Chapter 7 - Memoria Press

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Chapter 7 - Memoria Press

Classical Rhetoric

Martin Cothran

Instructor


Forensic rhetoric

Accusation and defense


Three points Aristotle proposes to

ascertain

Nature and number of incentives for

wrongdoing

State of mind of wrongdoers

Kind of persons who are wronged and

their condition


Wrongdoing

Injury voluntarily inflicted contrary

to law


Law

Special

General


Meanness

Wrongs concerning money


Profligacy

Matters of physical pleasure


Effeminacy

Matters of comfort


Cowardice

Where danger is concerned


Ambition

Where honor is concerned


Quick-temperedness

From anger


Love of victory

Wrongs done for the sake of victory


Embitteredness

Wrongs done for the sake of revenge


Stupidity

Wrongs done because of

misunderstanding of right and wrong


Shamelessness

Wrongs committed because he

doesn’t care what people think of

him


Human Actions

Voluntary

Involuntary


Human Actions

Voluntary

Involuntary

CHANCE

Necessity


Human Actions

Voluntary

Involuntary

CHANCE

Necessity

COMPULSION

NATURE


Human Actions

Voluntary

Involuntary

HABIT

Impulse

CHANCE

Necessity

COMPULSION

NATURE


Human Actions

Voluntary

Involuntary

HABIT

Impulse

CHANCE

Necessity

RATIONAL IMPULSE

Irrational Impulse

COMPULSION

NATURE


Human Actions

Voluntary

Involuntary

HABIT

Impulse

CHANCE

Necessity

RATIONAL IMPULSE

Irrational Impulse

COMPULSION

NATURE

ANGER

DESIRE


3 Reasons men do wrong

They suppose it can be done

They suppose they will not be found

out

They suppose that if they are found

out, they will not be punished


Division of Law

General laws of nature

Particular laws of groups


Division of Law

General laws of nature

Particular laws of groups


Division of Actions

Actions affecting the whole

community

Actions affecting only one member


Criteria for harm

Victim just suffer actual harm

Victim must suffer wrong against his

will


Two kinds of natural law

What comes from excess of virtue

and vice

What comes from an omission of

special, written law


Traditional Logic Review VII-1

What comes from excess of virtue

and vice

What comes from an omission of

special, written law


Mode

of Persuasion

Audience

of Speech

Time

Concerned

With

Aim of Speech End of Speech What The

Mode of

Persuasion

Depends On

What Speaker

Must Be Able

to Do

or Understand

Political

Forensic

Ceremonial


tmesis


hyperbaton


anastrophe


Forensic (legal) rhetoric


classification and division

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