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Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

<strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>Studies</strong>


Introduction<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London is an internationally<br />

renowned, exciting and innovative centre for<br />

postgraduate study in geography. As a member <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong>’s <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> you will<br />

join a well-resourced, intellectually stimulating, and<br />

supportive department that can help you realise your full<br />

potential. Whether joining one <strong>of</strong> the Department’s MA or<br />

MSc programmes, or working for a PhD, you will work<br />

closely with academic staff at the forefront <strong>of</strong> the<br />

discipline.<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> has been taught at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> since 1894,<br />

and the College has been a school <strong>of</strong> the University <strong>of</strong><br />

London since 1907. Your membership <strong>of</strong> the University<br />

<strong>of</strong> London will give you access to its specialised libraries<br />

and seminars, as well as links to an active community <strong>of</strong><br />

academic geographers. On successful completion <strong>of</strong> the<br />

programme you will be awarded a University <strong>of</strong> London<br />

PhD or MA/MSc degree.


Contents<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> 02<br />

• Support and resources<br />

• Seminars and discussion groups<br />

• The wider research environment<br />

• Timing<br />

• Bursaries and Studentships<br />

• Accommodation<br />

MA/MSc programmes 04<br />

• Core course<br />

• Prerequisite course<br />

• Dissertations<br />

• Supervision<br />

MA/MSc <strong>Geography</strong> 06<br />

• Programme structure<br />

• Specialist courses<br />

• Teaching staff<br />

• Student experiences<br />

MA Cities and Cultures 08<br />

• Programme structure<br />

• Specialist courses<br />

• Teaching staff<br />

• Student experiences<br />

MSc Globalisation and Development 10<br />

• Programme structure<br />

• Specialist courses<br />

• Teaching staff<br />

• Student experiences<br />

MA London <strong>Studies</strong> 12<br />

• Programme structure<br />

• Specialist courses<br />

• Teaching staff<br />

MSc in Physical <strong>Geography</strong> by Research14<br />

PhD programmes 16<br />

• Training<br />

• Research training in Human <strong>Geography</strong><br />

• Research training in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

and Environmental Science<br />

• Supervision and upgrading<br />

• Research interests<br />

• A record <strong>of</strong> success<br />

• Student experiences<br />

Staff research interests 19<br />

• Culture, Space and Power Research<br />

Theme<br />

Staff research interests (cont) 22<br />

• Health Place and Society<br />

Staff research interests (cont) 25<br />

• Economy, Development and<br />

Social Justice Research Theme<br />

Staff research interests (cont) 27<br />

• Hydrological, Hydrochemical<br />

and Fluvial Processes Theme<br />

Staff research interests (cont) 27<br />

• Environmental Change Theme<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 30<br />

London and the East End 31<br />

Further information and applications 32<br />

• Programme structure<br />

• Teaching staff<br />

The information given in this <strong>brochure</strong> is correct at the time <strong>of</strong><br />

going to press.<br />

The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any statement in<br />

it and accepts no responsibility for the consequences <strong>of</strong> any such<br />

changes.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 01


The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong><br />

The Department <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>Geography</strong> at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

is internationally renowned<br />

for the excellence <strong>of</strong> both<br />

its teaching and research.<br />

The most recent Research<br />

Assessment Exercise<br />

(RAE) (2001) – the way the<br />

government grades and<br />

funds research excellence<br />

in universities – confirmed<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>’s excellence,<br />

awarding the department<br />

Grade 5 (out <strong>of</strong> a possible<br />

5*).<br />

The College made extensive preparations<br />

to achieve the best possible pr<strong>of</strong>ile in RAE<br />

2008. When the results <strong>of</strong> the latest RAE are<br />

available (December 2008), they will be<br />

available online at www.qmul.ac.uk/RAE<br />

Our <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong>fers four MA/MSc<br />

programmes in human geography, and an<br />

MSc programme in physical geography. We<br />

have 32 full-time research active staff, and<br />

46 full and part-time students studying for<br />

PhDs in human and physical geography.<br />

Research in the Department is organised<br />

around five research themes:<br />

• Culture, Space and Power<br />

• Health, Place and Society<br />

• Economy, Development and Social Justice<br />

Research<br />

• Hydrological, Hydrochemical and Fluvial<br />

Processes<br />

• Environmental Change.<br />

These <strong>of</strong>fer a broad range <strong>of</strong> research<br />

expertise from which our graduate students<br />

greatly benefit. Strong inter-connections<br />

between each <strong>of</strong> the groups also benefit<br />

research students.<br />

Support and resources<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> is housed within the<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong>. The <strong>School</strong> is wellresourced<br />

and <strong>of</strong>fers dedicated work space in<br />

study rooms fitted with networked PCs. There<br />

is also a graduate computing room containing<br />

GIS s<strong>of</strong>tware, scanner, plotter and digitiser,<br />

and a Mac equipped for desktop publishing.<br />

Study and work space (with networked PCs)<br />

is also available in the Lock-Keeper’s cottage<br />

which is for all graduate students from<br />

Humanities and Social Science.<br />

Those undertaking physical geography and<br />

environmental science research have access<br />

to a suite <strong>of</strong> recently upgraded and extended<br />

laboratories. The laboratories have benefited<br />

from substantial investment by The Science<br />

Research Infrastructure Fund (SRIF) which<br />

has provided new specialist research<br />

laboratories including:<br />

• the world-leading Centre for<br />

Micromorphology for the optical and digital<br />

microscopic analysis <strong>of</strong> soils, sediments<br />

and micr<strong>of</strong>ossils.<br />

• the Centre for Aquatic and Terrestrial<br />

Environments, an exciting new<br />

interdisciplinary collaboration between the<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong> and the <strong>School</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> Biological and Chemical Sciences.<br />

Specialist research facilities housed with the<br />

department include:<br />

• the Wetlands Research Laboratory which<br />

includes equipment for analysis <strong>of</strong> the<br />

physical properties <strong>of</strong> peat soils and an<br />

environmental plant growth chamber<br />

which allows samples <strong>of</strong> the wetland soil,<br />

including the growing surface, to be<br />

incubated and analysed under realistic<br />

weather/climate conditions.<br />

• a dark room with hydr<strong>of</strong>luoric acid digestion<br />

facilities for the preparation <strong>of</strong> samples for<br />

luminescence dating.<br />

• housing for a rainfall simulator for research<br />

into soil erosion and contaminant transport<br />

pathways.<br />

Recent investment has provided a range <strong>of</strong><br />

new analytical instrumentation including:<br />

• Inductively-coupled plasma optical<br />

emission spectrometer (Varian Vista-PRO)<br />

• Ion Chromatography System 2500 (Dionex)<br />

• Elemental Analyser (Flash EA 1112)<br />

• TOC and TON analyser (HiPerTOC/TNb)<br />

• Laser Particle Size Analyser (Beckman<br />

Coulter LS 13320)<br />

• Computed X-ray Microtomograph system<br />

(Skyscan 1072)<br />

• Automated Material Birefringence Analyser<br />

(Metripol)<br />

<strong>Graduate</strong> students also have access to<br />

instruments housed in the <strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

Biological and Chemical Sciences including<br />

a Gamma Spectrometer (Canberra BEGe<br />

2825), Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array<br />

Detector (Agilent) and On-line Solid Phase<br />

02 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


Extraction-LC-Ion trap Mass Spectrometer<br />

(Prospekt/Agilent).<br />

We have an extensive pool <strong>of</strong> equipment<br />

for field research in geographical and<br />

environmental sciences. In addition to<br />

general field equipment to support<br />

geomorphological and environmental<br />

analysis, we have invested in specialist<br />

resources such as:<br />

• Equipment for surveying including a<br />

Ground Penetrating Radar (PulseEkko Pro<br />

1000 with Smart Cart) for geological and<br />

hydrological surveying, a survey grade GPS<br />

(Topcon HiPer Pro RTK-DGPS) and several<br />

Nikon surveying levels.<br />

• Coring and drilling equipment including a<br />

K-S gravity corer for sampling from deep<br />

lakes, a percussion corer for collecting soil<br />

and rock cores and equipment for drilling<br />

and recovering shallow snow and ice cores<br />

for glacial-climatological studies.<br />

• Automatic Weather Stations (Davies, Delta-<br />

T, Campbell Scientific and Skye<br />

Instruments) for boundary layer<br />

meteorological studies, including two semipermanent<br />

Campbell Scientific weather<br />

stations installed in central Iceland in<br />

collaboration with Loughborough<br />

University.<br />

• Equipment for hydrological monitoring<br />

and soil analysis including flow meters,<br />

data loggers, tensiometers and pressure<br />

transducers.<br />

Finally, we maintain specialist computer<br />

s<strong>of</strong>tware to support our field and laboratory<br />

analytical facilities, including:<br />

• GIS s<strong>of</strong>tware (ArcGIS)<br />

• Remote sensing and visualisation<br />

(ERDAS Imagine)<br />

• Visualisation and presentation <strong>of</strong> geological<br />

data (RockWorks)<br />

The Department is located immediately<br />

adjacent to the main College library on the<br />

Mile End campus. In addition to the <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> library, all graduate students have full<br />

access to the University <strong>of</strong> London Library<br />

(Senate House) and a number <strong>of</strong> other,<br />

specialist, University libraries. Members <strong>of</strong><br />

the <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> may also take advantage<br />

<strong>of</strong> the College Language Learning Unit<br />

(<strong>of</strong>fering beginner, intermediate and<br />

advanced level courses in English, French,<br />

German, Italian and Spanish), as well as<br />

many specialist language centres provided<br />

by the University <strong>of</strong> London.<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> provides a<br />

Postgraduate Research Fund for PhD<br />

students to support further training,<br />

conference attendance and fieldwork costs.<br />

Seminars and discussion<br />

groups<br />

All MA/MSc and PhD students are<br />

encouraged to participate fully in the lively<br />

research culture <strong>of</strong> the Department. This<br />

includes attending weekly Department<br />

seminars, which provide an opportunity to<br />

hear about leading research undertaken by<br />

invited visitors. PhD students present their<br />

own research in the Annual Postgraduate<br />

Symposium Day, and MA/MSc students<br />

present their draft course papers at<br />

conference days each semester. MA/MSc<br />

and PhD students are encouraged to attend<br />

Research Frameworks in Human <strong>Geography</strong>,<br />

which consist <strong>of</strong> an informal reading and<br />

discussion group convened around the work<br />

<strong>of</strong> a visiting speaker.<br />

Recent visitors in the series have included:<br />

• Derek Gregory<br />

• David Harvey<br />

• Cindi Katz<br />

• Doreen Massey<br />

• Linda McDowell<br />

• Don Mitchell and Ed Soja<br />

• Michael Storper<br />

• Eric Swyngedouw<br />

• Julie Graham<br />

• Ron Martin<br />

• Richard Walker<br />

• Peter Dicken<br />

• Catherine Rankin<br />

• Wendy Larner<br />

Students studying for the MSc in Physical<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> by Research or a PhD in physical<br />

geography are encouraged to attend<br />

meetings <strong>of</strong> the Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Group.<br />

This is a forum for the (generally informal)<br />

presentation <strong>of</strong> new research ideas and<br />

preliminary research findings, and for<br />

debates on high-pr<strong>of</strong>ile issues in<br />

environmental science.<br />

The Group’s meetings complement the more<br />

formal Departmental research seminars (<strong>of</strong><br />

which eight a year are in physical geography).<br />

Both MSc and PhD students are required to<br />

give a short research presentation in one <strong>of</strong><br />

the Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Group meetings.<br />

The Group meets every two-three weeks<br />

throughout the year.<br />

The wider research<br />

environment<br />

As members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong>, our<br />

MA/MSc and PhD students make a vital<br />

contribution to a department renowned for<br />

its intellectually stimulating and supportive<br />

atmosphere. Close links between<br />

postgraduates and staff, and a sense <strong>of</strong><br />

involvement in the life <strong>of</strong> the Department, is<br />

encouraged through small group teaching<br />

and a range <strong>of</strong> research activities in which<br />

postgraduate students play a full part.<br />

<strong>Graduate</strong> students are fully represented as<br />

decision-making members on all <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Department’s key committees.<br />

In human geography, research training for<br />

MA/MSc and first-year PhD students is<br />

provided through the <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>/University<br />

College London (UCL) Postgraduate Training<br />

Consortium, with members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Graduate</strong><br />

<strong>School</strong> taking a compulsory module<br />

alongside colleagues from the Departments<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong> and at UCL. This is a highly<br />

innovative and well-regarded research<br />

training programme which introduces<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 03


The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> (cont)<br />

postgraduates to a wide range <strong>of</strong> research<br />

expertise. It also helps you to establish an<br />

extensive research network consisting <strong>of</strong><br />

other postgraduate students and staff.<br />

In physical geography, research training for<br />

MSc and first-year PhD students is provided<br />

by members <strong>of</strong> the Department. The training<br />

is flexible enough to be tailored to the needs<br />

<strong>of</strong> individual students, while ensuring that key<br />

skills are covered.<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> also plays an active<br />

role in the London Postgraduate Training<br />

Consortium (consisting <strong>of</strong> the departments<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong> at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, UCL, Kings<br />

College London, Royal Holloway, University<br />

<strong>of</strong> London and the London <strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

Economics) providing all our students with<br />

the opportunity to develop important<br />

research contacts with both postgraduates<br />

and staff in a number <strong>of</strong> other institutions.<br />

Timing<br />

The Department’s MA/MSc courses begin<br />

in September <strong>of</strong> each year. As a full-time<br />

student you will complete your dissertation<br />

after 12 months, for graduation just before<br />

Christmas <strong>of</strong> that year. For part-time students<br />

the programme is 24 months, with the<br />

submission <strong>of</strong> the dissertation 24 months<br />

after initial enrolment and graduation just<br />

before Christmas <strong>of</strong> the final year. Those<br />

wishing to join the Department’s PhD<br />

programme usually do so in September,<br />

although other start dates are possible in<br />

consultation with supervisors and the<br />

Director <strong>of</strong> <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>Studies</strong>.<br />

Bursaries and<br />

Studentships<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> has a number <strong>of</strong><br />

bursaries available on a competitive basis.<br />

The MA/MSc bursaries cover course fees at<br />

the Home/EU fees rate and are allocated after<br />

the 1 July deadline <strong>of</strong> each year. Those<br />

applying for PhD research may also apply for<br />

a College Studentship, covering both fees<br />

and maintenance for home and overseas<br />

students. The Department is normally able<br />

to <strong>of</strong>fer a limited number <strong>of</strong> studentships<br />

funded by the UK Research Councils, for<br />

topics in both human and physical<br />

geography. All MPhil/PhD studentships are<br />

allocated by the Department in April each<br />

year following interview. Candidates do not<br />

need to make a separate application for<br />

bursaries and studentships, which are<br />

allocated as part <strong>of</strong> the usual application<br />

procedure.<br />

The Department is recognised by the<br />

Economic and Social Research Council<br />

(ESRC) for full-time, part-time and CASE PhD<br />

studentships. MA/MSc <strong>Geography</strong>, MA Cities<br />

and Cultures and MSc Globalisation and<br />

Development have been recognised under<br />

the ESRC’s 1+3 funding regime. The<br />

Department has a successful completion<br />

record for ESRC funded doctoral research.<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> also has an excellent<br />

record <strong>of</strong> attracting both Natural Environment<br />

Research Council (NERC) and College<br />

Studentships. These studentships <strong>of</strong>fer<br />

those working in physical geography and<br />

environmental science the opportunity to<br />

develop their own research topics, rather<br />

than being constrained by pre-existing<br />

programmes.<br />

You can find out more about bursaries and<br />

studentships at:<br />

http://www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/<br />

graduateschool/support.html<br />

Accommodation<br />

All single international students are <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

the chance to live in award-winning College<br />

accommodation (subject to availability). We<br />

have many attractive new developments<br />

situated on-campus or nearby, overlooking<br />

the Regent’s Canal and Mile End Park areas.<br />

If you are a first year postgraduate, there is<br />

no specific deadline for the submission <strong>of</strong><br />

housing applications, but as the allocation <strong>of</strong><br />

places starts at the beginning <strong>of</strong> June, the<br />

earlier you apply the better your chances will<br />

be <strong>of</strong> securing a place.<br />

Students with families are able to apply<br />

for intercollegiate halls <strong>of</strong> residence<br />

(International Hall). If you wish to apply for a<br />

one or more bed roomed flat, you must apply<br />

using the application form on the website at<br />

www.lon.ac.uk/halls<br />

The deadline to apply for family<br />

accommodation is March. Flats are <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

and allocated by International Hall and not<br />

by the <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> Residences Office.<br />

Alternatively students with families are able<br />

to apply for International Student House or<br />

Goodenough College accommodation or take<br />

up private accommodation.<br />

For further information on accommodation:<br />

www.ccrs.qmul.ac.uk/residences<br />

04 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


MA/MSc programmes<br />

The Department’s<br />

<strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong>fers the<br />

following programmes:<br />

• (L8S7) MA <strong>Geography</strong> full time 1 year<br />

• (L8S8) MA <strong>Geography</strong> part time 2 years<br />

• (L8S1) MSc <strong>Geography</strong> full time 1 year<br />

• (L8S2) MSc <strong>Geography</strong> part time 2 years<br />

• (L8S9) MA Cities and Cultures full time<br />

1 year<br />

• (L8S0) MA Cities and Cultures part time<br />

2 years<br />

• (L8S5) MSc Globalisation and<br />

Development full time 1 year<br />

• (L8S6) MSc Globalisation and<br />

Development part time 2 years<br />

• (L8Q1) London <strong>Studies</strong> full time 1 year<br />

• (L8Q2) London <strong>Studies</strong> part time 2 years<br />

• (F8S1) MSc in Physical <strong>Geography</strong> by<br />

Research full time 1 year<br />

• (F8S2) MSc in Physical <strong>Geography</strong> by<br />

Research part time 2 years<br />

Human <strong>Geography</strong><br />

Programmes<br />

Each human geography programme is closely<br />

tied to the interests <strong>of</strong> one or more <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Department’s research groups in human<br />

geography, ensuring that you are exposed to<br />

the latest thinking in your chosen specialist<br />

field.<br />

You may study on a full-time (12 months) or<br />

part-time (24 months) basis. Students on each<br />

programme study modules equivalent to the<br />

value <strong>of</strong> 180 credits made up according to the<br />

structure <strong>of</strong> each programme.<br />

All MA and MSc students (except for those<br />

taking MA London <strong>Studies</strong>, see page 11) –<br />

and all first-year PhD students who have not<br />

previously completed postgraduate research<br />

training – take a compulsory module Social,<br />

Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies, and a prerequisite module,<br />

Thinking Geographically.<br />

Compulsory module<br />

Social Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies<br />

All MA and MSc students take this<br />

interdepartmental and interdisciplinary<br />

compulsory module, which is ESRCrecognised<br />

and jointly taught with the<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong> at University<br />

College London. The module runs over<br />

two semesters and is divided into two parts:<br />

Qualitative Methods and Quantitative<br />

Methods/Spatial Representation. The module<br />

commences with an overview <strong>of</strong> the<br />

philosophical and theoretical underpinnings<br />

<strong>of</strong> social science methodologies (covering, for<br />

example, participatory action research, the art<br />

<strong>of</strong> interviewing and visual methodologies).<br />

You will then be presented with a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

methodologies, via lectures and practical<br />

applications, <strong>of</strong> a range <strong>of</strong> techniques for<br />

gathering and processing data. Alongside<br />

at least four meetings with an individual<br />

supervisor each semester, you will be<br />

introduced to dissertation research design,<br />

implementation and analysis.<br />

Prerequisite module<br />

Thinking Geographically<br />

This module provides an advanced-level<br />

introduction to competing theoretical<br />

traditions and epistemologies within human<br />

geography. It is based around fortnightly<br />

seminars that focus on influential<br />

approaches, perspectives and debates in<br />

geography, each involving the close reading<br />

<strong>of</strong> particular texts. Across the two semesters,<br />

seminars introduce aspects <strong>of</strong> thinking<br />

geographically and focus on particular<br />

traditions and ways <strong>of</strong> approaching<br />

geography. The subjects include: critical<br />

thinking about place and space; contested<br />

histories <strong>of</strong> geography; and the development<br />

<strong>of</strong> radical traditions within geography<br />

informed by Marxism, feminism and<br />

postcolonial perspectives. The seminars also<br />

focus on key debates and controversies in<br />

contemporary human geography such as<br />

culture and political economy; and activism,<br />

the academy and the nature <strong>of</strong> geographical<br />

research.<br />

Dissertations<br />

Each <strong>of</strong> the MA and MSc programmes<br />

includes a dissertation. For MA/MSc<br />

<strong>Geography</strong>, you may choose from three<br />

lengths <strong>of</strong> dissertation: 15,000 words (60<br />

credits), 22,500 words (90 credits), or<br />

30,000 words (120 credits). For MA Cities<br />

and Cultures, MSc Globalisation and<br />

Development, and MA London <strong>Studies</strong> you<br />

will complete a 15,000 word dissertation (60<br />

credits).<br />

Supervision<br />

Supervision for the dissertation is by a<br />

member <strong>of</strong> staff most expert in your chosen<br />

specialist field. You will be <strong>of</strong>fered a<br />

minimum <strong>of</strong> four supervisions per semester<br />

including the summer term and vacation.<br />

The research skills necessary for the<br />

completion <strong>of</strong> a satisfactory dissertation are<br />

provided through Social Science Research:<br />

Methods and Methodologies.<br />

You can expect to develop a close working<br />

relationship with your supervisor, who is<br />

responsible for overseeing your general<br />

personal and pr<strong>of</strong>essional development as<br />

well as the MA/MSc dissertation and, where<br />

appropriate, the preparation <strong>of</strong> any PhD or<br />

funding applications.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 05


MA/MSc <strong>Geography</strong><br />

The Department <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>Geography</strong> <strong>of</strong>fers four<br />

MA/MSc programmes in<br />

Human <strong>Geography</strong>. Three<br />

<strong>of</strong> these are specialised<br />

with set programmes <strong>of</strong><br />

study. They are:<br />

• MA Cities and Cultures<br />

• MSc Globalisation and Development<br />

• MA London <strong>Studies</strong><br />

All students take the compulsory module<br />

Social Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies. They also complete a 15,000<br />

word dissertation and three specialist<br />

modules. It is possible for students to<br />

substitute one <strong>of</strong> these specialist modules<br />

with an approved module <strong>of</strong>fered on another<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> programme. However, this must<br />

be discussed with the MA/MSc Programme<br />

Director. Individual <strong>brochure</strong>s on these<br />

modules are available from the Department<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong>.<br />

The department also <strong>of</strong>fers an MA/MSc in<br />

<strong>Geography</strong>. One distinctive feature <strong>of</strong> this<br />

programme is its flexibility. Students may<br />

choose the weighting and length <strong>of</strong> the<br />

dissertation and the number <strong>of</strong> specialist<br />

module options they complete. Three modes<br />

<strong>of</strong> study are available, however only Mode C is<br />

ESRC recognised.<br />

MA/MSc in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

Modes <strong>of</strong> Study<br />

Mode A MA/MSc <strong>Geography</strong> (Research)<br />

• Students complete the compulsory module<br />

Social Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies<br />

• A dissertation <strong>of</strong> 30,000 words<br />

• One specialist module from the list <strong>of</strong><br />

options <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

Mode B MA/MSc (Named Specialism eg<br />

Cultural <strong>Geography</strong>)<br />

• Students complete the compulsory<br />

module Social Science Research:<br />

Methods and Methodologies<br />

• A dissertation <strong>of</strong> 22,000 words<br />

• Two specialist modules from the list <strong>of</strong><br />

options <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

Mode C MA/MSc <strong>Geography</strong> (ESRC<br />

recognised)<br />

• Students complete the compulsory<br />

module Social Science Research:<br />

Methods and Methodologies<br />

• A dissertation <strong>of</strong> 15,000 words<br />

• Three specialist modules from the list<br />

<strong>of</strong> options <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

List <strong>of</strong> optional specialist<br />

modules <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

• Culture, Space and Power<br />

• Art, Performance and the City<br />

• Cities, Empire and Modernity<br />

• Empire, Race and Immigration<br />

• Understanding Globalisation and<br />

Development I<br />

• Understanding Globalisation and<br />

Development II<br />

• Globalisation and Development in Practice<br />

All MA and MSc students are encouraged to<br />

participate fully in the lively research culture<br />

<strong>of</strong> the Department. Weekly seminars provide<br />

an opportunity to hear about leading research<br />

undertaken by invited visitors. You are also<br />

encouraged to attend meetings <strong>of</strong> Research<br />

Frameworks in Human <strong>Geography</strong>, an<br />

informal reading and discussion group<br />

convened around the work <strong>of</strong> a visiting<br />

speaker.<br />

Teaching staff<br />

Core teaching staff for the programme<br />

includes:<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Alison Blunt<br />

• Dr Kavita Datta<br />

• Dr Shompa Lahiri<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Roger Lee<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jon May<br />

• Dr Cathy McIlwaine<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Catherine Nash<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Miles Ogborn<br />

• Dr Alastair Owens<br />

• Dr David Pinder<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Adrian Smith<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jane Wills<br />

06 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


MA Cities and Cultures<br />

The MA Cities and Cultures<br />

is an innovative<br />

programme that combines<br />

the study <strong>of</strong> cultural<br />

geography with a specific<br />

concern for cities.<br />

Focusing on urban<br />

cultures in the past and<br />

present, it is taught by<br />

some <strong>of</strong> the leading<br />

scholars in the field drawn<br />

primarily from the<br />

Department’s Culture,<br />

Space and Power research<br />

group.<br />

The programme uses the latest thinking<br />

in cultural geography and urban theory to<br />

provide an advanced and critical<br />

understanding <strong>of</strong> how cities are socially<br />

produced, imagined, represented and<br />

contested. It engages with original texts that<br />

have informed thinking about urban spaces<br />

and cultures as well as with a range <strong>of</strong> other<br />

source materials – including the built<br />

environment, art practices, literature, music<br />

and film – through which the meanings and<br />

politics <strong>of</strong> spaces in diverse cities can be<br />

analysed. MA Cities and Cultures is<br />

recognised under the ESRC’s 1+3 funding<br />

scheme.<br />

Programme structure<br />

All students take a compulsory module,<br />

Social Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies, and a prerequisite module,<br />

Thinking Geographically. Students then take<br />

the following specialised modules:<br />

• Culture, Space and Power<br />

• Art, Performance and the City<br />

• Cities, Empire and Modernity<br />

You will also complete a 15,000 word<br />

dissertation to be submitted in September,<br />

which is based on original research on a topic<br />

<strong>of</strong> your choice relating to the themes <strong>of</strong> the<br />

course. Recent dissertations completed by<br />

students taking Cites and Cultures include:<br />

• The Global Production <strong>of</strong> Urban Space in<br />

Shanghai<br />

• The Purification <strong>of</strong> Public Space: examining<br />

the clearance politics <strong>of</strong> London<br />

• Guerrilla Gardening: Geographers and<br />

Gardeners, Actors and Networks:<br />

Reconsidering Urban Public Space<br />

Compulsory module<br />

Social Science Research: Methods<br />

and Methodologies<br />

All MA and MSc students take this<br />

interdepartmental and interdisciplinary<br />

compulsory module, which is ESRCrecognised<br />

and jointly taught with the<br />

Departments <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong> and Anthropology<br />

at University College London. The module<br />

runs over two semesters and is divided into<br />

two parts: Qualitative Methods and<br />

Quantitative Methods/Spatial Representation.<br />

The module commences with an overview<br />

<strong>of</strong> the philosophical and theoretical<br />

underpinnings <strong>of</strong> social science<br />

methodologies (covering, for example,<br />

participatory action research, the art <strong>of</strong><br />

interviewing and visual methodologies).<br />

You will then be presented with a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

methodologies, via lectures and practical<br />

applications, <strong>of</strong> a range <strong>of</strong> techniques for<br />

gathering and processing data. Alongside<br />

at least four meetings with an individual<br />

supervisor each semester, you will be<br />

introduced to dissertation research design,<br />

implementation and analysis.<br />

Prerequisite module<br />

Thinking Geographically<br />

This module provides an advanced-level<br />

introduction to competing theoretical<br />

traditions and epistemologies within human<br />

geography. It is based around fortnightly<br />

seminars that focus on influential<br />

approaches, perspectives and debates in<br />

geography, each involving the close reading<br />

<strong>of</strong> particular texts. Across the two semesters,<br />

seminars introduce aspects <strong>of</strong> thinking<br />

geographically and focus on particular<br />

traditions and ways <strong>of</strong> approaching<br />

geography. The subjects include: critical<br />

thinking about place and space; contested<br />

histories <strong>of</strong> geography; and the development<br />

<strong>of</strong> radical traditions within geography<br />

informed by Marxism, feminism and<br />

postcolonial perspectives. The seminars also<br />

focus on key debates and controversies in<br />

contemporary human geography such as<br />

culture and political economy; and activism,<br />

the academy and the nature <strong>of</strong> geographical<br />

research.<br />

Specialist modules<br />

Culture, Space and Power<br />

This module presents an advanced-level<br />

introduction to the most recent thinking in<br />

cultural geography. The first half <strong>of</strong> the<br />

module addresses how cultural geographers<br />

have worked with concepts that are at the<br />

heart <strong>of</strong> the discipline <strong>of</strong> geography: space,<br />

place, landscape and nature. The following<br />

sessions develop these themes by<br />

considering geographies <strong>of</strong> the body, the<br />

psyche and emotions; the politics <strong>of</strong> identity;<br />

postcolonial geographies; and diasporic<br />

spaces. Throughout the module there is a<br />

concern with the distinctiveness and<br />

significance <strong>of</strong> cultural geographical<br />

perspectives, and with addressing the<br />

interconnections between culture, space<br />

and power.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 07


MA Cities and Cultures (cont)<br />

Art, Performance and the City<br />

This module explores ways <strong>of</strong> imagining,<br />

representing and performing the city through<br />

recent projects by cultural practitioners and<br />

artists in the East End <strong>of</strong> London. It involves<br />

critical reading, background research, and<br />

engaging with practices and sites through<br />

documentation and excursions. Projects<br />

examined include the ‘psychogeographical’<br />

explorations <strong>of</strong> the writer Iain Sinclair and<br />

film-maker Patrick Keiller and the<br />

controversies about place and politics<br />

involved in Rachel Whiteread’s “House”.<br />

Cities, Empire and Modernity<br />

This module focuses on two important sets <strong>of</strong><br />

processes that have shaped cities and city life<br />

in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries:<br />

empire and modernity. It seeks to understand<br />

how urban forms and urban experience are<br />

shaped at the nexus <strong>of</strong> these processes. The<br />

module aims to develop theoretical<br />

understandings <strong>of</strong> empire and modernity,<br />

and to interrogate them through an empirical<br />

engagement with a variety <strong>of</strong> different (and<br />

<strong>of</strong>ten paradigmatic) cities from a range <strong>of</strong><br />

periods and places. These include London,<br />

Paris, Calcutta, Chicago and Los Angeles, but<br />

the ‘spaces’ <strong>of</strong> empire and modernity in each<br />

<strong>of</strong> these cities are given a wide-ranging<br />

treatment, from home spaces to the media to<br />

museums.<br />

Teaching staff<br />

The core teaching staff for the programme<br />

includes:<br />

Student experience<br />

“My year studying Cities and Cultures at<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> provided me the opportunity<br />

to delve deeper into concepts which had<br />

most interested me at undergraduate<br />

level. The culture <strong>of</strong> urban spaces was<br />

explored through a variety <strong>of</strong> fascinating<br />

academic lenses, from the postcolonial<br />

to the postmodern city, via the utopian<br />

visions <strong>of</strong> the surrealists and beyond.<br />

Exploring such a diversity <strong>of</strong> ideas before<br />

focusing on specific areas <strong>of</strong> choice in<br />

extended essays was a great opportunity.<br />

“Friendly, approachable and supportive<br />

academic staff, and a wide variety <strong>of</strong><br />

departmental seminars and invited<br />

lectures made the department an<br />

enjoyable and stimulating place to be.<br />

Writing a dissertation, while <strong>of</strong>ten very<br />

hard work, was extremely satisfying and<br />

the final product is something with which I<br />

am extremely proud. I am currently taking<br />

time out to travel before embarking on a<br />

PhD.<br />

Oliver Zanetti, MA Cities and Cultures,<br />

2006-7, Winner <strong>of</strong> Landscape Research<br />

Group Masters Dissertation Prize 2007<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Alison Blunt<br />

• Dr Beth Greenhough<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jon May<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Catherine Nash<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Miles Ogborn<br />

• Dr Alastair Owens<br />

• Dr David Pinder<br />

• Dr Simon Reid-Henry<br />

08 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


MSc Globalisation and Development<br />

MSc Globalisation and<br />

Development examines the<br />

economic, political, social<br />

and institutional bases and<br />

consequences <strong>of</strong> uneven<br />

power relations within<br />

contemporary processes<br />

<strong>of</strong> global development.<br />

Not restricted merely to economic<br />

dimensions <strong>of</strong> globalisation, the programme<br />

also examines the moral, ideological, gender<br />

and race relations that shape processes <strong>of</strong>,<br />

and institutional responses to, globalisation<br />

and development. It does so at a range <strong>of</strong><br />

scales and in different spaces within an<br />

increasingly transnational world.<br />

MSc Globalisation and Development is an<br />

innovative programme that combines the<br />

theoretical and empirical study <strong>of</strong><br />

globalisation with a detailed examination <strong>of</strong><br />

the activities <strong>of</strong> a range <strong>of</strong> organisations<br />

concerned with the practice <strong>of</strong> development.<br />

Whilst the programme aims to develop an<br />

advanced and critical understanding <strong>of</strong> the<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> globalisation and<br />

development and to engage with questions<br />

<strong>of</strong> power and resistance, it also <strong>of</strong>fers the<br />

skills necessary to engage directly with<br />

practitioners working in the field <strong>of</strong><br />

development.<br />

Taught through an innovative range <strong>of</strong><br />

seminars, workshops, presentations and<br />

site visits, and delivered by members <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Department’s internationally renowned<br />

Economy, Development and Social Justice<br />

Research Group, the programme engages<br />

with the latest thinking and practice around<br />

globalisation and development.<br />

MSc Globalisation and Development is<br />

recognised under the ESRC's 1+3 funding<br />

scheme.<br />

Programme structure<br />

All students take a compulsory module,<br />

Social Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies and a prerequisite module,<br />

Thinking Geographically. Students then take<br />

the following specialised modules:<br />

• Understanding Globalisation and<br />

Development I and II<br />

• Globalisation and Development in Practice.<br />

You will also complete a 15,000 word<br />

dissertation to be submitted in September,<br />

which is based on original research on a topic<br />

<strong>of</strong> your choice relating to the themes <strong>of</strong> the<br />

course. Recent dissertations completed by<br />

students taking Globalisation and<br />

Development include:<br />

• The participation <strong>of</strong> civil society in the<br />

drafting and implementation process <strong>of</strong><br />

the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper in<br />

Senegal<br />

• The Way East to Mile End<br />

• The Rise <strong>of</strong> Corporate Responsibility:<br />

a geographical exploration <strong>of</strong> contested<br />

terrain<br />

• Trade and Development: (In)coherences<br />

<strong>of</strong> EU policy.<br />

Specialist modules<br />

Understanding Globalisation and Development I<br />

This module aims to develop advanced and<br />

critical understandings <strong>of</strong> geographies <strong>of</strong><br />

globalisation and development and to engage<br />

with questions <strong>of</strong> power and resistance. It<br />

also aims to provide an advanced theoretical<br />

grounding in the core aspects <strong>of</strong> globalisation<br />

as a process. It does so by exploring the<br />

economic, political and social dimensions <strong>of</strong><br />

processes <strong>of</strong> globalisation. This includes a<br />

consideration <strong>of</strong> the history <strong>of</strong> globalisation<br />

and capitalism from a range <strong>of</strong> perspectives<br />

including analyses <strong>of</strong> neo-liberalism, gender<br />

and globalisation, global cities and urban<br />

fragmentation, globalisation and the semiperiphery,<br />

as well as global conflict and global<br />

justice. The geographical scope <strong>of</strong> the<br />

module is global, engaging with ‘First’ world<br />

perspectives, as well as post-socialism and<br />

development discourses. The focus is<br />

primarily theoretical, and there is scope for<br />

students to explore specific avenues <strong>of</strong><br />

interest within these broad themes.<br />

Understanding Globalisation and Development II<br />

As a complement to Understanding<br />

Globalisation and Development I, this module<br />

focuses on the geographies <strong>of</strong> development<br />

and post-socialism. The module considers<br />

development and environmental ethics, as<br />

well as theories <strong>of</strong> post-socialism. At a<br />

different scale, it also explores global and<br />

local civil society, social capital and local<br />

networks. The focus is primarily theoretical,<br />

and there is scope for students to explore<br />

specific avenues <strong>of</strong> interest within these<br />

broad themes.<br />

Globalisation and Development in Practice<br />

This module provides a detailed examination<br />

<strong>of</strong> a series <strong>of</strong> interventions working to<br />

transform processes <strong>of</strong> globalisation at a<br />

variety <strong>of</strong> scales. It aims to introduce<br />

students, via site and web visits as well as<br />

external guest speakers, to the practical<br />

workings <strong>of</strong> a range <strong>of</strong> organisations both<br />

governmental and non-governmental, which<br />

are involved in attempts to shape processes<br />

<strong>of</strong> development in the context <strong>of</strong><br />

globalisation.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 09


MSc Globalisation and Development (cont)<br />

<strong>Graduate</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>ile – Lina<br />

Jamoul<br />

Studied: Masters in Globalisation and<br />

Development in the <strong>Geography</strong> department<br />

and PhD in <strong>Geography</strong> Department –<br />

graduated 2006.<br />

Currently: Community Organiser<br />

Why did you choose <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

The Masters course looked very interesting<br />

and interdisciplinary. I stayed on to do my<br />

PhD there because the teaching quality was<br />

so high, the Department was full <strong>of</strong><br />

interesting people doing interesting<br />

research, and it seemed very collegial.<br />

What did you gain from your time at<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

An exposure to a diverse set <strong>of</strong> research<br />

interests. I got to meet and discuss my work<br />

with internationally-renowned, visiting<br />

academics I had a huge admiration for Stuart<br />

Hall, David Harvey, Doreen Massey, Julie<br />

Graham. I also got an opportunity to put<br />

radical research into practice that had a real<br />

impact on the community and on the<br />

university campus itself.<br />

What are your career plans in the next<br />

five years<br />

When I finished my PhD, I moved to Chicago<br />

to take up a job as a community organiser<br />

with the Industrial Areas Foundation. I plan<br />

to return to the UK and work with the<br />

Citizens’ Organising Foundation – an<br />

invaluable relationship that was forged<br />

through the <strong>Geography</strong> Department at<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

This module revolves around two projects.<br />

The first project explores globalisation,<br />

economic justice and worker empowerment,<br />

focusing on Business Process Outsourcing<br />

and attempts to empower e-service workers<br />

in the Global South vis-à-vis their colleagues<br />

in the Global North. The second project<br />

explores the roles and actions <strong>of</strong> Nongovernmental<br />

Organisations (NGOs) and how<br />

they are involved in global-local networks.<br />

Students may also take one <strong>of</strong> the following<br />

module options from MA Democracy and<br />

Democratisation taught in the Department<br />

<strong>of</strong> Politics:<br />

• Liberal Democratic Practice<br />

• Democracy, Disagreement and the Political<br />

• Media and Democracy<br />

• Democracy in Plural Societies.<br />

For more information, see<br />

www.politics.qmul.ac.uk<br />

Teaching staff<br />

The core teaching staff for MSc Globalisation<br />

and Development includes:<br />

• Dr Kavita Datta<br />

• Dr Joanna Herbert<br />

• Dr Al James<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Roger Lee<br />

• Dr Cathy McIlwaine<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Adrian Smith<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jane Wills<br />

Student experiences<br />

The MSc Globalisation and Development<br />

course is perfect for those who, like me,<br />

want to gain a firm theoretical base and a<br />

broad knowledge <strong>of</strong> the issues while also<br />

being introduced to important practical<br />

skills. The opportunity to work with leading<br />

scholars in an excellently resourced and<br />

supportive department has fuelled my<br />

ambitions and allowed me to really expand<br />

my own interests. The class discussions<br />

are always extremely informative, and<br />

sometimes heated! Teaching is very<br />

personal with excellent support from all<br />

the staff.<br />

Ianto Jones, MA G&D 2007-8<br />

The importance <strong>of</strong> the MSc in<br />

Globalisation and Development is its<br />

nexus between theory and practice.<br />

During the year I was introduced to a<br />

myriad <strong>of</strong> contemporary development<br />

issues. These include: resistance to<br />

globalisation and neo-liberalism, social<br />

capital, civil society, theories <strong>of</strong><br />

development, non-governmental<br />

organisations, and gender. Projects<br />

included call centres in India and the<br />

operation <strong>of</strong> NGOs. If your undergraduate<br />

degree is not geography, development, or<br />

economics, there is no need for concern.<br />

This degree is accessible to students from<br />

other disciplines complemented by the<br />

pr<strong>of</strong>essionalism and devotion <strong>of</strong> staff who<br />

were always available to assist my<br />

multifarious questions.<br />

This Master's degree is ideal as a prelude<br />

to PhD study or to enhance one's<br />

employment prospects. Classes are small<br />

and there is always an opportunity to<br />

engage in spirited debate within a<br />

convivial milieu.<br />

Matthew Rippon, MA G&D 2007-8<br />

10 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


MA London <strong>Studies</strong><br />

One year full-time, two<br />

years part-time (Taught<br />

in conjunction with the<br />

<strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong> English and<br />

Drama and the<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> Politics)<br />

Programme description<br />

London has long been an international centre<br />

<strong>of</strong> cultural production and political power.<br />

This interdisciplinary masters programme<br />

takes the city as its focus, using London as a<br />

central example, resource and inspiration.<br />

The MA is collaboratively taught, drawing<br />

upon expertise across the Departments <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>Geography</strong>, Politics and the <strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong> English<br />

and Drama. The programme brings together<br />

historical and contemporary perspectives on<br />

metropolitan culture, through approaches<br />

that span the humanities and social sciences.<br />

It also makes the most <strong>of</strong> <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>’s<br />

position, being close to key cultural resources<br />

and institutions in London, while located in<br />

the city’s East End where many <strong>of</strong> the<br />

programme’s intellectual concerns find most<br />

vivid expression. Dramatic historical changes<br />

along with contemporary and future<br />

transformations <strong>of</strong> this area provide ample<br />

opportunities for scholarly reflection and<br />

debate as well as for engaging with practices<br />

and institutions within and beyond the<br />

academy.<br />

Programme outline<br />

A compulsory module considers influential<br />

perspectives on metropolitan life by using<br />

London as an example, but setting it in the<br />

context <strong>of</strong> other cities across the world. In<br />

addition, you will take three optional modules<br />

and complete a dissertation, following<br />

training in qualitative research methodologies<br />

and in the use <strong>of</strong> the unsurpassed resources<br />

for the study <strong>of</strong> London available in the city:<br />

libraries, archives, museums, galleries as well<br />

as sites and events.<br />

Compulsory modules<br />

• Cities, Empire and Modernity<br />

• Dissertation (15,000 words)<br />

• Resources for Research<br />

Optional modules<br />

may include:<br />

• Art, Performance and the City<br />

• Empire, Race and Immigration<br />

• Health, Housing and Education <strong>of</strong><br />

Immigrants in a Metropolitan Environment<br />

• Metro-intellectuals, 1770-1820 British<br />

Women Writers in London and Paris<br />

• Sociability: Literature and the City<br />

1660-1780<br />

• Urban Culture and the Book: London,<br />

Publishing and Readers in the Sixteenth<br />

Century<br />

• Writing the East End<br />

Assessment<br />

Assessment is through a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

assignments, ranging from extended essays<br />

to book reviews and oral presentations. You<br />

will also complete a 15,000 word dissertation,<br />

worth a third <strong>of</strong> total marks, on a topic <strong>of</strong> your<br />

choice relating to the programme.<br />

Entry requirements<br />

You will normally be expected to have a<br />

first degree with first or upper-second class<br />

honours in a humanities or social science<br />

subject (or equivalent international<br />

qualification). We actively encourage<br />

applications from students who have<br />

developed an interest in any aspect <strong>of</strong><br />

metropolitan culture at undergraduate<br />

level and/or who have practical experience<br />

<strong>of</strong> working in related areas.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 11


MSc in Physical <strong>Geography</strong> by Research<br />

The MSc in Physical<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> by Research<br />

provides students with an<br />

opportunity to investigate,<br />

in detail and to research<br />

standards, a topic <strong>of</strong><br />

interest to them within<br />

physical geography. It<br />

provides training in the<br />

key research methods and<br />

techniques used within<br />

physical geography and<br />

environmental science.<br />

You will also have the<br />

opportunity to explore the<br />

main research approaches<br />

used within physical<br />

geography and the debates<br />

on these approaches.<br />

Programme structure<br />

The programme is dominated by the<br />

Independent Research Project (IRP) which is<br />

worth 120 credits. Students propose, design,<br />

and implement a programme <strong>of</strong> original<br />

research under the guidance <strong>of</strong> one or more<br />

supervisors drawn from the physical<br />

geography staff in the Department. The IRP<br />

is assessed via a dissertation <strong>of</strong> up to 30 000<br />

words (or equivalent). In addition to the IRP<br />

there are three taught modules on the MSc:<br />

Environmental Modelling<br />

(15 credits)<br />

Through lectures, practicals and one-one<br />

supervision, this module (i) considers how<br />

models represent a fundamental means <strong>of</strong><br />

understanding the operation <strong>of</strong><br />

environmental systems, (ii) introduces key<br />

concepts (mass and energy balance and<br />

transfer equations) in environmental<br />

modelling, and (iii) explains how models<br />

can be constructed and tested in both a<br />

spreadsheet (MS Excel) and high-level<br />

programming language (Fortran 95)<br />

environment. The art and science <strong>of</strong> the<br />

formulation, construction, and testing <strong>of</strong><br />

environmental models is covered. The<br />

module is assessed via a programming<br />

exercise and a written report that reviews<br />

the use <strong>of</strong> models in a given area <strong>of</strong> physical<br />

geography.<br />

Project-specific Research Training<br />

(15 credits)<br />

This module introduces and provides training<br />

in the research issues, methodologies and<br />

field and laboratory procedures that are<br />

appropriate to the IRP, including theoretical<br />

background and context, research design<br />

and project management. The focus <strong>of</strong> the<br />

IRP, therefore, significantly determines the<br />

module content. The module is delivered<br />

through formal supervisory sessions, together<br />

with appropriate field and/or laboratory<br />

training and is assessed via submission <strong>of</strong><br />

two written reports.<br />

Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Research and Practice<br />

(30 credits)<br />

This module introduces students to current<br />

issues in physical geographical research. It<br />

focuses on the advantages and limitations <strong>of</strong><br />

differing approaches to physical geographical<br />

research (ie observational (mainly field),<br />

manipulative experimental (field and<br />

laboratory), and modelling-based (computer<br />

simulation)).<br />

It also provides training in research skills<br />

including presentation and writing skills. The<br />

course involves attendance at meetings <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Group (approximately<br />

every three weeks during the teaching year).<br />

Assessment is via an oral presentation to the<br />

Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Group and a written<br />

critique <strong>of</strong> research approaches in an area <strong>of</strong><br />

physical geography related to the IRP.<br />

Teaching staff<br />

All members <strong>of</strong> physical geography staff are<br />

available for IRP supervision. The IRP<br />

supervisor oversees the delivery <strong>of</strong> Projectspecific<br />

Research Training. The<br />

Environmental Modelling and Physical<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> Research and Practice courses<br />

are taught by Andrew Baird and a mixture <strong>of</strong><br />

physical geography staff. Andrew Baird is the<br />

overall convenor <strong>of</strong> the MSc.<br />

12 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


PhD programmes<br />

The breadth <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Department’s research<br />

expertise <strong>of</strong>fers a wide<br />

range <strong>of</strong> opportunities for<br />

those wishing to embark<br />

on a programme <strong>of</strong><br />

doctoral research.<br />

Close collaboration between individual<br />

research staff and a number <strong>of</strong> governmental<br />

and non-governmental agencies provides<br />

further opportunities for those wishing to<br />

undertake collaborative research.<br />

The Department welcomes applications from<br />

those wishing to study full or part-time, holds<br />

ESRC recognition for full-time, part-time and<br />

CASE Studentships and is recognised under<br />

the ESRC’s 1+3 funding regime. The<br />

Department also receives NERC studentships<br />

via the NERC algorithm.<br />

Training<br />

Through its PhD training programmes,<br />

the <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> provides you with the<br />

training in research and research-related<br />

skills necessary for the satisfactory<br />

completion <strong>of</strong> your PhD and for a research<br />

career in the natural or social sciences.<br />

Through participation in a range <strong>of</strong> broader<br />

consortia, and taking up the opportunities<br />

for training provided by these and more<br />

specialist agencies (for example, the <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong>/UCL, and London Postgraduate<br />

Training consortia, <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> Community<br />

Health Sciences Institute, London Group <strong>of</strong><br />

Historical Geographers, London Human<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> Reading Group, British<br />

Hydrological Society, Geological Society <strong>of</strong><br />

London, the NERC/Geomorphological<br />

Research Group’s and Geophysical Fluid<br />

Dynamics Group’s Postgraduate Training<br />

courses, and the Quaternary Research<br />

Association) you will be integrated into a<br />

range <strong>of</strong> research communities and networks<br />

operating at college, university, metropolitan,<br />

national and international scales.<br />

Research training in<br />

Human <strong>Geography</strong><br />

Core training<br />

For those undertaking research in human<br />

geography, core training is provided through<br />

the Department’s ESRC-recognised training<br />

programme, <strong>of</strong>fering exemption for those<br />

holding the Department’s MA/MSc<br />

<strong>Geography</strong>, MA Cities and Cultures or MSc<br />

Globalisation and Development degrees.<br />

Those not holding an ESRC-recognised<br />

Master’s degree take two modules through<br />

the Autumn and Spring terms <strong>of</strong> their first<br />

year: Social Science Research: Methods and<br />

Methodologies (see page 5) and Thinking<br />

Geographically (see page 5).<br />

Exemptions from parts <strong>of</strong> this programme<br />

may be granted where evidence <strong>of</strong><br />

satisfactory training completed elsewhere is<br />

provided. The training requirements <strong>of</strong> CASE<br />

students are agreed in advance on an<br />

individual basis to enable pr<strong>of</strong>essional<br />

qualifications and experience to be taken<br />

into account.<br />

Research training in<br />

Physical <strong>Geography</strong> and<br />

Environmental Science<br />

Core training<br />

For those undertaking research in physical<br />

geography or environmental science, core<br />

training is provided through a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

mechanisms. You will carry out personal<br />

development planning throughout your PhD.<br />

In addition, you are required to undertake<br />

compulsory skills training each year.<br />

In the first year, this requirement is met by<br />

completion <strong>of</strong> two compulsory modules:<br />

Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Research (see page 12)<br />

and Practice and Project-specific Research<br />

Training (see page 12). In second and third<br />

years, the training requirement can be met by<br />

a combination <strong>of</strong> internal courses (eg <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> Education and Staff Development<br />

courses), external short courses/workshops<br />

(eg UK GRAD workshops), demonstrating on<br />

undergraduate courses, external activities (eg<br />

POST placements) and self-directed<br />

learning.<br />

Supervision and upgrading<br />

The <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> provides you with a<br />

primary and secondary supervisor. While<br />

facilitating continuity in the case <strong>of</strong> staff<br />

leave, working closely with two supervisors<br />

provides you with a greater range <strong>of</strong> research<br />

expertise than would be possible through sole<br />

supervision.<br />

You can expect to form a close working<br />

relationship with your supervisors, meeting<br />

regularly (not less than fortnightly through the<br />

opening stages <strong>of</strong> the research) throughout<br />

your time in the Department. Supervisors are<br />

responsible for overseeing both your research<br />

and your broader career development.<br />

In both human and physical geography<br />

upgrading from MPhil to PhD status is usually<br />

completed towards the end <strong>of</strong> the first year.<br />

In human geography, the first-year training<br />

programme is assessed via the six-month<br />

review at which you present an extended<br />

literature review, methodology and timetable<br />

<strong>of</strong> research to your supervisors and one<br />

further member <strong>of</strong> staff. Supplemented by<br />

end <strong>of</strong> term reports, the six-month review<br />

provides both you and your supervisors with<br />

a clear indication <strong>of</strong> your progress in<br />

preparation for upgrading from MPhil to PhD<br />

status.<br />

Upgrading involves the submission <strong>of</strong> three<br />

pieces <strong>of</strong> work (a literature review,<br />

methodology and preliminary empirical<br />

examination) to the upgrading panel, which<br />

normally consists <strong>of</strong> your supervisors and an<br />

external expert <strong>of</strong> your choice. In physical<br />

geography, the first-year training programme<br />

is assessed through coursework completed<br />

for the Physical <strong>Geography</strong> Research and<br />

Practice and Project-specific Research<br />

Training modules. Upgrading involves the<br />

submission <strong>of</strong> a concise (c. 5000 word)<br />

report and oral examination by a panel <strong>of</strong><br />

three staff who are not involved in the<br />

supervision.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 13


PhD programmes (cont)<br />

The Department is<br />

experienced in working<br />

with both part-time<br />

students and those<br />

undertaking collaborative<br />

research, and its training<br />

programmes and<br />

upgrading procedures<br />

have been designed with<br />

the particular needs <strong>of</strong><br />

such students in mind.<br />

Research interests<br />

The breadth and depth <strong>of</strong> the Department’s<br />

research interests are reflected in the range<br />

<strong>of</strong> doctoral work completed over the years.<br />

Current PhD projects and recently defended<br />

PhD theses include:<br />

Physical <strong>Geography</strong> PhD Projects<br />

• Northwest European river systems over the<br />

last 200 ka<br />

• Sediment strain at the boundaries <strong>of</strong> former<br />

ice streams: multiscale analysis <strong>of</strong> the role<br />

and significance <strong>of</strong> subglacial sediment<br />

deformation<br />

• Modelling peatlands as complex adaptive<br />

systems<br />

• CH 4 ebullition from northern peatlands<br />

and temperate estuarine sediments<br />

• An investigation <strong>of</strong> the spatial distribution<br />

and partitioning <strong>of</strong> metals in estuarine<br />

sediments<br />

• Transport <strong>of</strong> fine sediments in vegetated<br />

chalk streams<br />

Human <strong>Geography</strong> PhD projects<br />

• Post-socialist transformations and the<br />

global city thesis, the case <strong>of</strong> Prague<br />

• Rickets: socio-economic and cultural<br />

factors and the role <strong>of</strong> primary care<br />

• Deconstructing the ghetto: a study <strong>of</strong><br />

former Soviet Union Jewish emigration<br />

to eastern Germany<br />

• Commodifying Multicultures: urban<br />

regeneration and the politics <strong>of</strong> space<br />

in Spitalfields<br />

• Daily Bread: Evangelical beliefs and<br />

identities through place<br />

• Youth, urban violence and citizenship<br />

in east London<br />

• Casualised workers in South Korea:<br />

transformation <strong>of</strong> work places<br />

• Teaching the art <strong>of</strong> politics: broad based<br />

organising in Britain<br />

• Construction <strong>of</strong> masculinity, sexuality and<br />

condom use among long-haul truck drivers<br />

in southern Africa: implications for STI/HIV<br />

prevention<br />

• The role <strong>of</strong> public involvement for<br />

sustainable inner city urban regeneration:<br />

the experience <strong>of</strong> two east London<br />

boroughs<br />

• European alternatives: radical political<br />

movements and intervention in the<br />

production <strong>of</strong> space<br />

• Cultural geographies <strong>of</strong> gay liberation<br />

• Spatial aspects <strong>of</strong> gender inequality in<br />

pension policy in Greece<br />

• Student identities <strong>of</strong> mixed descent in<br />

the UK and USA<br />

• Trade union federations in liberal market<br />

economies: Leading from the centre<br />

• Political transnationalism, gender and<br />

peace building among Colombian migrants<br />

in the UK and Spain<br />

• The Gilt on the Golden City: Expatriates,<br />

Social Exclusion and the Production <strong>of</strong><br />

Space in Post Socialist Prague<br />

• Geographies <strong>of</strong> theory and practice in<br />

contemporary British Anarchism.<br />

• Strengthening civil society in natural<br />

resource management in Vietnam.<br />

A record <strong>of</strong> success<br />

Our postgraduates have followed careers in<br />

different employment sectors and in a<br />

number <strong>of</strong> countries. Several former PhD<br />

students, from both the Human <strong>Geography</strong><br />

and Physical <strong>Geography</strong> programmes, are<br />

following academic careers as lecturers or<br />

research fellows in the UK, Europe, the US,<br />

Mexico and New Zealand. Other former<br />

students have utilised their research skills<br />

outside academia in the UK, Europe and<br />

Africa. Positions have included freelance<br />

work, and employment with business<br />

corporations, the UN, the Royal Geographical<br />

Society and Dutch Geological Society.<br />

Students from our Masters courses have<br />

continued on to pursue PhD studies, while<br />

others have been able to transfer their skills<br />

to private and public sector employment.<br />

<strong>Graduate</strong><br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>ile – Akile<br />

Ahmet<br />

Studied: <strong>Geography</strong> BA,<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> MSc and<br />

PhD in the <strong>Geography</strong><br />

Department, graduated<br />

BA 2003, Masters 2004.<br />

Currently: Working for Goldsmiths, University <strong>of</strong><br />

London in the department <strong>of</strong> Pr<strong>of</strong>essional and<br />

Community Education as a researcher.<br />

Why did you choose <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

The <strong>Geography</strong> department as well as the<br />

university as a whole is extremely friendly. The<br />

lecturers are always accessible. Having one-toone<br />

contact and the opportunity for regular<br />

feedback and support is essential.<br />

What did you gain from your time at <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong><br />

I have learnt so much from my time at <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong>. Firstly, how to manage my work and<br />

really enjoy the learning process to its fullest.<br />

Secondly, to be who I am at present. And finally,<br />

the unique location <strong>of</strong> <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> being a<br />

student in East London has taught<br />

me so much.<br />

What are your career plans in the next five<br />

years<br />

I hope to continue my career as an academic.<br />

14 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


PhD Student<br />

experiences<br />

“My research is a mix <strong>of</strong> different social<br />

sciences, and I was attracted to the <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> <strong>Geography</strong> Department partly<br />

because <strong>of</strong> its exciting interdisciplinary<br />

work. The broad scope <strong>of</strong> research taking<br />

place in the department makes it a really<br />

interesting melting pot.<br />

“I actually turned down a place at another,<br />

perhaps more famous college in favour <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. I was immediately made to<br />

feel included and valued, and there was<br />

very little evidence <strong>of</strong> snobbery unlike<br />

some other departments <strong>of</strong> its calibre. All<br />

levels <strong>of</strong> staff are incredibly friendly, and<br />

go over and above the call <strong>of</strong> duty to help<br />

their students.<br />

“PhD students are also encouraged to<br />

participate more in extracurricular<br />

research projects and initiatives, which<br />

reflects the challenging yet supportive<br />

atmosphere in the department. Although<br />

the department is friendly and relaxed, it<br />

is still academically world class, and this<br />

really encourages an<br />

atmosphere <strong>of</strong><br />

pushing the<br />

boundaries <strong>of</strong> the<br />

discipline.”<br />

Ant Ince, PhD Student<br />

in Political and<br />

Cultural <strong>Geography</strong>.<br />

“I am working on a PhD, focusing on<br />

global financial markets and the<br />

emergence <strong>of</strong> the Turkish financial market<br />

in particular. I am very happy to have a<br />

place at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> because I think it is<br />

the best place for my kind <strong>of</strong> research.<br />

Knowing the place from my ERASMUS<br />

year gave me the certain knowledge that I<br />

needed to come back and continue my<br />

studies here. My passion and enthusiasm<br />

in the field <strong>of</strong> cultural economic<br />

geographies and global restructuring was<br />

encouraged during my ERASMUS year as<br />

my lecturers’ economic geography meant<br />

more than pure economics, it was infused<br />

with cultural and social aspects.<br />

“And today, the regular meeting with my<br />

supervisors very much continues on an<br />

even higher level. They, as much as<br />

everybody else in the department are<br />

highly supportive and encouraging. I am<br />

very glad to be part <strong>of</strong> that atmosphere<br />

and am able to enhance my skills and<br />

abilities and share them with my<br />

colleagues and friends. Also continuing<br />

my academic career in London was <strong>of</strong><br />

importance to me. The unique location<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> in<br />

London’s urban<br />

landscape will have a<br />

positive impact to my<br />

PhD, life and career.”<br />

Tim Heinemann, PhD<br />

Student in Economic<br />

and Cultural<br />

<strong>Geography</strong><br />

“My PhD is investigating the physical and<br />

chemical factors which control the<br />

behaviour <strong>of</strong> organic and inorganic<br />

contaminants in soil and sediments<br />

through practical experience from detailed<br />

laboratory work. I chose to study at <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> because <strong>of</strong> its good reputation and<br />

the conducive environment it provides for<br />

serious academic work.<br />

“In addition to this, the quality <strong>of</strong> research<br />

<strong>of</strong> the Hydrological, Hydrochemical and<br />

Fluvial Processes research group in the<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> Department is highly rated and<br />

matches the best in the world because<br />

members <strong>of</strong> the group are world class<br />

academics. The Department also provides<br />

state <strong>of</strong> the art laboratories. Regular<br />

supervision from my<br />

supervisors enables<br />

me to get regular<br />

feedback on my<br />

research.”<br />

Margaret Kadiri, PhD<br />

Student in Physical<br />

<strong>Geography</strong><br />

“Initially, I came to <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> to work<br />

alongside leading pr<strong>of</strong>essionals in my area<br />

<strong>of</strong> research (deformation structures<br />

beneath iceberg scour marks) and<br />

because <strong>of</strong> the recently opened Centre for<br />

Micromorphology, which houses an array<br />

<strong>of</strong> impressive microscopic facilities<br />

including the latest microscopic X-ray<br />

technology. That aside, I feel fortunate I<br />

chose a department<br />

that I have found to<br />

be extremely friendly<br />

with a thriving and<br />

sociable postgraduate<br />

community.”<br />

Lorna Linch, PhD<br />

Student in Physical<br />

<strong>Geography</strong><br />

Winner <strong>of</strong> the Best Presentation Award<br />

at the Quaternary Research Association<br />

Postgraduate Symposium, Copenhagen<br />

2007.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 15


Staff research interests<br />

Culture, Space and Power<br />

Research Theme<br />

Research in the group critically engages with<br />

the interplay <strong>of</strong> culture, space and power in<br />

both historical and contemporary contexts.<br />

Members <strong>of</strong> the group conduct theoretically<br />

informed and empirically grounded research<br />

in the following areas:<br />

• Feminist and postcolonial geographies<br />

<strong>of</strong> home, travel and diaspora<br />

• Art, politics and the city<br />

• Property, power and urbanism<br />

• Comparative histories and geographies<br />

<strong>of</strong> the modern city<br />

• Historical geographies <strong>of</strong> globalisation<br />

• Globalisation and identity formation<br />

• Geographies <strong>of</strong> identity and relatedness<br />

• Technology, the body and socialenvironmental<br />

relations.<br />

Members <strong>of</strong> the group convene and teach<br />

MA Cities and Cultures and supervise a<br />

number <strong>of</strong> PhD students. Three members<br />

<strong>of</strong> the group (Alison Blunt, Miles Ogborn and<br />

David Pinder) are editors (with Jon May,<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, and Pyrs Gruffudd, University<br />

<strong>of</strong> Wales) <strong>of</strong> Cultural <strong>Geography</strong> in Practice.<br />

(London: Arnold, 2003).<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Alison Blunt<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons(Cantab) MA PhD(UBC)<br />

a.blunt@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Alison Blunt’s research interests span<br />

cultural, feminist and postcolonial<br />

geographies, with a particular focus on<br />

imperial travel and domesticity and on<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> home, identity, migration and<br />

diaspora. Her early research focused on the<br />

gendered spatiality <strong>of</strong> imperial travel and<br />

travel writing by women, and on imperial<br />

domesticity in British India. More recently,<br />

she has completed research funded by the<br />

ESRC and AHRC on Anglo-Indian women<br />

and the spatial politics <strong>of</strong> home in India,<br />

Britain and Australia in the context <strong>of</strong><br />

imperialism, nationalism, decolonisation and<br />

multiculturalism. Rather than focus on the<br />

diversity <strong>of</strong> individual homes and identities,<br />

this research examines their collective and<br />

political implications for a community <strong>of</strong><br />

mixed descent, both domiciled in India and<br />

resident across a wider diaspora. Her current<br />

research projects include ‘Diaspora Cities:<br />

Imagining Calcutta in London, Toronto and<br />

Jerusalem’ (funded by The Leverhulme<br />

Trust), which explores the city as a site <strong>of</strong><br />

diasporic memory, attachment and<br />

belonging; and ‘Gender and the Built<br />

Environment’ (in partnership with Women’s<br />

Design Service, funded by Urban Buzz),<br />

which is setting up a new database <strong>of</strong><br />

English-language publications for<br />

academics, practitioners and policy makers.<br />

She was awarded the Gill Memorial Award by<br />

the RGS-IBG in 2002 and a Philip<br />

Leverhulme Prize in 2003. She is editor <strong>of</strong><br />

Transactions from 2008-13, is Adjunct<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor in the Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong>,<br />

NTNU, Trondheim, and chairs the London<br />

Women and Planning Forum.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Blunt, A., Dowling, R., (2006).<br />

Home. Routledge, London.<br />

• Blunt, A., (2005). Domicile and diaspora:<br />

Anglo-Indian Women and the Spatial<br />

Politics <strong>of</strong> Home. Blackwell, Oxford.<br />

• Blunt, A., Gruffudd, P., May, J., Ogborn, M.,<br />

Pinder, D., (2003). Cultural <strong>Geography</strong> in<br />

Practice. Arnold, London.<br />

• Blunt, A., McEwan, C., (2002). Postcolonial<br />

Geographies. Continuum, London.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Catherine Nash<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons PhD(Nott)<br />

c.nash@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Catherine Nash’s research interests are in<br />

feminist cultural geography. Her research has<br />

explored the politics <strong>of</strong> collective identity and<br />

belonging, focused on changing<br />

constructions <strong>of</strong> Irish national identity, and<br />

engaged with recent debates in geography<br />

about postcolonialism, landscape, the body,<br />

visual representation, gender and<br />

nationhood. Over the past five years she has<br />

been building on this work through new<br />

research that engages with recent theoretical<br />

concerns in geography and related<br />

disciplines, contemporary cultural practices<br />

and new configurations <strong>of</strong> identity and<br />

16 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


elonging. Two recent projects addressed<br />

diasporic and local negotiations <strong>of</strong> belonging:<br />

one exploring ‘Irish roots’ genealogy and<br />

ethnicity amongst descendants <strong>of</strong> Irish<br />

emigrants to New Zealand, Canada, Australia<br />

and the United States, and local and<br />

community history projects and activities in<br />

relation to cultural policy, cultural politics and<br />

community relations in Northern Ireland. Her<br />

current research funded by an ESRC<br />

Research Fellowship (2004-07), entitled<br />

‘Genealogy and genetics: cultural<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> relatedness’, examines<br />

scientific and popular understandings <strong>of</strong><br />

origins, ancestry, inheritance and descent<br />

in relation to ideas <strong>of</strong> ethnicity, nationhood,<br />

‘race’ and gender.<br />

It draws on new perspectives on kinship in<br />

cultural and social anthropology to explore<br />

cultural geographies <strong>of</strong> relatedness within<br />

popular genealogy and new genetics.<br />

Publications include:<br />

Nash, C. (forthcoming) Genetic Kinship:<br />

New Geographies <strong>of</strong> Relatedness, Cornell<br />

University Press, Ithaca.<br />

Nash, C., (2008). Of Irish Descent: Origin<br />

Stories, Genealogy and the Politics <strong>of</strong><br />

Belonging. Syracuse University Press,<br />

Syracuse.<br />

Nash, C., (2003). “They’re family!”: cultural<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> relatedness in popular<br />

genealogy.’ In Ahmed, S., Fortier, A-M.,<br />

Seller, M. (Eds.). Uprootings, Regroundings:<br />

Questions <strong>of</strong> Home and Migration, Berg,<br />

Oxford.<br />

Nash, C., (2002). Genealogical identities.<br />

Environment and Planning D: Society and<br />

Space. 20, 27 – 52.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Miles Ogborn<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons PhD (Cantab)<br />

m.j.ogborn@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Miles Ogborn’s research is concerned with<br />

the analysis <strong>of</strong> the geographical organisation<br />

<strong>of</strong> power. Early research focused on the<br />

historical geography <strong>of</strong> state formation in<br />

nineteenth-century Britain, with an<br />

investigation <strong>of</strong> how significant new forms <strong>of</strong><br />

state intervention and social policy (from the<br />

police, poor law, and prisons to the regulation<br />

<strong>of</strong> prostitution) required new ways <strong>of</strong><br />

organising space within disciplinary<br />

institutions and state formations. More<br />

recently he has examined the spaces <strong>of</strong><br />

modernity in eighteenth century London in<br />

order to understand how the making <strong>of</strong> “the<br />

modern world” involved important changes in<br />

relationships <strong>of</strong> power through the creation <strong>of</strong><br />

new forms <strong>of</strong> spatial arrangement within<br />

innovative organisations and institutions.<br />

His most recent research, funded by the<br />

Leverhulme Trust, the British Academy, and<br />

the Clark Memorial Library (UCLA), is<br />

concerned with the historical geographies <strong>of</strong><br />

globalisation between 1550 and 1800. One<br />

strand involves examining writing as a<br />

powerful technology <strong>of</strong> globalisation through<br />

the example <strong>of</strong> the uses <strong>of</strong> script and print by<br />

the English East India Company. The second<br />

project uses biography to introduce Britain’s<br />

role in global history between the sixteenth<br />

and eighteenth centuries. By retelling the life<br />

stories <strong>of</strong> over forty individuals from a huge<br />

range <strong>of</strong> backgrounds – including merchants,<br />

monarchs, slaves, sailors and pirates –<br />

Britain’s rise as a global imperial power is<br />

described and explained.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Ogborn, M., (2008) (in press). Global Lives:<br />

Britain and the World, 1550-1800.<br />

Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.<br />

In press.<br />

• Ogborn, M., (2007). Indian Ink: Script and<br />

Print in the Making <strong>of</strong> the English East India<br />

Company. Chicago University Press,<br />

Chicago.<br />

• Baldwin, E., Longhurst, B., McCracken, S.,<br />

Ogborn, M., Smith, G., (2003). Introducing<br />

Cultural <strong>Studies</strong>. Prentice Hall, London.<br />

(second edition forthcoming 2008)<br />

Dr Alastair Owens<br />

Senior Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons PhD (London)<br />

a.j.owens@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Alastair Owens is an historical geographer<br />

with interests in nineteenth and twentieth<br />

century Britain. A key focus <strong>of</strong> recent work<br />

has been on investigating the relationships<br />

between gender, class and wealth in order to<br />

explore how individuals used markets and<br />

legal structures to ensure their own material<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 17


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

well-being and that <strong>of</strong> others. This is part <strong>of</strong> a<br />

wider project which aims to fundamentally<br />

revise our historical and geographical<br />

understanding <strong>of</strong> the provision <strong>of</strong> welfare in<br />

nineteenth and twentieth-century Britain. A<br />

recent, collaborative ESRC-funded project<br />

has extended this work through a study <strong>of</strong><br />

gender and investment in England and<br />

Wales, 1870-1930.<br />

Alastair has further research interests in<br />

material culture and everyday life in Victorian<br />

cities. Working with pr<strong>of</strong>essional<br />

archaeologists, he has recently completed an<br />

AHRC-funded project pioneering new<br />

approaches to studying the material histories<br />

or urban place in mid-Victorian London. As<br />

well as pursuing interdisciplinary research,<br />

Alastair also successfully collaborates with a<br />

number <strong>of</strong> organisations outside <strong>of</strong><br />

academia, including the Geffrye Museum<br />

and the Museum <strong>of</strong> London.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Beachy, R., Craig, B., Owens, A., (2006).<br />

Women, Business and Finance in<br />

Nineteenth-Century Europe: Rethinking<br />

Separate Spheres. Oxford: Berg.<br />

• Green, D.R., Owens, A., (2004). Family<br />

Welfare: Gender, Property and Inheritance<br />

since the Seventeenth Century. Praeger,<br />

Westport CT.<br />

Dr David Pinder<br />

Reader in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons PhD(Cantab)<br />

d.pinder@qmul.ac.uk<br />

David Pinder is interested in cultural and<br />

urban geography, and in social theories <strong>of</strong><br />

modernity, space and the city. His recent<br />

research addresses ways in which modern<br />

cities have been imagined, represented and<br />

contested through a focus on utopian visions<br />

<strong>of</strong> cities in twentieth century western Europe.<br />

This work critically engages with modernist<br />

planning and architectural discourses as well<br />

as the ideas and practices <strong>of</strong> avant-garde<br />

groups that sought to transform the<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> cities and everyday life. It has<br />

especially centred on the activists, artists and<br />

writers associated with the Situationist<br />

International during the 1950s and 1960s,<br />

and it considers their critiques <strong>of</strong> post-war<br />

urbanisation, their development <strong>of</strong> critical<br />

geographical practices, and their utopian<br />

visions <strong>of</strong> urban space.<br />

The aim <strong>of</strong> this research is not only to<br />

reconfigure standard histories <strong>of</strong> the<br />

modernist city and to draw out contested<br />

ideals within twentieth-century urbanism;<br />

it is also to rethink the place <strong>of</strong> utopianism in<br />

approaches to cities, and indeed to rekindle<br />

elements <strong>of</strong> utopianism itself. He is currently<br />

developing these interests through writings<br />

on contemporary artistic practices,<br />

psychogeography and the politics <strong>of</strong> urban<br />

space; and on the potential value <strong>of</strong><br />

utopianism for radical geographical<br />

perspectives today. He is also studying<br />

contested spaces <strong>of</strong> modernist urbanism in<br />

London and New York between the 1950s<br />

and 1970s. The latter research includes a<br />

focus on the ways in which artists and<br />

cultural practitioners sought to explore<br />

and intervene in urban space.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Pinder, D. (2005) Visions <strong>of</strong> the City:<br />

Utopianism, Power and Politics in<br />

Twentieth-Century Urbanism. Edinburgh,<br />

Edinburgh University Press.<br />

• Blunt, A., Gruffudd, P., May, J., Ogborn, M.,<br />

Pinder, D., (2003). Cultural <strong>Geography</strong> in<br />

Practice. Arnold, London.<br />

Health Place and Society<br />

Research Theme<br />

The Health, Place and Society theme<br />

incorporates streams <strong>of</strong> work, taking critical<br />

and innovative perspectives on health and<br />

healthcare, population change, the body and<br />

societies. Research under this theme<br />

includes work on:<br />

• Migration, gender and health<br />

• The impact <strong>of</strong> new technologies, regulatory<br />

paradigms and global economic<br />

imperatives on the way that human and<br />

non-human biological materials are treated<br />

as commodities and hi-tech biomedical<br />

science in non-Western locales<br />

• Spatial variation and inequality in health<br />

and healthcare<br />

• New methods to explore spatial health<br />

variations through statistical modelling<br />

18 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


• The individual experiences and<br />

interpretations <strong>of</strong> the body in different<br />

geographical settings.<br />

• Policy relevant research concerning the<br />

ways that urban change impacts on health,<br />

health related behaviour and health care<br />

provision.<br />

Dr Steven Cummins<br />

Senior Lecturer & NIHR Fellow<br />

BSc (CGCHE) MSc (London) PhD(Glas)<br />

Steven Cummins has a wide range <strong>of</strong><br />

interests in public health policy and health<br />

inequality. His particular interests are in the<br />

contextual and socio-environmental<br />

determinants <strong>of</strong> health; the design and<br />

evaluation <strong>of</strong> community social and policy<br />

interventions to improve population health;<br />

the consumer consequences <strong>of</strong> food retail<br />

restructuring; and the public policy<br />

implications <strong>of</strong> geographical research and<br />

books. He has authored over thirty-five<br />

papers. He has received a Philip Leverhulme<br />

Prize (2007) and his current research is<br />

supported by a NIHR Fellowship.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Cummins, S. (2007). ‘Understanding a<br />

representing place in health research: a<br />

relational approach', Social Science and<br />

Medicine<br />

• Cummins, S; Ellaway; MacIntyre; (2002).<br />

‘Place effects on health: how can we<br />

conceptualise, operationalise and measure<br />

them’ Social Science and Medicine<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Peter Congdon<br />

Research Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

BSc (Econ) MSc PhD(Lond)<br />

p.congdon@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Peter Congdon specialises in quantitative<br />

and modelling applications and has wide<br />

experience <strong>of</strong> research in spatial<br />

epidemiology, health service research, and<br />

regional demography. He has been a<br />

member <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Geography</strong> Department since<br />

1992, and a Research Pr<strong>of</strong>essor from 2001.<br />

He has participated in a range <strong>of</strong> funded<br />

research projects including ESRC funded<br />

projects on Contextual Health Variations and<br />

Trends in Locality Mortality, a SAMHSA<br />

funded project on Psychiatric Health Needs<br />

Mapping in New York State, and joint projects<br />

with the Department <strong>of</strong> General Practice,<br />

including a Department <strong>of</strong> Health funded<br />

study <strong>of</strong> psychiatric referrals in east London<br />

and a Kings Fund project on health and social<br />

care indicators for the elderly. He is an<br />

elected member <strong>of</strong> the International<br />

Statistical Institute since 2007. His research<br />

output includes methodological work (eg in<br />

statistical journals) and substantive studies<br />

considering links between health outcomes<br />

and social structure.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Congdon, P., (2006). Bayesian Statistical<br />

Modelling, 2nd edition. John Wiley, London.<br />

• Congdon, P., (2008). (forthcoming)<br />

Bayesian Hierarchical Models.<br />

Chapman&Hall/CRC.<br />

• Congdon, P., Stillwell, J., (1992). Migration<br />

Modelling: Macro and Micro Perspectives.<br />

Belhaven Press and John Wiley, London.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Isabel Dyck<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA MA (Manc) PhD (Simon Fraser<br />

University)<br />

i.dyck@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Isabel Dyck joined the Department <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>Geography</strong> from the University <strong>of</strong> British<br />

Columbia. She is internationally recognised<br />

for her research on: Feminist analyses <strong>of</strong> the<br />

home and work experiences <strong>of</strong> women with<br />

chronic illness; healthcare access for<br />

immigrant minority women, and integration<br />

issues for immigrant families; the home as a<br />

site for long-term home care. She has<br />

produced a range <strong>of</strong> papers concerned<br />

with embodiment, identity, home and<br />

health/disability experience.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Davis-Lewis, N., Dyck, I., McLafferty, S.,<br />

Lewis, N., (2004). Geographies<br />

<strong>of</strong> Women’s Health.<br />

• Moss, P., Dyck, I., (2003). Women, Body,<br />

Illness: Space and Identify in the Everyday<br />

Lives <strong>of</strong> Women with Chronic Illness.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 19


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

Dr Beth Greenhough<br />

Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc (Reading) MSc (Bristol) PhD<br />

(Open University)<br />

b.j.greenhough@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Beth Greenhough’s research draws on a<br />

combination <strong>of</strong> political-economic geography,<br />

cultural geography and science studies to<br />

explore the social implications <strong>of</strong> scientific<br />

innovations in the areas <strong>of</strong> health,<br />

biomedicine and the environment. Her work<br />

to date has explored the way in which<br />

emerging technologies in the biosciences<br />

and bio-medicine are placing new demands<br />

on existing medical and biological data<br />

collections. Her ESRC funded doctoral<br />

research analysed the debates and<br />

controversy surrounding a proposal made<br />

by an Icelandic biotechnology firm to use<br />

Iceland’s national medical records to<br />

construct a commercial research database.<br />

The research argued that the commercial use<br />

<strong>of</strong> bio-medical information resources,<br />

such as medical records, reflects how<br />

the biosciences are transforming the<br />

relationships between nature and society,<br />

science and medicine, and human and nonhuman<br />

subjects.<br />

Beth’s most recent interest is in bioethics<br />

and the issue <strong>of</strong> consent for participation<br />

in medical and scientific studies. She is<br />

currently developing a project that will<br />

compare the ethical procedures adopted for<br />

human clinical trials with those developed for<br />

use with animal subjects in biomedical<br />

research. She also has a strong commitment<br />

to promoting an interdisciplinary approach to<br />

the study <strong>of</strong> environmental issues and has a<br />

project with a colleague in Physical<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> at Keele University at student’s<br />

perceptions <strong>of</strong> environmental citizenship and<br />

how these vary according to students’ degree<br />

programmes.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Greenhough, B., (2007). Situated<br />

knowledges and the spaces <strong>of</strong> consent.<br />

Ge<strong>of</strong>orum. 38, 1140-1151.<br />

• Greenhough, B., (2006). Imagining an<br />

Island laboratory: Representing the field<br />

in <strong>Geography</strong> and Science <strong>Studies</strong>.<br />

Transactions <strong>of</strong> the Institute <strong>of</strong> British<br />

Geographers. 31, 224-237.<br />

• Greenhough, B., (2006). Decontextualised<br />

Dissociated Detached Mapping the<br />

networks <strong>of</strong> Bio-Informatic exchange.<br />

Environment and Planning A. 38, 445-463.<br />

• Greenhough, B., Jazeel, T., Massey, D.,<br />

(2005). Introduction: geographical<br />

encounters with the Indian Ocean tsunami.<br />

Geographical Journal. 171, 369-371.<br />

Dr Ray Hall<br />

Senior Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons PhD(Liv)<br />

r.hall@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Ray Hall’s research interests lie in the field<br />

<strong>of</strong> historical and contemporary population<br />

geography. A particular interest is changing<br />

European household structures and the<br />

interrelationships between these and wider<br />

social changes and how these are played out<br />

in cities. Her research has focused upon a<br />

number <strong>of</strong> scales, including work in both<br />

London and other European cities. Current<br />

research is concerned with urban change in<br />

central Europe.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Buzar S, Hall R and Ogden P E. Beyond<br />

gentrification: the demographic<br />

reurbanisation <strong>of</strong> Bologna. Environment<br />

and Planning A 39, 64-85<br />

• Buzar S. Ogden P E and Hall R. Households<br />

matter: the quiet demography <strong>of</strong> urban<br />

transformation. Progress in Human<br />

<strong>Geography</strong>, 29, 413-436<br />

• Hall R and Ogden PE (2003). The rise <strong>of</strong><br />

living alone in inner London: trends among<br />

the population <strong>of</strong> working age. Environment<br />

and Planning A 35: 871-888<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Philip Ogden<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons(Durham) DPhil(Oxon)<br />

p.e.ogden@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Phillip Ogden is a population geographer with<br />

particular interests in migration and recent<br />

demographic change in Western Europe and<br />

the Caribbean. He is currently engaged in<br />

research projects in France and the UK<br />

funded by the ESRC, the Nuffield Foundation<br />

and the British Academy on household<br />

structures and migration in the major cities.<br />

He has published widely in these areas and<br />

contributed to wider methodological debates<br />

in population geography. He chairs the<br />

Centre for Migration <strong>Studies</strong> at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

He has published in over 15 books and<br />

numerous journals.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Ogden, P.E., (1992). London Docklands:<br />

the challenge <strong>of</strong> development. Cambridge<br />

University Press, Cambridge.<br />

• Ogden, P.E., White, P., (1989). Migrants in<br />

Modern France. Allen and Unwin, London.<br />

• Ogden, P.E., (1982). Migration and<br />

Geographical Change. Cambridge<br />

University Press, Cambridge.<br />

Dr Bronwyn Parry<br />

Reader in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons(Macquarie) PhD(Cantab)<br />

b.parry@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Bronwyn Parry is an economic and cultural<br />

geographer whose primary interests lie in<br />

investigating the way human-environment<br />

relations are being re-cast by technological,<br />

economic and regulatory changes. Her<br />

special interests include the rise and<br />

operation <strong>of</strong> the life sciences industry,<br />

informationalism, the commodification <strong>of</strong> life<br />

forms, posthumanism, bioethics and systems<br />

for knowing, disciplining and governing<br />

nature.<br />

Examining historical and contemporary<br />

contestations over ‘ownership’ <strong>of</strong> bodily<br />

materials and artefacts has led her to<br />

investigate the role that different knowledge<br />

systems (from the Linnaean system <strong>of</strong><br />

biological classification to the WTO TRIPS<br />

system <strong>of</strong> Trade Related Intellectual Property<br />

Rights) have played in regulating access to,<br />

and use <strong>of</strong> biological and ‘natural’ materials<br />

over time.<br />

Bronwyn is currently developing several new<br />

strands <strong>of</strong> research. The first explores the role<br />

that corporeality plays in shaping our<br />

everyday engagements with the world. This<br />

work combines her long standing interests in<br />

20 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


the body with more recent engagements with<br />

phenomenology, materialist and affective<br />

geographies. The second analyses the<br />

phenomena <strong>of</strong> ‘reproductive tourism’ and<br />

assesses how it is altering concepts <strong>of</strong><br />

kinship, nationality and biological<br />

relatedness, the third (for which she has<br />

recently received a project grant <strong>of</strong> £30,000)<br />

considers how the visual arts may be<br />

rehabilitated as a medium for communicating<br />

complex ethical issues in science to a wider<br />

public.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Parry, B.C., (2008) (forthcoming).<br />

Entangled exchange: Reconceptualising<br />

the characterisation and practice <strong>of</strong> bodily<br />

commodification. Ge<strong>of</strong>orum.<br />

• Parry, B.C., (2008). Geographical<br />

Indications: Not all ‘Champagne and<br />

Roses’” In Bently, L., Davis, J., Ginsberg, J.<br />

(Eds.). Trademarks and Brands. Cambridge<br />

University Press.<br />

• Parry, B.C., (2007). Cornering the Futures<br />

Market in ‘Bio-epistemology.’ Biosocieties.<br />

2, 386-389.<br />

• Parry, B.C., (2006). The private life <strong>of</strong><br />

genetic samples. Women’s <strong>Studies</strong><br />

Quarterly Special Issue: The Global and<br />

the Intimate. 52-53.<br />

• Parry, B.C., Gere, C. M., (2006).<br />

Contested Bodies: Property Models and<br />

the Commodification <strong>of</strong> Human Biological<br />

Artefacts. Science as Culture. 15, 139-158.<br />

• Gere, C.M., Parry, B.C., (2006). The Flesh<br />

Made Word: Banking the Body in the Age <strong>of</strong><br />

Information. Biosocieties. 1, 83-98.<br />

• Parry, B.C., (2004). Trading the Genome:<br />

Investigating the commodification <strong>of</strong> bioinformation.<br />

Columbia University Press,<br />

New York, New York.<br />

Economy, Development<br />

and Social Justice<br />

Research Theme<br />

Members <strong>of</strong> the Economy, Development and<br />

Social Justice theme conduct theoreticallyinformed,<br />

politically-engaged research on<br />

the production, nature and consequences<br />

<strong>of</strong> inequality and uneven development.<br />

Members <strong>of</strong> this group <strong>of</strong>fer an innovative<br />

combination <strong>of</strong> development, economic and<br />

social geographical specialisms. There are<br />

three important areas <strong>of</strong> focus within this<br />

research group:<br />

1. Social Relations and Economic<br />

Geographies: including the proliferative<br />

and diverse nature <strong>of</strong> economic practices;<br />

the cultural construction <strong>of</strong> economic<br />

geographies; historical geographies <strong>of</strong><br />

property, investment and welfare; and<br />

changing forms <strong>of</strong> work and trade unions<br />

2. Geographies <strong>of</strong> Uneven Development:<br />

including work on global production and<br />

value networks, sunk costs and regional<br />

development in economic transformations;<br />

the political economy <strong>of</strong> post-socialist<br />

transformations; and the role <strong>of</strong> changing<br />

labour markets, welfare regimes and<br />

immigration in shaping poverty and<br />

livelihood strategies in cities in the U.K.,<br />

East-Central Europe, southern Africa and<br />

Latin America<br />

3. Politics, Identity and Social Justice:<br />

including work on violence, insecurity and<br />

development; gender and generational<br />

inequalities shaping everyday experiences<br />

<strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS; changing geographies <strong>of</strong><br />

welfare provision and homelessness;<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> neo-liberalism and<br />

resistance.<br />

4. International and transnational migration<br />

with a focus on migration to London<br />

Members <strong>of</strong> the EDSJ group are involved in a<br />

variety <strong>of</strong> collaborations with research users,<br />

including international trade unions (eg<br />

International Transport Workers’ Federation),<br />

community organisations (eg London<br />

Citizens), and regional and international<br />

governmental agencies (eg OECD, Thames<br />

Gateway).<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 21


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

Dr Kavita Datta<br />

Senior Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons (University <strong>of</strong> Botswana), PhD<br />

(Cantab)<br />

k.datta@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Kavita Datta’s research interests span a<br />

number <strong>of</strong> areas <strong>of</strong> development, gender and<br />

migration, and she has conducted research<br />

in both the global South (Botswana and<br />

South Africa) and North (London). Her most<br />

recent research has focused upon exploring<br />

the role and experiences <strong>of</strong> low paid migrant<br />

workers in London. This research has<br />

highlighted the changing nature, politics and<br />

sensibility <strong>of</strong> work, how and why ‘new’<br />

migrants have come to dominate low-paid<br />

work in global cities like London, and the<br />

household strategies that they employ in<br />

order to survive. She is also interested in<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> finance, and specifically<br />

financial exclusion and has undertaken<br />

research on financial exclusion among low<br />

paid migrant communities in London. This<br />

research builds upon broader research on<br />

housing finance, micro-finance and gender<br />

in the context <strong>of</strong> housing markets in Southern<br />

Africa, and she is co-editor <strong>of</strong> Housing<br />

Finance in Developing Countries. Gender is<br />

a critical focus <strong>of</strong> Kavita’s research and her<br />

work has focused specifically on gendered<br />

access to housing markets and migration<br />

processes as well as men and masculinities.<br />

She has also explored the interconnections<br />

between generation and gender in the<br />

context <strong>of</strong> the HIV/AIDS crisis in Southern<br />

Africa.<br />

Kavita’s research has been funded by<br />

the ESRC, Department for International<br />

Development (DfID), Nuffield Foundation<br />

and Central London Research Fund. She has<br />

worked as a consultant for the United Nations<br />

Centre for Human Settlement (UNHCS).<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Datta, K., (2007). Sons and fathers:<br />

Changing constructions <strong>of</strong> fatherhood<br />

in urban Botswana. Women’s <strong>Studies</strong><br />

International Forum. 30, 97-113.<br />

• Datta, K., (2007). In search <strong>of</strong> justice<br />

Gender and generation in a globalizing<br />

world. In: Mapetla, M., Schlyter, A., Bless,<br />

B. (Eds). Urban Experiences <strong>of</strong> Gender,<br />

Generation and Social Justice. Institute <strong>of</strong><br />

Southern African <strong>Studies</strong>, National<br />

University <strong>of</strong> Lesotho. pp.19-44.<br />

• Datta, K., (2007). Gender and micr<strong>of</strong>inance,<br />

Habitat Debate. Special issue<br />

on Financing for the Urban Poor. 13, 8.<br />

• Datta, K., (2007). Housing, Finance and<br />

Development. Report for the UNHCS.<br />

• Datta, K., (2007). Money matters: exploring<br />

financial exclusion among low paid migrant<br />

workers in London. Working Paper,<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong>, <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

University <strong>of</strong> London.<br />

• Datta, K., McIlwaine, C.J., Wills, J., Evans,<br />

Y., Herbert, J., May, J., (2007). The new<br />

development finance or exploiting migrant<br />

labour Remittance sending among lowpaid<br />

migrant workers in London.<br />

International Development Planning<br />

Review. 29, 43-67.<br />

Dr Joanna Herbert<br />

Leverhulme Early Career Fellow<br />

BA Hons PhD (Leic)<br />

j.herbert@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Joanna Herbert has research interests in the<br />

qualitative dimensions <strong>of</strong> migration and the<br />

South Asian diaspora. She has worked on<br />

several research projects on the experiences<br />

<strong>of</strong> minority ethnic groups including recent<br />

research for an ESRC project on migrants<br />

employed in low paid sectors in London. Her<br />

Leverhulme Trust funded research entitled<br />

‘Oral Histories <strong>of</strong> Ugandan Asians in Britain’<br />

seeks to go beyond the simplistic narrative <strong>of</strong><br />

the Ugandan Asian rise to economic and<br />

social success and glean other stories that<br />

constitute their experience in Britain. The<br />

project focuses on first and second<br />

generation Ugandan Asians and explores<br />

the role <strong>of</strong> memories, gender, class, place<br />

and generation in shaping identities and<br />

experiences. It also aims to contribute to<br />

wider debates about belonging, social<br />

cohesion and integration in Britain.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Herbert, J., (2008). Negotiating Boundaries<br />

in the City: Migration, Ethnicity and Gender<br />

in Britain. Aldershot: Ashgate.<br />

• Rodger, R., Herbert, J., (2007). Testimonies<br />

<strong>of</strong> the City: Identity, Community and Change<br />

in a Contemporary Urban World. Aldershot:<br />

Ashgate.<br />

Dr Al James<br />

Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons (Cambridge) PhD (Cambridge)<br />

a.james@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Al James is an economic geographer with<br />

teaching and research interests within the<br />

Global North (US, UK, Ireland) and Global<br />

South (India) focused around: (i) the cultural<br />

economy <strong>of</strong> innovation and learning in<br />

dynamic regional economies; (ii) gendered<br />

experiences <strong>of</strong> work and employment; and<br />

(iii) new forms <strong>of</strong> labour organising and<br />

worker empowerment in the New Economy.<br />

Within this framework, Al is currently working<br />

on an ESRC–funded research project that<br />

explores the connections between IT workers’<br />

everyday experiences <strong>of</strong> work-life conflict<br />

(particularly those <strong>of</strong> working parents);<br />

employer provision <strong>of</strong> different work-life<br />

‘balance’ policies and practices; and the<br />

kinds <strong>of</strong> intra- and inter-firm innovation and<br />

learning processes widely recognised as<br />

underpinning high tech firm competitiveness.<br />

This work is based on comparative fieldwork<br />

in two well known IT ‘clusters’: Dublin and<br />

Cambridge.<br />

Al is also working on a second project (with<br />

Bhaskar Vira at the University <strong>of</strong> Cambridge)<br />

which explores the mobility <strong>of</strong> e-service<br />

workers in India’s Business Process<br />

Outsourcing / Information Technology<br />

Enabled Services Sector. Additionally, this<br />

project (funded by the Nuffield Foundation)<br />

compares the role <strong>of</strong> different labour market<br />

intermediaries (voice accent trainers,<br />

placement agencies, recruiters, labour<br />

‘unions’) in mediating work and training<br />

practices, brokering employment<br />

relationships, and improving labour market<br />

outcomes for call centre workers in India<br />

and the UK. In so doing, the project seeks<br />

22 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


to contribute to a decentred Economic<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> which rejects the ongoing<br />

academic division <strong>of</strong> labour between<br />

‘economic’ and ‘development’ geographers.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• James, A., (2007). Everyday effects,<br />

practices and causal mechanisms <strong>of</strong><br />

‘cultural embeddedness’: learning from<br />

Utah's high tech regional economy.<br />

Ge<strong>of</strong>orum 38, 393-413.<br />

• Gray, M., James, A., (2007). Connecting<br />

gender and economic competitiveness:<br />

lessons from Cambridge's high tech<br />

regional economy. Environment and<br />

Planning A. 39, 417-436.<br />

• James, A., (2006). Critical moments in<br />

the production <strong>of</strong> ‘rigorous’ and ‘relevant’<br />

cultural economic geographies. Progress<br />

in Human <strong>Geography</strong>. 30, 1-20.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Roger Lee<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc(Nott)<br />

r.lee@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Roger Lee’s research interests lie in the field<br />

<strong>of</strong> economic geography. They are centred<br />

primarily on the social and cultural<br />

construction and functioning <strong>of</strong> economic<br />

geographies. At the global scale, this work<br />

concerns the ways in which the norms and<br />

evaluations <strong>of</strong> capitalism are reproduced by<br />

and through ‘spaces <strong>of</strong> regulation’ dominated<br />

increasingly by financial markets with global<br />

reach. The ability <strong>of</strong> financial markets not<br />

merely to regulate but to form new<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> accumulation is exemplified<br />

by work on ‘emerging markets’ as a category<br />

<strong>of</strong> investment which enhances the overall<br />

level <strong>of</strong> marginalisation and uneven<br />

development within the global economic<br />

geography.<br />

More recently, Roger has begin to think<br />

through the (limited) treatment <strong>of</strong> markets<br />

in economic geography and to examine the<br />

way in which they may both reinforce and<br />

intensify capitalist norms and categories<br />

(eg that <strong>of</strong> labour) through structured<br />

finance, for example, and may be put to<br />

work to challenge those norms.<br />

Although ‘alternative’ and challenging, these<br />

economic geographies are embedded in local<br />

social and political practices and institutions<br />

which are also constantly disrupted and<br />

shaped by globalising tendencies <strong>of</strong> circuits<br />

<strong>of</strong> value shaped by capitalist social relations.<br />

It is the contested relationships between the<br />

material imperatives <strong>of</strong> economies, their<br />

social manifestation and contestation in<br />

distinctive social forms <strong>of</strong> economic<br />

geography and the pr<strong>of</strong>ound ontological<br />

significance <strong>of</strong> conceptions <strong>of</strong> space in<br />

economic geography that provide the focal<br />

points for Roger’s interests.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Lee, R., Smith, D.M., (2004). Geographies<br />

and Moralities. Blackwell, Oxford.<br />

• Leyshon, A., Lee, R., Williams, C., (2003).<br />

Alternative economic spaces. Sage,<br />

London.<br />

• Lee, R., Wills, J., (1997). Geographies <strong>of</strong><br />

Economies. Arnold, London.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jon May<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons (Cantab) PhD (Lond)<br />

j.may@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Jon May is a social and cultural geographer<br />

with a particular interest in (global) cities.<br />

His work uses an ethnographic approach to<br />

explore questions <strong>of</strong> inequality and social<br />

justice in an era <strong>of</strong> rapid urban chance, social<br />

and economic restructuring and welfare<br />

reform. For the past decade or so his work<br />

has focused around two main themes:<br />

exploring the geographies <strong>of</strong> homelessness,<br />

and migrant labour in the global city.<br />

In the first <strong>of</strong> these areas, early work explored<br />

the life histories <strong>of</strong> homeless people; media<br />

and legislative constructions <strong>of</strong> homelessness<br />

(especially those concerned with the<br />

construction <strong>of</strong> ‘homeless places’ and<br />

questions <strong>of</strong> geographical mobility); and<br />

homeless people’s own experiences <strong>of</strong><br />

movement and <strong>of</strong> place. More recently, his<br />

work on the Homeless Places Project has<br />

extended the rather narrow accounts <strong>of</strong><br />

homelessness and <strong>of</strong> the ‘revanchist city’<br />

found in the geographical literature, exploring<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 23


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

instead the various and complex experiences<br />

<strong>of</strong> and responses to street homelessness in<br />

the UK – examining the changing face <strong>of</strong><br />

homeless services in an era <strong>of</strong> neo-liberal<br />

welfare ‘reform’; the geographies <strong>of</strong><br />

voluntarism; and homeless people’s own<br />

understandings and experiences <strong>of</strong> voluntary<br />

service spaces and <strong>of</strong> the streets. Under the<br />

second <strong>of</strong> these themes, work with<br />

colleagues in the Global Cities at Work team<br />

at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> has explored the practices<br />

and politics <strong>of</strong> ‘travelling neoliberalism’ –<br />

charting the processes behind and formation<br />

<strong>of</strong> a distinctive ‘migrant division <strong>of</strong> labour’ in<br />

the London low-wage economy, the diverse<br />

experiences <strong>of</strong> low-paid migrant workers<br />

themselves, and the politics attendant to<br />

such divisions.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Blunt, A., Gruffudd, P., May, J., Ogborn, M.,<br />

Pinder, D., (2003). Cultural <strong>Geography</strong> in<br />

Practice. Arnold, London.<br />

• May, J., Thrift, N., (2001). TimeSpace:<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> temporality. Routledge,<br />

London.<br />

• Crang, M., Crang, P., May, J., (1999).<br />

Virtual Geographies: bodies, space,<br />

relations. Routledge, London.<br />

Dr Cathy McIlwaine<br />

Reader in Human <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons MA(Liv) PhD(Lond)<br />

c.j.mcilwaine@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Cathy McIlwaine is a development<br />

geographer with regional interests in Latin<br />

America (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Colombia<br />

and Guatemala), although she has also<br />

worked in South East Asia (the Philippines)<br />

and Southern Africa (Botswana and South<br />

Africa). Her research has focused on a<br />

number <strong>of</strong> key areas: gender and ethnic<br />

inequalities within households and labour<br />

markets; the reconfiguration <strong>of</strong> gender<br />

relations through export orientated<br />

development strategies; urban poverty; the<br />

relationships between violence and the<br />

development process; civil society, social<br />

capital, and social exclusion in the South.<br />

More recently, she has been working on<br />

issues <strong>of</strong> international migration especially<br />

among Latin Americans to Europe as well as<br />

migrant labour in London. In her work on<br />

urban violence in particular, Cathy has drawn<br />

heavily upon and further developed<br />

techniques <strong>of</strong> Participatory Urban Appraisal<br />

(PUA). Her research has a strong policy focus<br />

and she has worked as a consultant with the<br />

World Bank, the Inter-American<br />

Development Bank and the Commonwealth<br />

Secretariat. She also chairs the Carila Latin<br />

American Welfare Group which works with<br />

Latin American migrants in London.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• McIlwaine, C., (2009). Latin London: the<br />

Lives <strong>of</strong> Latin American Migrants in the<br />

Capital. Institute for the Study <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Americas. London.<br />

• Chant, S., McIlwaine, C., (2009).<br />

Geographies <strong>of</strong> Development in the 21st<br />

Century: An Introduction to the Global<br />

South. Edward Elgar, London.<br />

• McIlwaine, C., Moser, C., (2004).<br />

Encounters with Violence in Latin America.<br />

Routledge, London.<br />

• McIlwaine, C., Willis, K., (2002).<br />

Challenges and Change in Middle America:<br />

Perspectives on Development in Mexico,<br />

Central America, and the Caribbean.<br />

Prentice Hall, Harlow.<br />

Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos<br />

Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

Diploma in Town Planning (University <strong>of</strong><br />

Thessaly, Greece) PhD(Lond)<br />

k.melachroinos@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Konstantinos Melachroinos is an economic<br />

geographer with a strong interest in issues<br />

related to regional development and change<br />

in a wide range <strong>of</strong> countries. Theoretical<br />

considerations about the nature <strong>of</strong> the<br />

economic indicators applied in spatial<br />

analysis form an important aspect <strong>of</strong> his<br />

work. Furthermore, another part <strong>of</strong> his<br />

research focuses on the measurement and<br />

mapping <strong>of</strong> territorial trends and the<br />

evaluation <strong>of</strong> regional development policies.<br />

During the period 2003-2005 he contributed<br />

to the development <strong>of</strong> the OECD Territorial<br />

Database and the preparation <strong>of</strong> several<br />

OECD publications. His current research<br />

24 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


projects involve the examination <strong>of</strong> the effects<br />

<strong>of</strong> globalisation on regional inequalities and<br />

the impact <strong>of</strong> Taiwanese FDI on local<br />

economic development in China.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Melachroinos, K.A., (2002). European<br />

integration and the spatial dynamics <strong>of</strong><br />

manufacturing – employment change.<br />

Environment and Planning A. 34, 2017-<br />

2036.<br />

• Melachroinos, K.A., Spence, N., (2001).<br />

Manufacturing productivity growth across<br />

European Union states: 1978-1994.<br />

Environment and Planning A. 33, 1681-<br />

1703.<br />

• Melachroinos, K.A., Spence, N., (2001).<br />

Conceptualising sunk costs in economic<br />

geography: cost recovery and the<br />

fluctuating value <strong>of</strong> fixed capital. Progress<br />

in Human <strong>Geography</strong>. 25, 347-364.<br />

Dr Simon Reid-Henry<br />

Lecturer in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons (Cantab) MA PhD(Cantab)<br />

s.reid-henry@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Simon Reid-Henry’s research interests<br />

cover a range <strong>of</strong> interests across the Human<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> spectrum. His earlier research<br />

work on the politics <strong>of</strong> knowledge production<br />

centred upon the history <strong>of</strong> the attempt to<br />

develop an alternative biotechnology industry<br />

in Cuba. This work brought together his<br />

interests in the history <strong>of</strong> science,<br />

development agendas, socialism (and its<br />

nationalist variants) as well as a broader set<br />

<strong>of</strong> issues concerning pharmaceutical<br />

dependencies and health-based inequalities.<br />

His work today branches out from this in two<br />

linked research agendas. The first is about<br />

the contemporary pharmaceutical industry<br />

and in particular the issue <strong>of</strong> access to antiretroviral<br />

drugs, linking a series <strong>of</strong> arguments<br />

about social justice and moral economy to<br />

the technological mediation <strong>of</strong> political<br />

economy.<br />

The second concerns the cultural<br />

construction <strong>of</strong> sovereignty and is based<br />

upon an historical-geography <strong>of</strong> Guantánamo<br />

Bay. Both lines <strong>of</strong> research are ultimately<br />

concerned with the way that particular sorts<br />

<strong>of</strong> lives are valued in the twenty-first century,<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Reid-Henry, S.M., (2008) (forthcoming).<br />

The Cuban Cure: Reason and Resistance in<br />

Global Science. Chicago University Press,<br />

Chicago.<br />

• Reid-Henry, S.M., (2007). Scientific<br />

Innovation and Non-Western Regional<br />

Economies. Environment and Planning A<br />

(doi:10.1068/a39157)<br />

• Reid-Henry, S.M., (2007). Activism and the<br />

Academy: an interview with Daniel Defert.<br />

Antipode. 39, 240-246.<br />

• Reid-Henry, S.M., (2007). Exceptional<br />

Sovereignty Guantanamo Bay and the Recolonial<br />

present. Antipode. 39, 627-648.<br />

• Reid-Henry, S.M., (2007). The Contested<br />

Spaces <strong>of</strong> Cuban Development:<br />

postsocialism, postcolonialism and<br />

development. Ge<strong>of</strong>orum. 38, 445-455.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Adrian Smith<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Human <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons MA DPhil(Sus)<br />

a.m.smith@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Adrian Smith’s main interests are in<br />

economic geographies, the political economy<br />

<strong>of</strong> cities and regions, and post-socialist<br />

transformations. For the past seventeen years<br />

or so he has been working on a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

projects looking at the economic and social<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> transformation in Central<br />

Europe. This work has engaged with debates<br />

over political-economic transformation, nonessentialist<br />

Marxism and development theory<br />

to try to understand the contemporary<br />

geographies <strong>of</strong> social power.<br />

His current research involves work in three<br />

main areas. Firstly, he is examining the<br />

economic geographies <strong>of</strong> post-socialist<br />

transformations and the ‘new’ Europe.<br />

Currently, this involves an examination <strong>of</strong><br />

the east European garment industry and<br />

the growth <strong>of</strong> outward processing, global<br />

contracting and new trade regimes.<br />

Secondly, he works on cultures <strong>of</strong> economies<br />

and household economic practices. This<br />

research involves understanding household<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 25


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

economic practices and survival strategies in<br />

central Europe as historically situated and<br />

culturally inflected economic relations.<br />

Thirdly, his work has also focused on the<br />

globalisation and restructuring <strong>of</strong><br />

metropolitan manufacturing in London’s<br />

garment sector. Investigating the scope and<br />

scale <strong>of</strong> restructuring, the kinds <strong>of</strong><br />

restructuring strategies established and the<br />

role <strong>of</strong> institutional structures and practices,<br />

this project builds upon his other interests in<br />

the global garment industry.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Smith, A., Stenning, A., Willis, K., (2008).<br />

Social Justice and Neo-Liberalism. Zed<br />

Books, London.<br />

• Rainnie, A., Smith, A., Swain, A., (2002).<br />

Work, Employment and Transition:<br />

Restructuring Livelihoods in ‘post-<br />

Communist’ Eastern Europe. Routledge,<br />

London.<br />

• Smith, A., (1998). Reconstructing the<br />

Regional Economy: Industrial<br />

Transformation and Regional Development<br />

in Slovakia. Edward Elgar, Cheltenham.<br />

• Pickles, J., Smith, A., (1998).Theorising<br />

Transition: The Political Economy <strong>of</strong> Post-<br />

Communist Transformations.<br />

Routledge, London.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Nigel Spence<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc(University <strong>of</strong> Wales) PhD(London)<br />

N.Spence@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Nigel Spence is an economic geographer<br />

currently working in several areas <strong>of</strong> the<br />

discipline. He is the author <strong>of</strong> several books<br />

and a considerable number <strong>of</strong> research<br />

papers in the field. He has also acted as a<br />

consultant on many urban and regional<br />

planning projects in the UK (including<br />

recently for the Department <strong>of</strong> Trade and<br />

Industry and the Thames Gateway London<br />

Partnership) and the European Union<br />

(including recently for the Commission and<br />

the Court <strong>of</strong> Auditors). He has a number <strong>of</strong><br />

current research themes.<br />

The first concerns regional output,<br />

employment and productivity linked to issues<br />

<strong>of</strong> deindustrialisation and tertiarisation in the<br />

UK and Europe. Some <strong>of</strong> this work is linked to<br />

a government advisory role on regional<br />

accounts.<br />

The second examines regional dimensions <strong>of</strong><br />

new firm formation especially in the context<br />

<strong>of</strong> government policy generally and Greece<br />

and the UK in particular. Some <strong>of</strong> this work<br />

has been supported by the European<br />

Commission.<br />

The third explores the links between public<br />

infrastructure provision and regional<br />

economic development. In the UK the<br />

specific research context has been to<br />

examine the effects on industrial costs via<br />

survey, whereas in Greece the focus has been<br />

on the relationships between the<br />

development and infrastructure explored via<br />

panel data and econometric methods. This<br />

research has had the support <strong>of</strong> both the UK<br />

and the Greek governments.<br />

The last involves issues <strong>of</strong> energy<br />

consumption and sustainability in UK<br />

cities, notably involving worktravel.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Frost, M., Spence, N., (2008). Energy<br />

consumption and worktravel trips: London,<br />

Birmingham and Manchester, 1981-2001.<br />

Environment and Planning A.<br />

• Rovolis, A., Spence, N., (2003). Promoting<br />

regional economic growth in Greece by<br />

investing in the public infrastructure.<br />

Environment and Planning C Government<br />

and Policy 20. 393-419.<br />

• Rovolis, A., Spence, N., (2002). Duality<br />

theory and cost function analysis in a<br />

regional context: the impact <strong>of</strong> public<br />

infrastructure capital in the Greek regions.<br />

Annals <strong>of</strong> Regional Science. 36, 55-78.<br />

• Melachroinos, K.A., Spence, N., (2001).<br />

Cost recovery and the fluctuating value<br />

<strong>of</strong> fixed capital: an alternative way <strong>of</strong><br />

conceptualising sunk costs. Progress<br />

in Human <strong>Geography</strong>. 25, 347-364.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jane Wills<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BA Hons(Cantab) PhD(Open)<br />

j.wills@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Jane Wills has research interests in the<br />

political-economy <strong>of</strong> work and employment<br />

with a particular focus on labour organisation.<br />

Recent research has been focused on (1)<br />

migrant workers in low paid employment in<br />

London (with Datta, May and McIlwaine); (2)<br />

the London living wage campaign; (3)<br />

London Citizens’ model <strong>of</strong> broad-based<br />

organisation; and (4) efforts to enforce labour<br />

standards in global production chains.<br />

Previous research has explored the<br />

development <strong>of</strong> European Works Councils,<br />

labour internationalism and community<br />

unionism in the UK. More information and<br />

a list <strong>of</strong> journal articles are available on the<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> department website.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Wills, J., Datta, K., Evans, Y., Herbert, J.,<br />

May, J., McIlwaine, C., (2009). Global Cities<br />

at Work: migrant workers in an uneven<br />

world. Pluto Press, London.<br />

• Hale, A., Wills, J., (2005). Threads <strong>of</strong><br />

Labour: Garment industry supply chains<br />

from the workers’ perspective. Blackwell,<br />

Oxford.<br />

• Waterman, P., Wills, J., (2001).<br />

Place, Space and the New Labour<br />

Internationalisms. Blackwell, Oxford.<br />

Hydrological,<br />

Hydrochemical and Fluvial<br />

Processes Research<br />

Theme<br />

The Hydrological, Hydrochemical and Fluvial<br />

Processes theme conducts research on<br />

hydrological, geomorphological and chemical<br />

processes in freshwater (incl. wetland) and<br />

estuarine environments through field<br />

observation, laboratory and field<br />

experiments, and model development and<br />

testing, using grants from NERC, EPSRC, the<br />

Environment Agency, HR Wallingford Ltd,<br />

and Natural England among others. The<br />

26 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


theme has made significant advances in<br />

understanding <strong>of</strong>: (i) the influence <strong>of</strong><br />

hydrological processes on the transport <strong>of</strong><br />

agrochemicals in river catchments (Heppell,<br />

Wharton); (ii) hydro-geomorphological and<br />

hydro-ecological interactions in rivers with<br />

applications in flood estimation and river<br />

restoration (Wharton, Heppell); (iii) the<br />

sources, transport and behaviour <strong>of</strong> metals in<br />

estuarine environments (Spencer); (iv) water<br />

flows, heat transfers, and methane dynamics<br />

in wetland soils (Baird); and (v)<br />

ecohydrological processes and their role in<br />

peatland development over timescales <strong>of</strong><br />

101-103 years (Baird). The theme has links<br />

with the Environmental Change research<br />

theme, particularly in the ecohydrology <strong>of</strong><br />

Holocene peatland development (Belyea,<br />

Baird), and with colleagues in Biological<br />

and Chemical Sciences at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

(contaminant transport and biogeochemical<br />

cycling).<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Andy Baird<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc Hons(Hull), PhD(Bris)<br />

a.j.baird@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Much <strong>of</strong> Andy’s research considers the<br />

physical processes <strong>of</strong> water, heat and gas<br />

transfer in peat soils. Peatlands are globallyimportant<br />

carbon stores (they contain at least<br />

a third <strong>of</strong> the global soil carbon store) and are<br />

both sinks and sources <strong>of</strong> atmospheric<br />

carbon dioxide and sources <strong>of</strong> atmospheric<br />

methane. Because <strong>of</strong> this, they are thought to<br />

exert an important control on global climate.<br />

Carbon balance processes in peatlands are<br />

strongly influenced by hydrological and<br />

thermal processes. For example:<br />

(i) When the peatland water table is near<br />

the peatland surface, more methane<br />

(produced during the anaerobic decay <strong>of</strong><br />

peat) is lost to the atmosphere than when<br />

the water table is further below the surface.<br />

Andy has recently become interested in<br />

modelling peat formation / peatland<br />

development over timescales <strong>of</strong> 10 – 10<br />

years. A suite <strong>of</strong> models under the name<br />

DigiBog is being developed for this purpose.<br />

The models simulate peat accumulation<br />

(carbon sequestration) and allow for<br />

interactions between hydrological and<br />

ecological processes across a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

spatial and temporal scales. The models<br />

are examples <strong>of</strong> a complex adaptive system<br />

(CAS) and show emergent behaviour. It is<br />

planned to link the CAS models to wetland<br />

methane emission models to improve<br />

predictions <strong>of</strong> wetland methane emissions.<br />

This work is being done in collaboration with<br />

one <strong>of</strong> Andy’s PhD students and Dr Lisa<br />

Belyea.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Kettridge, N., Baird, A.J., (2008)<br />

(forthcoming). Modelling soil temperatures<br />

in northern peatlands. European Journal <strong>of</strong><br />

Soil Science.<br />

• Surridge, B.W.J., Heathwaite, A.L., Baird,<br />

A.J., (2007). The release <strong>of</strong> phosphorus to<br />

porewater and surface water from river<br />

riparian sediments. Journal <strong>of</strong><br />

Environmental Quality. 36, 1534-1544<br />

• Kettridge, N., Baird, A.J., (2007). In situ<br />

measurements <strong>of</strong> the thermal properties<br />

<strong>of</strong> a northern peatland: Implications for<br />

peatland temperature models. Journal <strong>of</strong><br />

Geophysical Research. 112, F2, F02019.<br />

• Kellner, E., Baird, A.J., Oosterwoud, M.,<br />

Harrison, K., Waddington, J.M., (2006).<br />

The effect <strong>of</strong> atmospheric pressure and<br />

temperature on methane (CH4) ebullition<br />

from near-surface peats. Geophysical<br />

Research Letters. 33, L18405.<br />

(ii) Methane is produced by micro-organisms<br />

from the Archaea and the rate <strong>of</strong><br />

production is strongly temperaturedependent<br />

(it increases with<br />

temperature).<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 27


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

Dr Lisa Belyea<br />

Senior Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc Hons (Carleton), MSc (Waterloo),<br />

PhD (London)<br />

L.Belyea@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Lisa Belyea’s research interests focus on the<br />

spatial and temporal dynamics <strong>of</strong> ecological<br />

systems, with particular interests in peatlands<br />

and other moss-dominated lands. These<br />

systems are globally important stores <strong>of</strong><br />

organic carbon, but their current role in<br />

transferring carbon to and from the<br />

atmosphere and hydrosphere is highly<br />

uncertain. Understanding how peatlands<br />

and other carbon-rich ecosystems respond<br />

to environmental forcing is vital to predicting<br />

possible feedbacks on the global carbon<br />

cycle and climate system. These responses<br />

can be abrupt and highly non-linear, owing<br />

to ecological-hydrological feedback<br />

mechanisms operating on a range <strong>of</strong> spatial<br />

scales (1 – 1000 m). Current research<br />

focuses on three major areas:<br />

Spatiotemporal dynamics <strong>of</strong> ecosystem<br />

development – ongoing work focusing on the<br />

formation <strong>of</strong> spatial patterns at the landscape<br />

scale; Geochemical controls on peat<br />

decomposition – a three-year NERC-funded<br />

project (with partners at Edinburgh,<br />

Newcastle and Uppsala Universities) uses<br />

a gradient from fen to bog to investigate the<br />

linkages among physicochemical<br />

environment, litter chemistry and<br />

decomposition rate; Short- and long-term<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> fire on peatland carbon cycling –<br />

an ‘Urgent’ NERC-funded project (with<br />

collaborators at MLURI and CEH Edinburgh)<br />

is investigating the impact <strong>of</strong> a fire on the<br />

Silver Flowe (a blanket peatland in southwest<br />

Scotland).<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Cutler, N.A., Belyea, L.R., Dugmore, A.J.<br />

(2008) Spatial patterns <strong>of</strong> microsite<br />

colonisation on two young lava flows, Mt<br />

Hekla, Iceland. Journal <strong>of</strong> Vegetation<br />

Science.<br />

• Belyea, L.R., (2007). Revealing the<br />

Emperor’s new clothes: niche-based<br />

palaeoenvironmental reconstruction in<br />

the light <strong>of</strong> recent ecological theory. The<br />

Holocene. 17, 683-688.<br />

• Belyea, L.R., (2007). Climatic and<br />

topographic constraints on the abundance<br />

<strong>of</strong> bog pools. Hydrological Processes. 21,<br />

675-687.<br />

• Belyea, L.R., Baird, A.J., (2006). Beyond<br />

“the limits to peat bog growth”: cross-scale<br />

feedback in peatland development.<br />

Ecological Monographs. 76, 299-322.<br />

Dr Kate Heppell<br />

Senior Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc Hons(Bris) MSc(Lond) Dphil(Oxon)<br />

c.m.heppell@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Kate Heppell is a hydrologist with 14 years<br />

research experience in the fields <strong>of</strong> hillslope<br />

hydrology and hydrochemistry, specialising in<br />

the influence <strong>of</strong> hydrological processes on<br />

the fate and transport <strong>of</strong> agrochemicals<br />

(nutrients and pesticides) in river<br />

catchments. There are two foci to her current<br />

research: Studying the hydrological and<br />

hydrochemical processes by which<br />

agrochemicals are transported to surface<br />

waters and understanding the in-stream fate<br />

and transport <strong>of</strong> agrochemicals in rivers and<br />

lakes <strong>of</strong> lowland catchments.<br />

Recent research at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, funded as<br />

part <strong>of</strong> the NERC LOCAR thematic<br />

programme, has focused on understanding<br />

the different processes responsible for the instream<br />

trapping, and subsequent release, <strong>of</strong><br />

particulate material by aquatic vegetation in<br />

chalk rivers. Kate’s role in this research has<br />

been to determine the fate <strong>of</strong> agrochemicals<br />

transported through the rivers <strong>of</strong> such<br />

permeable catchments. For example, the<br />

deposition <strong>of</strong> sediment beneath vegetation<br />

within chalk streams has unexpected<br />

implications for nitrogen and carbon cycling<br />

in the form <strong>of</strong> methane production and<br />

denitrification in the shallow hyporheic. Her<br />

research has also demonstrated that<br />

variations in organic matter composition <strong>of</strong><br />

sediments in chalk streams (due primarily to<br />

algal remains) can account for differences in<br />

pesticide sorption to the sediment within a<br />

single river reach. As a result <strong>of</strong> this research<br />

Kate has developed an interest in the<br />

28 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


changing balance <strong>of</strong> the allochthonous and<br />

autothonous organic matter input to rivers,<br />

which plays a vital role in biogeochemical<br />

cycling and sorption <strong>of</strong> organic contaminants.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Sanders, I., Heppell, C.M., Cotton, J.A.,<br />

Wharton, G., Hildrew, A., Flowers, E.J.,<br />

Trimmer, M., (2007). Emission <strong>of</strong> methane<br />

from chalk streams has potential<br />

implications for agricultural practices.<br />

Freshwater Biology. 52, 1365-2427.<br />

• Cotton, J.A., Wharton, G., Bass, J.A.B.,<br />

Heppell, C.M., Wotton, R.S., (2006). Plantwater-sediment<br />

interactions in lowland<br />

permeable streams: investigating the effect<br />

<strong>of</strong> seasonal changes in vegetation cover on<br />

flow patterns and sediment accumulation.<br />

Geomorphology. 77, 320-334.<br />

• Heppell, C.M., Chapman, A.S., (2006).<br />

Analysis <strong>of</strong> a two-component hydrograph<br />

separation model to predict herbicide<br />

run<strong>of</strong>f in drained soils. Agricultural Water<br />

Management. 79, 177-207.<br />

Dr Laura Shotbolt<br />

Postdoctoral Researcher<br />

BSc Hons (Lancaster) MSc (Aberdeen)<br />

PhD (Salford)<br />

l.shotbolt@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Laura Shotbolt’s research interests are in the<br />

transport, fate and impact <strong>of</strong> environmental<br />

contaminants. Her research is currently<br />

focused on reconstructing records <strong>of</strong> past<br />

pollution from environmental archives and<br />

investigating toxic effects <strong>of</strong> trace metals.<br />

She is also interested in improving analytical<br />

methods in environmental sciences and is<br />

developing new techniques for extracting<br />

porewater from anaerobic sediments. Most<br />

recent research projects include an<br />

investigation into the impacts <strong>of</strong> atmospheric<br />

pollution on microbial communities in<br />

blanket bogs funded by Moors for the Future<br />

and an investigation into temporal records <strong>of</strong><br />

anthropogenic Pb deposition using<br />

herbarium mosses funded by a NERC<br />

instrumentation grant. She is also involved in<br />

a DEFRA funded project developing critical<br />

load methodologies for heavy metals.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Shotbolt, L., Büker, P., Ashmore, A.R.,<br />

Tipping, E., (2007). Reconstructing past<br />

trace metal deposition in the UK using moss<br />

samples from herbaria collections.<br />

Environmental Pollution. 147, 120–130.<br />

• Shotbolt, L., Hutchinson, S.M., Thomas,<br />

A.D., (2006). Determining past heavy metal<br />

deposition onto the southern Pennines<br />

using reservoir sedimentary records.<br />

Journal <strong>of</strong> Paleolimnology. 35, 305–322.<br />

• Shotbolt, L., Thomas, A.D., Hutchinson,<br />

S.M., (2005). Reservoir sediments as<br />

records <strong>of</strong> recent environmental change:<br />

A review. Progress in Physical <strong>Geography</strong>.<br />

29, 337–361<br />

Dr Kate Spencer<br />

Senior Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc(Thames Polytechnic) MSc/DIC(Lond)<br />

PhD(Greenwich)<br />

k.spencer@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Kate Spencer is an estuarine geochemist with<br />

particular interest in the management <strong>of</strong> fine<br />

sediment including issues <strong>of</strong> sediment<br />

quality, contaminant behaviour and<br />

pathways, and sediment tracing. Recent<br />

projects include an Environment Agency<br />

funded project to examine the impacts <strong>of</strong><br />

water injection dredging on water quality<br />

and ecotoxicity and a NERC funded project<br />

to develop field methodologies for measuring<br />

fine sediment transport in estuarine<br />

environments. Recently, she convened an<br />

ESRC NERC transdisciplinary seminar<br />

‘Channel RestOration in Contaminated Urban<br />

Settings’ or CROCUS and has been involved<br />

in RIMEW, an EU funded international project<br />

examining sediment contamination and long<br />

term sediment management in UK and<br />

French estuaries.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Spencer, K.L., Suzuki, K., Benson, T.,<br />

Taylor, J.A., Manning, A., Dearnaley, M.,<br />

(2007). The potential use <strong>of</strong> geochemically<br />

labelled minerals as tracers for cohesive<br />

sediments. In: Westrich, B. and Förstner, U.<br />

(Eds) Sediment Dynamics and Pollutant<br />

Mobility in Rivers—Interdisciplinary<br />

Approach. Springer-Verlag Berlin,<br />

Heidelberg, New York.<br />

• Spencer, K.L., MacLeod, C.L., Tuckett, A.,<br />

Johnson, S.M., (2006). Heavy Metals in the<br />

Medway and Swale Estuaries: Source,<br />

Distribution and Ecotoxic Potential. Marine<br />

Pollution Bulletin. 52, 226-230.<br />

• Spencer, K.L., Dewhurst, R.E., Penna, P.,<br />

(2006). Potential impacts <strong>of</strong> water injection<br />

dredging on water quality and ecotoxicity in<br />

Limehouse Basin, River Thames, SE<br />

England, UK. Chemosphere. 63, 509-521.<br />

Dr Geraldene Wharton<br />

Reader in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc Hons (Sheff) PhD (Soton)<br />

Geraldene Wharton’s current research<br />

focuses on the interactions <strong>of</strong> plants, water<br />

and fine sediments in rivers. She has a<br />

particular interest in the role that plants play<br />

as river ecosystem engineers in trapping and<br />

retaining fine sediments, and how the<br />

aggregated nature <strong>of</strong> these fine sediments<br />

affects their entrainment and transport<br />

characteristics. This research has been<br />

funded by the Environment Agency and the<br />

Natural Environment Research Council<br />

through the Lowland Catchment Research<br />

Thematic Programme. The research<br />

conducted through LOCAR has been<br />

important in demonstrating the significance<br />

<strong>of</strong> biotic processes in the sediment dynamics<br />

<strong>of</strong> chalk river systems in several ways. Ongoing<br />

work in this area is being conducted in<br />

collaboration with Roger Wotton (University<br />

College London), Ian Droppo (Environment<br />

Canada) and Natural England.<br />

Geraldene’s second main area <strong>of</strong> research is<br />

river restoration with current investigations<br />

centred on nitrogen dynamics in reconnected<br />

floodplains and the challenges and appraisal<br />

<strong>of</strong> urban river restoration schemes, funded by<br />

the Environment Agency and an ESRC-NERC<br />

Transdisciplinary seminar series, CROCUS<br />

(Channel RestOration in Contaminated<br />

Urban Settings). Geraldene also has a<br />

practical involvement in river restoration as a<br />

Director <strong>of</strong> the UK River Restoration Centre, a<br />

not-for-pr<strong>of</strong>it company promoting the science<br />

and practice <strong>of</strong> river restoration.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 29


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Wharton, G., Gilvear, D., (2007). River<br />

restoration in the UK: meeting the needs <strong>of</strong><br />

both the EU Water Framework Directive and<br />

flood defence International Journal <strong>of</strong><br />

River Basin Management. 5, 143-154.<br />

• Sanders, I. A., Trimmer, M., Heppell, C. M.,<br />

Cotton, J. A., Wharton, G., Hildrew, A. G.,<br />

Flowers, E. J., (2007). Emission <strong>of</strong> methane<br />

from chalk streams has potential<br />

implications for agricultural practices.<br />

Freshwater Biology. 52, 1176-1186.<br />

• Clarke, S. J., Wharton, G., Cotton, J. A.,<br />

(2006). Spatial and temporal variations in<br />

the sediment habitat <strong>of</strong> Ranunculus spp. in<br />

lowland chalk streams – implications for<br />

using macrophytes as environmental<br />

monitors <strong>of</strong> sediment and water health<br />

Water, Air & Soil Pollution. Focus 6, 393-<br />

401.<br />

• Cotton, J. A., Wharton, G., Bass, J. A. B.,<br />

Heppell, C. M., Wotton, R. S., (2006). The<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> seasonal changes to in-stream<br />

vegetation cover on patterns <strong>of</strong> flow and<br />

accumulation <strong>of</strong> sediment. Geomorphology.<br />

77, 320-334.<br />

Environmental Change<br />

theme<br />

The Environmental Change theme focuses on<br />

processes and patterns <strong>of</strong> regional to global<br />

environmental change. Research combines<br />

process modelling and palaeo-environmental<br />

reconstruction with laboratory- and fieldbased<br />

studies. There are three main strands<br />

<strong>of</strong> enquiry: (a) rapid environmental change<br />

and positive feedbacks between biological<br />

and physical systems, (b) quantitative and<br />

integrative analysis <strong>of</strong> environmental change<br />

across different scales <strong>of</strong> time and space,<br />

and (c) interaction <strong>of</strong> liquid and solid phases<br />

<strong>of</strong> water with sediments and landscapes.<br />

Current research projects include: subglacial<br />

processes and their influence on glacier<br />

dynamics; new approaches to the<br />

sedimentological and geomorphological<br />

archive <strong>of</strong> glacial and fluvial systems, in the<br />

latter allowing documentation <strong>of</strong> previously<br />

unrecognised complexity in river behaviour<br />

and response to climatic forcing and<br />

contributing significantly to linkage <strong>of</strong> the<br />

timing and patterns <strong>of</strong> Palaeolithic<br />

occupation <strong>of</strong> the British Isles to climate and<br />

sea level change; development <strong>of</strong> a new<br />

Mutual Temperature Range method for<br />

palaeoclimate reconstruction; how fine-scale<br />

heterogeneity and cross-scale feedbacks<br />

between vegetation and hydrology influence<br />

peatland dynamics on time scales <strong>of</strong> 10s to<br />

100s <strong>of</strong> years, with implications for predicting<br />

carbon cycle responses to climate change.<br />

Dr Simon Carr<br />

Senior Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc Hons (London) PhD (London)<br />

s.j.carr@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Simon Carr undertakes research that<br />

examines the interactions between climate,<br />

glaciers and landscape on short to long<br />

timescales. This work is directed towards<br />

reconciling the climatic and glaciological<br />

modelling <strong>of</strong> ice-mass behaviour with the<br />

geomorphological and sedimentary evidence<br />

<strong>of</strong> recent and Quaternary glaciation. Simon’s<br />

work also examines the ways in which the<br />

Internet and global mass-media are used to<br />

communicate the science and implications <strong>of</strong><br />

climate change. Simon is currently working<br />

on several projects:<br />

Deformation, Micromorphology & Micr<strong>of</strong>abric<br />

<strong>of</strong> Subglacial Sediments; This work examines<br />

the potential <strong>of</strong> micr<strong>of</strong>abric analysis <strong>of</strong><br />

subglacial sediments for providing a detailed<br />

reconstruction <strong>of</strong> the strain history <strong>of</strong> tills to<br />

give a direct mechanism for the validation <strong>of</strong><br />

models <strong>of</strong> predicted glacial dynamics. This<br />

approach may be used to validate models <strong>of</strong><br />

ice sheet stability, including for example the<br />

presence and significance <strong>of</strong> palaeo icestreams.<br />

Topoclimatic Controls Over Marginal<br />

Glaciation; Small glaciers and ice-caps are<br />

considered by the IPCC to be the most<br />

sensitive indicators <strong>of</strong> climate change. It is<br />

therefore critical to understand the<br />

topoclimatic controls over small-scale<br />

mountain glaciation when using<br />

contemporary or former glaciers as climate<br />

proxy evidence. This research focuses on the<br />

examination <strong>of</strong> climatic and topographic<br />

controls over modern glacier mass-balance<br />

on small ice-cap (Iceland) and cirque/valley<br />

glaciers (Norway), and also examines the role<br />

and significance <strong>of</strong> glacier micro-climates.<br />

This research is being used to develop<br />

methods <strong>of</strong> glacier reconstruction that may<br />

be used to understand palaeoclimatic<br />

conditions, notably for the Younger Dryas<br />

period in the British Isles, and other events <strong>of</strong><br />

marginal glaciation in Southern Africa.<br />

30 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


Publications include:<br />

• Carr, S.J., Coleman, C.G., Humpage, A.J.,<br />

Shakesby, R.A., (2007). The Quaternary <strong>of</strong><br />

the Brecon Beacons; Field Guide.<br />

Quaternary Research Association, London.<br />

• Carr, S.J., Coleman, C.G., (2007). An<br />

improved approach for the reconstruction<br />

<strong>of</strong> former glacier mass-balance and<br />

dynamics. Geomorphology. 92, 76-90.<br />

• Carr, S.J., Goddard, M., (2007). Role <strong>of</strong><br />

particle-size in the development <strong>of</strong> till<br />

fabric: implications for using eigenvectors<br />

in understanding glacier dynamics. Boreas.<br />

36, 371-385.<br />

• Carr, S.J., Holmes, R., van der Meer, J.J.M.,<br />

Rose, J., (2006). The Last Glaciation in the<br />

North Sea Basin; micromorphological<br />

evidence <strong>of</strong> extensive glaciation. Journal <strong>of</strong><br />

Quaternary Science. 21, 131-153.<br />

Dr David J Horne<br />

Senior Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc MSc(Lond) PhD(Bristol)<br />

d.j.horne@qmul.ac.uk<br />

David Horne specialises in the study <strong>of</strong> living<br />

and fossil ostracod crustaceans, both marine<br />

and freshwater, and has broader research<br />

interests in the fields <strong>of</strong> palaeoclimatology,<br />

crustacean phylogeny, and the evolutionary<br />

ecology <strong>of</strong> sex and parthenogenesis. A<br />

current focus <strong>of</strong> his research is the<br />

application <strong>of</strong> ostracods to<br />

palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic<br />

interpretations <strong>of</strong> British Quaternary<br />

archaeological sites. He is also involved in<br />

investigations <strong>of</strong> older ostracod faunas such<br />

as those associated with the Early Cretaceous<br />

‘feathered dinosaurs’ <strong>of</strong> Liaoning in China.<br />

His NODE GIS database (Nonmarine<br />

Ostracod Distribution in Europe) forms the<br />

basis <strong>of</strong> a contribution to the EU-funded<br />

Fauna Europaean Biodiversity Project. He<br />

collaborates with colleagues at the Natural<br />

History Museum (where he is a Scientific<br />

Associate <strong>of</strong> the Zoology Department) and<br />

with scientists in Europe, Japan, China and<br />

the USA.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Williams, M., Siveter, D.J., Ashworth, A.C.,<br />

Wilby, P.R., Horne, D.J., Lewis, A.R.,<br />

Marchant, D.R., (2008). Exceptionally<br />

preserved lacustrine ostracods fromthe<br />

Middle Miocene <strong>of</strong> Antarctica. Proceedings<br />

<strong>of</strong> the Royal Society <strong>of</strong> London Series B.<br />

Online. doi:10.1098/rspb.2008.0396<br />

• Martens, K., Rossetti, G., Horne, D.J.,<br />

(2003). How ancient are ancient asexuals<br />

Proceedings <strong>of</strong> the Royal Society <strong>of</strong> London<br />

Series B – Biological Sciences. 270, 723-<br />

729<br />

• Brouwers, E.M., Cronin, T.M., Horne, D.J.,<br />

Lord, A.R., (2000). Recent shallow marine<br />

ostracods from high latitudes: implications<br />

for late Pliocene and Quaternary<br />

palaeoclimatology. Boreas. 29, 127-143.<br />

Dr Simon Lewis<br />

Senior Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

BSc Hons PhD(Lond)<br />

s.lewis@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Simon Lewis’s research focuses on the record<br />

<strong>of</strong> the ice ages and is concerned in particular<br />

with the stratigraphic evidence for glacial<br />

events, the nature <strong>of</strong> river behaviour during<br />

the repeated glacial episodes that have<br />

occurred over the last two million years and<br />

also the record <strong>of</strong> human presence in Europe<br />

during the ice age period. He is currently<br />

working on a number <strong>of</strong> research projects,<br />

including evidence for the earliest Palaeolithic<br />

occupation <strong>of</strong> Britain; environmental change<br />

and archaeology during the Hoxnian<br />

Interglacial and river dynamics and<br />

catchment development associated with iceage<br />

climate fluctuations. Work on Palaeolithic<br />

human occupation has investigated the<br />

landscapes inhabited by humans during the<br />

Quaternary in south east England and the<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 31


Staff research interests (cont)<br />

factors influencing early human behaviour.<br />

Work on the evolution <strong>of</strong> the upper Thames<br />

catchment has examined the response <strong>of</strong> the<br />

river to large-scale climate fluctuations and<br />

long-term sediment stores and fluxes through<br />

the catchment. He is currently a member <strong>of</strong> a<br />

multi-institutional project on the ‘Ancient<br />

Human Occupation <strong>of</strong> Britain’.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Lewis, S.G., Maddy, D., Buckingham, C.,<br />

Coope, G.R., Field, M.H., Keen, D.H., Pike,<br />

A.W.G., Roe, D.A., Scaife, R.G., Scott, K.,<br />

(2006). Pleistocene fluvial sediments,<br />

palaeontology and archaeology <strong>of</strong> the upper<br />

River Thames at Latton, Wiltshire, England.<br />

Journal <strong>of</strong> Quaternary Science. 21, 181-<br />

205.<br />

• Ashton, N., Lewis, S.G., Parfitt, S., White,<br />

M., (2006). Riparian landscapes and<br />

human habitat preferences during the<br />

Hoxnian (MIS 11) Interglacial. Journal<br />

<strong>of</strong> Quaternary Science. 21, 497-505.<br />

• Ashton, N., Lewis, S.G., (2002). Deserted<br />

Britain: declining populations in the British<br />

late Middle Pleistocene. Antiquity. 76, 388-<br />

396.<br />

Dr Sven Lukas<br />

Lecturer in Physical <strong>Geography</strong><br />

Diplom (MSc) (Bochum, Germany),<br />

PhD (St Andrews)<br />

s.lukas@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Sven Lukas' research aims at understanding<br />

the timing <strong>of</strong> glacier-climate interactions and<br />

their effects on the shaping <strong>of</strong> the landscape.<br />

He uses a combination <strong>of</strong> traditional and<br />

novel methods to provide input data to<br />

numerical models used to predict future<br />

climate change. Sven's research comprises<br />

three themes: (1) reconstructing the effects<br />

<strong>of</strong> rapid climate change on mountain<br />

glaciation using geomorphological mapping<br />

and palaeoglaciological approaches; (2)<br />

constraining the timing <strong>of</strong> these glaciations<br />

by applying optically-stimulated<br />

luminescence (OSL) dating to glacial<br />

sediments; and (3) using sedimentological<br />

methods to reconstruct ice-marginal moraine<br />

formation and glacier dynamics. Much <strong>of</strong><br />

Sven's work focuses on the Younger Dryas<br />

and early Holocene with study sites in<br />

Scotland, Svalbard, Norway and the Alps.<br />

Publications include:<br />

• Lukas, S., (2007). Early-Holocene glacier<br />

fluctuations in Krundalen, south central<br />

Norway: palaeo-glacier dynamics and<br />

palaeoclimate. The Holocene. 17, 585-598.<br />

• Lukas, S., (2005). A test <strong>of</strong> the englacial<br />

thrusting hypothesis <strong>of</strong> 'hummocky'<br />

moraine formation - case studies from the<br />

north-west Highlands, Scotland. Boreas.<br />

34, 287-307.<br />

• Benn, D.I., Lukas, S., (2006). Younger<br />

Dryas glacial landsystems in North West<br />

Scotland: An assessment <strong>of</strong> modern<br />

analogues and palaeoclimatic implications.<br />

Quaternary Science Reviews. 25, 2390-<br />

2408.<br />

• Lukas, S., Spencer, J.Q.G., Robinson,<br />

R.A.J., Benn, D.I., (2007). Problems<br />

associated with luminescence dating <strong>of</strong><br />

Late Quaternary glacial sediments in the<br />

NW Scottish Highlands. Quaternary<br />

Geochronology. 2, 243-248.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jaap van der Meer<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

MSc PhD(Amsterdam)<br />

j.meer@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Jaap van der Meer’s research interests lie<br />

with glacial processes and resulting<br />

landforms. On a general level he studies<br />

sediment transfer and (temporal) storage in<br />

the glacial system, from the ice divide to the<br />

shelf edge. More specifically, the focus is<br />

upon two elements: the study <strong>of</strong> dynamic<br />

structures, eg push moraines and<br />

streamlined landforms; and the<br />

micromorphological (thin section) study <strong>of</strong><br />

glacial sediments. Underpinning his research<br />

is the need to understand the response <strong>of</strong><br />

Pleistocene ice masses to environmental<br />

change, as a key to future developments.<br />

Jaap is on the editorial board <strong>of</strong> Journal <strong>of</strong><br />

Quaternary Science, Quaternary Science<br />

Reviews, Boreas and Terra Antartica. He is<br />

editor <strong>of</strong> the book series ‘Developments in<br />

Quaternary Science’.<br />

32 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


Publications include:<br />

• Kjær, K.H., Larsen, E., van der Meer, J.J.M.,<br />

Ingólfsson, Ó., Krüger, J., Benediktsson,<br />

Í.Ö., Knudsen, C.G., Schomacker, A.,<br />

(2006). Subglacial decoupling at the<br />

sediment-bedrock interface – an essential<br />

mechanism for rapid ice flow. Quaternary<br />

Science Reviews. 25, 2704-2712.<br />

• van der Meer, J.J.M., (2004). Spitsbergen<br />

push moraines. Including translation <strong>of</strong>:<br />

Gripp K, Glaciological and geological results<br />

<strong>of</strong> the Hamburg Spitsbergen-Expedition <strong>of</strong><br />

1927. Developments in Quaternary Science<br />

4, Elsevier, Amsterdam.<br />

• van der Meer, J.J.M., Menzies, J., Rose, J.,<br />

(2003). Subglacial till: the deforming glacier<br />

bed. Quaternary Science Reviews.<br />

22,1659-1685.<br />

• Naish, T., Woolfe, K. J., Barrett, P. J., van<br />

der Meer, J. J. M., (2001). Orbitally induced<br />

oscillations in the East Antarctic ice sheet at<br />

the Oligocene/Miocene boundary. Nature.<br />

413, 719-723.<br />

Other staff in the Department include:<br />

• Dr Kathryn Allton, Research Associate;<br />

hydrological, hydrochemical and fluvial<br />

processes<br />

• Dr.Meic Goodyear, Research Associate;<br />

health<br />

• Dr. Noah Hysler-Rubin, Research<br />

Associate; culture, space and power<br />

• Dr. Shompa Lahiri, Research Associate;<br />

culture, space and power<br />

• Dr. Dianna Smith, Research Associate;<br />

health<br />

• Dr Frank Verheijen, Research Associate;<br />

hydrological, hydrochemical and fluvial<br />

processes<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 33


<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London<br />

One <strong>of</strong> the UK’s leading<br />

research-focused<br />

universities, <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

University <strong>of</strong> London is an<br />

inspiring place to work and<br />

study<br />

Among the three largest <strong>of</strong> the colleges <strong>of</strong> the<br />

University <strong>of</strong> London, <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>'s 3,000<br />

staff deliver world class degree programmes<br />

and research across a wide range <strong>of</strong> subjects<br />

in Humanities, Social Sciences and Laws, in<br />

Medicine and Dentistry and in Science and<br />

Engineering.<br />

With a budget <strong>of</strong> over £220 million per<br />

annum and a yearly economic impact on the<br />

UK economy <strong>of</strong> over £600 million, <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> <strong>of</strong>fers a vibrant and intellectually<br />

stimulating environment to its 15,000<br />

students.<br />

A focus on world-leading<br />

research coupled with firstclass<br />

teaching<br />

All <strong>of</strong> our academic staff are engaged in<br />

valuable research – bringing benefits to their<br />

chosen field <strong>of</strong> expertise, as well as the<br />

students with whom they share the fruit <strong>of</strong><br />

their knowledge.<br />

A university is, by its very essence, a place<br />

dedicated to learning, and everything we do<br />

reflects that reality. This focus enables staff<br />

and students alike to realise their full<br />

potential. For each generation <strong>of</strong> students,<br />

this means being well-prepared for future<br />

success; and for staff, being supported in<br />

their valuable and ongoing research activity.<br />

As a member <strong>of</strong> the 1994 Group <strong>of</strong> researchfocused<br />

universities, <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> has made a<br />

strategic commitment to the highest quality <strong>of</strong><br />

research. Indeed, we believe that a vibrant<br />

research environment means that our<br />

students have access to the world's leading<br />

experts in their chosen subjects.<br />

We have invested in this principle through a<br />

systematic programme <strong>of</strong> recruiting to <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> the best academic staff in their<br />

disciplines from around the world. We are<br />

interested in academics at the peak <strong>of</strong> their<br />

careers who have made a substantial<br />

commitment to their field, as well as those<br />

who show promise. This creates an inspiring<br />

and dynamic atmosphere, particularly<br />

suitable for postgraduate work.<br />

The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) –<br />

the way the government grades and funds<br />

research excellence in universities -<br />

confirmed <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>’s excellence in a<br />

broad range <strong>of</strong> fields in 2001. It also<br />

demonstrated that our research performance<br />

is continually improving. The College saw a<br />

100 per cent increase in the number <strong>of</strong><br />

departments achieving the highest 5 and 5*<br />

ratings since the RAE in 1996 – a total <strong>of</strong> 60<br />

per cent <strong>of</strong> all departments in the College<br />

were in these bands. Over 80 per cent <strong>of</strong> staff<br />

were judged to be in departments ranked as<br />

4, 5 or 5* meaning that they were <strong>of</strong> national<br />

or international excellence, compared to a<br />

national average <strong>of</strong> 64 per cent. To add to<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>’s achievement, we submitted<br />

one <strong>of</strong> the highest percentages <strong>of</strong> staff <strong>of</strong> any<br />

institution in the country for the RAE – 90 per<br />

cent <strong>of</strong> staff were selected for submission.<br />

Since 2001, <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> has been ranked<br />

in the top ten in the UK for its resourcing <strong>of</strong><br />

research.<br />

The College made extensive preparations<br />

to achieve the best possible pr<strong>of</strong>ile in RAE<br />

2008. All three sectors <strong>of</strong> the College<br />

(Humanities and Social Sciences, the <strong>School</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> Medicine and Dentistry, Science and<br />

Engineering) have shown significant growth<br />

and development across all areas <strong>of</strong> research<br />

activity. This is based on numbers <strong>of</strong><br />

postgraduate students, research assistants,<br />

post-doctoral research fellows and research<br />

grants. When the results <strong>of</strong> the latest RAE are<br />

available (December 2008), they will be<br />

available online at www.qmul.ac.uk/RAE<br />

Part <strong>of</strong> The University <strong>of</strong><br />

London<br />

Although the size and the range <strong>of</strong> subjects<br />

covered by <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> gives it all the<br />

characteristics and facilities <strong>of</strong> a university in<br />

its own right, it is also part <strong>of</strong> the federal<br />

University <strong>of</strong> London, a wide-ranging body<br />

comprising over 30 institutes. Together, these<br />

make it the largest and most diverse<br />

34 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


London and the East End<br />

university in the country. It also means that,<br />

although <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> is a self-governing<br />

institution, our graduate students are able to<br />

take advantage <strong>of</strong> the wide and varied<br />

academic research facilities <strong>of</strong> the University<br />

<strong>of</strong> London. The University <strong>of</strong> London provides<br />

the single largest critical mass <strong>of</strong> academic<br />

research in the UK.<br />

The University <strong>of</strong> London is one <strong>of</strong> the leading<br />

universities in the world, with the largest<br />

postgraduate population <strong>of</strong> any university in<br />

the United Kingdom. It contains within it a<br />

large number <strong>of</strong> specialist graduate study<br />

and research centres, several <strong>of</strong> which are<br />

based at <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, including the Centre<br />

for Commercial Law <strong>Studies</strong>, the IRC in<br />

Biomedical Materials and many others.<br />

Students <strong>of</strong> <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> are also<br />

automatically members <strong>of</strong> the University <strong>of</strong><br />

London Union (ULU), which is among the<br />

most active and lively in the country.<br />

International outlook<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> has many active collaborative<br />

partnerships, these form an integral part <strong>of</strong><br />

our international strategy. The rise in<br />

importance <strong>of</strong> countries such as China, India<br />

and Pakistan in scientific, technical and<br />

medical research, teaching and industrial<br />

development presents some exciting<br />

opportunities.<br />

Furthermore, twenty per cent <strong>of</strong> our students<br />

are from overseas, representing more than<br />

100 countries, so we are a truly multicultural<br />

community. We have links with a variety <strong>of</strong><br />

international institutions, and exchanges are<br />

available to the United States and many<br />

European countries.<br />

An exciting and dynamic<br />

location<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> is in the heart<br />

<strong>of</strong> the East End, one <strong>of</strong><br />

London’s most vibrant<br />

areas, with a rich history<br />

and an exciting future.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>'s locations span London's<br />

diverse districts. Two <strong>of</strong> our four campuses<br />

are in east London, in the Borough <strong>of</strong> Tower<br />

Hamlets between The City and Canary Wharf,<br />

a multicultural and socially diverse area that<br />

is one <strong>of</strong> the most rapidly developing parts <strong>of</strong><br />

London.<br />

Our other campuses are in central London: at<br />

Charterhouse Square and Barts Hospital, on<br />

the edge <strong>of</strong> the City <strong>of</strong> London, the key<br />

financial district, one <strong>of</strong> the two campuses <strong>of</strong><br />

Barts and The London Medical <strong>School</strong>; and<br />

at Lincoln's Inn Fields, in London's Legal<br />

District, the home for our <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>School</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

Law and the world-famous Centre for<br />

Commercial Law <strong>Studies</strong>.<br />

“Behind the imposing Victorian<br />

<strong>Queen</strong>s’ Building at the front<br />

entrance, you quickly find<br />

yourself in a perfectly laid out,<br />

and brand new, student village.<br />

It has shops, restaurant, open<br />

green spaces.”<br />

The Guardian<br />

The Mile End Campus provides a completely<br />

integrated and secure student experience.<br />

Situated next to Regent’s canal and the open<br />

green spaces <strong>of</strong> Mile End Park, the campus<br />

<strong>of</strong>fers a peaceful environment in which to<br />

study and live, with a 2,000-bed, awardwinning<br />

Student Village. An extensive<br />

programme <strong>of</strong> refurbishment, and over £200<br />

million invested in the last five years mean<br />

that students enjoy first-class facilities.<br />

As well as comfortable canal-side<br />

accommodation, the Mile End Campus is<br />

home to outstanding academic facilities,<br />

housed in architecturally-diverse buildings.<br />

These include the Victorian <strong>Queen</strong>s’<br />

Building, the modern, award-winning Lockkeeper’s<br />

Cottage <strong>Graduate</strong> Centre for the<br />

Humanities and Social Sciences, the<br />

Informatics Teaching Laboratory, a striking<br />

new Learning Resource Centre and state-<strong>of</strong>the-art<br />

laboratories. The Campus also has a<br />

bank, bookshop, the Student Union, and a<br />

good choice <strong>of</strong> cafés, bars and restaurants.<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London 35


Further information and applications<br />

Routes into PhD research<br />

Candidates with the appropriate<br />

qualifications (see below) may apply directly<br />

to any <strong>of</strong> the Department’s Masters’ or PhD<br />

programmes. The Department is recognised<br />

by the ESRC for full-time, part-time and CASE<br />

PhD studentships. It holds ESRC 1+3<br />

Research Training recognition on its MA/MSc<br />

<strong>Geography</strong>, MA Cities and Cultures and MSc<br />

Globalisation and Development programmes.<br />

Criteria for admission<br />

MA/MSc Human and Physical<br />

Entry to one <strong>of</strong> the Department’s MA/MSc<br />

programmes is dependent upon a first or<br />

upper-second class honours in <strong>Geography</strong><br />

or a cognate discipline. You will be asked to<br />

include a brief Statement <strong>of</strong> Interest (about<br />

300 to 500 words) outlining the main<br />

academic areas covered in your first degree,<br />

how these might relate to the issues<br />

examined on your chosen MA/MSc<br />

programme, and your main reasons for<br />

choosing the MA/MSc programme at <strong>Queen</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong>. You should include a full academic<br />

transcript (a record <strong>of</strong> courses taken and<br />

grades achieved) and two referees’ reports.<br />

PhD<br />

Entry to the Department’s PhD programme<br />

is usually dependent upon a first or an upper<br />

second class degree or equivalent in<br />

<strong>Geography</strong> or a cognate discipline. You are<br />

asked to include a 500 to 1,000-word<br />

Research Proposal outlining the academic<br />

context <strong>of</strong> the proposed research, the<br />

research aims, methodology and proposed<br />

timetable.<br />

You should include a full academic transcript<br />

(a record <strong>of</strong> courses taken and grades<br />

achieved) and two referees’ reports. You are<br />

strongly encouraged to make contact with a<br />

potential supervisor from the department<br />

(www.geog.qmul.ac.uk see staff interests)<br />

before submitting your application. Deadline<br />

dates for applications are posted on the<br />

departmental website www.geog.qmul.ac.uk.<br />

See the following websites for further<br />

information about external funding<br />

opportunities:<br />

Natural Environment Research Council<br />

www.nerc.ac.uk<br />

Economic and Social Research Council<br />

www.esrc.ac.uk<br />

Arts and Humanities Research Council<br />

www.ahrc.ac.uk<br />

The Department welcomes informal<br />

enquiries about any aspect <strong>of</strong> its graduate<br />

programmes.<br />

For further information on the content <strong>of</strong><br />

individual MSc programmes please contact<br />

the relevant programme convenor:<br />

MA/MSc <strong>Geography</strong><br />

email: geography-ma-msc@qmul.ac.uk<br />

MA Cities and Cultures<br />

email: geography-ma-cc@qmul.ac.uk<br />

MSc Globalisation and Development<br />

email: geography-msc-gd@qmul.ac.uk<br />

MA London <strong>Studies</strong><br />

email: london-studies-ma@qmul.ac.uk<br />

MSc in Physical <strong>Geography</strong> by Research<br />

email: a.j.baird@qmul.ac.uk<br />

For further information about the<br />

Department’s PhD programme please<br />

contact:<br />

Director <strong>of</strong> <strong>Graduate</strong> <strong>Studies</strong><br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London<br />

Mile End Road<br />

London<br />

E1 4NS<br />

email: geog@qmul.ac.uk<br />

Visit the Department’s website:<br />

www.geog.qmul.ac.uk<br />

Completed applications should be sent to<br />

Admissions and Recruitment Office<br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London<br />

Mile End Road,<br />

London E1 4NS<br />

Email: admission@qmul.ac.uk<br />

36 <strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London


This guide has been produced by<br />

the Publications and Web Office for<br />

the Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

For further information contact:<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>Geography</strong><br />

<strong>Queen</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> London<br />

Mile End Road<br />

London<br />

E1 4NS<br />

Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8200<br />

Fax: +44 (0)00 8981 6276<br />

email: geog@qmul.ac.uk<br />

www.geog.qmul.ac.uk

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