Adrienne Barbeau: actress, sex symbol, writer - Armenian Reporter

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Adrienne Barbeau: actress, sex symbol, writer - Armenian Reporter

the armenian

reporter

July 12, 2008

July 12, 2008

culture&

arts

the armenian reporter

&

Adrienne Barbeau:

actress, sex symbol, writer

See page C6

Faith

in the

inner

eye

Page C4

Celebrating

Jirayr Zorthian’s

legacy

Page C2

The voice

behind

the echo

Page C9


Celebrating Jirayr Zorthian’s legacy

A new exhibition

documents the late

artist’s collaboration

with physicist Richard

Feynman

by Adrineh

Gregorian

Jirayr Zorthian said, “The purpose of life

is living.” Though this statement seems

obvious, very few people truly live life.

Modern norms have confined humans to

a seat not far from one screen or another.

We have in some form or another suppressed

our imagination and our minds

have been numbed by convention. Zorthian,

however, never subscribed to the

norm – not in his upbringing, not in his

profession, and definitely not in his lifestyle.

Zorthian was born in Kutahya, Turkey,

on April 14, 1911. He and his family survived

two massacres during the Armenian

Genocide. In 1923, when Zorthian

was 9, his family sought refuge in New

Haven, Connecticut, by way of Europe.

While in Europe, Zorthian’s father exposed

his young son to the arts.

This exposure would eventually change

the course of Zorthian’s life. In 1936, he

graduated from Yale University with a

degree in fine arts and flew off to Italy

to study at the American Academy of

Rome.

Back in the United States, Zorthian’s

reputation as a mural artist burgeoned.

His artwork can be found in 42 buildings

throughout the country. Zorthian then

took his artistic vision into the third dimension

as an architectural and design

consultant.

Despite a long career of creating artwork

and designing structures, Zorthian’s

lifestyle and contribution to the

artists’ community can arguably be his

lasting legacy.

In 1945, he purchased a 45-acre ranch

outside Pasadena, California, and

turned it into The Center for Research

and Development with an Emphasis on

Aesthetics.

This ranch was Zorthian’s refuge. It

wasn’t so much for escaping the world;

rather, he was showing the world how

it could be. With decades worth of collected

recycled materials, Zorthian constructed

buildings, art installations, collages,

and sculptures.

For their bohemian lifestyle, Zorthian

and his wife, Dabney, created a self-sufficient,

sustainable existence by raising

their own livestock and growing their

own vegetables.

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Jirayr Zorthian, The Divorcement, 1952 Ink on paper 17 x 24 inches

Zorthian in “Planet Zorthian”

In 1957, Zorthian established on his

ranch a summer day camp, called the

Zorthian Ranch for Children, where

youngsters could develop their creative

and athletic potential. Zorthian served

as camp director for the following 25

years.

Zorthian would go on to become a

staple in Southern California’s art circles.

Throughout the decades, he accommodated

a large number of artists and

free spirits on the ranch. By doing so,

Zorthian created his own eccentric community.

One facet of this community was

the friendship between Zorthian and

CalTech physicist and Nobel Laureate

Richard Feynman. Their friendship became

the catalyst for a notable exchange

of the scientific/objective and artistic/

subjective worlds, and Zorthian became

Feynman’s artistic mentor.

Every year the Zorthian clan participated

in two major celebratory events.

The first was the annual Blessing of the

Animals, around Easter, when the Cardinal

of Los Angeles blesses animals on

historic Olivera Street in Downtown.

Zorthian and his family would gather all

their pets and livestock to participate in

the procession of animals.

The second event was “The Primavera,”

celebrating the coming of spring, the

birthdays of Zorthian and Dabney, and

their wedding anniversary.

Both of these events are chronicled in

Planet Zorthian, a 2004 film collaboration

between Harout Arakelian, Lisa Tchakmakian,

Sevag Vrej, and Arno Yeretzian.

While the four filmmakers followed the

artist independently of each other, their

films combine to create an experimental

On page C1: Adrienne Barbeau, a successful actress, known for her roles in

horror movies, has co-written a new book, Vampyres of Hollywood. Read a

reprint of her interview with the British online entertainment magazine

Den of Geek on page C6. Photo: Pamela Springsteen.

“cubist” documentary, whereby each of

the four segments can be seen as standalone

pieces yet complement one another

by offering individual perspectives on

the life and work of Zorthian.

Zorthian passed away on January 6,

2004, at the age of 92. Dabney died in

2006. Though he is no longer with us,

his spirit lives on in his art, his passion

has permeated thousands who passed

through his ranch, and his example is an

inspiration to many still to come.

Since the 1950s, Zorthian had rarely

showcased his work in exhibits. While

most of his public art consisted of murals

in buildings across America, his

sketches and paintings remained in his

private collection. This year Jay Belloli

and the Armory Center for the Arts in

Pasadena have curated an art exhibit

titled “Jirayr Zorthian/Richard Feynman:

A Conversation in Art,” running

through August 31, 2008.

“Everybody knew Zorthian,” says Belloli.

“He was such a colorful personality

that everybody knew him. But hardly

anyone knew the art because he hardly

every showed.”

Most of Zorthian’s artwork is still at

the ranch.

“Jirayr was extraordinarily talented.

He was really almost like a prodigy,” says

Belloli. “A lot of the artwork in the show

is from very early in his career. He was

doing important art when he was still a

student at Yale University. It just shows

how good he was.”

Belloli goes on to say, “Zorthian had

an incredible facility, astonishing drawings

in the show, very ambitious drawings,

wonderful portraits. He was just

really very good.”

According to Belloli, Zorthian considerably

influenced Feynman through his

mentorship and their close friendship.

C2 Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008


Jirayr Zorthian, Cortez in Mexico, 1936 Tempera and gold leaf on board 52”x 67 1/3”

“Feynman didn’t think he could draw

and Zorthian really taught him how to

draw,” Belloli says. “The exhibit really

became about both of their work and

their close connection as friends and as

Zorthian serving as Richard Feynman’s

mentor.”

Zorthian started off in the 1930s, the

period of social realism, with very realistic

art. By the 1940s, he progressed

into expressionism. In the late 1950s

and early 1960s, he focused on elaborate

realistic drawings. Some of the artwork

featured at the current exhibit is

unprecedented in terms of size. “It just

shows that even though he got older, he

was still being ambitious in the art that

he made,” says Belloli.

Until his death, Zorthian and Dabney

lived, worked, taught, and entertained

at this small utopia they called home.

Not only did he build this lifestyle, but,

more importantly, he planted the seeds

for future generations to cultivate their

own self-expression.

“Jirayr Zorthian/Richard Feynman: A

Conversation in Art” will be on view in

the Susan and John Caldwell Gallery at

the Armory Center for the Arts Tuesday

through Sunday, noon-5:00 p.m. Admission

is free. The Armory is located at 145

North Raymond Avenue, Pasadena, CA

91103 f

connect:

armoryarts.org

zorthian.com

The artist in action...

Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008

C3


Faith in the inner eye

The art of Seeroon

Vassilian-Yeretzian

by Mariette Tachdjian

There is a bittersweet quality to Seeroon

Vassilian-Yeretzian’s voice over the telephone.

Remaining palpable even after we

meet face to face, it is the same quality

that is characteristic of many artists who,

through their own personal struggles,

have transmitted their lives onto canvas.

Then there is her brilliant artwork. A true

testament to a woman’s hardships resulting

from genotyping and the yearning for

expression, Seeron’s paintings became

chapters in her own spiritual evolution.

At the Roslin Art Gallery in Glendale,

which she owns, Seeroon unravels her

many layers, through both the canvas

and her voice.

It doesn’t take a skilled eye to interpret

the anguish present in her early

works. Dark, sometimes morbid figures

are immortalized through oily hues of

black, blue, and gray. Anyone can feel

the torment that cries out from the

nightmarish faces in her 1988 piece titled

“Condemned.”

Macabre subjects are just one aspect

of this multi-faceted artist, however.

“My art became like my diary. You bring

from the past, you go forward, and you

watch around you,” says Seeroon, who

spent her first 17 years of life in a South

Beirut Armenian refugee camp. Shortly

after trading their shanty town hut

for a real house, Seeron’s father tragically

died. Pain and suffering have been

known to create great art. But perhaps

it is her later pieces illustrating crucified

women that really pushed her own edge,

and that of her audience.

In an attempt to expose the enigmatic

underside of a woman’s resilient exterior,

Seeroon used the creative process to

peel back all of her fragile layers, starting

from her early adulthood.

It was the dawn of the civil war in

Beirut, and Seeroon, having been discouraged

by her parents from pursuing

art, decided to study opera, followed

by fashion design. An impressionable

young woman, her fate seemed to be realized

as she fulfilled the expected role

of becoming a bride. But little did she

know that her marriage to an intellectual

named Harout Yeretzian (who would

later become the proprietor of Abril

Bookstore in Glendale) would one day

create a harmonious existence between

art and literature. With their son and

a few coins in their pockets, the Yeretzians

moved from Beirut to Los Angeles

in the 1970s.

Still starving for formal training in

the fine arts, Seeroon studied at the

prestigious Otis Parsons Art Institute

and UCLA. The liberated soul was finally

allowed to channel her experiences and

emotions onto the canvas for the first

time, without restraint or censorship.

Influences of Picasso, Dali, Miro, even

Francis Bacon, are evident in her early

work, though she will tell you that they

may have been at play only at a subconscious

level. Seeroon went on to draw

inspiration from her Armenian and

Middle Eastern backgrounds as well as

the underbelly of American life.

Of particular interest to her were the

Top: Evolution. Above

left: Condemned.

Above right: Self

Portrait. Left: Seeroon

Yeretzian

homeless in Los Angeles, a sight that

disillusioned her at first, as she herself

had come from a childhood of poverty.

“We were homeless but we had a

home, and a father and mother… it was

a commune,” she says. Perhaps it was

that sense of the loss of innocence that

burst out in pieces like “The Mattress”

(1989) and “Timeless” (1999s). Along

with a newfound freedom in the City of

Angels, she became keenly aware of the

estrangement that is often felt in such a

vast and impersonal city. “Here we live

in homes, but we are not a community,

we are in cages. We care about humanity,

but we don’t care about our neighbors,”

she explains.

Darkness and destitution unquestionably

inspired some of her masterpieces.

But perhaps her most striking, and controversial,

work to date is her series of

crucified women, which she completed

in the 1990s. At first glance, these paintings

appear sacrilegious. But beyond the

religious symbolism, there is a clearly

metaphorical treatment of female martyrdom

on those canvases. “It’s not only

Christ who gets crucified. Each of us has

a process,” says Seeroon, who still sees

women’s roles as inherently difficult

amidst a society of material abundance.

C4 Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008


Above: Glory Alphabet. Left: Timeless.. Below:

The Trap.

“We inflict our wounds. Sometimes it’s

self-inflicted,” she says. The paintings

were not exactly palatable to Armenian

audiences. But Seeroon adds with conviction,

“I didn’t care. I don’t paint to

sell.”

Though her work is first and foremost

provocative, Seeroon has been able to

move from one phase to the next without

compromising her artistic integrity.

These days she is focused on more natural

elements and livelier subjects, such

as her evolving series based on and inspired

by medieval Armenian illuminated

manuscripts, which she calls “our Armenian

jewels.” She expands on the natural

themes of birds, peacocks, as well as

human forms, using vivid purples and

golds, reds and blues, to create illumination

(stylized lettering accompanied

by painted figures). She has mastered

this style, having been influenced by

medieval masters such as Toros Roslin

(after whom Seeroon’s gallery is named).

Through her own interpretations, she is

able to create anything from a meditative

mandala to intricately decorative

depictions of the Armenian alphabet.

Seeroon’s work has been featured at

UCLA’s Kerchoff Hall, Otis Parsons Gallery,

as well as the J. Paul Getty Museum’s

Armenian and Iranian art festivals.

She was even invited to participate in

a large public-art installation commissioned

by the City of Los Angeles in

2002. If you were an Angeleno back in

2000–2002, you may recall the “Community

of Angels” project, in which

dozens of unique, six-foot-tall statues

of angels – commissioned by the

city – were displayed near landmarks

throughout Los Angeles. Seeroon

– the only Armenian artist invited to

participate in the exhibition – created

her “Angel of the Century,” by painting

angels of various ethnic backgrounds

onto a statue that stood at the Century

City Plaza Towers.

Seeroon’s personal life has allowed her

to embrace the best of Armenian art and

Armenian Paradise.

literature. “We are book and art pushers,”

she says, of her collaboration with

her husband. Together, they have created

a unique voice in the community.

But that voice also feels strongly about

supporting other artists. “If we support

our artists, we are supported,” she says.

Seeroon currently displays her work

alongside other notable artists from the

Armenian community, at the Roslin gallery

in Glendale.

f

connect:

roslin.com

Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008

C5


The Den of Geek interview: Adrienne Barbeau

The formidable star of

Escape From New York and

other cult classics chats

with DoG about writing,

bats, therapy, and kicking

ass...

by Martin Anderson

Editor’s note: We are reprinting this interview

with permission from Den of Geek,

the British online entertainment magazine

which published the piece earlier this

month.

Adrienne Barbeau negotiated a successful

Broadway career – during which

she originated the role of Rizzo in Grease

- into a successful television career in the

1970s on the hit comedy Maude. A meeting

with John Carpenter, who was casting

his acclaimed TV thriller Someone’s

Watching Me, led to a role, marriage,

their son Cody, and yet another career

as an acclaimed “Scream Queen” in the

likes of The Fog, Creepshow, Swamp Thing,

Two Evil Eyes, and Escape From New York.

Following the acclaim of her 2006

memoirs There Are Worse Things I Could

Do, Adrienne has now written a horror

novel together with author Michael

Scott, in which heroine Ovsana Moore is

a rather Barbeau-esque actress... who is

also a vampire! The novel follows her efforts

in concert with an LAPD detective

to find the serial killer who is slaying the

“A-list” stars of Hollywood...

[N.b.: Vampyres of Hollywood did not

arrive on my desk until four hours before

this interview took place, so I had

only read the early chapters at the time

- M.A.]

Martin Anderson: Is Vampyres of

Hollywood the first time that you’ve really

looked for that creative voice inside

yourself

Adrienne Barbeau: It’s the first time

I’ve applied it to fiction, yes. I guess I

found a voice when I was doing There

Are Worse Things I Could Do, and tried to

bring it into this one as much as I could.

M.A.: You seem like a really social person,

so how does the writing life suit

you

A.B.: There’s a part of it that I love,

and some of that is not being dependent

upon anyone else for my creativity.

I don’t have to wait for the script to

come, I don’t have to wait for the offer

to come in or for the money to be raised

[laughs]. So it’s wonderful just to be able

to get up in the morning and get the

kids to school, and then come back and

sit down and try to fashion something

that didn’t exist before. Because there’s

so much else that I have to do in terms of

being a mom and continuing my acting

career and all of that, I don’t sit at the

computer for days on end without talking

to other people. We have a house at

the New Jersey shore, and we’re here for

about five weeks - my husband has been

loving enough and gracious enough to

take the kids on some four-day field trips

[laughs]. They’ve gone off to Boston, so

Adrienna Barbeau: “I never set out to be a sex symbol.”

I am able to just get up and sit down

and just write straight through - but I’m

able to balance the communication with

other people with the communication

with the computer [laughs].

M.A.: So you’re developing your own

routines

A.B.: Yeah, I guess I am. It’s still new

enough to me that I don’t trust how

much time I can take away from it, if

you know what I mean. So if my husband

says “So-and-so’s having a party

on Friday night and I think we should

go,” I tend to think “I don’t know - how

many words am I gonna get written

this week” [laughs]. So I worked out a

monthly deadline and when I get there

and realize that I’ve written as much as

I’m supposed to have written, then okay

- I can go off and go shopping.

M.A.: Many writers say that they

surprise themselves at what they come

up with when they’re writing - has that

been your experience That you have access

to creative resources that you can’t

normally get to

A.B.: Yes, it has, and the way I would

explain it is that I’ll go back maybe 60

or 70 pages, or back to the beginning or

whatever, and I’m reading through it and

I find myself thinking “Did I write that”

[laughs]. Where did that come from Out

of me There are other times when I’ve

written something and I think “Oh, that

works,” and I’m sorta proud of that. But

even as I’m aware of that, I’m also aware

that it wasn’t anything that I thought of

before I put my fingers on the computer.

And it’s really fascinating.

M.A.: You’ve said that you didn’t turn

to George Romero or John Carpenter

before the novel was completed. So was

the feedback loop during the writing

process between you and Michael Scott,

or was there someone else to turn to

A.B.: Hmmm... I don’t want to get

confused between the first one and the

second one, which I’m writing all by myself.

That one I have definitely shown

to my husband and I have two other

friends, both of whom are writers, that

I’ve sent chapters to, asking “Am I still

on track” - that kind of thing. Vampyres

Of Hollywood I’m sure I showed to Billy -

my husband - but I don’t think I showed

it to anyone else as I was going along. I

think there was one night when I got

together with a bunch of girlfriends

[laughs] and I read the opening pages so

that they’d know what I was doing.

With Vampyres, Michael and I were

bouncing it back and forth. He’s an

expert at these things, and that was

enough - except for my husband.

M.A.: Speaking of the opening pages,

which I’ve read – “Death By Oscar’ [in

which a deplorable actor who has just

won an Academy Award is found dead in

a taxi with the statuette shoved up his

rectum]... – man, that’s a nasty death!

[Adrienne laughs]. Is this maybe a case

of having a little bit of payback on one or

two real characters from your own life

A.B.: I hadn’t thought of that part

of it being a case of getting revenge! I

have a feeling that if I go back and look

at it, there’s probably a few things in

there... [laughs]. I hadn’t really realized

this about being a writer, but a friend of

mine told me that another well-known

author has always said to her “I’m the

Goddess! I can do anything I want!” I’m

just coming to realize that. If there’s a

book I like that I’m reading, I can have

my character read that book, and I can

give that author a boost. And that’s

great fun.

M.A.: But it’s quite therapeutic as well

as creative

A.B.: I think so. You know, because

you read the memoirs, that I’m not looking

to drag too many people over the

coals [laughs], but it’s fun to be able to

get those little details in there that some

people will recognize.

M.A.: There’s a nice division in the

book between Ovsana’s voice and the

detective’s voice - is that how the work

divided between yourself and Michael

Scott in practical terms

A.B.: No, actually - the voice is a

real amalgam of the two of us. I think

that the final chapters, the battle and

the monsters and the Vampyrs and the

Weres, more of that came out of Michael.

We sat down and outlined the

whole thing together, in the same room,

saying that this was where we wanted

to go and this was what we wanted to

have happen. The structure of it is really

Michael - he wrote the first draft of the

chapter and then he sent it to me and

said “This is your book, just do whatever

you want with it.”

So the voice, the actual words on the

paper... the voice is more mine. The dialogue,

the way they speak - that’s more

me. But when we went back over it, we

both agreed that we couldn’t tell where

I had left off and he had picked up and

vice versa. I had to look something up

the other day and I thought “Is that in

Michael’s first draft or mine” I couldn’t

figure it out. We really found a way to

blend the two, I think.

M.A.: Ovsana seems like a melding of

all the roles that you’re loved for, like in

Escape From New York, Swamp Thing, and

The Fog... surely there’s got to be a film,

and you’ve got to play her.

A.B.: [Laughs]. Well, I think she looks

younger than I do! Well, you haven’t read

it all the way through yet. But maybe I

can play the villainess at the end - who

looks like Betty Davis as Baby Jane Hudson

in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!

C6 Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008


M.A.: Did you hesitate to put so many

real-life Hollywood stars of the past as

vampires in the book They’ve even got

dialogue...

A.B.: No, I just had to do a lot of research.

We didn’t hesitate [laughs]! I

didn’t always use these specifications,

but I tried to find people who had died

in a manner where I could logically conceive

of bringing them back, like Olive

Thomas, who died so young that she

never aged, that kind of thing. In the

end I don’t think I succeeded all the way.

I just went back and I looked at some of

the bios for the characters that we used

- some of them did live quite a while!

I tried to pick ones that had died of a

death that could be faked, that kind of

thing. But it was great fun.

M.A.: How far advanced are you on

the sequel

I’m almost half-way through. I’ve got

a deadline of January, and I’ll make it!

M.A.: I’m asking blindly, since I

haven’t read the whole of Vampyres yet,

but can you tell us anything about the

direction that Ovsana will take in the

new book

A.B.: There’s a relationship that develops

between Peter and Ovsana, much

to Maral’s distress, so I’m gonna explore

that a little bit. But it’s a true sequel,

picking up not long after this one ends,

and dealing with the fallout of this one.

M.A.: Would it have been harder to

originate this first book alone

A.B.: Yes... definitely! I don’t know if

I would have! Michael was the driving

force right from the beginning. I met

Michael through another friend, and

the first night I met him, he had read my

memoir, and he knew my film history

and my career, and he said you should

be writing a novel for your 18-34 fan

base, all the guys –

M.A.: 18-41. Please.

A.B.: [Laughs]. Ah, thank you! Since

I’ve been doing these conventions, I’d

say it was like 18 - death! People who

like horror films, they don’t stop liking

them! They are fantastic fans; it’s an

incredible... support system! So he said

“You should be writing a horror novel for

your horror-genre fan base. And I said

that I didn’t know, I’ve never written a

novel, just this nonfiction book, and he

said “Oh, I’ll help you - that’s nothing!”

[laughs]. Okay - fine! So we sat down

and he said “Okay, what do you want to

write Science fiction, like Escape From

New York, or a ghost story like The Fog”

A.B.: And I honestly don’t remember

how I settled on vampires. But what I’ve

come to realize, now that I’ve written

one and we’re in the middle of writing

the next one, is that Ovsana’s character

- a female vampire - is very much akin to

the characters that I read all the time. I

read Lee Childs, the Jack Reacher novels...

he’s one of your countrymen, actually,

although I think he lives here in the

States now... but I read detective novels,

or mysteries or thrillers or whatever

you’d [call them], and Jack Reacher is one

of my favorites. And when I think about

it, Ovsana, she can kick ass [laughs], just

like all these guys that I read, and like the

characters that I usually play. So I guess

that’s where she came from. What better

format to write the kind of woman that

I would like to be - and like to think that

I am, on occasion, and that I play in the

movies...the strong survivor, fighting for

justice... [laughs].

M.A.: Of course I was going to ask, is

that tough “Adrienne Barbeau” character

- for which you’re celebrated - someone

that you’ve grown into or someone

that you maybe admired and would like

to be Is it a fantasy or a reflection of

how you’ve lived your life

A.B.: You know, I think it is. I think it’s

a reflection of my heritage, in some ways.

I’ve dedicated the second book to my Armenian

aunts and my grandmother. I’ve

come from a culture of women - at least

my relatives - that were survivors. They

survived the holocaust. You’ve read the

memoirs, so you know that I have one

relative that walked away from her two

year-old son and never saw him again in

the hope that he would be taken in and

survive; she escaped and she eventually

lived a very long life.

So I think some of it is in the DNA -

and we use that with Ovsana, as she’s an

Armenian vampire. The rest of it, I guess,

is the person that I became, or maybe

that I grew up as and then became. I’m

not a victim [laughs]. I’ve sort of spent

my life trying to grow into... if I say a

strong person, I mean a capable person,

or a person who can take care of herself

and hopefully take care of the people

around her.

I would like to think that if I were in a

terrifying situation, I would act the way

the characters that I’ve portrayed act

[laughs]. I’m never tested. But I value

strength in a person.

M.A.: Aside from your physical attributes,

do you think that it was the

independence and strength of your onscreen

characters that made you a sex

symbol

A.B.: I don’t know, Martin. You know,

you’ve read the book. I never set out to

be a sex symbol, and I don’t know what

makes a sex symbol. I think that it was

the camera, or the media or whatever,

that made me a sex symbol. I wasn’t playing

those roles, but they just… [laughs].

M.A.: You talk about the visualization

that helps you get the things that you

need and want - were you visualizing

something like the Vampyres project

when Michael Scott turned up

A.B.: I don’t know if I was visualizing

something like this project. I think that

years ago, before I ever started writing,

it was in my head as something. I read a

lot, and whenever I read somebody that

I love I always thought “God, I wish I

could write like that.” And I know that for

years, going back, I thought “Wouldn’t it

be wonderful to be a writer, and you

could do it anywhere…” You could go sit

on a beach, you wouldn’t have to be in

Los Angeles or New York, on Broadway.

So I was putting that kind of thought

out at least, that it would be a wonderful

career to have.

I had a friend years ago, he was a therapist,

he used to say “Adrienne, someday

you’re going to reach a lot of people

in some other way. I think you’re going

to be a teacher or something, but

you have something else you have to say

that you’re not saying as an actor.” And

I just thought “I don’t know what that’s

all about.” But maybe this is it.

M.A.: I get the impression that your

own lifelong struggle to find your voice

has given you character and attitude

that you might have otherwise struggled

hard to find

A.B.: Yeah, probably so. The struggle

or the search was always to understand

myself, I think. And to communicate.

I’ve always been fascinated with communication.

I’ve taken a course... there’s

a fella whose name just went out of my

head [laughs], who teaches all over the

world and has written a book called Nonviolent

Communication, I think. I went

and took a couple of weekend seminars

with him. I remember back even before

my first son was born, so that’s about

25 years ago, reading Parent Effectiveness

Training, and they talk about methods

of communication, “active listening,”

things like that... and it’s what I was in

therapy for, I think... to learn to communicate.

I hadn’t thought of it until just

now, when you asked me the question

[laughs]. I’m communicating again!

M.A.:There were some really good actresses

out there kicking ass in the 80s

- and you were amongst them - but it

really kind of took off in the 90s and beyond.

Do you feel that you kind of paved

the way for that, or maybe regret that it

all happened later

A.B.: What I feel is that I wish someone

was still interested in seeing somebody

like me doing it again [laughs]!

M.A.: I’m interested...

A.B.: Ahhh, thanks! Did you see The

Convent

M.A.: I did.

A.B.: That came along just at the time I

was saying to my husband “Ah, nobody’s

gonna hire me to pick up a gun again.”

But yeah, I wish that kind of character or

those kinds of roles had been as popular

when I was doing them as they are now.

Or as “mainstream” as they are now.

What with the advent of the popularity

of video games and everything, so

that you’ve got... well, I’m going back a

ways now and thinking about Lara Croft.

There must be something more recent...

but you know... big films. Because I still

love doing ‘em. But I’m just glad I had

the chance, you know [laughs].

M.A.: One of the things I loved in your

memoirs was the story of “the trapped

bat,” and I was wondering if you’d tell it

again for our readers

A.B.: Oh, poor John! [Laughs]. We

had just moved into a home that we

bought, up in Inverness, where we shot

The Fog. A gorgeous part of the country,

and this house was in the middle of the

woods - there was nothing around. It

was Labor Day weekend, which meant

that Jerry Lewis was doing his telethon,

for muscular dystrophy or whatever it

is that he does. John [Carpenter] had

to stay up and see it - that was his annual

night-time watching. So I went to

bed and I was sound asleep, and all of a

sudden I hear John’s voice saying “Adrienne!

Adrienne!” And I looked around

and I didn’t see him... and he was on the

floor, on his knees, with a towel over his

head - the master of horror! And he said

“There’s a bat in the living room!” And I

said “Well... yeah” And he said “There’s

a bat in the living room!” So I got up and

got to the living room and opened the

door and this little bat flew past me and

flew out the door [laughs].

M.A.: So cool - someone who makes

horror movies is bound to be frightened

of bats! Totally makes sense...

A.B.: [Laughing] Yeah!

M.A.: You talk about the hard time

you had making Unholy at the end of

your memoirs, and I kind of expected

you to finish with “Oh boy, never again,”

but instead you take it all in your stride.

How do you get to think like that

A.B.: This sounds sort of hokey, but

for me it always begins with the words.

So I’m always aware that something

could come along and be really valuable

because of the words, the script.

But it may not necessarily be the one

that somebody with a lot of money

wants to finance. I just did another one

last November that was just a wonderful

character for me to play, and I’m

so glad that I did it. But it was lowbudget.

What I learned from Unholy

is that I make sure I have a dressing

room [laughs]. There were kids in that

movie who were dressing in a tent at

18 degrees, and I sort of draw the line...

I’ve got to have at least a heater in a

room [laughs].

M.A.: I could feel the cold as I was

reading it.

A.B.: Oh, it was a nightmare. But then

you turn around and do one like I did

last year [Reach For Me]. Seymour Cassel

is starring, and Alfre Woodard and

LeVar Burton, and LeVar directed it. I

loved the character and I got to do some

work that I wouldn’t have gotten to do

if I wasn’t willing to put up with the lowbudget

aspect. I just like to work.

M.A.: Have you ever wanted to take

the reins yourself and do some directing

A.B.: Never. It doesn’t interest me

at all. What I think I might be good at

would be directing an actor, maybe onstage

or in a scene, but I don’t understand

filmmaking at all [laughs]. I know

what’s wrong... I know what an actor

needs to do to get him where he needs

to be, and I could probably impart that,

but I’m not interested in directing.

M.A.: Do you like horror any more

now than you used to In your memoir,

you say that you’re not a great fan...

A.B.: [Laughing] No! My husband

wanted to see The Happening, which just

came out, and the previews looked really

good. But I said “I don’t wanna go

in there” [laughs]. I don’t want to have

them do that to me! I don’t like it. I

love action-adventure - I’m right there

for James Bond or thrillers or anything

like that, but if it’s gonna make me jump

and scream...

We went to see Get Smart yesterday

[laughs], and my poor kids were sitting

in front of me... I don’t know what happened,

somebody stepped out of a closet

or something... and I screamed! f

connect:

denofgeek.com

Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008

C7


The show must go on

Paul Meshejian is the

driving force behind

the annual PlayPenn

theatrical conference

by Armina

LaManna

PHIL ADELPHIA

and LONDON

– As the founding

artistic director

of PlayPenn, Paul

Meshejian is an integral part of the greater

theatrical community of Philadelphia. Recently

he stole a little time from his overwhelminlgy

busy schedule to talk to me

about PlayPenn and Another Man’s Son – a

play written by Silva Semerciyan, which

will be featured this month at the Play-

Penn 2008 Conference in Philadelphia.

Meshejian had spent several years

working as an actor and director in Minneapolis,

where he first came across

the Playwrights’ Center – a big laboratory

dedicated to the advancement

of playwriting. “When I was getting a

little tired of acting, I started to think

about what work in the theater satisfied

me the most,” Meshejian explained. “I

found that it was my time there, at the

Playwrights’ Center!”

Realizing that Philadelphia had nothing

like the Playwrights’ Center and how

ephemeral work in the theater could be,

Meshejian started talking to artistic directors

around town about beginning a

similar program in Philadelphia. “Almost

everyone said that they needed something

like this,” Meshejian said. “So one

day I was talking to someone about this,

and he asked me how much I needed. I

foolishly picked a number out of the air,

and this guy said that he’d give me half

that for three years. And that kind of

money – $20,000 a year for three years

– was the seed money that allowed me to

ask other people to invest. And they did.

The first year, 2005, we raised $50,000,

then last year our budget was around

$94,000, and then this year our budget

is $148,000. But we haven’t raised all

that money for this year yet.”

Meshejian described PlayPenn’s expansion:

from four plays during the summer

conference to six; from a single symposium

to two; and then this year they are

adding two extra readings. “It’s clear that

there is a need for it,” Meshejian said,

referring to the significance of PlayPenn.

Even before finding success locally,

PlayPenn made headway on the national

scene. Out of the 14 plays developed

so far, eight have been produced

around the country. “One of the things

I wanted to do was introduce new work

to Philadelphia,” Meshejian said. “I’m

very happy to say that of the six plays

we developed last year, four are being

produced this coming season, and three

of them are seeing productions at local

theaters: the Arden, Interact Theatre,

and People’s Light.”

I asked Meshejian about how he came

across Semerciyan’s play: “Early on the

ADAA [Armenian Dramatic Arts Alliance]

got in touch with me, right when they

“I’m very happy to say that of the six plays we developed last year, four are being produced this coming season, and three of them are seeing productions at

local theaters: the Arden, Interact Theatre, and People’s Light.”

Silva Semerciyan.

Actors Harry Philibosian and Larry John Meyers.

were first starting. I became a member.”

Meshejian continued to tell me about

how he searched for ways to reach out to

Armenian writers who were doing work

that would be interesting to a broader

audience. “First, the richness of our history

is worthy of reflection,” Meshejian

said. “Second, the Genocide experience

is lost in the shadow of the Holocaust.

Not that there’s a competition, but there

just hasn’t been any public, formal recognition

of it.” To illustrate his point,

Meshejian referred to Peter Balakian

and his book, Black Dog of Fate. “What he

[Balakian] says is that there is no way to

understand a thing like this [Genocide]

until art gets made from it,” he said.

To this end, Meshejian said, he put a

call out to the ADAA for Armenian plays

tackling these issues. The response came

in the form of two plays, one of which,

Another Man’s Son, was a family drama.

“The politics of this particular family reflect

the invidious influence of tyranny

and how that tyranny, which comes from

without, gets exercised at home,” said

Meshejian said, who seemed very enthusiastic

about the play. I could understand

why. I recently read the play and found

myself drawn to the family, especially to

Lucine, the heroine. The writer, Semerciyan,

an American who has been living

and working in England for the past ten

years, will be making a special trip to

Philadelphia for the PlayPenn 2008 Conference

to see a reading of her play.

When asked about where he sees Play-

Penn in five years, Meshejian laughed

heartily and said, “What I would love is for

PlayPenn to extend the work of the conference

outward throughout the year. I would

like to offer a weeklong reading workshop

to a worthy play and playwright. My fantasy

would be to find the funds that would

allow me to invite writers here, give them

a good enough stipend, so that they can

establish themselves here, make relationships

here with local theaters, and possibly

become interconnected with the actors

and directors of this theater community.”

Meshejian continued to tell me that he

would also like to be able to give local writers

the opportunity and resources to hear

their plays performed by actors. All these

plans require the support of the community

at large. “It’s such a rarity that the

Armenian people, history, and culture get

such exposure,” Meshejian said. “So this

is a great opportunity for people who are

interested in fueling this exposure to step

up and contribute to PlayPenn.”

Another Man’s Son is a play that tackles

issues of filial duty, tyranny, loyalty,

and love. Its protagonist, Lucine, a brave

young woman, faces and confronts these

issues head on. Semerciyan and I had a

chance to discuss the play over the phone.

As her determined and passionate

voice came through the headset, I started

to sense similarities between Lucine

and her creator. “I studied playwriting at

the University of Michigan,” Semerciyan

said. “I was really taken by playwriting

and knew that I’d always be interested

in it. After my move to the UK, I had to

move away from it, but then returned to

it about four years ago. And I began with

Another Man’s Son.”

She went on to tell me that the knowledge

she accumulated over the years

about playwriting was applied to her play,

which she hopes will one day come to fruition.

“Along the way I wrote other plays,”

she said, referring to Playthings, Filibuster,

and Down the Packhorse. I asked Semerciyan

about how the characters in Another

Man’s Son came about. She explained that

they were fictitious. “But even fictitious

characters have antecedents in life,” she

said. “Lucine is kind of like me, you know.

What if I had been born back then And,

of course, a little bit of imagination.” Semerciyan

added that the father character

was a composite of patriarchs that she

had come across and heard about over

the years. “The factual information about

the father surviving the Genocide – I got

from my grandfather,” she explained.

“But to really bring characters into conflict

the way that they do in my play, it had

to come more from the fictitious realm.”

Originally, Semerciyan had submitted her

play to a contest held by the ADAA, then

she was invited to submit it to PlayPenn.

“I am hoping that hearing it out loud from

start to finish at PlayPenn will give me a

better idea of how it plays and how to better

gauge the dramatic action,” she continued.

“This is a great opportunity to see

how it works.” When asked if there was

a specific theater that she hoped would

produce Another Man’s Son, Semerciyan

simply said, “I would just like it to have a

life after PlayPenn. To be seen!”

The debut public reading of Another

Man’s Son will take place on July 26, at 8

p.m., at the PlayPenn 2008 Conference. f

connect:

playpenn.org

C8 Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008


The voice behind the echo

Ardzagang Armenian

Television continues to

grow strong

by Armina LaManna

NEW MILFORD, N.J. – In last week’s Arts

& Culture section, the Armenian Reporter

presented the story of a young and multitalented

artist, Haik Kocharian. In that

article Haik talked about the influence

his parents, also artists, had on him. It

is them – Haik’s mother, Karine Kocharian,

in particular – that we shall tell you

about today.

An accomplished actor and a dedicated

journalist, Mrs. Kocharian enjoys

the love and respect of those who surround

her and those who get to see

her and her work weekly on the “Ardzagang”

television program. Co-produced

by Aram Manoukian and Haik

Kocharian, the Brooklyn-based show

offers news and cultural information to

Armenian communities in the tri-state

area. Cablecast on Brooklyn Community

Access Television, “Ardzagang” is

also broadcast throughout Southern

California.

For those of you who have had

the pleasure of seeing plays at the

Sundukian Theater in Yerevan in the

70s, 80s, and 90s, will undoubtedly already

be familiar with Karine Kocharian

– a woman whose talent, drive, and

love of her people helped her overcome

the difficulties of a homeland in great

flux, and who, together with her husband,

Ara Manoukian, created a muchneeded

bridge between Armenia and its

diaspora.

Mrs. Kocharian is a graduate of the

Yerevan Fine Arts and Theater Institute.

“There is a funny story about how I got

admitted to the program there,” she remembered

fondly. “After the first exam,

I fell and broke my foot. Obviously, I

thought that I wasn’t going to be admitted

since I missed the other exams.

But, shortly thereafter, Vartan Ajemian

sent me word that he would be taking

me into the program.” She then continued

to tell me that at first she went to

university to study something else, but

when her teacher noticed that she was

not into her French exam, “she asked

me why I wasn’t responding to the questions.

I said because I wanted to be in

the theater program. That’s when the

teacher told me to just go to the theater

program,” Kocharian explained.

At the very young age of 19, Karine

married Vladimir Kocharian, a renowned

actor and artist in his own right.

This was a union of love and to this day

she fondly recounts her days with her

husband. The couple later moved to

Leninakan (now Gyumri), where Karine

worked at the State Theater of Gyumri.

“A couple years later, Vartan Ajemian

and then Hratch Ghaplanian invited us

back to Yerevan to the Sundukian Theater.

Being invited to the theater was a

big deal then,” recalled Kocharian. But

tragedy struck in 1989, when Vladimir

suddenly died. “This was a great, great,

great tragedy for me,” she stated.

Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008

As we spoke, it was clear to me that

she was greatly fond of the Sundukian

Theater and her years there. After all,

she thought of that theater as her home.

There she appeared in many leading

roles, ranging from Shakespeare to Ostrovsky.

“My life’s meaning has always

been in the theater!” Kocharian said.

“And I feel a great void now that it’s not

part of my life.”

Kocharian then excitedly told me

that later this year she will be back on

stage at the Sundukian Theater, to play

the title role in Brecht’s Mother Courage.

“This is a dream come true for me,” she

commented. To Kocharian, teaching

proved to be another source of much

happiness and joy. “My students at the

Yerevan Fine Arts and Theater Institute

and the Pedagogical Institute gave me

life,” she said. Talking about her teaching

years and her students was a very

nostalgic moment for Kocharian. She

spoke about the guilt she felt for leaving

her students when she resigned

from her teaching post. She said she

even wrote a play about a similar scenario

– only in her play the students

were able to get their teacher to return

to them.

At this point in the conversation, Kocharian

told me about a truly joyous

moment in her life: her reunion with

Ara Manoukian, a fellow actor, in 1994.

Before coming to the States, Manoukian

and Kocharian performed in Europe for

a couple months. They continued acting

in America and even performed for what

was then a small Armenian community

in Colorado. Manoukian finished Ghaplanian’s

theater program in Yerevan and

has been seen in many plays and films

in Armenia. “To this day Ara and I still

don’t know what kind of force brought

us together,” Kocharian said. “But what

I can say is that Ara gave me a will to live

again.” Kocharian credited Manoukian

for the fact that she is still around and

that she is still creating. “I had cancer a

few years after we arrived in the States.

We lived through many troubles,” she

recalled.

In the mid 1990s, it was suggested to

them that they begin a television program.

The rest, as they say, is history.

Kocharian and Manoukian went back to

college, got certified as producers, and

began their new careers in the fledgling

world of Armenian-American television.

“It was on April 3 of 1996 that our first

program aired,” Kocharian remembered

and proudly stated that “Ardzagang” has

Above: Ara Manoukian

and Karine Kocharian.

Right: Karine

Kocharian. Below:

Kocharian and

Manoukian’s many

characters.

been on for 12 uninterrupted years. “Ara

is in charge of the filming and I write

the texts and programs,” Kocharian explained.

The show covers topics ranging

from culture and education to religion

and politics, and features profiles of and

interviews with cultural leaders, clergy,

and politicians.

“For the past two years I have also

been working for Voice of America,” Kocharian

said. “I prepare programs which

I send to Washington and from there

they get sent to Armenia.”

Karine moved on to talk a bit about

politics and the relationship between

Armenia and the diaspora. “When Armenia

was closed to the diaspora, that

same diaspora cherished Armenians

from their motherland,” she said. “Then,

when Armenia first opened up to the

diaspora, something similar to animosity

ran amongst everyone. Now it is my

opinion that after getting to know each

other better, the diaspora and Armenia

are once again united.”

Kocharian added that it is the specific

mission of “Ardzagang” to better investigate

the differences between Armenians

of various countries of origin, to help

us see each other in a more informed

light, and ultimately strengthen the ties

that bind us. “Healthy criticism is a good

thing,” Kocharian said. “But there are

times and situations when we have to

have a more constructive attitude rather

than a judgmental one.” It is to this

vision that Kocharian and Manoukian

wish “Ardzagang” to ‘contribute.

“‘Ardzagang’ is television for our diaspora

here in and near New York and is

about our diaspora in New York,” Kocharian

said and added, “We cover everybody,

no matter what their political associations,

no matter what their religious

denomination. We treat everyone fairly.”

Since the launch of the program, “not

once have we had a rerun,” Kocharian

continued. “Recently there was a flood

and we lost almost all our equipment. Yet

even then, our programs did not have a

break. After all, ‘Ardzagang’ is like a child

to us!”

f

C9


Program Grid 14 – 20 July

USArmenia is a 24-hour broadcasting station specializing in the full spectrum of HD-quality Armenian

programming.

Located in Burbank’s famed media district, our headquarters comprise 15,000 square feet of studio

space and production facilities, in addition to 40,000 square feet of offices.

Our programs are broadcast locally on Charter Cable’s Channel 286, and nationwide on Global Satellite

117 and through the Dish Network, to a viewership of over 100,000 households.

Our broadcast lineup consists of original programming produced both locally and in Armenia. It

includes local, national, and international news, news feeds from Armenia four times a day, as well as a

broad range of proprietary talk shows, soap operas, reality shows, documentaries, and feature films.

USArmenia holds exclusive rights to the Hay Film Library, a collection of hundreds of Armenian- and

Russian-language movies released since 1937. To date, more than 550 titles in the collection have been

restored and upgraded to HD quality.

USArmenia works in conjunction with the Armenian Reporter, an independent English-language weekly

newspaper with a circulation of 35,000 across the United States.

For timely and highest-standard local and national news coverage, USArmenia maintains a mobile HDproduction

unit in Southern California and a reporting team in Washington

EST PST

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14 July 15 July 16 July 17 July 18 July 19 July

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Space matters

John Halajian’s

riveting account of

lunar exploration

by K. N. Mouradian

Moon Stories: A Roadmap to Lunar

Exploration and Beyond is the last

book written by John Halajian, a

pioneering engineer and an expert

on Armenian architecture died last

year.

As with his previous works

– like 2006’s Armenian Church Architecture:

From Dormancy to Revival

– Moon Stories reflects the

author’s expansive knowledge of

multiple aspects in the sciences

and arts. Halajian writes his stories

as a quest to understand the

moon, and pays homage to the unsung

heroes he worked with while

serving as a technical consultant

to NASA during the peak lunar-exploration

years of the 1960s.

Halajian begins with a chronology

of events that led to the photometric

mapping of the moon. The

ensuing narrative is as much a

scientific account as it is a human

story, and unfolds the trials as

well as the excitement and humor

of the uncharted journey. During

the course of the moon stories, the

journey itself becomes the destination,

and the author conveys how

events came together, through either

coincidence or fate.

The book also depicts the means

by which discoveries are made and

transformed into new technologies.

The antithesis of the book may be

initially viewed as the post-lunarlanding

days, and the premature derailing

of many lunar research programs.

But further reading offers an

optimistic view of the reinvention

of ideas, from the mapping of the

moon to that of our own planet.

Specifically, the author’s invention

of the first computer-compatible

digital imaging system to map the

“integral brightness,” polarization,

and color of the moon inevitably

led to the evolution of the digital

camera we use today. As the book

approaches its final chapter, the author

becomes more philosophical,

touching on human origin and destiny.

Moon Stories is a must read for

those with an appreciation of the

sciences and a sense of adventure.

Halajian was the co-inventor

of a version of the digital camera,

which he developed to map the

moon. He is also known as a writer

of essays on a variety of subjects

including history, science, religion,

architecture, and music. He built

his own house in Long Island, New

York, where he lived until his final

days with his family. During the

latter part of his life, Halajian lost

the use of his arms and legs following

spinal-cord surgery. However,

with the help of an energetic support

team of caregivers, friends,

and family, he was able to channel

his knowledge and creative ideas

into books.

The recent revival of the lunar

exploration program on a global

level is a tribute to the author

and his pioneering peers. Halajian’s

moon stories are an important

link in the continuity of new

lunar discoveries and innovative

technologies.

Technical papers and reports

written by the author on photometric

measurements of simulated

lunar surfaces and other related

lunar topics can be found on the

NASA Technical Reports Server at

ntrs.nasa.gov/.

f

Moon Stories: A Roadmap to Lunar Exploration

and Beyond

By John Halajian. Tate Publishing, 2007.

Available at abrilbooks.com, amazon.com,

and other booksellers.

John Halajian’s last

book, Moon Stories

C10 Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008


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Remembering Harry Barba

by Christopher Atamian

He believed that writing should

instruct and elevate the soul. He

turned out finely crafted, oldfashioned

realist prose. And he

spent much of the latter part of

his life concerned that he and his

writing had already been forgotten

by the general public. Noted

Armenian-American writer Harry

Barba died on December 4, 2007,

at the age of 85.

A Pulitzer Prize finalist for his

1985 novel Round Trip to Byzantium

and an accomplished shortstory

writer, Barba belonged to a

pioneering group that helped pave

the way for succeeding generations

of Armenian writers in the

United States. Barba tackled issues

of ethnicity and assimilation, perhaps

in a more indirect but no less

important manner than his more

famous contemporaries William

Saroyan and Marjorie Dobkin.

Barba belonged to a generation

of Armenian-American writers

who often lived their ethnic identities

half-in, half-out, and who,

for whatever reasons, occulted

their own and their characters’ Armenian

roots. Another successful

Barba novel, For the Grape Season

(1960), introduces readers to a

group of seasonal grape pickers

who move to a remote Vermont

valley and are never explicitly identified

as Armenian. Rather, we are

led to believe that they are Tatar

or Iranian, or simply from some

nebulous genetic starting point in

the Caucasus.

Barba belonged to a

pioneering group that

helped pave the way for

succeeding generations

of Armenian writers in

the United States.

In Round Trip to Byzantium, an

American Fulbright professor

travels to Syria to teach English

literature. At one point, a female

student is dismissed by her Arab

classmates as “an Armenian.” Later

on, the main erotic interest in the

book is a mixed Armeno-Byzantine

Lolita character who could have

walked straight out of a Middle

Easternized version of Nabokov’s

imagination. Once again, however,

a Barba protagonist, in this case

the professor, is never identified

as Armenian, although he is obviously

based on the author himself.

And in the racy short story “Love

in the Persian Way,” the oversexed

teenage protagonist, who makes

a favorite pastime out of bedding

every female in his household, also

has an indeterminate ethnic identity.

The orientalized, the exoticized,

the repressed Other: all these

things haunt Barba’s prose like

ghosts from an ethnic past, clawing

at the edge of page and story,

waiting to come out of hiding and

declare themselves for who they really

are. But Barba – who was born

Nahabed O’Hanessian – is relevant

to the general public as well. His

insistence on “socially functional

writing,” which posits that literature

has both a redemptive and a

moral value, is certainly a powerful

if somewhat out-of-vogue viewpoint

these days. And some of his

short stories, such as “The Man

Who Didn’t Want to Box Muhammad

Ali” and “The Plum Tree Plunderers,”

are simply outstanding.

It’s good to be

reminded of literature’s

redemptive powers.

It’s good, as well, to

read well-crafted and

sometimes salacious

prose.

In the end, it’s good to be reminded

of literature’s redemptive

powers. It’s good, as well, to read

well-crafted and sometimes salacious

prose. Finally, it’s good that

we have had people like Barba, for

whom writing and teaching, along

with family life, represent a raison

d’être unto themselves. Thanks in

part to Barba and his generation,

those ghosts from the Armenian

past have finally made their way

onto the page in bold letters, jinns

sprung from the bottle, never to

return.

f

Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008

C11


C12 Armenian Reporter Arts & Culture July 12, 2008

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