2:15:49

2:21:33

2:28:21

2:29:09

2:35:36

2:25:51

2:31:18

2:28:45

2:29:30

2:22:11

2:30:00

2:45:30

2:48:15

2:55:41

1:54:33

2:04:44

123

122

51

105

161

125

187

150

143

208

153

112

133

249

152

183

199

80

120

155

196

244

217

148

142

238

239

186

204

288

115

188

203

164

91

252

210

262

274

269

255

294

103

233

295

191

242

216

215

234

260

247

265

273

254

287

284

279

277

290

50

49

86

40

109

83

127

166

100

140

178

190

138

168

135

158

149

145

219

225

222

212

251

235

193

220

230

198

227

243

258

264

275

253

270

261

266

245

267

285

289

292

84

156

31

30

8

23

48

32

54

41

39

60

43

25

35

67

42

52

57

17

28

44

56

66

62

40

38

64

65

53

59

73

26

55

58

50

19

68

61

70

72

71

69

74

22

63

75

1

5

3

2

4

8

6

9

10

7

14

13

12

11

15

3

2

6

1

8

4

9

17

7

12

19

20

11

18

10

16

14

13

24

27

26

23

33

30

21

25

29

22

28

31

35

37

41

34

40

36

38

32

39

42

43

44

5

15

5:51:17

5:20:07

5:21:53

5:44:12

5:27:07

5:38:19

5:29:05

5:34:47

5:37:20

4:45:32

5:34:47

6:04:15

5:52:00

5:36:04

5:41:54

5:51:51

5:49:41

5:11:55

6:08:57

5:37:11

5:56:30

6:22:42

6:11:50

6:04:44

6:31:32

5:56:39

5:56:38

6:49:58

6:18:51

5:44:41

6:59:55

6:30:23

6:48:45

6:32:03

5:54:04

5:54:41

6:10:10

7:35:04

8:34:52

7:38:45

9:48:22

8:32:50

5:16:33

6:28:31

5:39:03

5:26:09

6:11:50

6:06:44

6:40:28

5:54:38

6:56:46

6:24:41

6:37:28

7:12:07

7:46:50

7:51:18

8:32:03

8:33:48

8:55:11

4:41:19

4:40:09

4:40:27

4:39:20

5:20:47

4:45:28

5:07:22

5:04:10

5:33:12

5:39:55

5:12:44

5:21:27

5:45:36

5:34:30

5:41:04

5:25:00

5:45:21

5:41:05

6:08:03

6:27:16

6:08:23

6:02:47

5:38:39

6:28:24

6:27:48

7:05:21

6:44:24

6:40:25

6:46:30

6:22:30

7:09:50

7:48:00

7:14:45

7:11:53

7:18:29

6:22:25

7:05:16

8:18:16

8:09:34

7:48:34

8:41:19

5:46:04

182

129

134

173

139

163

141

149

159

69

150

201

184

153

172

183

181

118

210

158

192

224

215

203

231

196

195

245

221

174

253

230

244

232

188

190

213

267

283

268

292

281

124

229

165

138

216

204

239

189

252

225

237

261

269

274

280

282

288

60

57

59

54

131

67

107

104

146

167

119

132

177

148

170

137

176

171

207

226

208

200

164

228

227

257

241

238

242

223

259

270

262

260

263

222

256

278

275

272

286

178

48

32

34

45

35

43

36

38

42

13

39

56

50

40

44

49

47

29

58

41

53

62

60

57

65

55

54

68

61

46

69

64

67

66

51

52

59

70

73

71

74

72

30

63

2

1

5

4

8

3

9

6

7

10

11

12

13

14

15

4

2

3

1

9

5

7

6

12

15

8

10

19

13

16

11

18

17

22

26

23

21

14

28

27

33

30

29

31

25

34

38

36

35

37

24

32

41

40

39

42

20

5:26:46

5:50:48

6:04:29

5:49:07

6:01:08

5:52:29

5:51:17

6:00:55

5:56:17

6:26:39

5:53:26

5:43:40

5:51:55

5:39:11

5:55:17

5:56:58

5:54:52

6:42:47

5:59:23

6:16:02

6:06:19

5:35:56

5:58:29

5:53:18

5:57:40

6:09:53

6:10:58

5:50:57

6:06:45

6:08:43

6:01:04

6:10:51

6:21:15

6:50:07

7:18:47

6:53:21

7:19:28

6:49:12

6:08:11

7:23:22

6:30:44

7:18:39

5:39:04

5:49:26

5:58:22

6:16:05

6:27:36

6:44:53

6:11:19

6:48:04

6:46:35

6:33:54

6:32:21

6:39:34

6:23:34

7:08:29

6:43:51

5:11:57

5:35:04

5:37:08

5:53:31

5:26:59

6:08:38

5:46:08

5:33:22

5:38:19

5:39:03

6:06:01

5:46:57

5:39:29

5:58:26

5:54:51

6:10:01

6:05:24

6:01:39

6:02:54

5:40:45

6:09:43

6:32:14

6:33:12

5:47:26

6:15:27

5:43:33

5:55:27

6:09:39

5:55:48

6:09:51

6:22:03

5:48:35

6:12:26

6:34:37

6:34:12

7:28:34

6:24:34

6:19:53

6:40:40

6:43:14

6:14:23

49

132

182

126

172

141

137

170

159

235

145

108

139

93

155

161

153

256

167

215

187

73

165

144

162

202

206

133

190

197

171

205

228

269

282

270

283

267

194

284

241

281

92

129

163

216

236

259

207

266

263

246

244

252

231

278

258

16

70

78

147

51

196

115

64

82

91

186

119

94

164

152

203

185

174

178

100

200

243

245

121

213

107

157

199

158

201

230

124

210

249

248

285

234

224

255

257

212

10

29

51

27

48

34

32

46

41

63

36

20

33

18

40

42

39

65

45

60

52

12

44

35

43

57

59

30

53

55

47

58

62

67

70

68

71

66

54

72

64

69

1

2

3

5

7

12

4

14

13

9

8

10

6

15

11

1

4

5

15

2

24

11

3

6

7

23

12

8

19

16

28

22

20

21

9

26

35

36

13

31

10

17

25

18

27

33

14

29

38

37

41

34

32

39

40

30

2:10:21

2:25:04

2:17:45

2:10:43

2:07:30

2:14:26

2:15:14

2:09:38

2:15:49

2:29:53

2:23:45

2:14:46

2:18:50

2:23:47

2:25:12

2:14:07

2:14:37

2:25:06

2:10:47

2:26:55

2:13:08

2:10:57

2:07:32

2:35:55

2:16:19

2:26:14

2:25:54

2:13:58

2:25:38

2:22:14

2:14:21

2:22:36

2:28:13

2:27:25

2:50:07

2:51:38

2:42:01

2:37:59

2:33:56

2:55:16

2:48:23

3:38:15

2:04:42

2:22:22

2:07:36

2:15:17

2:25:30

2:46:59

2:33:01

2:27:17

2:28:39

2:44:30

3:06:42

3:03:59

2:46:14

2:50:21

3:02:34

2:07:13

2:08:51

2:07:47

2:07:36

2:12:57

2:20:09

2:18:04

2:28:54

2:10:37

2:13:53

2:10:01

2:18:52

2:24:29

2:13:19

2:23:36

2:18:37

2:13:50

2:25:09

2:15:16

2:30:17

2:23:37

2:12:19

2:26:12

2:31:20

2:15:59

2:10:44

2:21:11

2:16:43

2:21:31

2:40:03

2:41:53

2:39:20

2:48:35

2:40:47

2:39:44

2:51:19

3:12:02

2:35:36

2:30:46

2:57:29

2:48:28

93

199

160

100

54

134

144

81

151

223

192

139

167

193

202

131

137

200

102

211

121

104

55

238

155

208

205

129

204

182

133

184

216

214

263

268

253

239

233

270

260

286

33

183

57

147

203

259

231

213

217

257

282

279

258

264

275

51

68

59

58

118

176

162

218

97

128

84

168

197

123

189

164

127

201

146

225

190

115

206

228

153

101

178

156

181

247

252

244

262

248

246

267

285

237

226

274

261

22

53

45

23

8

37

41

17

42

63

51

39

46

52

55

34

38

54

24

60

30

25

9

65

44

58

57

32

56

48

36

49

62

61

69

70

67

66

64

71

68

72

1

4

2

3

5

11

8

6

7

9

15

14

10

12

13

1

4

3

2

9

19

16

27

6

12

5

18

24

10

22

17

11

25

13

28

23

8

26

30

14

7

20

15

21

34

36

32

38

35

33

39

41

31

29

40

37

15:25:37

15:33:08

15:36:53

15:39:48

15:40:59

15:42:52

15:44:16

15:49:14

15:50:47

15:54:55

15:56:20

15:59:06

16:01:03

16:02:27

16:06:37

16:10:12

16:10:16

16:14:05

16:16:14

16:24:46

16:26:55

16:31:12

16:32:00

16:37:36

16:46:52

16:52:08

16:52:53

17:02:48

17:03:14

17:03:31

17:11:51

17:12:40

17:49:51

17:55:03

17:58:03

18:04:38

18:25:24

19:31:06

19:52:19

20:28:03

21:35:10

22:30:13

15:32:59

15:59:25

16:31:55

16:52:04

17:50:57

17:55:14

18:03:36

18:09:31

18:24:51

18:58:09

20:13:06

20:19:53

20:21:31

21:10:33

21:30:18

13:53:15

14:16:46

14:20:03

14:32:18

14:56:41

15:08:41

15:09:18

15:12:02

15:17:39

15:32:45

15:35:20

15:37:12

15:48:53

15:51:59

15:58:11

15:58:36

16:08:25

16:10:19

16:40:32

16:53:46

16:56:38

17:01:13

17:01:59

17:05:37

17:09:58

17:14:00

17:17:02

17:17:52

17:19:37

17:33:57

18:42:05

18:45:03

18:51:21

18:53:08

19:03:42

19:11:03

19:11:22

19:35:55

19:50:58

20:14:46

20:32:24

124

132

136

139

140

142

143

147

149

151

152

155

160

162

168

171

172

175

176

180

184

186

188

191

196

201

202

209

210

211

216

217

229

235

239

241

245

262

266

275

283

285

131

156

187

200

233

236

240

242

244

255

269

271

272

279

282

34

55

60

75

95

103

106

109

115

130

133

137

146

150

153

154

170

173

194

204

206

207

208

213

215

218

220

222

224

226

250

251

253

254

256

258

259

264

265

270

276

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007

Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall

Place No. Names 1 City / Country 1 Names 2 City / Country 2 Ev Sect Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

TEAMS TWO DAy OPEN MEN

1

2

3

8

9

16

17

18

24

31

35

36

38

40

48

50

54

57

58

60

64

65

82

84

86

89

104

108

720

837

743

722

706

815

785

833

763

835

802

718

711

778

712

732

854

715

745

819

822

726

853

824

817

762

714

856

799

PAUL MASSIE CHRISTCHURCH

SVEN BRUSS QUEENSTOWN

STEVEN NORTON QUEENSTOWN

GLEN MENZIES CHRISTCHURCH

DAVE GRIEVE WANAKA

JAMES DAWSON TAURANGA

JAMIE MCLAUGHLAN CHRISTCHURCH

MATTHEW FRICKER PUKEKOHE

ANDREW BUSHELL CHRISTCHURCH

RyAN O’SULLIVAN AUCKLAND

MIKE JONES WELLINGTON

IAIN HAyCOCK LEESTON

BARNy FRASER GREAT BRITAIN

SEAN JONES TWIZEL

TIM SILVA ASHBURTON

TIM HARDWICK-SMITH ELTHAM

GLEN WEBLEy CHRISTCHURCH

GLENN PALMER AUCKLAND

JONATHAN CLEINE CHRISTCHURCH

DARRyN GABB AUCKLAND

MARTIN HEATH FEILDING

GRANT BORRIE AUCKLAND

SHELDON LEE FAIRLIE

CHRISTOPHER WILSON AUCKLAND

DUANE MAJOR CHRISTCHURCH

CHRIS MONEy PORIRUA

NEAL PALMER AUCKLAND

DAVID GRUSNING WAIHEKE ISLAND

PAUL GLANVILLE TAUPO

ROBERT LOVERIDGE

ADRIAN BAILEy

JIM HAWKRIDGE

KEVIN TAyLOR

NICO DE JONG

MICHAEL BORRIE

BRENT THOMAS

BLAIR MCROBBIE

CRAIG GRANT

AARON BASKERVILLE

MICHAEL RyAN

DAVID HEILER

ALEC JORGENSEN

ANDREW CAMERON

JASON COCHRANE

BEN COLLIER

GLEN MUIR

NIGEL SMITH

ANDREW MCCORMICK

STU PENFOLD

MICHAEL SARGENT

ANDREW HARVEy

GRAHAM WILLETTS

BENJAMIN ELLIS

MARK ALLISON

DARREN RODERICK

STEVE KILGALLON

CARL BURR

KERRy HARE

CHRISTCHURCH

QUEENSTOWN

QUEENSTOWN

CHRISTCHURCH

DUNEDIN

TAURANGA

CHRISTCHURCH

TAUPO

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

WELLINGTON

ROLLESTON

GREAT BRITAIN

AUSTRALIA

WARKWORTH

TARANAKI

AUCKLAND

DUNEDIN

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

MANGAKINO

AUCKLAND

FAIRLIE

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

MASTERTON

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

1:46:15

1:46:34

1:46:24

1:56:16

1:46:41

1:56:09

1:46:22

1:46:26

1:51:05

1:52:17

1:46:46

1:53:27

2:02:05

1:52:35

2:03:17

2:19:34

2:14:01

2:01:36

1:46:21

1:55:32

2:04:07

2:08:26

2:04:06

2:09:27

1:54:07

2:04:49

2:03:34

2:09:02

1:53:09

2

11

6

66

13

64

5

7

25

39

16

47

74

40

75

127

121

72

4

61

88

95

87

105

54

92

77

102

43

1

6

4

17

7

16

3

5

9

10

8

13

19

11

20

29

28

18

2

15

23

25

22

27

14

24

21

26

12

3:28:46

3:23:37

3:27:32

3:18:11

3:42:46

4:11:35

4:09:11

3:56:54

4:28:03

4:12:05

4:35:38

4:57:49

3:58:38

4:33:55

4:59:21

4:44:16

5:24:10

5:15:45

5:51:47

5:01:28

4:40:16

4:41:04

5:05:29

4:57:18

5:55:26

5:30:18

5:47:51

5:10:54

4:07:31

4

2

3

1

9

24

22

15

35

25

45

60

16

42

62

52

91

83

116

64

50

51

71

59

119

97

113

77

19

4

2

3

1

5

10

9

6

12

11

14

19

7

13

20

17

25

24

28

21

15

16

22

18

29

26

27

23

8

4:35:53

4:37:48

4:47:06

5:15:26

5:09:06

5:05:24

5:07:47

5:36:09

5:18:14

5:49:28

5:27:58

5:10:10

6:07:18

5:44:26

5:19:38

5:30:40

5:01:19

5:25:58

4:58:20

5:45:10

6:10:34

5:59:10

5:55:54

6:15:20

5:32:08

5:55:34

6:01:16

6:43:01

2

4

5

25

18

15

17

55

26

79

45

20

112

66

30

50

12

41

9

68

116

100

94

122

51

89

103

144

1

2

3

10

8

6

7

17

11

20

14

9

25

18

12

15

5

13

4

19

26

23

22

27

16

21

24

28

1:52:43

1:57:57

1:57:03

1:57:09

1:55:41

1:58:18

2:09:29

1:58:06

2:06:36

2:02:55

2:16:18

2:09:48

2:07:20

2:07:41

2:11:52

2:08:59

2:06:49

2:11:13

2:18:06

2:13:05

2:08:16

2:15:50

2:31:13

2:16:09

2:19:21

2:15:25

2:21:41

2:18:02

4

13

9

10

7

15

59

14

37

25

97

62

40

43

77

55

38

72

102

81

49

93

135

96

111

90

121

101

1

5

3

4

2

7

15

6

9

8

23

16

11

12

18

14

10

17

25

19

13

21

28

22

26

20

27

24

11:43:37

11:45:55

11:58:05

12:27:01

12:34:12

13:11:26

13:12:48

13:17:35

13:43:56

13:56:44

14:06:39

14:11:12

14:15:21

14:18:36

14:34:07

14:43:27

14:46:17

14:54:31

14:54:32

14:55:14

15:03:13

15:04:29

15:36:40

15:38:13

15:41:01

15:46:04

16:14:22

16:20:57

1

2

3

8

9

16

17

18

24

31

35

36

38

40

48

50

54

57

58

60

64

65

82

84

86

89

104

108

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

TEAMS TWO DAy OPEN WOMEN

23

42

55

855

788

823

SIA SVENDSEN

BELINDA NICHOL

LIZ BLAZEy

CHRISTCHURCH

KAIAPOI

CHRISTCHURCH

SARA WALLEN

IMOGEN INGLIS

KATHARINA

SWEDEN

CHRISTCHURCH

LAKE TEKAPO

T

T

T

W

W

W

1:46:53

2:00:50

1:57:11

18

70

68

1

3

2

4:08:05

4:28:25

5:31:33

20

36

99

1

2

4

5:37:51

5:45:27

5:10:46

58

69

23

2

3

1

2:09:49

2:09:03

2:08:10

63

56

48

5

3

2

13:42:36

14:23:45

14:47:40

23

42

55

1

2

3

BURTSCHER

99 725 RACHEL HARRIS CHRISTCHURCH EMMA BECKLEy CANTERBURy T W 2:11:36 112 7 5:40:16 108 6 5:53:46 86 5 2:20:00 115 12 16:05:38 99 4

103 786 JENNI GUARD TIMARU KAREN CHAMBERS TIMARU T W 2:03:49 82 4 5:50:22 114 9 5:56:19 95 6 2:19:47 113 11 16:10:16 103 5

107 780 LIZ MCNEILL CHRISTCHURCH WENDy CROSSEN CHRISTCHURCH T W 2:11:54 116 8 6:06:38 123 10 5:46:17 72 4 2:16:00 94 8 16:20:48 107 6

115 727 TRISTINE EMERy PALMERSTON DESIREE SILK FEILDING T W 2:12:21 118 9 5:46:46 112 8 6:21:15 131 12 2:20:15 116 13 16:40:36 115 7

NORTH

119 806 CHERIE HAy CHRISTCHURCH ANNABEL MCPHAIL CHRISTCHURCH T W 2:14:19 123 10 6:07:00 124 11 6:13:07 118 8 2:09:38 60 4 16:44:03 119 8

120 805 ERIN TURNER ROTORUA CATHERINE HELMS CHRISTCHURCH T W 2:45:04 156 16 5:28:05 94 3 6:17:22 129 10 2:16:03 95 9 16:46:33 120 9

125 749 HELEN MCKENZIE INVERCARGILL GABRIELLE VERMUNT INVERCARGILL T W 2:18:24 125 11 6:07:37 126 12 6:32:04 143 13 2:10:47 69 6 17:08:50 125 10

131 840 BECKy BELL CHRISTCHURCH FLICK JANE BLACK- BLENHEIM T W 2:09:04 104 6 5:33:45 101 5 7:35:49 155 16 2:07:54 45 1 17:26:31 131 11

MORE

133

135

139

146

152

845

791

804

757

821

ANNE MARIE GUINEy

ROSEMARy DAVIS

TRACEy BROWN

CORINA FAESENKLOET

SARAH CORSON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

CLEVEDON

DEE-ANN POOL

GWENDA WILLIS

ROSEMARy SORyL

LISA ROBSON

KATRINA PURDON

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

HAMILTON

AUCKLAND

T

T

T

T

T

W

W

W

W

W

2:09:03

2:27:22

2:32:16

2:34:27

2:45:03

103

140

146

148

155

5

12

13

14

15

7:00:13

7:12:14

5:45:09

6:13:34

7:26:22

139

142

110

130

149

14

15

7

13

16

6:14:45

5:58:36

7:11:44

6:47:25

6:19:37

121

99

150

148

130

9

7

15

14

11

2:18:40

2:12:40

2:28:22

2:40:42

2:34:43

104

79

132

144

140

10

7

14

16

15

17:42:39

17:50:52

17:57:31

18:16:07

19:05:43

133

135

139

146

152

12

13

14

15

16

TEAMS TWO DAy SCHOOL BOyS

11

14

41

43

51

818

795

800

776

719

JOS HOETJES

NICHOLAS WILSON

FINNBAR MCCLOy

HUW JOHN

BLAKE LUFF

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

BLENHEIM

RANGIORA

ALEXANDRA

JAMES LASSCHE

ELLIOT SMITH

SAM HANSBy

TROy BILBROUGH

JACK THOMPSON

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

BLENHEIM

WAIKUKU BEACH

ALEXANDRA

T

T

T

T

T

SB

SB

SB

SB

SB

1:42:46

1:46:30

1:48:08

1:47:05

2:03:55

1

9

24

20

84

1

2

4

3

5

3:54:12

4:01:43

4:28:37

5:05:25

5:17:54

14

18

37

70

87

1

2

3

4

5

5:04:26

5:21:43

5:53:58

5:27:25

5:18:52

13

33

87

44

27

1

3

5

4

2

1:59:07

1:55:20

2:10:12

2:08:18

2:03:20

16

6

66

50

26

2

1

5

4

3

12:40:30

13:05:16

14:20:54

14:28:12

14:44:01

11

14

41

43

51

1

2

3

4

5

TEAMS TWO DAy VETERAN MEN (COMBINED AGE OVER 80)

4

5

6

10

12

22

25

26

29

34

37

39

46

49

52

56

59

63

66

68

69

72

73

76

77

78

79

81

83

87

88

92

97

100

105

117

123

126

127

132

134

142

143

144

155

156

811

820

748

827

860

803

717

771

766

812

801

744

729

741

707

775

777

810

728

832

779

784

781

770

705

783

814

807

834

772

789

753

734

843

792

733

859

756

857

730

841

808

701

809

829

768

IAN HUNTSMAN

DAVE RUDGE

IAN WALSH

TONy DEy

GRANT CLIFFORD

DEAN SCHLUTER

DOUG MCKIRDy

MARTIN POWLEy

KEITH BOOT

JONATHAN CURRAN

LAURENCE BURLTON

COLIN CRAMPTON

GARETH HOWARD

DEAN JOHNSON

NEVILLE GEARy

MURRAy GRIBBEN

RON THOMAS

PETER HUNT

STEVE PEARCE

MURRAy LORD

TIM SMITH

BRyAN TOURELL

IAN TITTER

BRIAN JANES

RICHARD WILLIS

GRAEME LEPPER

STEVE BOOKER

VINCENT DALy

STU BELL

LLyOD SMITH

PETER VAN SCHIE

ROSS ROBERTS

NEIL GREEN

PETE DAVIS

STUART CHRISP

CHRIS DUFFy

DARRyL SyMONDS

ROSS RIORDAN

RICHARD CLARK

CRAIG BOyCE

PETER WILLIAMS

TONy KING

TOM PRyDE

PETER READ

EVAN CUMMINS

PETER SOMMER-

CHRISTCHURCH ANDREW EVANS

WELLINGTON MURRAy DOUGHTy

CHRISTCHURCH PETER KING

DUNEDIN DAVID GARDNER

HAVELOCK NORTH BRETT HARTE

AUCKLAND PHILIP SCHLUTER

TIMARU NATHAN DICKSON

GORE GRAHAM SINNAMON

LyTTELTON DAVE HARRISON

HASTINGS MARK STEPHEN

CHRISTCHURCH JOHN FREDERICKSEN

WELLINGTON TIM ARBUCKLE

NAPIER KEVIN MCCARTHy

GRETA VALLEy DAVID NICHOLLS

AUCKLAND LUTZ BECKERT

WELLINGTON MARK DOSSOR

WELLINGTON JIM LEE

AUCKLAND BRANE KRAJNIK

CHRISTCHURCH ALASTAIR MCLEAN

UNITED STATES ROBERT JOHNSTON

AUCKLAND PHILLIP RICE

AUCKLAND CHRIS MORRISSEy

WAITARA CHARLES BAyLy

MURUPARA BUTCH MERRIMAN

CAMBRIDGE CHRIS CRICKETT

NEW PLyMOUTH HARVEy REID

RAKAIA JUSTIN CALDER

QUEENSTOWN CRAIG TOOMER

TAUPO BLAIR MATHESON

CHRISTCHURCH DAVE MILLS

AUSTRALIA ADRIAN VAN SCHIE

CHRISTCHURCH FRANK FRIZELLE

WELLINGTON RICHARD FINDLAy

CHRISTCHURCH ANDREW MCCLURG

AUCKLAND PETE ANDREW

QUEENSTOWN MICHAEL DURKIN

CHRISTCHURCH ERIC HUNTER

CHRISTCHURCH JIM MCCONNELL

CAMBRIDGE JAMES DOyLE

CHRISTCHURCH STEVE BECKETT

CHRISTCHURCH KEN LOOI

AUCKLAND RUSSELL TROy

QUEENSTOWN GARTH BARFOOT

CHRISTCHURCH GARy KNOWLES

AUCKLAND PADDy FINNAGAN

AUCKLAND JOE SCOTT-WOODS

CHRISTCHURCH

UPPER HUTT

CHRISTCHURCH

WAIMATE

HASTINGS

AUCKLAND

TIMARU

OTUREHUA

HIBISCUS COAST

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

NAPIER

GRETA VALLEy

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

SLOVENIA

LyTTELTON

UNITED STATES

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

STRATFORD

MURUPARA

CAMBRIDGE

NEW PLyMOUTH

QUEENSTOWN

QUEENSTOWN

TAUPO

CHRISTCHURCH

UNITED STATES

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

WELLINGTON

LyTTELTON

CHRISTCHURCH

GREAT BRITAIN

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

V

1:52:08

1:51:09

1:46:32

1:46:18

1:46:40

1:46:52

2:09:00

2:08:21

1:47:09

1:51:34

1:51:27

1:51:33

1:52:45

2:11:19

2:03:42

1:53:34

2:11:24

2:02:00

2:04:23

1:54:52

2:08:54

2:32:34

2:25:41

2:03:44

2:04:12

1:54:10

2:08:41

2:24:06

1:51:35

2:11:43

2:03:41

2:08:48

2:32:01

2:01:15

2:22:53

2:20:27

2:04:05

2:04:08

1:54:18

2:25:38

2:37:17

1:54:59

2:20:03

2:22:37

2:25:20

2:57:42

38

26

10

3

12

17

101

94

21

35

29

34

41

110

80

48

111

73

91

58

98

147

138

81

90

55

96

134

36

114

79

97

145

71

133

131

86

89

56

137

153

59

129

132

136

159

11

6

2

1

3

4

31

27

5

9

7

8

12

32

21

13

33

19

26

16

30

44

42

22

25

14

28

39

10

34

20

29

43

18

38

36

23

24

15

41

45

17

35

37

40

46

3:50:59

3:37:26

3:33:31

3:36:14

4:09:00

4:10:15

4:18:14

3:53:35

4:30:11

4:59:12

4:25:59

4:57:17

4:48:48

4:15:10

4:37:09

4:52:52

4:32:14

5:08:29

5:09:47

5:24:47

5:03:34

4:21:54

5:28:55

5:12:36

5:53:29

5:35:49

5:01:45

4:34:57

6:05:00

5:08:17

5:38:14

5:54:45

5:00:31

5:58:38

5:18:56

5:37:33

7:26:22

6:09:01

8:01:24

6:28:32

5:35:45

6:21:47

7:28:07

7:12:43

8:24:53

7:24:57

11

7

5

6

21

23

29

12

38

61

34

58

53

28

47

56

39

75

76

92

69

30

96

79

117

103

65

44

122

74

105

118

63

121

88

104

150

128

157

136

102

133

151

143

158

148

4

3

1

2

6

7

9

5

12

19

11

18

16

8

15

17

13

24

25

28

22

10

29

26

34

31

21

14

37

23

33

35

20

36

27

32

43

38

45

40

30

39

44

41

46

42

4:35:05

4:56:27

5:00:27

5:10:01

4:58:44

5:32:32

5:27:59

5:43:16

5:26:11

5:10:26

5:52:45

5:24:20

5:42:24

6:05:41

5:53:23

5:51:42

6:01:39

5:44:16

5:42:22

5:48:32

5:52:16

6:15:28

5:19:15

5:55:40

5:22:32

5:45:34

6:10:11

6:27:11

5:26:09

6:13:08

5:49:17

5:45:41

6:16:22

5:55:50

6:15:54

6:22:31

5:25:16

6:31:28

5:05:53

6:21:18

6:44:41

7:38:25

5:58:31

5:46:52

6:17:18

6:54:26

1

7

11

19

10

52

46

63

43

22

83

38

61

109

85

81

105

65

60

76

82

124

29

91

35

70

115

139

42

119

78

71

127

93

126

134

40

142

16

132

146

157

98

74

128

149

1

2

4

6

3

15

14

18

13

7

27

10

17

33

28

25

32

19

16

23

26

36

8

29

9

20

34

42

12

35

24

21

38

30

37

41

11

43

5

40

44

46

31

22

39

45

2:02:08

1:57:32

2:03:49

2:04:53

1:55:57

1:59:57

1:48:51

2:02:52

2:08:28

2:05:10

2:04:33

2:02:45

2:08:56

2:08:22

2:10:36

2:15:24

2:09:24

2:08:07

2:09:10

2:07:39

2:11:32

2:09:38

2:05:45

2:15:26

2:08:22

2:16:33

2:12:30

2:10:04

2:14:27

2:10:55

2:13:58

2:04:32

2:11:32

2:11:48

2:18:47

2:22:10

2:02:40

2:25:15

2:10:13

2:20:18

2:52:39

2:08:07

2:16:36

2:49:56

2:42:23

2:34:58

21

11

28

33

8

17

2

24

53

34

32

23

54

52

68

89

58

47

57

42

74

61

35

91

51

98

78

65

88

70

85

31

73

76

105

124

22

129

67

117

153

46

99

151

147

141

5

3

9

12

2

4

1

8

20

13

11

7

21

19

27

35

23

17

22

15

30

24

14

36

18

37

32

25

34

28

33

10

29

31

39

41

6

42

26

40

46

16

38

45

44

43

12:20:20

12:22:32

12:24:19

12:37:25

12:50:20

13:29:35

13:44:03

13:48:04

13:51:59

14:06:21

14:14:43

14:15:55

14:32:52

14:40:32

14:44:48

14:53:30

14:54:41

15:02:52

15:05:41

15:15:49

15:16:14

15:19:33

15:19:34

15:27:25

15:28:34

15:32:05

15:33:06

15:36:18

15:37:10

15:44:02

15:45:09

15:53:46

16:00:24

16:07:30

16:16:29

16:42:39

16:58:22

17:09:51

17:11:46

17:35:46

17:50:20

18:03:16

18:03:16

18:12:06

19:49:53

19:52:02

4

5

6

10

12

22

25

26

29

34

37

39

46

49

52

56

59

63

66

68

69

72

73

76

77

78

79

81

83

87

88

92

97

100

105

117

123

126

127

132

134

142

143

144

155

156

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

HALDER

TEAMS TWO DAy VETERAN WOMEN (COMBINED AGE OVER 80)

74

80

96

101

109

111

112

761

774

828

767

740

750

831

JENNIE BELL

LESLEy TAyLOR

CATHERINE JAy

CATH WEIR

LINDSAy CROCKER

RACHEL KING

CECILE MAUGER

CHRISTCHURCH

DUNEDIN

WANAKA

CHRISTCHURCH

LyTTELTON

HOKITIKA

AUCKLAND

SOPHIA PEGG

MICHELLE HULLAND

ROByN ALLEN

VICKy EASTWOOD

ELEANOR WOOFF

JENNIFER BROWN

KIM SHAW

CHRISTCHURCH

RENWICK

WHANGAREI

CHRISTCHURCH

LyTTELTON

GREyMOUTH

AUCKLAND

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

VW

2:03:29

2:10:58

2:11:59

2:26:03

2:20:25

2:11:45

2:35:20

76

107

117

139

130

115

151

1

3

5

7

6

4

8

5:28:39

5:14:08

5:46:40

5:33:10

5:30:22

6:07:34

5:02:17

95

82

111

100

98

125

66

3

2

6

5

4

8

1

5:23:41

5:55:35

5:48:46

5:58:19

6:09:14

5:49:29

6:29:23

37

90

77

97

114

80

141

1

4

2

5

6

3

8

2:24:54

2:14:20

2:12:57

2:10:04

2:21:22

2:21:27

2:23:45

127

86

80

64

119

120

125

8

3

2

1

5

6

7

15:20:42

15:35:01

16:00:22

16:07:35

16:21:22

16:30:15

16:30:44

74

80

96

101

109

111

112

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

TAyLOR

116 830 JENNy WEBB WHANGAREI ARLENE BORE WAIOURU T VW 2:08:59 100 2 5:56:14 120 7 6:15:33 125 7 2:19:53 114 4 16:40:39 116 8

158 758 FRANCES WARNES SCOTLAND SILKE DALLMANN SCOTLAND T VW 2:50:44 157 9 9:23:42 159 9 7:20:52 152 9 4:11:57 158 9 23:47:13 158 9

Race Timing Services provided by Timing New Zealand - www.TimingNewZealand.co.nz

ISSUE THIRTYnine • 2007 7


Cycle 1 Mountain Run Kayak Cycle 2 Overall

Place No. Names 1 City / Country 1 Names 2 City / Country 2 Ev Sect Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl Time Pl Sec Pl

TEAMS TWO DAy MIXED

13

15

33

53

61

62

67

71

90

91

93

94

98

102

110

129

130

138

140

149

150

153

157

858

836

765

708

816

847

742

721

790

842

709

813

839

738

751

764

731

826

848

825

716

723

724

793

ANDREA KOOREy

GRIER FULLER

CHRIS MAITLAND

TONy STRETCH

EMMA LOCKE

JASON HENWOOD

SAM MATSON

MALCOLM JENNINGS

MARCEL KUNG

STEPHEN JOHN

KATE MCCLELLAND

DAVID REESE

EDEL KELLy

KRISTy LANGRIDGE

DEBBIE JOHNS

ROB LINDSAy

DAVID CROFTS

JULIE FAULKNER

GEOFF BROWN

DEAN TAyLOR

GUy JOHNSTON

KIT JOHNSON

IAIN COSSAR

WARREN SHERVEy

BLENHEIM

TAURANGA

HOKITIKA

ASHBURTON

CHRISTCHURCH

LyTTELTON

CHRISTCHURCH

WANAKA

AUCKLAND

WALES

ASHBURTON

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

GLENTUNNEL

CHRISTCHURCH

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

INVERCARGILL

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

KAIAPOI

WELLINGTON

QUEENSTOWN

GEORGE BAXTER BLENHEIM

JILL FULLER TAURANGA

TANyA REA HOKITIKA

HELEN KING WEST MELTON

MALCOLM STONEy CHRISTCHURCH

TANIA FRASER LyTTELTON

REBECCA PIERCE CHRISTCHURCH

KRISTy WILSON WANAKA

DUAN PAWANNA AUCKLAND

JOSIE BOLAND CHRISTCHURCH

SAM LOCK ASHBURTON

JANINE HALE CHRISTCHURCH

GREG JOHNSTON GREyMOUTH

CHAZ WOODHOUSE COALGATE

PETER MONRO CHRISTCHURCH

NICOLA ANDERSON ARROWTOWN

CATHERINE CROFTS AUCKLAND

TONy RAGGETT INVERCARGILL

MARy DIMOND CHRISTCHURCH

SHONA HAyWOOD CHRISTCHURCH

LyDIA POOLE AUCKLAND

RONA DEVINE CHRISTCHURCH

ELIZABETH MILDENHALL WELLINGTON

LISA COOPER QUEENSTOWN

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1:59:35

1:46:29

1:46:45

1:46:56

2:11:11

1:46:46

2:19:38

1:51:29

2:15:56

1:52:50

2:24:53

1:54:05

2:57:21

2:34:44

2:31:46

2:09:30

1:51:33

2:58:58

2:36:58

2:05:10

1:54:25

2:28:27

2:03:51

1:51:37

69

8

14

19

108

15

128

30

124

42

135

52

158

150

143

106

33

160

152

93

57

141

83

37

11

1

2

4

15

3

17

5

16

8

18

9

23

21

20

14

6

24

22

13

10

19

12

7

3:48:16

4:23:50

4:48:52

5:16:02

4:24:33

5:25:03

5:02:19

5:06:46

5:22:53

6:10:07

4:22:23

5:39:14

4:36:48

4:50:58

5:22:02

7:16:47

7:51:10

5:13:37

5:38:37

7:24:45

7:52:52

6:54:10

9:47:17

5:07:39

10

32

54

85

33

93

67

72

90

129

31

107

46

55

89

145

154

81

106

147

155

138

160

73

1

3

6

12

4

15

8

9

14

18

2

17

5

7

13

20

22

11

16

21

23

19

24

10

5:14:37

4:35:54

5:05:05

5:25:01

6:06:12

5:42:56

5:46:44

6:07:50

5:54:39

5:28:57

6:46:12

5:47:27

6:23:28

6:22:45

6:12:46

5:37:24

5:10:15

7:36:58

7:12:13

6:13:45

6:01:32

7:30:57

6:06:36

24

3

14

39

110

62

73

113

88

49

147

75

137

135

117

56

21

156

151

120

104

154

111

4

1

2

5

13

8

9

15

11

6

20

10

19

18

16

7

3

23

21

17

12

22

14

1:48:12

2:19:32

2:23:57

2:17:17

2:13:37

2:07:12

2:04:28

2:13:13

2:14:24

2:19:07

2:25:02

2:38:20

2:07:44

2:21:45

2:22:05

2:18:50

2:30:00

2:07:39

2:31:54

2:50:58

2:54:56

2:37:42

2:52:57

1

112

126

100

84

39

30

82

87

109

128

143

44

122

123

106

133

41

138

152

157

142

154

1

12

15

9

7

3

2

6

8

11

16

20

5

13

14

10

17

4

18

21

23

19

22

12:50:38

13:05:44

14:04:38

14:45:15

14:55:32

15:01:56

15:13:08

15:19:16

15:47:52

15:50:59

15:58:29

15:59:05

16:05:21

16:10:10

16:28:37

17:22:30

17:22:56

17:57:11

17:59:41

18:34:37

18:43:45

19:31:15

20:50:41

13

15

33

53

61

62

67

71

90

91

93

94

98

102

110

129

130

138

140

149

150

153

157

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

TEAMS TWO DAy FAMILy

19

20

21

28

32

44

45

47

70

95

106

113

114

121

122

124

136

137

141

145

147

148

151

154

852

754

702

851

760

713

846

850

798

710

739

782

773

769

704

838

797

703

747

752

746

735

796

736

KEVIN COOMBES

PHILIP VAN POLANEN

EMMA DE LACEy

AARON CURRIE

PAUL PETERSON

MICHAEL POHIO

CRAIG BATES

DAVID GLEN

IAN AUGUST

PAT BODGER

GARy WEINBERG

CHRIS MORRISON

BRAD FRIS

PAUL CRIGHTON

BARRy ROBERTSON

RODNEy STUDD

GREG ADLAM

JOHN SINCLAIR

NICK SMEETON

BRODIE KANE

DAVE HOCQUARD

NATHAN FACER

MARK ELDER

GEOFFREy LAURENCE

OPUNAKE

ASHBURTON

CHRISTCHURCH

BLENHEIM

CHRISTCHURCH

TAURANGA

MOSGIEL

AUCKLAND

SHANNON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

NEW PLyMOUTH

QUEENSTOWN

WELLINGTON

WELLINGTON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

WAIKUKU BEACH

BLENHEIM

AUSTRALIA

RANGIORA

AUCKLAND

DANIEL COOMBES

JOHN VAN POLANEN

JACOB DE LACEy

SCOTT CURRIE

SAMUEL PETERSON

HAyDEN POHIO

RAyLENE BATES

CAROLINE GLEN

HAMISH AUGUST

KATE BODGER

KATE WEINBERG

LUKE KINGSTONE

ROBERT FRIS

JULIE GARDNER

JESSICA ROBERTSON

SARAH STUDD

NIC BANKS

VICTORIA SINCLAIR

IAN SMEETON

JO KANE

NIKKI HOCQUARD

KATy FACER

RAE NOBLE-ADAMS

SARAH LAURENCE

OPUNAKE

ASHBURTON

CHRISTCHURCH

AUSTRALIA

CHRISTCHURCH

MT MAUNGANUI

MOSGIEL

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

AUCKLAND

NEW PLyMOUTH

QUEENSTOWN

AUCKLAND

CHRISTCHURCH

WELLINGTON

AUCKLAND

WAIKUKU BEACH

BLENHEIM

AUSTRALIA

RANGIORA

AUCKLAND

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

1:47:42

1:51:29

1:53:22

1:56:35

1:51:30

2:13:14

1:51:09

1:51:22

2:08:55

1:53:58

2:11:14

2:11:40

1:53:21

1:56:02

2:03:36

1:53:37

1:55:29

2:18:56

2:44:59

2:14:14

2:13:45

1:55:48

2:31:47

2:03:57

22

31

45

67

32

119

27

28

99

51

109

113

44

63

78

49

60

126

15